About all

Athletes with ms: 7 Athletes With MS Who Kick Butt

Living with Multiple Sclerosis: Don McNeal’s Story

Living with Multiple Sclerosis

“I have Multiple Sclerosis, but Multiple Sclerosis doesn’t have me.”  That quote comes from Don McNeal, a two time National College Football Champion (1978, 1979) who played for Alabama under coach Paul “Bear” Bryant.  McNeal spoke at the Multiple Sclerosis News and Views Conference in Huntsville, AL Thursday, 8-18-16 and shared how he and other athletes with multiple sclerosis struggled and cope with this debilitating disease.

Don McNeal’s Story

Born and raised in Atmore, AL native, McNeal was a star on the Escambia County High School football team.  After high school, he played football for Alabama University under coach Paul “Bear” Bryant.  In addition to helping his team win two National Championships, McNeal was Captain of the Team in 1979 then drafted as a defensive back by the Miami Dolphins in 1980. McNeal played in two Super Bowls with the Dolphins: Super Bowl XVII in January 1983 and Super Bowl XIX in January 1985. During those seasons, McNeal was named the Dolphins’ Player of the Year. He retired at the end of the 1989 season having played his entire pro career with the Dolphins. In 1992 he was selected as a member of the University of Alabama All-Centennial Team in 1992 and in 2008 was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in Birmingham, Alabama.

Don McNeal, two time national championship winner, played for Alabama

After retirement from football, McNeal became actively involved in his community. He served as a drug-rehab counselor, teacher, coach, lay pastor, board member, and frequent public speaker. He was a pastor at New Testament Baptist Church in South Florida and speaker for Power Talent. To this day, he remains active with associations that assist youth and adults.

Discovering Multiple Sclerosis

McNeal was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2014. Multiple Sclerosis is an incurable, auto-immune disease and that damages the myelin sheath surrounding sensory and motor nerve fibers. Depending on which nerves are affected, it can cause impairment in vision, sensation, strength, endurance and coordination.  It has begun to sap McNeal’s strength and coordination and he now uses a power scooter to assist with mobility.  McNeal believes repeated NFL concussions brought on his ailment.  He and a number of athletes with multiple sclerosis and other disorders suing the league for damages .  They are not looking for sympathy.  They want empathy.  “There are a lot of former players who are trying to do the right thing,” he said. “I hope the NFL will do right by us.”

Finding Hope

Huntsville MS Awareness Group meets with Don McNeal

McNeal spoke at the Huntsville Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Conference Thursday 8-18-16 .  His mission is to share hope and inspiration with those facing Multiple Sclerosis. “Coach Don Shula always told me no matter what, always show your class,” said McNeal.  That meant standing tall and facing what was to come with poise and grace.  “That’s what I’m trying to do here.”

McNeal, ever the optimist, refuses to feel down about it, but turns his energy toward helping others. A man of deep religious faith, he still spends three days a week at Dade Christian School in Miami Lakes.  “He has such a good spirit,” said McNeal’s wife Rhonda. “He never complains, and even picks me up when I have a bad day. His positive attitude is why everyone still wants him around here.”

Don McNeal raises funds for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment

Playing Hard: 3 Professional Athletes with MS – MS

Multiple sclerosis is a disease that does not discriminate and affects individuals of all ages, races and professions. While a diagnosis of MS can seem devastating, it does not have to stop you from living your life to the fullest and following your dreams. The following list of three professional athletes with MS proves that not only can individuals that suffer from MS lead normal, healthy lives but that they are also only limited by the scope of their imagination and ambition.

Josh Harding
Josh Harding is the goaltender for the Minnesota Wild hockey team. He started his professional career playing for the Houston Aeros in the American Hockey League in 2004. In 2006, he was moved to the Minnesota Wild hockey team. He was diagnosed with MS officially in November of 2012 after having kept the disease a secret for over a month. He has been playing with the NHL and the Minnesota Wild since his move to the team and Harding has received multiple awards during his career.       Rather than letting MS affect his performance, outlook or career, Josh Harding went on to have the best season of his career in the 2012-2013 year. Harding was the recipient of the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy in 2013. He also is the founder of a charity, called Harding’s Hope, that helps patients of MS pay for necessary medications.

Chris Wright
Chris Wright is a professional basketball player that currently plays for ASVEL Basket in the French league. Following his diagnosis, Wright became the first player in the history of the NBA known to have MS. Chris Wright has played for a number of teams including the New Orleans Hornets, the Iowa Energy and the Mavericks. He also played basketball in Turkey as part of the Turkish Basketball League. Wright was told while playing in Turkey, immediately following his diagnosis that his career was over. He was determined not to let his disease hold him back and went on to spend a season with the Dallas Mavericks. He also signed short-term contracts with the San Antonio Spurs and the Brooklyn Nets before signing his current contract with the ASVEL Basket in France. Wright credits being an athlete and living a healthy, active lifestyle to a major part of his success in managing MS.

Kelly Sutton
NASCAR driver Kelly Sutton was diagnosed with MS well before her career as a professional race car driver began. Kelly started racing cars at the young age of 10 and was diagnosed at the age of 16. Kelly Sutton was the first known NASCAR driver to have the disease, Trevor Bane was diagnosed in 2013 with MS. Kelly Sutton did not let her MS diagnosis at 16 change her dreams and she began her professional career in 1992 at Old Dominion Speedway. Kelly holds the record for the most races run by a female in the Craftsman Truck series and she has also won awards including Most Popular Driver at both Old Dominion Speedway and at the Allison Legacy Series. In addition to Most Popular Driver, Kelly was the first woman to win the Allison Legacy Series in 1997. Though Sutton’s last race was in 2007, she continues work on her charity, the Let It Shine Foundation which is dedicated to raising awareness for and helping those affected with MS.

These three accomplished professional athletes are just a small sample of people with MS who have done incredibly things. Living a health and active lifestyle helps to manage systems and can help you to achieve your dreams. 

How I became a para athlete

When I was 13, my body started to go numb and my vision got blurry. I didn’t pay much attention to it, because as a kid these things don’t bother you. The GP told me I had a throat infection and gave me some antibiotics.

The next day my symptoms got lots worse and my mum took me to A&E. I had a stroke and was put into a coma. I remember waking up afterwards not being able to move and dribbling into a vomit bowl. I was terrified.

I was rushed to different hospitals for tests. I remember crying as I said goodbye to my dad from inside an ambulance. I thought this was the last time I’d see him.

An MRI scan and lumbar puncture confirmed it was MS. I still feel the pain of that needle entering my spine. I didn’t know what MS was. My neurologist gave me a comic called ‘MEDIKIDZ’ and I started to do research online.

My brother and sister came to visit every now and then, and we’d play pool and table football. My symptoms eased off and I could walk slowly with my mother’s help. I was really wobbly at first.

I started to recover from the vision troubles and weakness in my left side, so I was discharged.

Back to school

About two months after my diagnosis, I was back on my feet and carrying on with my daily life. I carried on being who I was and didn’t considering myself as an MS ‘sufferer’.

My school was great – my walking was slow, so they let me leave class five minutes early to get to the next lesson and take extra time at lunch to take my medication.

When I got better, I started to do athletics. I competed for my school in the 100m and placed 4th with a time of 11.6 – I was really happy.

I saw potential in myself and really wanted to improve, so I joined Connie Henry’s Track Academy. It helped me to grow – both as an athlete and as a person. The club felt like a second home. Somewhere I could train and socialise with other athletes.

I was lucky not to have another relapse until I turned. I was rushed to hospital and given steroids through a drip. I hate needles!

The left side of my body was all frozen for days, paralysed and cold. It felt worse than frostbite. I was so cold that I slept with wearing three pyjamas and five socks on my left foot. Brrr!

Training hard

With the help of a great friend and athlete Lumar, I started to get my strength back. He encouraged me and we worked together to get me where I needed to be. Thanks to him, I recovered and felt stronger than ever.

All the training paid off and the next year I ran two personal bests in the 100m and 200m.

Now I train six times a week. I do track training with an academy and strength and conditioning training. The stronger I get the better I feel about my MS.

My vision is basically blurred. It’s really hard not being able to see clearly during training. I find it hard to see facial expressions or even hurdles or cones, but I feel better than ever.

Racing on the world stage

When the 2016 Olympics arrived, Lumar insisted that I get classified to compete internationally. I followed his advice and got classified as a national T38.

In December, I was rushed to hospital – this time for emergency hernia surgery, but I got better quickly. Four months later I went to Dubai to compete for Great Britain at the international Grand Prix. I won my 100m final race.

I’m now training for my next competition – I’ll be competing for Team GB at the world para juniors in Switzerland.

I really want to go out and do my best. I can’t come back home with a silver or bronze. It has to be gold for me. I’ve worked for it and I’m the fastest junior in the world this year, so why not?

Next stop Usain Bolt speed. Wish me luck!

> Find out more about exercise and MS.

Josh Harding: Athletes with multiple sclerosis face particular challenges

For athletes like Minnesota Wild goaltender Josh Harding, a diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis is particularly challenging.

MS is an autoimmune disease caused when myelin — the protective coating of nerve cells — is attacked, disrupting the electrical signals from the brain that sends messages to various parts of the body. Symptoms are varied but include muscle weakness, loss of coordination and blurred vision.

5 common questions about MS

Harding, who was diagnosed with MS last year, was a last-minute replacement for Niklas Backstrom for the opening playoff game Tuesday against the Chicago Blackhawks. Despite not having had a start in the past two months, the 28-year-old Regina native acquitted himself well, stopping 35 shots. But it wasn’t enough to stop the Blackhawks, who won 2-1 in overtime.

NHL playoffs: Blackhawks win opener in OT

Dr. Paul O’Connor, director of the MS clinic at Toronto’s St. Michael’s Hospital, one of the largest in North America, said the disease impacts athletics in a specific way.

“MS can have a major impact on athletes, depending on the severity of the condition. MS is usually associated with fatigue and reduced endurance. It can also be associated with physical disability such as weakness, numbness, altered vision and decreased balance. Mood can also be affected. All of these factors can affect athletic performance. So it is a matter of how severe the MS is and partly how one responds to it,” O’Connor said.

He noted that being physically fit can mitigate the impact of the disease.

“Physical fitness makes one the ‘best that one can be.’ It improves mood and enhances quality of life. It might slow disability increases over time but this has not been proven,” O’Connor added.

There are treatments for MS that can be taken orally or by injection, O’Connor said, noting there are new injection therapies “that hold promise.”

MORE ON THESTAR.COM

Maple Leafs juggle lines before first game against Boston Bruins in NHL playoffs

NHL playoff coverage

For Runner With M.S., No Pain While Racing, No Feeling at the Finish

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — When a pack of whip-thin girls zipped across the finish of the 1,600-meter race at a recent track meet here, the smallest runner’s legs wobbled like rubber, and she flopped into her waiting coach’s arms. She collapses every time she races.

Kayla Montgomery, 18, was found to have multiple sclerosis three years ago. Defying most logic, she has gone on to become one of the fastest young distance runners in the country — one who cannot stay on her feet after crossing the finish line.

Because M.S. blocks nerve signals from Montgomery’s legs to her brain, particularly as her body temperature increases, she can move at steady speeds that cause other runners pain she cannot sense, creating the peculiar circumstance in which the symptoms of a disease might confer an athletic advantage.

But intense exercise can also trigger weakness and instability; as Montgomery goes numb in races, she can continue moving forward as if on autopilot, but any disruption, like stopping, makes her lose control.

“When I finish, it feels like there’s nothing underneath me,” Montgomery said. “I start out feeling normal and then my legs gradually go numb. I’ve trained myself to think about other things while I race, to get through. But when I break the motion, I can’t control them and I fall.”

At the finish of every race, she staggers and crumples. Before momentum sends her flying to the ground, her coach braces to catch her, carrying her aside as her competitors finish and her parents swoop in to ice her legs. Minutes later, sensation returns and she rises, ready for another chance at forestalling a disease that one day may force her to trade the track for a wheelchair. M.S. has no cure.

Last month, Montgomery, a senior at Mount Tabor High School, won the North Carolina state title in the 3,200 meters. Her time of 10 minutes 43 seconds ranks her 21st in the country. Her next major competition is the 5,000 meters at the national indoor track championships in New York on March 14, when she hopes to break 17 minutes.

Her trajectory as a distance runner has been unusually ascendant.

“When she was diagnosed, she said to me, ‘Coach, I don’t know how much time I have left, so I want to run fast — don’t hold back,’ ” said Patrick Cromwell, Montgomery’s coach. “That’s when I said, ‘Wow, who are you?’ ”

At the time, Montgomery was one of the slowest on her team, completing her first 5-kilometer race in 24:29; by last November, she had run a 17:22, placing 11th in the regional qualifier for the Foot Locker national cross-country championships.

The diagnosis of M.S. came after Montgomery could not feel her legs after she fell playing soccer and shocks ran up her spine. She was on Mount Tabor’s junior varsity cross-country team and told her coach that her legs went numb when she ran.

“I said, ‘Well, sweetie, that’s kind of how running is, you feel the pain and then you don’t, you just have to push through,’ ” Cromwell said. “But she said ‘No, they stay numb.’ I knew that wasn’t normal, and that’s when the doctor visits started.”

A magnetic resonance imaging exam revealed six lesions on Montgomery’s brain and spine. With treatment, she went into remission and resumed racing.

Because Montgomery has played down her condition, few people understand her unusual racing finishes. In the national indoor 5,000-meter championship last year, officials forgot to catch her and she fell on her face, lying prostrate on the track until someone carried her away. Announcers speculated that she had a seizure. Some assume she is fainting. Others, she said, have simply called her a wimp.

She dismisses the attention.

“I didn’t want to be treated differently, and I didn’t want to be looked at differently,” she said.

In many ways, Montgomery’s life resembles that of an ordinary high school track athlete. Before every race, she puts on the same lucky green sports bra and size 5 ½ racing flats that carry her 5-foot-1 frame. She is deeply involved with her Methodist church, along with her younger sister and her parents, a nursing student and a pesticide salesman. She carries a 4.70 grade-point average and logs 50 miles a week.

Though examples of elite athletes with M.S. are scarce, some have speculated that Montgomery’s racing-induced numbness lends a competitive edge, especially given the improvement in her times since the diagnosis.

“The disease has no potential to make her physically more competitive,” said her neurologist, Lucie Lauve, who also said she did not know precisely why Montgomery collapsed after races. “If M.S. has made her a better athlete, I believe it is a mental edge.”

Cromwell, Montgomery’s coach, said he thought that insensitivity to the pain of distance racing could be marginally advantageous.

“I think there’s a benefit to numbness,” he said. “I don’t know anyone in their right mind, though, who would trade this; who would say, ‘Give me M.S. so I have a little bit of numbness after Mile 2.’ But I think that’s when she gets her strength.”

The numbness is particularly dire for midrace falls. At her state cross-country meet last year, she clipped the heel of a fellow runner in the lead pack and crashed. Facedown with her legs splayed, she could not get up. Runners sprinted by, and she slipped from all-state contention. Seeing a rival pass was enough to get her to use a nearby fence to pull herself up and cruise into 10th place.

It was a lesson in resilience. “Now I know I can do it,” she said. “It may take a little while, but if I fall, I know I can get up.”

Exercise is commonly recommended for M.S. patients, and Montgomery’s doctor has cleared her for racing. However, some experts worry pushing to the point of collapse could have long-term drawbacks.

“When you push to your limit, your body usually sends pain signals to warn you that you’re damaging tissues,” said Dr. Peter Calabresi, director of the Multiple Sclerosis Center at Johns Hopkins. He has not treated Montgomery.

“Pushing that limit is what endurance sports are all about. But if you can’t feel those signals and push from tingling to extreme or prolonged numbness, you could be doing damage that we won’t even know about until down the road. It’s a paradox.”

College recruitment has been another challenge, Montgomery said. When coaches called, she told them she had M.S., and they told her it was not a problem. “But then they didn’t call back,” she said.

Lipscomb University in Tennessee was an exception. She will enroll there this fall on a scholarship.

Montgomery is closing out a high school career that is consistently improving.

“I make myself do it,” she said. “I tell myself, ‘I know you’re tired and you can’t feel anything and it’s hard but you’re going to finish this.’ And then I do.”

Running With Multiple Sclerosis – Cheryl Hile Marathon Runner

Cheryl Hile, now 45, first started running back in 1996 after gaining weight during college. She did it to lose weight, and also to bond with her boyfriend at the time, Brian Hile—now her husband—who was also a runner.

She remembers him coming home after a marathon feeling that mix of soreness and elation, and she realized she wanted in on those long distances, too.

So in 2000, she signed up for her first race—and it was a full marathon.

“I wanted to feel that soreness!” Hile tells Runner’s World with a laugh. “Training was very difficult, but at mile 16 of the race, I just realized this is so awesome.”

[Smash your goals with a Runner’s World Training Plan, designed for any speed and any distance.]

Her competitive attitude has been a blessing, as it has helped her get through the ups and downs of a decade-plus battle with multiple sclerosis, a condition of the central nervous system which leads to communication problems between your brain and body. Through her diagnosis and beyond, she’s continued to use running as a way to stay grounded.

Fighting for a Diagnosis

In January of 2006, Hile had just completed the Phoenix Rock ’N’ Roll Marathon when she started experiencing some alarming symptoms: Electric shocks ran down her shoulders, from her ears to her knees to her back.

“They were so painful, and I also experienced a lot of numbness,” she says.

Her primary care doctor (PCP), who was also a sports specialist, thought the symptoms were just due to a pinched nerve, and wrote her a prescription for a nerve-numbing medication. But as months passed, the electric shocks and the pain got worse.

Hile eventually had an electromyography (EMG) to test for nerve conduction, which came back abnormal, and was referred to a general neurologist. The doctor ordered an MRI scan.

The results showed many lesions in her brain, and two in her cervical spine.

“The neurologist was still not convinced I had MS because I was a runner and very active—at that time, MS patients were commonly using wheelchairs, canes and walkers,” she says.

She fought to see an MS specialist, who confirmed what he thought with a spinal tap. Ten months after her symptoms first appeared, she finally had a diagnosis: multiple sclerosis.

“Multiple sclerosis is a disease in which the immune system attacks myelin, the coating on nerves of the brain, spinal cord and nerves to the eyes, disrupting signals from the brain and spinal cord to the body resulting, in symptoms such as numbness and weakness,” says Barry Singer, M.D., neurologist and director of the MS Center for Innovations in Care at Missouri Baptist Medical Center in St. Louis, Missouri. The autoimmune disease affects nearly one million people in the U.S., and woman are two to three times more likely to be diagnosed with it—and most who are diagnosed are between the ages of 20 and 50.

Before her MS diagnosis, Hile had already run 13 marathons. She was terrified of how MS would change her life—especially the running part.

“I was so shocked by the news,” she says. “Back then, I didn’t know anything about MS, and there wasn’t as much information available. I thought I was going to get every single horrible symptom.”

Hile says she became depressed, and her neurologist feared she might become suicidal. She prescribed antidepressants, but Hile credits continuing to stay active with really helping her overcome her fear and anger.

“My husband really encouraged me to keep on running and exercising,” she says. “Moving made me feel so much better about myself and raised my spirits—I was addicted to the runner’s high.”

The benefit is not just anecdotal, though—staying active is one of the most important treatments for patients with MS.

“Exercise is critical for brain health. Since the central nervous system—brain and spinal cord—is under attack in MS, preserving the brain’s back-up reserves is critical, and a routine exercise regimen can help,” says Singer. “For people with very mild or no disability, running is an awesome option. I have a wide spectrum of runners living with MS in my practice, from casual joggers to marathon runners.”

Running With MS

Today, she runs every other day, and on days when her MS symptoms flare—when she experiences things like electric shocks or numbness—she opts for the elliptical or bike. She’s also added in more weight lifting and exercises using a wobble board to help with balance issues, common in people with MS.

“The hard part with MS is not knowing how my body will react when I wake up in the morning,” she says. “Sometimes I wake up and I’m physically tired, so I have to adjust my training.”

She struggles with brain fog and mental fatigue along with the physical issues: Her right leg muscles have atrophied, and she has a drop foot—caused by two lesions in the nerve fibers of her cervical spine, which mess with the electrical impulses from her brain to her right shin.

“When I run, that electrical impulse is not rapid enough to lift my foot,” she explains. “As a result, my foot drops and drags, and I end up tripping over my own toes.”

To fight that, she wears a carbon-composite ankle-foot orthotic that helps her gait and prevent falls, and pushes off with the left side of her body while her right side follows along.

“My husband runs on my right side to keep me on a straight vector otherwise, because of my ineffective right side, I tend to drift to the right,” she says.

Before MS, Hile was running marathons around 4:10, and now she runs them around the 5:00 mark. Her husband now runs alongside her in races to help manage her pace, hydration, and balance. He also opens GU packets or water bottles for her when she needs them, since she has lost some mobility in her arms.

“I’ve adopted the run-walk method during my races, and it’s helped keep me in the game,” she says. She wears an extra-wide shoe that fits her leg brace, the Saucony Hurricanes, and sticks with moisture-wicking clothes that help keep her cool. (Another symptom of MS is heat intolerance.)

Rachel Hatch Photography

Hile has learned to find a new normal when it comes to running with MS.

“When I started tripping and falling, I went to my neurologist, and her words were to lower your expectations. That really hurt,” she says. “But from that day forward my mantra has been, ‘I do what I can and I never give up.’ Even if I have those bad MS days, I still do it, I still go.”

MS-related fatigue has made marathons more challenging lately, and she isn’t sure how much longer she can continue with the 26.2.

“MS fatigue makes all my symptoms worse; my foot drags more, my right leg feels heavier to lift, the neuropathic pain is stronger and more frequent, and I’m not as mentally strong as before,” she says. “It becomes harder to ‘tough it out’. My mantra is to never give up, but sometimes the pain and fatigue break me down and I just want to stop. That is when a walk break is in order and a pep talk from my husband is much needed.”

She’s already purchased a road bike in anticipation for when she’ll need more days off from running.

[Smash your goals with a Runner’s World Training Plan, designed for any speed and any distance.]

But she’s already accomplished some pretty major goals while running with MS: For one, she is the first person with MS to run a marathon on all seven continents, a feat she accomplished from September 2016 to September 2017.

And through running, she’s been able to raise awareness for MS by partnering with the MS MindShift campaign, which aims to educate people with MS on what they can do to keep their brain as healthy as possible for as long as possible.

Still, she’s not ready to hang up her running shoes just yet: This fall, she will run the Richmond Marathon for the second year in a row on the team she helped create, Team Run A Myelin My Shoes, which raises money for MS awareness and research. Last year, the team had 55 physical and virtual members, and this year, the team already has 100 members. (You can join the team here).

“With MS, there are a lot of uncertainties. It’s changed my whole life. But I’ve found running has elevated my body, my brain and my spirit,” she says. “And it’s helped me accomplish what I’ve set out to do—rather than mourn the things I’ve lost, I treasure what I still can do.”

Emily Shiffer
Emily Shiffer is a former digital web producer for Men’s Health and Prevention, and is currently a freelancer writer specializing in health, weight loss, and fitness.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Mississippi bans transgender athletes from women’s sports – The Campus

This past Sunday, Governor Tate Reeves (R-MS) signed a bill that banned transgender athletes from participating in girl’s and women’s sports in Missisippi. Barring a successful legal challenge, this Senate bill will be written into law on July 1, according to USA Today.

This bill is thought to be a response to President Biden’s executive order signed on Jan. 20 to combat gender discrimination. Mississippi became first state to enact a ban on transgender athletes. Besides Mississippi, over 20 states across the country have varying degrees of restrictions on athletes aimed at minors who identify as transgender.

Raegan Myers, ’23, expressed disgust towards the new Mississippi legislation.

“I was not surprised, but I was very, very sad,” Myers said. “I think it’s just another example of how blatantly transphobic the southern part of America is.”

Marshall Ramos, ’24, a member of Allegheny’s All Gender Equity Society, and a transgender man also expressed his disagreement towards the bill.

“Mississippi made a choice that goes against Title IX, and for me that’s very disturbing because it’s a federal law meant to protect students,” Ramos said. “I understand the controversial nature of it, but this law poses a danger to transgender students.”

Ramos is referring to Title IX within the Education Amendments of 1972. This section of the Amendment states, “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

Ian Eggert, ’23, also supports Title IX and agrees that transgender minors should be able to compete in girls’ sports.

“I believe that lower-risk and lower competition sports like high school and elementary school should allow transgender athletes to play,” Eggert said. “But once it becomes more of a monetary or financial gain for people, then more research needs to be done before making a decision.”

A Duke Law study compared men’s records to the best women’s track records. For example, over 10,000 men beat the women’s 100 meter dash record of 10.78 seconds. The study also deduced that there is a 10-12% performance gap between elite male athletes and elite female athletes. The competitive gap is less between non-elite male athletes and female athletes, but once again men outperform women in track and field.

After learning about the Duke Law study, Eggert continued to hold the same opinion about lower-level competition, but supports the bill to an extent for more highly touted athletic competitions.

“To a certain degree, I believe the bill just because how much more developed and how many more records could be broken when transgender women play against (cisgender) women.” Eggert said. “However, you can have someone (who transitioned) when they were young and played men’s or women’s sports their entire life; I believe the development would be a little different for them.”

Ramos also noted how the situation is different between male and female athletes at the Olympic level, compared to lower-level athletics.

“Looking at Olympic athletes versus college or high school athletes, it’s hard to generalize there because of the ability difference,” Ramos said. “Also, at the Olympic level, we should expect the athletes to have the money for testosterone blockers and some of the chemical changes that go with the transition from male to female.”

Testosterone levels have been a factor for sports organization determining whether or not transgender women can play women’s sports. The Guardian published an article exploring a study conducted by the British Journal of Medicine, which found that the International Olympic Committee’s guidelines of transgender women waiting one year post-transition was too soon.

Yet two years post transition, transgender women held a lower competitve advantage against cisgender women. Still, they held a 12% advantage against their Olympic peers two years post-transition. The IOC will continue to rework their framework to include guidelines of gender identity, while also advocating for fair competition.

Mississippi made a choice that goes against Title IX, and for me that’s very disturbing becuase it’s a federal law meant to protect students.”

— Marshall Ramos, Class of 2024

Regardless, measuring athletic potential solely upon testosterone levels may be problematic. For instance, Caster Semenya is an intersex cisgender woman and Olympic gold medalist. Because Semenya is an intersex woman, she produces more testosterone than her co-competitors, but she will have to undergo surgery or take hormones to lower her testosterone to continue her career.

In The Conversation, Julian Savulescu, professor of biomedical ethics at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute  elaborated on how testosterone may not be the best way to gauge athletic capability.

“Semenya’s best time is only two percent faster than her competitors,” Savulescu stated. “It is not possible to determine how much of this two percent is testosterone, and how much is due to other factors about her as an athlete, or her psychology.”

The discussion to allow transgender women to compete in women’s sports is still an ongoing issue among athletics. Even though this discussion is polarizing, Ramos remains hopeful that there can be some common ground on the issue.

“There definitely has to be some thought about the advantage transgender women have,” Ramos said. “But there also needs to be consideration that these women are human.”

Masters of Sports of Russia (MS and MSMK)

Last name, First name Digit View Trainer Sports goods
Yatsevich
Alexander
International Master of Sports
MSMK
400 m s / b Trubeev E.A.
  • 2-time silver medalist of the USSR Championships 1980, 1981
  • 2x USSR Cup Winner 1980, 1981
  • Winner of the Spartakiad of Friendly Armies g.Budapest 1981,
  • USSR Champion 1982, Kiev
  • Silver medalist of the European Championship Athens 1982,
  • The record holder of the city of Leningrad was among the top 10 runners in the world for 3 years in a row
Braiko
Peter
International Master of Sports
MSMK
height Trubeev E.A.
  • 2-time participant in the Olympic Games 2000, 2004
  • 2-time Champion of Russia 2003, 2004
  • Ex-record holder of St. Petersburg among youth
  • Participant of the World and European Championships
  • Multiple winner and medalist of the Championships and Championships of Russia and St. Petersburg 1994-2005
Minina
Olga
Master of Sports of Russia
MS
100 m s / b Trubeev E.A.
  • Participant of international competitions among juniors (4th place) 1996
  • Multiple winner and medalist of the Championships and Championships of St. Petersburg 1992-1999
Cherepanova
Anna
Master of Sports of Russia
MS
100 m s / b Trubeev E.A. Odinokov P.M.
  • Silver medalist of the Russian Youth Championship 2000,
  • Champion of Russia in 4×100 m relay race 2001
  • Multiple winner and medalist of the Championships and Championships of St. Petersburg 1995-2007
Sobolev
Vladimir
Master of Sports of Russia
MS
400 m s / b Moseev A.L.
  • One of the strongest runners of St. Petersburg, prize-winner of the Championships of St. Petersburg 1998-2000
Pfau
Lyudmila
Master of Sports of Russia
MS
all-around Trubeev E.A.
  • One of the strongest athletes of St. Petersburg, winner and medalist of the Championships of St. Petersburg 1999-2003
Bessoltseva Anastasia Master of Sports of Russia
MS
core Klyuzheva N.E.
  • Participant of the European Championship among juniors (7th place) 2009
  • Participant of the European Cup among sports clubs (5th place) 2010
  • Winner and medalist of the Russian Youth Championships 2010-2011
  • Multiple winner and medalist of the Championships and Championships of Moscow and St. Petersburg 2006-2011
Belova
Ekaterina
Master of Sports of Russia
MS
200 m Odinokov P.M.
  • Champion of the II Summer All-Russian Universiade 2010
  • Multiple winner and medalist of the Championships and Championships of St. Petersburg 2003-2010.
Rybochenok
Ekaterina
Master of Sports of Russia
MS
60 m
100 m
Odinokov P.M.
  • Winner of the Russian Championship in relay race 4×100 m 2005
  • Bronze medalist of the Russian Championship among juniors 2010
  • Bronze medalist of the Russian Youth Championship 2011
  • Bronze medalist of the Russian Championship in relay race 4×100 m 2011
  • Multiple winner and medalist of the Championships and Championships of St. Petersburg 2005-2011

Is boxing MC difficult?

One of the most prestigious sports categories is the Master of Sports, in boxing this category indicates the high technical potential of the athlete, as well as successful performances at tournaments within the country and international championships.

Achieving high results in boxing is possible only with regular visits to the boxing section

, under the guidance of a specialized boxing trainer who has sufficient experience and skills in boxing training.

Boxing is a sport for the strong in spirit and purposeful

Boxing is a very strict sport, but the training of athletes is one of the most diverse due to the main criterion that boxers develop, namely endurance. To complete the rank of Master of Sports (MS), you need to go a long way of training, sparring and competition.

Mastery tournaments receive a lot of attention, there must be a certain number of Masters of Sports among the participants, such tournaments have been classified as “Class A”.

for women

become 1st or 2nd in the national championship (have at least 3 fights)

win the Russian Boxing Cup (fight at least 3 fights)

win any championship of the Federal Districts, or the championships of Moscow or St. Petersburg (have at least 3 fights)

men

become 1st or 2nd in the Russian Boxing Cup (fight at least 3 fights)

Win an All-Russian tournament included in the EKP Rossport (fight at least 3 fights)

to become 1st or 2nd at any championship of the Federal Districts, or at the championships of Moscow or St. Petersburg (have at least 3 fights)

MS is also awarded for taking first place at the world and European championships among juniors, a similar situation among older boxers.

Among men, Masters of Sports are given for the 4th and 5th place in the World Championship, as well as if he takes from 1st to 8th place in the Olympic tournament, but as a rule, athletes who are part of the national team countries and perform at such championships already have the category of Master of Sports in boxing.

Achieve boxing success with the Drummer’s team

The Drumnik Boxing Club, through an experienced coaching staff, has brought up a large number of CCMs and MSs in boxing, an individual approach to each athlete, as well as a favorable environment in each hall of this club contribute to the full development of athletes and a rapid increase in efficiency in the ring.Taking into account the great experience and regular tournaments and open rings in the Udarnik club, everyone can get a good experience in boxing in the close-knit and friendly team of the club.

The best sportsmen – SSHOR №2

Furazhkin Victor – Honored Master of Sports, six-time world champion in powerlifting 1999-2005, seven-time European champion, two-time winner of the World Games; multiple champion and winner of the Championships and Cups of Russia.

Malyarenko Alexey – Master of Sports of international class in powerlifting, two-time champion of Russia 1999-2001., winner and prize-winner of Russian Cups 1996-2000, participant of the European Championship 2001;

Khakimov Igor – Master of Sports of international class in powerlifting, Winner of the Russian Cup 1997 – 1998, multiple medalist of the Championships and Cups of Russia 1995 – 1999.

Batiev Valeriy – Master of Sports of Russia in weightlifting, Champion of Russia in weightlifting 2006, multiple winner of the Championships and Cups of Russia 2003-2006.

Zvyagintsev Andrey – Master of Sports of international class in powerlifting, two-time winner of the World Championship among juniors 1998-1999; Winner of the European Championship among juniors in 1999; winner of the Championship of Russia among youths and juniors 1998 – 1999.

Zvyagintsev Anatoly – International Master of Sports in powerlifting. Winner of the Russian Championship among juniors in 2000, Champion of Russia in bench press in 2000, Winner of the Cup of Russia in 2001, participant in the European Championship in bench press in 2001, multiple medalist of the Championships and Cups of Russia in 2001 – 2003.

Burtsev Evgeniy – Master of Sports of International Class in Powerlifting, winner of the Russian Championship among youth 2000 U18

Polkanov Andrey – Master of Sports of Russia in powerlifting, bronze medalist of the Russian Championship among youths under 18 in 2000

Bedoidze Victoria – Master of Sports of international class in powerlifting, Bronze medalist of the Russian Championship among girls under 18 2001, Winner of the Russian Championship 2004, Winner of the World Championship among girls under 18 2003, 2004

Sergeeva Irina – Master of Sports of Russia in powerlifting, bronze medalist of the Russian Championship among girls under 18 years of age 2004, participant of the World Championship under 18 years old 2004

Pakholkova Nadezhda – Master of Sports of Russia in weightlifting. Silver medalist of the Russian Weightlifting Championship among girls under 18 years of age 2000, bronze medalist of the Russian Championship among youth in 2003, bronze medalist of the Russian Cup among women 2005

Kostin Evgeniy – International Master of Sports in weightlifting, silver medalist of the 2008 Russian Cup

Vasev Alexander – Master of Sports of international class in powerlifting, winner and medalist of the Russian Championships among juniors 2013-2014, bronze medalist of the World Championships among juniors 2013.

Pavel Panyukov – Master of Sports of Russia in weightlifting, bronze medalist of the 2014 Russian Cup

Krylova Victoria – candidate master of sports in boxing, winner of the World Championship 2011, medalist of the Championships and Cups of Russia in 2014, 2016, 2017 Member of the Russian national team 2018

Bratus Ekaterina – Master of Sports of international class in powerlifting, Winner and medalist of the Championships of Russia 2009 – 2014, medalist and winner of the European Championships among juniors 2010-2013., winner of the World Championship in classic powerlifting in 2014. Bronze medalist of the Russian Championship in 2017, champion of Russia in 2018, bronze medalist of the European Championship in 2018. Member of the Russian national team in 2018.

Tsebenko Efim – Master of Sports of Russia in powerlifting, bronze medalist of the Russian Championship among youths 2012 – 2013, silver medalist of the European Championship among youths 2012

Evdokimova Ir IN – Master of Sports of Russia in weightlifting, bronze medalist of the Russian Youth Championship 2013

Lisitsa Matvey – candidate master of sports in freestyle wrestling, winner and prize-winner of the All-Russian and international competitions among youths in 2014-2017, winner of the 2015 Russian Championship among youths under 15 years old.

Malyshev Roman – candidate master of sports in freestyle wrestling, winner and medalist of the All-Russian competitions among youths and juniors 2014 – 2018.

Pushkin Alexei – Master of Sports of Russia in freestyle wrestling, winner and prize-winner of the All-Russian competitions among youths and juniors 2014 – 2016.

Abdukhaliyev Marat – candidate master of sports in freestyle wrestling, bronze medalist of the 2015 Russian Championship among boys under 15.

Lyashenko Andrey – Master of Sports of Russia in weightlifting, bronze medalist of the Russian Championship among youths under 18 in 2015, bronze medalist of the Russian Championship among juniors under 20 years of age 2017. Member of the Russian national team among youth in 2018.

Shibanova Maria – candidate master of sports in freestyle wrestling, silver medalist of the 2016 Russian Championship. among girls under 16 years old.

Anna Rekachinskaya – candidate master of sports in powerlifting, bronze medalist of the 2017 Russian Championship among girls under 18, Winner of the 2018 Russian Championship.in classic powerlifting among girls under 18 years old.

Malyarenko Vladislav – Master of Sports of Russia in powerlifting, bronze medalist of the 2017 Russian Championship among juniors under 23.

Isakova Ekaterina – Master of Sports of Russia in weightlifting, bronze medalist of the 2017 Russian Championship among juniors under 20. Member of the Russian national youth team 2018

Vasilyeva Margarita – Master of Sports of international class in powerlifting, silver medalist of the 2017 European Championship among juniors under 23, winner of the 2018 Russian Championship among juniors, silver medalist of the 2018 European Championship

Veible Artem – Master of Sports of Russia in powerlifting, bronze medalist of the 2014 Russian Championship among boys aged 14-18, winner of the Russian Championship 2018 among juniors 19-23 years old

Athletes Database | REGIONAL OFFICE OF THE FEDERATION OF DANCE SPORT AND ACROBATIC ROCK-N-ROLL IN KRASNODAR REGION

1 DanceLife Timashevsk Kudashev Igor Adopted RO FTSARR KK
2 ESSAY Apsheronsk Sultanov Sultan Adopted RO FTSARR KK
3 Flash Dance Anapa Bogoslovsky Alexander Adopted RO FTSARR KK
4 Imperia Krasnodar Ivanov Alexander Adopted RO FTSARR KK
5 Magic dance Sochi Shakurova Liana Adopted RO FTSARR KK
6 PRO DANCE Krasnodar Sokhin Alexey Adopted RO FTSARR KK
7 Red Fox Krasnodar Antropov Mikhail Adopted RO FTSARR KK
8 Rich Style Anapa Kustova Julia Adopted RO FTSARR KK
9 Star Tuapse Lyakhova Oksana Adopted FCS Sochi
10 Academy Slavyansk-on-Kuban Shishkin Andrey Adopted RO FTSARR KK
11 Accent Krasnodar Karnaukhov Anton Adopted RO FTSARR KK
12 Alt-Grazia SShOR No. 3 Krasnodar Orlova Anna Adopted RO FTSARR KK
13 Alliance Anapa Egorova Tatiana Adopted FCS Anapa
14 Antares Krasnodar Adamskaya Tatiana Adopted FCS Krasnodar
15 Argo Sochi Shvetsov Sergey Adopted RO FTSARR KK
16 ARMADA Krasnodar Konstantinova Elena Adopted RO FTSARR KK
17 Art Domino Krasnodar Orlov Vladimir Adopted RO FTSARR KK
18 Aelita Tuapse Yashina Natalia Adopted FCS Sochi
19 Valencia Krasnodar Klimov Valery Adopted RO FTSARR KK
20 Vikart Krymsk Verlup Andrey Adopted RO FTSARR KK
21 VIP-Dance Sochi Shvaryov Anton Adopted FCS Sochi
22 Gamma Krasnodar Baldina Olga Adopted RO FTSARR KK
23 Gloria Sochi Bakulina Tatiana Adopted RO FTSARR KK
24 Grand Prix Sochi Ruzanov Kirill Adopted FCS Sochi
25 Grace Sochi Gerasimova Zinaida Adopted FCS Sochi
26 Danza Vita Mostovskoy Rodionova Asya Adopted RO FTSARR KK
27 Dance-Gala SDYUSSH 1 Krasnodar Khimina Elena Adopted RO FTSARR KK
28 Children on the parquet Krasnodar Efimova Elena Application pending RO FTSARR KK
29 Diamond Krasnodar Andriyash Nikita Application pending FCS Krasnodar
30 Dynamo SDYUSSH 1 Krasnodar Shturkin Vladimir Adopted RO FTSARR KK
31 Dynasty Krasnodar Morozov Igor Adopted RO FTSARR KK
32 Dolce Vita Sochi Komandenko Daria Adopted RO FTSARR KK
33 DYUSSH Nadezhda-Champion Gelendzhik Olga Kartashova Adopted RO FTSARR KK
34 DYUSSH Nika Novorossiysk Koldobanov Victor Adopted RO FTSARR KK
35 CYSS Olympus Krylovskaya Azatyan Armine Adopted RO FTSARR KK
36 Imperial Krasnodar Halaimov Alexey Adopted RO FTSARR KK
37 Crystal DYUSSH Slavyansk-on-Kuban Cherakyants Elena Adopted RO FTSARR KK
38 Leia Krymsk Yablunovsky Evgeniy Adopted RO FTSARR KK
39 League Dance Krasnodar Konivets Tatiana Adopted FCS Krasnodar
40 Ludmila Temryuk Solid Ludmila Adopted FCS Anapa
41 Dream Krasnodar Savostin Denis Adopted RO FTSARR KK
42 Nivadiya Labinsk Boychenko Anna Adopted RO FTSARR KK
43 Unification of Kuban Krasnodar Alexey Aleshkov Adopted RO FTSARR KK
44 Orion Goryachy Klyuch Alexey Yashny Adopted RO FTSARR KK
45 Paradise Armavir Gubacheva Svetlana Adopted RO FTSARR KK
46 Perfect Yeysk Chernova Julia Adopted RO FTSARR KK
47 Prestige Krasnodar Savina Olga Adopted RO FTSARR KK
48 Promenade Sochi Stepanov Leonid Adopted FCS Sochi
49 Rainbow Belorechensk (Krasnodar.edge) Savostina Anastasia Adopted RO FTSARR KK
50 Reverance Sochi Dmitry Chernysh Adopted FCS Sochi
51 Saina Abinsk Lavrenyuk Alexander Adopted RO FTSARR KK
52 Sunrise Sochi Demidenko Olga Adopted FCS Sochi
53 Santana Sochi Kotov Vladimir Adopted FCS Sochi
54 Symphony Temryuk Shaparnaya Olga Adopted RO FTSARR KK
55 Contemporary Anapa Putilova Lidia, Simonyan Razmik Adopted FCS Anapa
56 Constellation-Dance Krasnodar Snitka Tatiana Adopted RO FTSARR KK
57 Sunny Beach Novomikhaylovsky Andrianova Marina Adopted FCS Sochi
58 Sparta Sochi Hatipoglu Hope Adopted FCS Sochi
59 Spartak Krasnodar Ron Irina Adopted RO FTSARR KK
60 Style Krasnodar Babadjanov Artur Adopted RO FTSARR KK
61 SSHOR No. 3 Magnolia Krasnodar Kravets Alexey Adopted RO FTSARR KK
62 Talisman Krasnodar Garbuzova Anna Adopted RO FTSARR KK
63 Top Dance Krasnodar Irina Bezguzova Adopted RO FTSARR KK
64 Tornado Gelendzhik Cade Marina Adopted RO FTSARR KK
65 Favorite Tuapse Shabanov Roman Adopted FCS Sochi
66 Fantasy Gelendzhik Budzinskaya Ekaterina Adopted RO FTSARR KK
67 Festival Sochi Grevtsova Ludmila Adopted FCS Sochi
68 Flamingo Sochi Semitko Oleg Adopted FCS Sochi
69 Flash Kanevskaya Eremenko Svetlana Adopted RO FTSARR KK
70 Fortune Novorossiysk Maxim Buzunov Adopted RO FTSARR KK
71 School of Dance by Andrey Eremin Krasnodar Eremin Andrey Adopted RO FTSARR KK
72 Eureka Anapa Ospishcheva Irina Adopted FCS Anapa
73 Exclusive Novorossiysk Lunev Artyom Adopted RO FTSARR KK

Athletes of St. Petersburg :: Powerlifting Federation of St. Petersburg

1 from 25.03.2019 No. 46-ng MSMK SIMONYANTS Karina Rafikovna
2 dated 22.02.2019 No. 33-ng MSMK KUZMIN Alexey Alexandrovich
3 dated 27.08.2012 No. 14-ng MSMK VAVILOVA Yulia Alexandrovna
4 from 25.06.2021 No. 73-ng MC VASILIEV Alexey Igorevich
5 dated June 25, 2021 No. 73-ng MC USYNIN Alexander Dmitrievich
6 dated May 31, 2021 No. 56-ng MC ZAPOROZHETS Nikita Alexandrovich
7 from 31.05.2021 No. 56-ng MC KIRYUKHINA Sofia Mikhailovna
8 dated May 31, 2021 No. 56-ng MC RYABOVA Maria Sergeevna
9 dated 27.01.2021 No. 8-ng MC TRUSHNIKOV Roman Andreevich
10 from 27.01.2021 No. 8-ng MC Shestiperov Artem Dmitrievich
11 dated 28.12.2020 No. 135-ng MC DAVYDENKO Alina Anatolievna
12 dated 28.12.2020 No. 135-ng MC KIREEV Vladislav Anatolievich
13 from 28.12.2020 No. 135-ng MC Alexey LEVIN
14 dated 28.12.2020 No. 135-ng MC SYCHEVA Anna Vyacheslavovna
15 dated 28.12.2020 No. 135-ng MC KHODNEVA Yulia Alekseevna
16 from 04.12.2020 No. 127-ng MC ALEXANDROVA Ulyana Sergeevna
17 dated 04.12.2020 No. 127-ng MC KUDACHKIN Kirill Borisovich
18 dated 04.12.2020 No. 127-ng MC LYTASOVA Kristina Valerievna
19 from 04.12.2020 No. 127-ng MC SEIMOVA Tatiana Mikhailovna
20 dated 30.09.2020 No. 97-ng MC DROBIKOV Alexey Alexandrovich
21 dated 30.09.2020 No. 97-ng MC Vitaly D. FILATOV
22 from 30.09.2020 No. 97-ng MC KhON Sergey Synkheevich
23 dated 28.08.2020 No. 76-ng MC KORNEV Roman Vitalievich
24 dated 28.08.2020 No. 76-ng MC KRONGHOUSE Sergey Mikhailovich
25 from 28.08.2020 No. 76-ng MC Nekhtsa Daria Alekseevna
26 dated 28.08.2020 No. 76-ng MC PETROV Andrey Alexandrovich
27 dated 28.08.2020 No. 76-ng MC USOV Evgeniy Pavlovich
28 from 27.05.2020 No. 35-ng MC BAKUNTSEV Nikita Andreevich
29 dated 27.05.2020 No. 35-ng MC DUNICHEV Maxim Dmitrievich
30 dated May 27, 2020 No. 35-ng MC KUZMOVA Olga Vladimirovna
31 from 27.05.2020 No. 35-ng MC Malkova Katerina Dmitrievna
32 dated May 27, 2020 No. 35-ng MC MITROFANOV Sergey Nikolaevich
33 dated May 27, 2020 No. 35-ng MC POPOV Alexey Andreevich
34 from 27.05.2020 No. 35-ng MC PROTSENKO Ivan Vitalievich
35 dated May 27, 2020 No. 35-ng MC ROSTOVSKY Oleg Anatolyevich
36 dated 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC ALMASOVA Ksenia Sergeevna
37 from 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC BARANYUK Alena Nikolaevna
38 dated 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC LENKIN Ivan Nikolaevich
39 dated 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC MIKHAILOV Nikita Andreevich
40 from 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC MUKOVNYA Semyon Stanislavovich
41 dated 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC Raznitsyn Sergey Alexandrovich
42 dated 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC Sokolov Alexander Yurievich
43 from 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC SPITSYN Anton Grigorievich
44 dated 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC TISHOV Alexander Lvovich
45 dated 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC TKACH Alexander Valerievich
46 from 30.03.2020 No. 26-ng MC TSVETKOV Anton Yurievich
47 dated 27.02.2020 No. 12-ng MC VORONIN Andrey Viktorovich
48 dated 27.02.2020 No. 12-ng MC KASHIRIN Andrey Sergeevich
49 from 28.11.2019 No. 159-ng MC ABUSUEVA Antonina Semyonovna
50 dated 28.11.2019 No. 159-ng MC ASTRATOV Vladimir Alexandrovich
51 dated 28.11.2019 No. 159-ng MC BASOV Dmitry Igorevich
52 from 28.11.2019 No. 159-ng MC DARSANIA Bogdan Zazaevich
53 dated 28.11.2019 No. 159-ng MC SHCHEGLOV Maxim Yurievich
54 dated 07.11.2019 No. 148-ng MC SANDAKOV Ilya Olegovich
55 from 07.11.2019 No. 148-ng MC SUK Vladimir Olegovich
56 dated 07.11.2019 No. 148-ng MC TOLCHEV Andrey Anatolievich
57 dated December 29, 2018 No. 182-ng MC BOCHANOV Sergey Sergeevich
58 from 29.12.2018 No. 182-ng MC VOROBIEVA Daria Borisovna
59 dated December 29, 2018 No. 182-ng MC MAGAZOV Evgeniy Vadimovich
60 dated December 29, 2018 No. 182-ng MC MELNIKOV Alexey Vasilievich
61 from 29.12.2018 No. 182-ng MC NIKITIN Kirill Valerievich
62 dated December 29, 2018 No. 182-ng MC PECHNIKOV Oleg Igorevich
63 dated December 29, 2018 No. 182-ng MC PIDMICHEVA Sofia Nikolaevna
64 from 29.12.2018 No. 182-ng MC SAVELIEVA Ksenia Vladimirovna
65 dated December 29, 2018 No. 182-ng MC FEDOTOVA Yulia Vladimirovna
66 dated December 29, 2018 No. 182-ng MC Tsyrenshchikov Alexey Dmitrievich
67 from 29.12.2018 No. 182-ng MC SHAKHMURADOV Movsar Nasrudinovich
68 dated December 29, 2018 No. 182-ng MC SHERMATYUK Evgeniy Igorevich
69 dated December 29, 2018 No. 182-ng MC EIVAZOV Jalil Iskenderovich
70 from 29.12.2018 No. 182-ng MC YANBAEVA Elena Sergeevna
71 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC AKIMKIN Petr Yurievich
72 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC ANDRIANOV Sergey Viktorovich
73 from 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC ANDRONOV Nikita Vladimirovich
74 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC BONDARENKO Pavel Andreevich
75 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC VASILKOVA Irina Vladimirovna
76 from 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC ZABRODIN Oleg Vadimovich
77 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC ZAITSEVA Yulia Alexandrovna
78 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC KADZAEV Alexander Nikolaevich
79 from 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC KOLOKOLTSEVA Nadezhda Vladislavovna
80 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC LAPPALAINEN Dmitry Olegovich
81 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC NESKORODOV Stanislav Evgenievich
82 from 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC NOVIKOV Maxim Sergeevich
83 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC PIVNIK Sergey Vyacheslavovich
84 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC RUSAKOV Alexey Viktorovich
85 from 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC SOSNOVSKY Denis Andreevich
86 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC STEPANOV Stas Yurievich
87 dated 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC CHALTSEV Nikolay Vladimirovich
88 from 30.10.2018 No. 152-ng MC Chernitsyn Ksenia Vladislavovna
89 dated March 29, 2018 No. 40-ng MC VORONOV Dmitry Valerievich
90 dated March 29, 2018 No. 40-ng MC KARTEL Anastasia Vladimirovna
91 from 29.03.2018 No. 40-ng MC KLEVAKIN Alexey Anatolyevich
92 dated March 29, 2018 No. 40-ng MC KORPACHEV Alexey Viktorovich
93 dated March 29, 2018 No. 40-ng MC LAVROV Igor Evgenievich
94 from 29.03.2018 No. 40-ng MC RADINA Daria Alexandrovna
95 dated March 29, 2018 No. 40-ng MC Samatov Artyom Anatolievich
96 dated March 29, 2018 No. 40-ng MC TARASOV Gleb Mikhailovich
97 from 26.06.2017 No. 88-ng MC BERESNEV Roman Andreevich
98 dated 15.05.2017 No. 62-ng MC BRICHIKOV Nikolay Vladimirovich
99 dated 15.05.2017 No. 62-ng MC LUPA Oleg Grigorievich
100 from 15.05.2017 No. 62-ng MC MIKHAILOV Valery Mikhailovich
101 dated 15.05.2017 No. 62-ng MC SAFYANNIKOVA Anastasia Konstantinovna
102 dated 15.05.2017 No. 62-ng MC SHEVELEVA Natalia Alexandrovna
103 from 15.12.2016 No. 196-ng MC POLYAKOV Andrey Vladimirovich
104 dated 17.10.2016 No. 155-ng MC GAVRILOVA Anna Alekseevna
105 dated 17.10.2016 No. 155-ng MC GREBENSCHIKOV Ivan Valerievich
106 from 17.10.2016 No. 155-ng MC EFIMOVA Tatiana Nikolaevna
107 dated 17.10.2016 No. 155-ng MC IRON Kirill Nikolaevich
108 dated 17.10.2016 No. 155-ng MC ZHOGINA Margarita Alekseevna
109 from 17.10.2016 No. 155-ng MC LEYSLE Timur Valerievich
110 dated 17.10.2016 No. 155-ng MC LEI Maria Alexandrovna
111 dated 17.10.2016 No. 155-ng MC MOGUROVA Ksenia Viktorovna
112 from 17.10.2016 No. 155-ng MC RYABENKOV Ivan Alekseevich
113 dated August 29, 2016 No. 130-ng MC BRODOVY Alexander Bogdanovich
114 dated August 29, 2016 No. 130-ng MC GORDEEV Sergey Vladimirovich
115 from 29.08.2016 No. 130-ng MC KLOCHEK Igor Yurievich
116 dated August 29, 2016 No. 130-ng MC MYAGKOV Andrey Dmitrievich
117 dated August 29, 2016 No. 130-ng MC SAMARIN Nikolay Viktorovich
118 from 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC VINOGRADOV Alexander Yurievich
119 dated 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC ZINKOVSKAYA Anna Vasilievna
120 dated 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC KADYROV Yuri Rustamovich
121 from 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC KAZENOV Sergey Alexandrovich
122 dated 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC KALACHEV Andrey Mikhailovich
123 dated 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC KRASNOV Anton Alekseevich
124 from 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC KUZNETSOVA Alisa Vadimovna
125 dated 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC SIDOROV Alexey Petrovich
126 dated 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC SPITSIN Alexander Alexandrovich
127 from 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC TOLASOVA Antonina Anatolievna
128 dated 28.12.2015 No. 193-ng MC YURGENS Kristina Alexandrovna
129 dated 08.06.2015 No. 78-ng MC Meshchansky Igor Petrovich
130 from 10.04.2015 No. 51-ng MC BUGAEV Igor Alekseevich
131 dated 15.12.2014 No. 174-ng MC BATYGINA Ekaterina Alekseevna
132 dated 15.12.2014 No. 174-ng MC DUNAEVA Olga Gennadievna
133 from 15.12.2014 No. 174-ng MC EGOROVA Olesya Pavlovna
134 dated 15.12.2014 No. 174-ng MC OKUN Ekaterina Evgenievna
135 dated 15.12.2014 No. 174-ng MC PENKIN Dmitry Valerievich
136 from 15.12.2014 No. 174-ng MC Prudnikov Pavel Sergeevich
137 dated 15.12.2014 No. 174-ng MC SPIRIDONOV Alexander Sergeevich
138 dated 15.12.2014 No. 174-ng MC OLD Inna Viktorovna
139 from 15.12.2014 No. 174-ng MC SUDOSIEVA Olga Valerievna
140 dated 06.08.2014 No. 83-ng MC DANILOV Nikita Dmitrievich
141 dated 06.08.2014 No. 83-ng MC DYATKO Dmitry Viktorovich
142 from 06.08.2014 No. 83-ng MC IVANOV Maxim Evgenievich
143 dated 06.08.2014 No. 83-ng MC MENIAKHMETOV Rustam Ramilevich
144 dated 06.08.2014 No. 83-ng MC SAGATOV Timur Rustamovich
145 from 06.08.2014 No. 83-ng MC TARASOV Andrey Nikolaevich
146 dated 06.08.2014 No. 83-ng MC TEPLOV Alexander Gennadievich
147 dated 06.08.2014 No. 83-ng MC SHCHERBAKOVA Maria Andreevna
148 from 23.06.2014 No. 67-ng MC BOGOMAZOV Mikhail Yurievich
149 dated 23.06.2014 No. 67-ng MC NEVOLIN Alexey Vyacheslavovich
150 dated 23.06.2014 No. 67-ng MC SHUDAEV Roman Rashidbekovich
151 from 31.10.2013 No. 148-ng MC SHMIDT Yana Sergeevna
152 dated 30.09.2013 No. 128-ng MC ALEXEEV Danil Alexandrovich
153 dated 30.09.2013 No. 128-ng MC BOCHAROVA Yulia Vladimirovna
154 from 30.09.2013 No. 128-ng MC GRIGORIEV Alexey Yurievich
155 dated 30.09.2013 No. 128-ng MC IVASHKOV Vladimir Alexandrovich
156 dated 30.09.2013 No. 128-ng MC KONEV Ivan Vitalievich
157 from 30.09.2013 No. 128-ng MC KOROLEV Dmitry Nikolaevich
158 dated 30.09.2013 No. 128-ng MC PISKOVSKY Stanislav Alexandrovich
159 dated 30.09.2013 No. 128-ng MC Sokolov Alexey Alexandrovich
160 from 30.09.2013 No. 128-ng MC UDAROVA Yanina Valentinovna
161 dated 14.08.2013 No. 110-ng MC DUSHENINA Ekaterina Viktorovna
162 dated 14.08.2013 No. 110-ng MC LUPIN Sergey Grigorievich
163 from 14.08.2013 No. 110-ng MC STARCHENKO Elizaveta Olegovna
164 dated 20.05.2013 No. 54-ng MC MAKSIMOV Eduard Gennadievich
165 dated 20.05.2013 No. 54-ng MC MERKULOV Alexander Vasilievich
166 from 11.03.2013 No. 20-ng MC Dergunov Vladimir Vladimirovich
167 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC BALABANOV Dmitry Nikolaevich
168 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC BALAKHOV Maxim Olegovich
169 from 21.02.2013 No. 9-ng MC Borovskaya Inna Eduardovna
170 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC GARNOV Alexander Nikolaevich
171 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC GONCHARUK Vladimir Valentinovich
172 from 21.02.2013 No. 9-ng MC DEIS Gennady Andreevich
173 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC IVANOV Vitaly Yurievich
174 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC IVANOVA Anna Stanislavovna
175 from 21.02.2013 No. 9-ng MC Ilyin Alexander Pavlovich
176 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC MARUSHINA Elena Vyacheslavovna
177 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC MIKHAILOVA Olga Yurievna
178 from 21.02.2013 No. 9-ng MC MURADYAN Karen Gevorgovich
179 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC OSTAPCHUK Alexander Alexandrovich
180 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC PETRUS Artem Sergeevich
181 from 21.02.2013 No. 9-ng MC PIK Nadezhda Alexandrovna
182 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC RAGOZINA Natalya Alexandrovna
183 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC SEMENOVA Irina Vasilievna
184 from 21.02.2013 No. 9-ng MC STARYGIN Dmitry Alexandrovich
185 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC TIMOFEEVA Anastasia Vasilievna
186 dated February 21, 2013 No. 9-ng MC URUSOV Stanislav Anatolievich
187 from 21.02.2013 No. 9-ng MC EKGARDT Konstantin Nikolaevich
188 dated 05.02.2013 No. 6-ng MC VOSKOBOINIKOV Konstantin Yurievich
189 dated 26.12.2012 No. 73-ng MC FEDOROVA Natalia Sergeevna
190 from 28.11.2012 No. 50-ng MC VERDIYANU Vladimir Dmitrievich
191 dated 30.10.2012 No. 32-ng MC BOGDANOVSKY Vladimir Viktorovich
192 dated 30.10.2012 No. 32-ng MC Zakharenkov Alexander Alexandrovich
193 from 30.10.2012 No. 32-ng MC ZAKHAROV Stanislav Sergeevich
194 dated March 16, 2012 No. 37-ng MC BOGDANOV Mikhail Vladimirovich
195 dated 16.03.2012 No. 37-ng MC GLADKOVA Vera Alexandrovna
196 from 14.02.2012 No. 18-ng MC AGARONYAN Vilen Arsenovich
197 dated 14.02.2012 No. 18-ng MC BARANOV Sergey Vladimirovich
198 dated 14.02.2012 No. 18-ng MC VAROV Mikhail Nikolaevich
199 from 14.02.2012 No. 18-ng MC GRITCHENKO Andrey Nikolaevich
200 dated 14.02.2012 No. 18-ng MC IVAS Alexey Mikhailovich
201 dated 14.02.2012 No. 18-ng MC KONOVALOV Andrey Nikolaevich
202 from 14.02.2012 No. 18-ng MC KUSHKHOV Muaed Barasbievich
203 dated 14.02.2012 No. 18-ng MC MIKULIN Evgeny Vladimirovich
204 dated 14.02.2012 No. 18-ng MC SMIRNOV Alexander Sergeevich
205 from 14.02.2012 No. 18-ng MC SHANIN Alexander Mikhailovich
206 dated 18.10.2011 No. 133-ng MC ROVNOV Alexander Sergeevich
207 dated 19.09.2011 No. 121-ng MC LUPULENKO Alexey Nikolaevich
208 from 12.07.2011 No. 98-ng MC ABRAMOV Valentin Vladimirovich
209 dated 12.07.2011 No. 98-ng MC PAVLENKO Andrey Vladimirovich
210 dated 23.05.2011 No. 77-ng MC GURIEVA Ekaterina Andreevna
211 from 23.05.2011 No. 77-ng MC DEMENTIEV Alexander Mikhailovich
212 dated 23.05.2011 No. 77-ng MC KRINITSKY Alexander Yaroslavovich
213 dated 23.05.2011 No. 77-ng MC RAEVSKY Victor Yurievich
214 from 23.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.