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salicylic acid topical | Michigan Medicine

What is the most important information I should know about salicylic acid topical?

Salicylic acid topical can cause a rare but serious allergic reaction or severe skin irritation. Stop using this medicine and get emergency medical help if you have: hives, itching; difficult breathing, feeling light-headed; or swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

What is salicylic acid topical?

Salicylic acid is a keratolytic (peeling agent). Salicylic acid causes shedding of the outer layer of skin.

Salicylic acid topical (for the skin) is used in the treatment of acne, dandruff, seborrhea, or psoriasis, and to remove corns, calluses, and warts.

There are many brands and forms of salicylic acid available. Not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Salicylic acid topical may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using salicylic acid topical?

You should not use salicylic acid topical if you are allergic to it.

Do not use this medicine on a child or teenager who has a fever, flu symptoms, or chickenpox. Salicylates applied to the skin and absorbed into the bloodstream can cause Reye’s syndrome, a serious and sometimes fatal condition in children.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if this medicine is safe to use if you have:

  • liver or kidney disease;
  • diabetes; or
  • blood circulation problems.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

How should I use salicylic acid topical?

Salicylic acid topical is available in many different forms, such as liquid, gel, lotion, cream, ointment, foam, soap, shampoo, cloth pads, and skin patches. Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor.

Salicylic acid topical can cause a rare but serious allergic reaction or severe skin irritation. Before you start using this medicine, you may choose to apply a “test dose” to see if you have a reaction. Apply a very small amount of the medicine to 1 or 2 small acne areas every day for 3 days in a row. If there is no reaction, begin using the full prescribed amount on the 4th day.

Do not take by mouth. Topical medicine is for use only on the skin.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you do not understand these instructions.

You may need to shake the medicine before use. Follow all directions on the product label.

It may take up to several days before your symptoms improve. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse.

Do not use salicylic acid topical to treat any skin condition that has not been checked by your doctor.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep the foam canister away from open flame or high heat. The canister may explode if it gets too hot. Do not puncture or burn an empty aerosol canister.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not use two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of salicylic acid is not expected to be dangerous. Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 if anyone has accidentally swallowed the medication.

What should I avoid while using salicylic acid topical?

Do not use on open wounds or on sunburned, windburned, dry, or irritated skin. Rinse with water if this medicine gets in your eyes or mouth.

This medicine may be flammable. Do not use near high heat or open flame. Wash the medicine off your hands before handling a hair styling appliance (such as a curling or straightening iron). High heat could cause the medicine to ignite and burn your skin.

Do not smoke until the gel has completely dried on your skin.

Avoid using other medications on the areas you treat with salicylic acid topical unless your doctor tells you to.

What are the possible side effects of salicylic acid topical?

Salicylic acid topical can cause a rare but serious allergic reaction or severe skin irritation. These reactions may occur just a few minutes after you apply the medicine, or within a day or longer afterward.

Stop using this medicine and get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives, itching; difficult breathing, feeling light-headed; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Also stop using salicylic acid topical and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe headache, ringing in your ears, problems with hearing, thinking problems;
  • severe stomach pain, vomiting, or diarrhea;
  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • shortness of breath; or
  • severe burning, dryness, or irritation of the skin.

Common side effects may include:

  • minor skin irritation, rash, or peeling; or
  • changes in the color of treated skin (usually whitening).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect salicylic acid topical?

Medicine used on the skin is not likely to be affected by other drugs you use. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about salicylic acid topical.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. (‘Multum’) is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum’s drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum’s drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2021 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 4.04. Revision date: 4/17/2019.

Ocular chemical burns from accidental exposure to topical dermatological medicinal agent

Indian J Ophthalmol. 2018 Oct; 66(10): 1476–1477.

Jitender Jinagal

Advanced Eye Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Parul C Gupta

Advanced Eye Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Gaurav Gupta

Advanced Eye Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Kamal K Sahu

1Department of Internal Medicine, St. Vincent Hospital, Worcester, 123 Summer Street-01608, USA

Jagat Ram

Advanced Eye Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Advanced Eye Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

1Department of Internal Medicine, St. Vincent Hospital, Worcester, 123 Summer Street-01608, USA

Correspondence to: Dr. Jagat Ram, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India. E-mail: [email protected]

Received 2018 Mar 26; Accepted 2018 Jun 14.

Copyright : © 2018 Indian Journal of Ophthalmology

This is an open access journal, and articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as appropriate credit is given and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

Abstract

We report a case of accidental ocular chemical injury by self-medication with a single application of a topical ayurvedic medication containing salicylic acid, phenol, and tincture iodine, which is being used in developing countries for treatment of various dermatological conditions.

Keywords: Accidental exposure to topical drops, corneal epithelial defect, ocular chemical burns

Chemical ocular burns comprise 5.5–15.5% of all ocular trauma cases in various parts of the world.[1,2,3] They are a significant problem, as they may destroy the entire corneal epithelium and may extend into the limbus and fornices,[4] which subsequently leads to nonhealing epithelial defects and sometimes complete corneal melts. Therefore, such injuries should be taken seriously. Chemical injuries may be caused by acidic or alkaline agents. Chemical agents commonly causing it are hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, nitric acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid, ammonium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide, and calcium hydroxide.[5]

Salicylic acid (Organic formula: C6H4(OH)COOH) is considered a weak acid. It is obtained from bark of willow tree.[6] Ocular injury with salicylic acid has not been frequently reported in ophthalmic literature. Overall there is only one report of ocular chemical injury with 20% salicylic acid. [7] We report a case of accidental ocular chemical injury by self-medication with a single application of a topical Ayurvedic medication (containing salicylic acid, phenol, and tincture iodine), which is being used in developing countries for treatment of various dermatological conditions.

Case Report

A 38-year-old male presented to our outdoor patient clinic with right eye pain, redness, and diminution of vision for 2 weeks. He had ocular irritation 2 weeks back for which he accidentally instilled a drop of topical ayurvedic medication in his right eye considering it as artificial tears, which led to severe ocular pain, irritation, watering, and photophobia. After instillation, he realized that those drops were being used for the treatment of dermatomycosis of his son. Patient consulted a local ophthalmologist and was referred to our center. He presented to us with the container of the ayurvedic medication [].

(a) Container of the ayurvedic dermatological medication showing the different constituents. (b) Slit lamp photograph of the affected eye (right) showing circumcorneal congestion, swollen corneal epithelial edges, and nonhealing epithelial defect of size 6 × 5.7 mm. Corneal is hazy due to presence of stromal edema

On ophthalmological examination, the best corrected visual acuity was counting fingers in the affected eye and 6/9 in the left eye. On slit lamp biomicroscopy, there was diffuse conjunctival congestion with a polygonal-shaped corneal epithelial defect of size 6 × 5.7 mm, in the lower half of cornea involving the central visual axis with swollen rounded edges and surrounding area of corneal edema extending 2 to 2.5 mm from the edges. The epithelial defect stained positively with fluorescein. Area of epithelial defect was associated with corneal stromal thinning up to 30–40% of total stromal depth []. However, no conjunctival staining or limbal scar were seen. After saline wash, the patient was started on topical moxifloxacin 0.5%, dexamethasone 0.5%, vitamin C drops, hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose 0. 3%, and carboxymethylcellulose gel 1% along with oral doxycycline 100 mg BD and tablet vitamin C 500 mg TID. The patient was also started on autologous serum. In view of the nonhealing epithelial defect, amniotic membrane transplantation was performed []. It was repeated after a period of 2 weeks to fasten healing, as mechanical shredding of amniotic membrane transplant occurred spontaneously. Preserved human amnion has been previously successfully used as a biological bandage, promoter of epithelialization, inhibitor of inflammation, and angiogenesis in chemical burns of the ocular surface,[8] though early detachment of the patch remains a major problem despite the use of multiple sutures or a protective bandage contact lens.[9]

(a) Cornea post amniotic membrane transplantation. (b) Nebulomacular corneal opacity

The defect healed leaving behind a nebulo-macular corneal opacity after a period of 10 weeks [].

Discussion

The chemical involved in our case that led to such severe ocular burns was an ayurvedic medicine used for the treatment of skin diseases such as ringworm, eczema, fungal infections of fingers/toes, and dermatitis. Its main constituents were 10% salicylic acid, phenol 1%, and tincture iodine (ethyl alcohol) 3%. Salicylic acid acts by quarantining the impacted region from body moisture, thereby cutting the supply of moisture to the fungus and thus, the wound dries quickly. Salicylic acid has keratolytic properties and removes dead and infected cells, hereby removing fungus from that region. Phenol, also known as carbolic acid, is an aromatic hydrocarbon compound that acts as a mild acid. These compounds have corrosive and anesthetic properties. Tincture iodine (ethyl alcohol) is also an irritant to the ocular surface and can cause ocular surface injuries. Salicylic acid is common ingredient used in many dermatological drugs for various skin diseases and it comes in vials, which look very similar to the containers of eye drops and the patient can very easily confuse it with other eye drops, as happened in our case. Our patient instilled it accidently, mistaking it to be lubricating eye drops and only a single application of it caused severe injuries. Severe ocular injuries with such ayurvedic medicines have not been reported earlier. Only one case of chemical injury has been reported with 20% salicylic acid.[7] Salicylic acid is a weak acid with a pH of 3.3, but still it caused extensive chemical burns and nonhealing epithelial defect. Salicylic acid solubilizes intercellular cement and causes desquamation when applied over skin.[10] In our case, it might have solubilized the tight junctions between the corneal epithelium, thereby causing de-epithelization of cornea immediately. Long-term effect can be explained by the damage caused to the limbal stem cells, leading to nonhealing ulcers.

It is best to prevent injury from this chemical and keep it away from the reach of children and elderly people. Avoid keeping it with other eye drop containers and instilling eye drops carefully only after ensuring that proper medicine is being instilled. Pharmaceutical drug companies should be guided by drug regulatory authorities regarding differential packaging and dispensing of different medicinal agents being used for altogether different body parts. The different container sizes and packaging colors should be used, so that even illiterate people can understand the difference between the commonly used drugs.

Conclusion

In conclusion, salicylic acid, phenols, and tincture iodine are common constituents of many dermatological drugs and accidental ocular chemical injury is not uncommon and may lead to very severe chemical burns. Treatment of chemical burns with such agents is tedious and longstanding, so the best way to avoid ocular morbidity due to salicylic acid associated chemical burns is prevention. Similarity of these commercially available solutions with eye drop containers can make them susceptible to be used as eye drops and thus cause accidental ocular chemical burns.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1. Herr RD, White GL, Jr, Bernhisel K, Mamalis N, Swanson E. Clinical comparison of ocular irrigation fluids following chemical injury. Am J Emerg Med. 1991;9:228–31. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]2. Nicaeus T, Erb C, Rohrbach M, Thiel HJ. An analysis of 148 outpatient treated occupational accidents. Klin Monbl Augenheilkd. 1996;209:A7–11. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]3. Pegg SP, Miller PM, Sticklen EJ, Storie WJ. Epidemiology of industrial burns in Brisbane. Burns Incl Therm Inj. 1986;12:484–90. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]4. Pfister RR. The effects of chemical injury on the ocular surface. Ophthalmology. 1983;90:601–9. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]5. Saini JS, Sharma A. Ocular chemical burns—clinical and demographic profile. Burns. 1993;19:67–9. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]6. Mackowiak PA. Brief history of antipyretic therapy. Clin Infect Dis. 2000;31(Suppl 5):S154–6. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]7. Shazly TA. Ocular acid burn due to 20% concentrated salicylic acid. Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2011;30:84–6. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]8. Sangwan VS, Tejwani S, Mahesh SP, Murthy R. Amniotic membrane transplantation: A review of current indications in the management of ophthalmic disorders. Indian J Ophthalmol. 2007;55:251–60. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]9. Letko E, Stechschulte SU, Kenyon KR, Sadeq N, Romero TR, Samson CM, et al. Amniotic membrane inlay and overlay grafting for corneal epithelial defects and stromal ulcers. Arch Ophthalmol. 2001;119:659–63. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]10. Davies M, Marks R. Studies on the effect of salicylic acid on normal skin. Br J Dermatol. 1976;95:187–92. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

A report of two cases

Case report

Salicylic acid burn induced by wart remover:

A report of two cases

W. H.C. Tiong *, E.J. Kelly

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland

1. Introduction

Salicylic acid is a well-known topical keratolytic agent.

Various concentrations of its derivatives have been used for

different applications ranging from the treatment of acne to

chemical peels [1,2]. Oral mucosal burns caused by exposure to

aspirin and other salicylic acid derivatives have been reported

in the past [3–5]. To our knowledge, there is no report in the

literature on a burn to the skin caused by salicylic acid.

2. Case report

Two sisters, aged 9- and 13-year-old, presented to our unit

with partial thickness burns to their left forearm and right

forearm after self-treatment of warts over the olecranon

process with over-the-counter Scholls

1

Clear Away One Step

Salicylic Acid Plantar Wart Remover (Schering-Plough Health-

care). Both children started using the Plantar Wart Remover 10

days prior to presentation with chemical burns to the elbow.

Both had insisted that they followed the exact direction of

application as provided by the manufacturer. They were both

healthy otherwise with no significant past medical history.

On examination, there was a 4 cm 6 cm area of partial

thickness burn with islands of normal skin on the left elbow

(Fig. 1) of the 9-year-old girl. Her older sister had a 3 cm 8cm

area of partial thickness burn with some granulation tissue on

her right elbow (Fig. 2). Both wounds were washed thoroughly

and treated conservatively with paraffin gauze dressings. The

wound on the left elbow of the 9-year-old girl healed after 1

week and the right elbow wound of the 13-year-old girl healed

after 2 weeks.

3. Discussion

The salicylic acid keratolytic effect appears to be concentra-

tion dependent [1]. A 5% and above concentration exerts an

increasingly potent and rapid deep keratolytic effect on the

stratum corneum and ultimately exerts an exfoliative action.

Various concentrations of its derivatives have been used for

different application ranging from the treatment of acne to

psoriasis to chemical peels [1,2]. Concentration of up to 50%

has been used for wart removal [1]. It works by reduces the

intercellular cohesiveness of the horny cells by dissolving the

intercellular cement material and reduces the pH of the

stratum corneum thereby increasing hydration and inducing

softening. This leads to desquamation of corneocytes [1].

The active ingredient of the Plantar Wart Remover is 40%

salicylic acid [6]. It is marketed as a one-step, fast wart

remover for warts only on the bottom of the foot [6]. The

manufacturer warned against its application on moles,

burns 35 (2009) 139–140

article info

Article history:

Accepted 30 October 2007

*Corresponding author at: Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Hand Surgery, University Hospital Galway, Galway, Ireland.

Tel.: +353 868206735.

E-mail address: [email protected] (W.H.C. Tiong).

available at www.sciencedirect.com

journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/burns

0305-4179/$34.00 #2007 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

doi:10.1016/j.burns.2007.10.013

Student left with chemical burns from The Ordinary’s Salicylic Acid 2% Solution

A student has claimed she was left ‘housebound’ after a cult beauty product left her face erupting in oozing blisters and scabs. 

Natasha Martlew, 20, from Wirral, Merseyside, had decided to boost her ‘very basic’ skincare regime – comprising soap, water and a light moisturiser – by trying salicylic acid for the first time.

Highly regarded in the beauty world, The Ordinary’s £4.20 Salicylic Acid 2% Solution is recommended for blemish-prone skin and claims to de-clog pores.

But less than 12 hours after using a thin layer of the product on December 4, Natasha’s face erupted in painful, weeping blisters and she was advised by a 111 operator to go to hospital.

Natasha suffered chemical burns and was issued a seven-day course of antibiotics to clear up the infection, with doctors reportedly telling her she was ‘one of the unlucky ones’.

Skincare horror: Natasha Martlew, 20, from Wirral, Merseyside, suffered chemical burns after trying The Ordinary’s Salicylic Acid 2% Solution for the first time and went to hospital

As the infection scabbed over, a horrified Natasha hid away indoors for fear of people staring at her and has been signed off work for 20 days.

The psychology student, who says she has been left with ‘holes in her face’, is now sharing the shocking pictures to warn others about the potential dangers of beauty products.

Natasha said: ‘My friend at work recommended it. I was really buzzing about trying it and was telling my whole family to try it as well.

‘I’d never used it before and didn’t want to put loads on so put one or two drops on a cotton pad and rubbed it on my face.

‘There was no reaction at first apart from it going a little bit red, but I presumed it was because I was putting something on my face so didn’t think anything of it.

‘When I woke up for work the next morning and looked in the mirror I wondered what was all over my face.

The product believed to have left Natasha with chemical burns. Highly regarded in the beauty world, The Ordinary’s Salicylic Acid 2% Solution is recommended for blemish-prone skin and claims to de-clog pores

Before being rushed to hospital: Natasha who says she has been left with ‘holes in her face’, is now sharing the shocking pictures to warn others about the potential dangers of beauty products

‘My initial reaction was that it was loads of spots, it looked like I had 100 whiteheads on my face.

‘I touched my chin and that’s when something popped and I realised they were blisters. All this clear and yellow liquid came out, it was horrible.’

After calling in sick to work, Natasha called 111 and was advised to go to the nearest hospital within an hour.

Natasha went to Arrowe Park Hospital in Upton, Wirral, where she was examined by a nurse and consultant who confirmed she was suffering from chemical burns.

Natasha, who also works in a call centre, said: ‘I was crying my eyes out because I didn’t want to go out looking like I did.

‘I’m self-conscious anyway and always usually have my make-up on going out. I was thinking ‘how can I go out getting stared at like this?’

Natasha’s skin at its worst. She recalled: ‘I touched my chin and that’s when something popped and I realised they were blisters. All this clear and yellow liquid came out, it was horrible’

After using The Ordinary’s product, Natasha’s face erupted in in oozing blisters and scabs – leaving her ‘housebound’ and in need of urgent medical care

‘It felt like a throbbing pain on my face, it was burning and sore to touch. My forehead was where it hurt the most as that was the deepest burn.

‘A consultant at the hospital said it was chemical burns and that salicylic acid does have the potential to cause this as it’s an acidic product.

‘He said he was really, really sorry it had happened to me, but I’d just been unlucky.

Natasha was prescribed a seven-day course of antibiotics and instructed to only wash her face with water.

The following day she visited her GP where she was told she was also suffering from contact dermatitis and was signed off work for two weeks to give the infection time to clear.

Natasha’s face covered in painful blisters. A consultant at the hospital told her she had suffered chemical burns and that salicylic acid could have caused the reaction – calling her ‘unlucky’

Recovery: Natasha was prescribed a seven-day course of antibiotics and instructed to only wash her face with water. The following day she visited her GP where she was told she was also suffering from contact dermatitis and was signed off work for two weeks

University of Liverpool student Natasha said: ‘It was awful because I’ve had so many problems with my skin in the past and it was really good.

‘I thought getting a good skin care routine would keep it like that, it was mortifying.

‘It sounds horrible, but I thought it looked like the symptoms when people get AIDS and they get all those scabs.

‘That’s what I kept saying to my dad, ‘I don’t want to go out in case people think I’ve got something I haven’t’.’

The instructions on the The Ordinary product, part of the DECIEM group, advise to ‘use in the AM and PM’ and specifically instruct the user ‘do not rinse off’.

The packaging warns to stop using in case of ‘persistent irritation’ and also carries ‘sunburn alert’ highlighting that it may increase the skin’s sensitivity to the sun.

Natasha said: ‘I followed the instructions on the box as I’d never used it before and just put a small amount on.

Natasha is on medication and has been signed off work for two weeks while she recovers. She said: ‘When I’ve been going out I’ve just been putting a bit of concealer on the main scars instead of a full face of makeup like I’m used to’

‘When I looked at the box all it warned about was ‘persistent irritations’. I’d only used it once so that wouldn’t apply to me.

‘I just don’t understand why a warning about potential risks from using it just the once were not written on the box. If it was, I wouldn’t have used it.

‘I was just mortified that this happened, I think we were all in shock as it’s a normal product that a lot of people buy.

‘We don’t know why it had happened to me, it’s just one of those things.’

Having battled spot-prone skin in her teen years, Natasha was trying the product in the hope of maintaining a clear complexion but was left feeling self-conscious about her appearance.

Natasha said: ‘When I went to the GP I had a scarf around my chin area up to my nose and thought everyone was staring at me.

Speaking about the painful blisters, which are now beginning to heal, Natasha said: ‘I was just mortified that this happened, I think we were all in shock as it’s a normal product that a lot of people buy’

‘If anyone looked at me I would turn around and face the other way.

‘Apart from going to the GP I was just hiding away at home. I wouldn’t let my family or my boyfriend see me and spent my time sitting in feeling miserable for myself.

‘I was worried I’d be scarred for life, the scabs that have fallen off have left scars and holes on my face.

‘It’s like being a teenager again with serious acne and I’ve had to cancel a few nights out.

‘I’ve got my work Christmas night out coming up but I think by then I will just have to go, I can’t live my life indoors.

‘When I’ve been going out I’ve just been putting a bit of concealer on the main scars instead of a full face of makeup like I’m used to.

‘It could have happened to anyone. Unfortunately it was me, I was just unlucky.

Natasha, pictured before the flare-up, has been left upset by her experience and is feeling self-conscious about her skin. She is planning to attend her Christmas party regardless

‘I’ve just finished the antibiotics and started going back to soap and moisturiser. I was really nervous the first time putting moisturiser on again.

‘I’m starting to feel positive about it now, I do understand there are more people worse off in the world than me.’

After emailing The Ordinary they responded offering a £4.25 refund and a product to ‘soothe irritation’ – unimpressed by their offer, Natasha didn’t respond.

She is now urging The Ordinary to update its packaging to include warnings about possible side effects from just one application.

Natasha said: ‘I’m really upset. You put your trust in these brands that are supposed to be reputable companies.

‘You don’t expect that if you follow the instructions this will happen.

‘Now I’ve got to look in the mirror, see the scars and know that it could have been prevented if they’d have just labelled it to highlight the risks.’

DECIEM has been contacted for comment.

“The Burn Means It’s Working!”

We’re here to share what we know — but don’t take it as medical advice. Talk to your medical provider if you have questions.

Go to the usual places to find acne products and you may think you have dozens of options — but not quite. Most products contain the same ingredients: salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide. These two ingredients can help, but they can also easily irritate your skin and make acne worse. Yikes.

Here’s the worst part: some brands even sell entire lines where each product contains salicylic acid or other harsh ingredients. This is serious overkill for your skin! If your skin ever gets red, dry, squeaky/shiny, or your acne gets more inflamed, you may be feeling the burn.

Irritated skin = more acne

When you feel the burn, that means your skin is irritated, and irritated skin is prone to acne. If you spot rough, dull, or dry patches on your face, that’s a good sign your skin is dehydrated from over-cleansing or using harsh soaps, which strip your skin of its natural protective oils and can aggravate acne.

How to stop your skin from burning or irritation

If any of the symptoms have already appeared, the first and most important thing is stop using your skincare products. Send your Curology skincare provider a message to share your experience and get follow-up advice, or try the following tips:

1. Check your products for any irritating ingredients.

We highly recommend reviewing the comedogenicity — potential for blocking pores — of the ingredients in your current skincare products. Use our handy guide to see Curology’s list of common pore-clogging ingredients to get started.

2. Ditch the salicylic acid — especially if you’re using your Curology cream.

If you’ve been feeling the burn, it’s best to give your skin a break so it can recover. And if you’re using a topical treatment like your Curology cream, you may not need salicylic acid anyway!

3. Don’t wash your face more than twice a day.

Cleanse with a truly gentle cleanser made for sensitive skin—like the Curology cleanser, which is made to be safe for sensitive and acne-prone skin. To remove makeup, use a micellar water such as Bioderma Sensibio h3O.

4. Don’t scrub your skin when it’s irritated.

Avoid physical exfoliation and chemical exfoliation until your skin has had enough time to recover. This includes cleansing brushes like the Clarisonic!

5. Ditch the toner.

First off, definitely avoid toners that contain alcohol in the ingredients list! It’s a common culprit in skin irritation. (By the way, we should say that toner isn’t even a necessary step in your everyday skincare routine.) But if you still enjoy toners, try a gentler alternative like Thayers Rose Petal Alcohol-Free Witch Hazel with Aloe Vera.

6.

Beware even “gentle” products.

Yep, you’ve got to do your research. Even with products labeled “soothing” or “for sensitive skin,” it’s a good idea to check the ingredients.

Counterintuitive though it may seem (especially if you’re acne-prone or oily), you really want to go easy on your skin. Give the gentler, less-is-more approach a try for a few months, and you should notice your skin looking much happier and healthier.

As always, if you’re using Curology, you can chat one-on-one with your personal skincare expert to get advice for what products to use (or stop using!) for your particular situation.

• • •

We’re here to tell you what we know. That’s why our information is evidence-based and fact-checked by medical experts. Still, everyone’s skin is unique—the best way to get advice is to talk to your healthcare provider.

Empowering you with knowledge is our top priority. Our reviews of other brands’ products in this post are not paid endorsements—but they do meet our medically fact-checked standards for ingredients (at the time of publication).

Salicylic Acid Topical: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing

Follow all directions on the product package. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Before using this product for the first time, check if you are allergic to it. To check, put a small amount on one or two small areas of acne for three days. If you have an allergic reaction, stop using this product and get medical help right away (see the symptoms of an allergic reaction in the Side Effects section). If you don’t have an allergic reaction, you can use the product.

This medication is for use on the skin only. To avoid irritation, do not let this medication come into contact with your eyes, nose, mouth, groin, or any broken skin (e.g., cuts, scrapes, rashes). If you do get the medication in those areas, flush the area with cool water for 15 minutes.

If you are using a cream, lotion, solution, or gel, apply a thin film of the medication to the areas of your skin affected by acne, usually 1 to 2 times a day or as directed by your doctor. Before applying each dose, gently wash the affected area with a mild cleanser, then pat dry. Apply a small amount of medicine to the affected area and rub in gently. If using the pads, wash the affected skin with a mild cleanser, then pat dry. Wipe the pad gently onto the skin to apply the medication, usually 1 to 3 times a day or as directed by your doctor. Wash hands after use.

If using cleansers containing salicylic acid, wet the affected area. Gently rub the cleanser into the skin for 10 to 20 seconds. Do not scrub the skin. Work into a full lather and rinse thoroughly, and then pat dry. If too much drying occurs, you may need to rinse the cleanser off sooner or use it less often. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for further details.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Do not use large amounts, apply this drug more often, or use it for a longer period than directed. Your condition will not clear faster, but the chance for side effects may be increased.

If your condition persists or worsens, or if you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

Salicylic Acid Topical: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing

Follow all directions on the product package. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

This medication is for use on the skin only. To avoid irritation, do not let this medication come into contact with your eyes, nose, mouth, groin, or any broken skin. If you do get the medication in those areas, flush the area with cool water for 15 minutes. Wash hands after use.

First, soak the corn, callus, or wart in warm water for about 5 minutes to soften the treatment area. Dry thoroughly. Your doctor may direct you to use a pumice stone, callus file, or emery board to carefully remove the top dead layers of skin after soaking and before applying the medication. This dead skin removal is only to help the medication work better. Do not try to rub the wart or callus off.

If you are using a liquid/gel, apply a few drops or a thin coat of the medication to cover the entire wart, callus, or corn using the applicator if provided. Be careful to apply it only to the affected area and not the surrounding skin. Let dry for 5 minutes. Depending on the brand used, you may need to apply the medication twice with each treatment. Check your product package and follow the directions carefully. You may cover the area loosely with a bandage. Repeat this procedure 1 to 2 times daily for up to 2 weeks for corns and calluses and 12 weeks for warts or as directed by your doctor.

If you are using a medicated pad or bandage, you may need to cut the pad so that it covers the treatment area completely but does not touch the surrounding skin. Peel off the protective covering and place the patch/bandage over the area. Leave in place according to package directions. Remove and place a new patch/bandage as directed (usually every 8 to 48 hours depending on brand). Repeat this procedure for up to 2 weeks for corns and calluses and 12 weeks for warts.

Dosage is based on your medical condition, product type/brand, and response to treatment. Do not use large amounts, apply this medication more often, or use it for a longer period than directed. Your condition will not clear faster, but the chance for side effects may be increased.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, use it at the same time each day.

If your condition persists or worsens, or if you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

Salicylic acid burn

After a salicylic acid burn, if cured, will there be no scar or redness for life?

It depends on what kind of burn …

Salicylic acid ointment is an excellent product that can be applied to the entire skin without fear of causing burns.

How long will the redness from the salicylic acid burn on the forehead last?

The skin has an average healing capacity of 21 days, if you use Actovegin ointment or boro plus the process can be accelerated

Skin burn with salicylic acid – apply.To eat the graph with hyaluronic acid, and she herself will take up the business of historiography.

How can salicylic acid burns be lubricated?

Very good and proven means of fat to him.
There is a friend who cured a burn from hydrochloric acid with this drug.
I will send you a photo of the results if you want to know more.

Chemical burn with salicylic acid. MilaMi 03/11/2014, 16 14 04. The acid had to be washed off with a solution of water and soda. Generally it is necessary to see a doctor.

A burn from salicylic acid on the face what can be treated? the red spot remains, the faster you can remove the redness?

At first we do without thinking, and then we think to do it ??? and who gave you this advice? and is replete with all over the Internet!

3 Chemical burns with salicylic acid.Currently, there are a large number of different chemicals around us that we directly use in everyday life.

Salicylic acid burn.

You won’t do anything, the burn will be a week

Salicylic acid burn. Facial burn with salicylic acid. It is accompanied by an itching sensation, severe swelling, and the formation of a pinkish scab.

How can salicylic acid burns be smeared?

SULFURIC ACID!

Salicylic acid burn. Anna 27.02.2016, 12 55 00. I wipe my face with salicylic acid, it removes acne like a hand, the next day the result is already visible.

Nothing, it will come off in an hour

Soda solution-neutralization reaction

Any acid is quenched with alkali, and vice versa, alkali with acid. in your case, even soap is suitable, also alkali

How long will the burn from salicylic acid go through ??? help ..

Try it – Panthenol – foam from burns, regenerates the skin. And for the future, so that salicylic acid does not leave unpleasant memories about yourself, on the skin, use synthomycin liniment on top of it (doctor’s recommendation) And in

Hello, please tell me what to do with a burn from alcoholic salicylic acid 2%.I wanted to cauterize the pimple, but a burn formed, something like a bubble …

This cannot be, because this can never be.

How many times a day should panthenol be used? (burn on the skin from salicylic acid)

Better with methyluracil ointment

Consultation on the topic – Burn of the face with salicylic acid – Hello, three days ago I rubbed my face with 2% salicylic acid, the next morning severe itching began …

How many days later will burn from salicylic acid? ? ?

From 3 days to 1-2 weeks completely, smear a smaller face, no oils, only water, but there are some ointments, read in net

There is an opinion that salicylic acid can cause skin burns.If peeling is carried out with salicylic acid of high concentration, adjacent areas of the skin …

I cauterized the pimple with salicylic acid and now I have a burn.

I smeared acne with salicylic acid now I have burns I think 100% of it how to treat these burns?

Maybe it’s time to see a doctor?

The simultaneous use of effesel and salicylic acid intensifies this side effect, which is why you got such a severe burn.

Anoint with sulfuric acid)

How long does a salicylic acid burn last?

It looks like it is incurable as in the proverb a thief will never become a laundress

Hello, at night I rubbed my face with salicylic acid 2%.In the morning, tell me what actions you can take yet and how long can this kind of burn last?

Like a normal burn, a week, maybe 2
or maybe a scar will remain if it is deep

Does sour cream help with a burn with salicylic acid?

Bredyatina !!

Burn after salicylic peeling. The rules for the treatment of burns after cleansing with salicylic acid are as follows

None. Sour cream. Do you want to apply acidic to damaged skin?

If I had a burn from salicylic acid, then I cured it, everything went away, then there will be no scar and other consequences.

There will be no.

Do nothing, just wait, after a few days it will pass to improve the condition and speed up the ointment with calendula.

Can I lubricate burnt skin with salicylic acid?

Menovazine. It will anesthetize and the kuzh is tanned, it will climb a little less. And it costs a penny.

If after using a product with salicylic acid a burn occurs, then you can use preparations to nourish and moisturize the burned skin.

Will it help with acne if you first sit in potassium permanganate, and then apply salicylic acid to acne?

The burn will turn out.And salicylic from acne does not go in any way

I burned my forehead with salicylic acid, the stain was red, then crust and peeling, chemical burn is a disgusting thing, after it the trace disappears for a long time.

And then you can switch to the face.

If pimples on the butt will help.

Burn with iodine, it helped me, my age was like that)) well, there are all sorts of creams + washing gel and tonic

It is very risky to treat acne like that, you will earn yourself a burn, then there is nothing you can do.Better make a mask from Polisorb, it helped me to cure acne, which I could not cope with for a very long time.

Is it possible to make a compress with salicylic acid?

For what purpose? However, the burn is guaranteed. Salicilka is used for chemical peels.

This page contains the most popular posts and comments of our users on the topic Burns of the face with salicylic acid.

No, the burn will be

Why?

The skin around the eyes is the thinnest and most sensitive, so this pencil can have a bad effect on this area of ​​the face.

Chemical burn with salicylic acid.With acid 2, after that I safely applied Clarence oil to my face and went to bed.

Do you have acne there too?

There were pimples a small rash on the chin, burned with alcohol .. after a couple of hours they became all white … is this normal?

No) you will soon fall into a coma)

6 Video Salicylic acid for acne. Properties of salicylic acid. Caution, do not actively rub the substance into the skin, as you can provoke a chemical burn.

Small, at your age this is normal

Tell me how you can cure, say, a burn from salicylic acid

Question for the female sex !…. Inside

Where is the question?

Chemical burn with salicylic acid. With acid 2, after that I safely applied Clarence oil to my face and went to bed.

Incorrect power supply. The microflora in the intestine is disturbed or dysbiosis.
Eat right – fresh vegetables and fruits, kefir (for eastern microflora). When all the rubbish from the intestines comes out, there will be no acne.
Cookies, flour, beer – Forget it!
Incompatible products: sugar, meat, fish, plums. butter, milk.

Salicylic acid

Redness is already a burn

Salicylic acid is used in the treatment of wounds, burns, oily seborrhea, acne, chronic eczema, psoriasis, dyskeratosis, ichthyosis, warts, calluses.

You had an irritation from mechanical cleaning. Most likely you added more by wiping your face.

Of course you can get burned, it’s an acid solution. You need to take the weakest 1% and wipe a little completely

Chemical burn of the face with salicylic acid – Question to the dermatologist

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Salicylic-zinc paste

Ingredients:

active ingredients: 1 g of paste contains 0.02 g salicylic acid, 0.25 g zinc oxide

potato starch, white soft paraffin.

Dosage form. Paste.

Basic physical and chemical properties: homogeneous mass of white with a yellow tint.

Pharmacological group.

Dermatological agents. Medicines with a softening and protective effect. Medicines containing salicylic acid.

ATX code D02A F.

Pharmacological properties.

Pharmacological. Combined medicinal product for external use, the effect of which is due to the medicinal properties of the constituent parts of the medicinal product.Salicylic acid has anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and mild local irritant effects. Zinc has a weak antimicrobial, astringent, absorbent effect, dries the skin, reduces exudation and helps to reduce local manifestations of inflammation and irritation.

Pharmacokinetics. When applied externally, salicylic-zinc paste is practically not absorbed into the systemic circulation and does not have a resorptive effect.

Clinical characteristics.

Indications.

Skin diseases: dermatitis, diaper rash, pyoderma, rosacea, acne, eczema, ulcers with a predominance of exudation.

Contraindications.

Hypersensitivity to drug components. Acute purulent diseases of the skin and adjacent tissues.

Interaction with other medicinal products and other types of interactions.

When used simultaneously with drugs for external use, new compounds with unpredictable effects can be formed.

Application features.

Avoid contact with eyes and wounds. If the paste accidentally gets into your eyes, rinse them thoroughly with plenty of running water.

It is not recommended to apply the paste to areas of the skin that are very wet, as well as in case of excessive dryness.

Do not use in case of acute purulent processes. Do not apply to mucous membranes.

Application during pregnancy or lactation.

The use of the drug is not recommended for pregnant women and women during lactation.

The ability to influence the reaction rate when driving vehicles or other mechanisms.

Not affected.

Method of administration and dosage.

Applied to adults externally. The paste is applied in the form of applications to the affected areas of the skin 1-2 times a day.

The duration of the course of treatment is determined depending on the nature of the disease and is approximately 6 to 20 days.

Children.

The drug is not used to treat children.

Overdose.

When applied to large areas of the skin for a long time, an increase in the allergic reaction is possible.

In this case, the patient should stop using the drug and consult a doctor.

Adverse reactions.

Allergic reactions are possible, including itching, rash, burning, dryness, peeling of the skin, urticaria, flushing.Allergic reactions to the components of the paste.

Expiry date. 4 years old.

Storage conditions.

Store at a temperature not exceeding 25 ° C.

Keep out of reach of children.

Packing.

25 g in tubes in a pack or without a pack.

Vacation category. Without a prescription.

Manufacturer / applicant.

Ternopharm LLC.

Location of the manufacturer and address of the place of business / location of the applicant.

Ternopharm LLC.

Ukraine, 46010, Ternopil, st. Fabrichnaya, 4.

Date of last revision. 21.06.18

Rilastil ACNESTIL Cream for acne prone skin with salicylic acid, azeloglycine and oligopeptide-10, 50 ml – Planet of Health

Product description

The Rilastil Acnestil line is designed for the treatment of mild to moderate acne and is active against biological causes that cause damage to: overactive sebaceous glands, duct hyperkeratosis, intense pro-inflammatory effect, inflammation phase.Rilastil Acnestil Cream 50 ml is a special cream designed for the treatment of mixed, oily and acne-prone skin. With its keratolytic, sebum normalizing, soothing and mattifying effect, it reduces and prevents blemishes of acne-prone skin. Enriched with panthenol, ceramides and hyaluronic acid with moisturizers and antimicrobial agents such as azeloglycine, sodium salicylate, oligopeptide-10 and niacinamide to help control the growth of microorganisms on the skin.Specifications:
– Free of perfumery and wheat derivatives;
– Hypoallergenic. The product is designed to minimize the risk of allergies;
– Clinically and microbiologically tested;
– Non-comedogenic;
– Recommended for oily to combination skin, especially acne prone skin.

Action

For the treatment of mixed, oily and acne-prone skin.

Recommended use

Apply morning and evening to face and neck after cleansing, with gentle massage movements until completely absorbed by the skin.In case of contact with eyes, rinse thoroughly with water. Keep away from heat and close tightly.

Contraindications

Individual intolerance to the components of the product.

Buy Rilastil ACNESTIL Cream for acne prone skin with salicylic acid, azeloglice and oligopept-10, 50ml in the pharmacy

Price for Rilastil ACNESTIL Cream for acne prone skin with salicylic acid, azeloglice and oligopept-10 9000 for Rilastil ACNESTIL Cream for acne prone skin with salicylic acid, azeloglice and oligopept-10, 50ml

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