About all

Side effects of dimenhydrinate: Dimenhydrinate: MedlinePlus Drug Information

Содержание

Dimenhydrinate oral tablets

What is this medicine?

DIMENHYDRINATE (dye men HYE dri nate) is an antihistamine. It is used to prevent and to treat the nausea, vomiting, or dizziness of motion sickness.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Dramamine, Dramamine Motion Sickness Relief, Driminate, TripTone

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • glaucoma
  • heart disease
  • liver disease
  • lung or breathing disease, like asthma or emphysema
  • pain or trouble passing urine
  • phenylketonuria
  • porphyria
  • prostate trouble
  • seizures
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to dimenhydrinate, diphenhydramine, tartrazine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. To prevent motion sickness start taking this medicine 1/2 to 1 hour before you travel. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 2 years old for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, use only that dose. Do not use double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • alcohol
  • MAOIs like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, and Parnate
  • some medicines for allergies, cold, or cough
  • medicines that make you sleepy

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular check ups. Tell your doctor or health care professional if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse.

Your mouth may get dry. Chewing sugarless gum or sucking hard candy, and drinking plenty of water may help. Contact your doctor if the problem does not go away or is severe.

This medicine may cause dry eyes and blurred vision. If you wear contact lenses you may feel some discomfort. Lubricating drops may help. See your eye doctor if the problem does not go away or is severe.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue
  • changes in vision
  • confused, agitated, or nervous
  • fast, irregular heartbeat
  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls
  • ringing in the ears
  • tremor
  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • constipation or diarrhea
  • dry mouth
  • headache
  • loss of appetite
  • stomach upset, vomiting

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

Side Effects of Dimenhydrinate Use & Abuse

Dimenhydrinate is an over-the-counter medication, commonly known as Dramamine or Gravol, that is used to treat motion sickness and the symptoms associated with it. It can also be used recreationally to have calming effects or induce a high sensation. Due to these desirable effects, dimenhydrinate can become addictive.

Use and abuse of dimenhydrinate can lead to various and sometimes dangerous side effects. It is important to recognize the signs of dimenhydrinate use to prevent addiction.

Symptoms of Dimenhydrinate Abuse

The symptoms of chronic or abusive use of dimenhydrinate are oftentimes difficult to notice because they are very similar to the symptoms of mental health disorders such as depression. A person may be abusing dimenhydrinate if they experience the following physical and psychological symptoms.

Physical Symptoms of Dimenhydrinate Abuse

Some common physical side effects of dimenhydrinate abuse include:

  • Dilated pupils
  • Facial skin flushing
  • Severe drowsiness or sleepiness
  • Trouble breathing, speaking or swallowing
  • Seizures
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Shakiness

Psychological Symptoms of Dimenhydrinate Abuse

Psychological side effects of dimenhydrinate abuse include:

  • Excitability or hyperactive
  • Seeing hallucinations
  • Delirium
  • Feeling confused
  • Becoming violent

Other Side Effects of Dimenhydrinate Use

Even when taken at the recommended dose, dimenhydrinate can have uncomfortable side effects. The side effects of dimenhydrinate (normal use) include:

  • Headache
  • Dizziness that is new or worsening
  • Drowsiness
  • Constipation
  • Blurry vision
  • Dry mouth, nose or throat
  • Ears ringing
  • Problems with coordination
  • Nausea

Severe Side Effects of Dimenhydrinate Use

Severe side effects from dimenhydrinate use include a fast, pounding or irregular heartbeat or allergic reaction. An allergic reaction is usually identified by hives or skin rash, difficulty breathing, or swelling of the face, mouth or throat. If a person experiences either of these severe side effects, they should call their doctor immediately or seek medical help.

Effects of Long-Term Dimenhydrinate Abuse

Dimenhydrinate is an antihistamine, meaning that it blocks histamine receptors in certain nerves. It works to prevent nausea and dizziness because it binds to histamine receptors on nerves in the inner ear which regulate balance and response to sudden movements. Long-term use of dimenhydrinate, and therefore long-term blocking of histamine binding to its receptors, can lead to damage of these nerves.

A person may become tolerant of dimenhydrinate when they use is over a long time, making the desired high associated with dimenhydrinate use harder to achieve. This effect may cause individuals who use dimenhydrinate recreationally to take higher doses. This use is dangerous and may lead to overdose, which can be fatal.

Signs of Dimenhydrinate Overdose Include:

  • Disorganized thinking or speech
  • Hallucinations
  • Paranoia
  • Irrational behavior
  • Amnesia
  • Delirium

People who use dimenhydrinate regularly and for long periods may experience withdrawal symptoms if use is stopped, including:

  • Depression
  • Feeling sleepy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Being forgetful
  • Easily agitated
  • Increased clumsiness
  • Nausea
  • Hostility

Signs of Dimenhydrinate Addiction

If a person is using dimenhydrinate recreationally or chronically and begins to crave it between uses, or does not feel normal unless they are using it, these may be signs of addiction.

Other signs of dimenhydrinate addiction include:

  • Sleeping more than usual (associated with the sedative effect)
  • Antisocial behavior (including withdrawing from friends)
  • Paranoia (due to the hallucinations associated with use)
  • Being overly secretive or trying to hide use
  • Finding packages in the trash

Persons with mental health conditions such as anxiety, schizophrenia or depression, or substance use disorders are more likely to use dimenhydrinate repetitively. A person struggling with addiction to other substances will also be more likely to abuse dimenhydrinate. Because dimenhydrinate is an easily accessible over-the-counter drug, it is important to watch for signs of abuse in teens.

Dimenhydrinate Addiction Intervention

As with any substance use disorder, addiction to dimenhydrinate is dangerous and should be taken seriously. Individuals actively using dimenhydrinate for effects other than its intended use should seek help.

If an overdose of dimenhydrinate is suspected, it is important to get help immediately.

If you or a loved one are struggling with a substance use disorder, The Recovery Village can help. To learn more about our comprehensive treatment plans, contact us to speak with a representative.

  • Sources

    Craig, D.F.; Mellor, C.S. “Dimenhydrinate dependence and withdrawal.” Canadian Medical Association Journal, May, 1990. Accessed June 14, 2019.

    Halpert, A.G.; Olmstead, M.C.; Beninger, R.J. “Mechanisms and abuse liability of the anti-histamine dimenhydrinate” Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, January, 2002. Accessed June 12, 2019

    MedlinePlus. “Dimenhydrinate.” July 15, 2018. Accessed June 12, 2019

    Winn, R.E.; McDonnell, K.P. “Fatality secondary to massive overdose of dimenhydrinate.” Annals of Emergency Medicine, September, 1993. Accessed June 12, 2019

    Young, G.B.; Boyd, D.; Kreeft, J. “Dimenhydrinate: evidence for dependence and tolerance. ” Canadian Medical Association Journal, March 1988. Accessed June 14, 2019.

Medical Disclaimer: The Recovery Village aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.

Dimenhydrinate – Oral | HealthLink BC

Pronunciation: DYE-men-HYE-dri-nate

Common Brand Name(s): Gravol

Important: How To Use This Information

This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

Uses

Dimenhydrinate is an antihistamine used to prevent and treat nausea, vomiting, and dizziness caused by motion sickness.

Do not use this medication in children younger than two years unless directed by the doctor.

Other Uses

This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.

This drug may also be used for nausea and dizziness caused by inner ear problems (such as Meniere’s disease).

How To Use

Follow all directions on the product package. If your doctor has prescribed this medication, take it as directed. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth with or without food. Measure liquid forms of this medication using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose. The chewable tablets should be chewed thoroughly before being swallowed.

The dosage is based on your age, medical condition, and response to treatment. Do not increase your dose or take this medication more often than directed.

To prevent motion sickness, take the first dose 30 to 60 minutes before starting activity such as travel.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

Side Effects

Drowsiness, constipation, blurred vision, or dry mouth/nose/throat may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

To relieve dry mouth, suck (sugarless) hard candy or ice chips, chew (sugarless) gum, drink water, or use a saliva substitute.

If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, remember that he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including:

  • mental/mood changes (such as restlessness, confusion)
  • fast/irregular heartbeat
  • shaking (tremor)
  • difficulty urinating

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including:

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including:

  • rash
  • itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat)
  • severe dizziness
  • trouble breathing

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US –

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before taking dimenhydrinate, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to diphenhydramine; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of:

  • breathing problems (such as asthma, emphysema)
  • high pressure in the eye (glaucoma)
  • heart problems
  • high blood pressure
  • liver disease
  • seizures
  • stomach/intestine problems (such as ulcers, blockage)
  • overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism)
  • difficulty urinating (for example, due to enlarged prostate)

This drug may make you drowsy or blur your vision. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more drowsy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness or clear vision until you can do it safely. Avoid alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Liquid products or chewable tablets may contain sugar and/or aspartame. Caution is advised if you have diabetes, phenylketonuria (PKU), or any other condition that requires you to limit/avoid these substances in your diet. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about using this product safely.

Children may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug. This drug can often cause excitement in young children instead of drowsiness.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially drowsiness, confusion, constipation, or trouble urinating. Drowsiness and confusion can increase the risk of falling.

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

This drug passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Drug Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include:

  • antihistamines applied to the skin (such as diphenhydramine cream, ointment, spray)

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products that cause drowsiness such as opioid pain or cough relievers (such as codeine, hydrocodone), alcohol, marijuana (cannabis), drugs for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, lorazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants (such as carisoprodol, cyclobenzaprine), or other antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine).

Check the labels on all your medicines (such as allergy or cough-and-cold products) because they may contain ingredients that cause drowsiness. Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely.

This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including allergy skin test), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: severe drowsiness, seizures, widened pupils. In children, mental/mood changes (such as restlessness, irritability, hallucinations) may occur before drowsiness.

Notes

Keep all regular medical and laboratory appointments.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of your next dose, skip the missed dose. Take your next dose at the regular time. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from moisture and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Do not freeze liquid forms of this medication. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

Dimenhydrinate – Injection | HealthLink BC

Pronunciation: DYE-men-HYE-dri-nate

Common Brand Name(s): Gravol

Important: How To Use This Information

This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

Uses

Dimenhydrinate is an antihistamine used to prevent and treat nausea, vomiting and dizziness caused by motion sickness when medication cannot be given by mouth.

Dimenhydrinate injection should not be used in newborns because of an increased risk of side effects.

Other Uses

This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.

This drug may also be used for symptoms of other motion and balance problems such as feelings of dizziness/spinning (vertigo) and inner ear problems (such as Meniere’s disease). It may also be used for nausea and vomiting due to surgery, radiation sickness, side effects of drug treatment, and other causes.

How To Use

This medication is injected into a vein (IV), or it can be injected into a muscle by a health care professional, as directed by your doctor. Your dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

Side Effects

Drowsiness, constipation, blurred vision, or dry mouth/nose/throat may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

To relieve dry mouth, suck on (sugarless) hard candy or ice chips, chew (sugarless) gum, drink water or use a saliva substitute.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including:

  • mental/mood changes (such as restlessness, confusion)
  • fast/irregular heartbeat
  • shaking (tremor)
  • difficulty urinating

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including:

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including:

  • rash
  • itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat)
  • severe dizziness
  • trouble breathing

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US –

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www. fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before using dimenhydrinate, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to diphenhydramine; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of:

  • breathing problems (such as asthma, emphysema)
  • glaucoma
  • stomach problems (such as ulcers, obstruction)
  • difficulty urinating (for example, due to an enlarged prostate gland)
  • heart disease
  • high blood pressure
  • liver disease
  • seizures
  • overactive thyroid

This drug may make you drowsy or blur your vision. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more drowsy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness or clear vision until you can do it safely. Avoid alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Children may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug. This drug can often cause excitement in young children instead of drowsiness.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially drowsiness, confusion, constipation, or trouble urinating. Drowsiness and confusion can increase the risk of falling.

This drug should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using this medication.

This drug passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Drug Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include:

  • antihistamines applied to the skin (such as diphenhydramine cream, ointment, spray)

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products that cause drowsiness such as opioid pain or cough relievers (such as codeine, hydrocodone), alcohol, marijuana (cannabis), drugs for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, lorazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants (such as carisoprodol, cyclobenzaprine), or other antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine).

Check the labels on all your medicines (such as allergy or cough-and-cold products) because they may contain ingredients that cause drowsiness. Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely.

This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including allergy skin test), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: severe drowsiness, seizures, widened pupils. In children, mental/mood changes (such as restlessness, irritability, hallucinations) may occur before drowsiness.

Notes

Do not share this product with others.

Missed Dose

For the best possible benefit, it is important to receive each scheduled dose of this medication as directed. If you miss a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist right away to establish a new dosing schedule.

Storage

Not applicable. This medication is given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.

Dimenhydrinate – LiverTox – NCBI Bookshelf

Last Update: January 16, 2017.

OVERVIEW

Introduction

Dimenhydrinate is a first generation antihistamine that is used for treatment or prevention of motion sickness or symptoms of nausea and dizziness. Dimenhydrinate has not been linked to instances of clinically apparent acute liver injury.

Background

Dimenhydrinate (dye” men hye’ dri nate) is the 8-chlorotheophylline salt of diphenhydramine and, thus, combines a first generation antihistamine with a xanthine that is added to counteract the drowsiness caused by diphenhydramine. This combination was approved as an over-the-counter agent in 2004 and is used largely for prevention of motion sickness and nausea. Dimenhydrinate is available in multiple generic forms as tablets 25 or 50 mg or oral solutions, most of which are available without prescription, a common brand name being Dramamine. A liquid formulation for intramuscular use is also available. The typical adult oral dose is 50 mg taken an hour before expected travel and up to three or four times daily. Common side effects include sedation, impairment of motor function, confusion, dizziness, blurred vision, dry mouth and throat, palpitations, tachycardia, abdominal distress, constipation and headache. Antihistamines can worsen urinary retention and glaucoma.

Hepatotoxicity

Despite widespread use, dimenhydrinate has not been linked to liver test abnormalities or to clinically apparent liver injury. The reason for its safety may relate to its limited duration of use.

Likelihood score: E (unlikely to be a cause of clinically apparent liver injury).

References on the safety and potential hepatotoxicity of antihistamines are given together after the Overview section on Antihistamines.

Drug Class: Antihistamines

PRODUCT INFORMATION

REPRESENTATIVE TRADE NAMES

Dimenhydrinate – Generic, Dramamine®

DRUG CLASS

Antihistamines

COMPLETE LABELING

Product labeling at DailyMed, National Library of Medicine, NIH

CHEMICAL FORMULA AND STRUCTURE

View in own window

DRUG CAS REGISTRY NUMBER MOLECULAR FORMULA STRUCTURE
Dimenhydrinate 523-87-5 C17-h31-N-O.C7-H7-Cl-N4-O2 Gravol – Uses, Side Effects, Interactions

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Dimenhydrinate belongs to a group of medications called antiemetics. This medication is used to prevent and treat motion sickness as well as nausea and vomiting associated with various conditions such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. It is also used to treat nausea and spinning sensations (vertigo) due to Ménière’s disease and other conditions that cause these symptoms.

Dimenhydrinate works to relieve or prevent nausea and vomiting by affecting the vomiting centre in the brain. Most people can expect some relief of nausea and vomiting within one hour of taking any form of dimenhydrinate. It works to relieve vertigo by affecting the brain and the inner ear.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are using this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

IM Injection
Each mL contains dimenhydrinate 50 mg. This dosage form is for IM use only, unless diluted at least 1:10 with a compatible physiological solution; i. e., sterile saline or 5% dextrose in water. Nonmedicinal ingredients: methylparaben (multidose vials only), propylene glycol, and propylparaben (multidose vials only). This medication does not contain tartrazine.

100 mg Adult Suppositories
Each white, opaque suppository contains dimenhydrinate 100 mg adult. Nonmedicinal ingredients: polyethylene glycol, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide. This medication does not contain gluten or tartrazine.

Easy-to-Swallow Filmkote tablets
Each round, biconvex, peach coral tablet, intagliated “GRAVOL” on one side and quadrisected on the other, contains dimenhydrinate 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: alumina, cellulose, FD&C Yellow No. 6, lactose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycol, silicon dioxide, starch (corn), talc, and titanium dioxide. This medication does not contain gluten or tartrazine.

Liquid
Each 5 mL of yellow, transparent, viscous liquid with a bittersweet mixed fruit flavour, contains dimenhydrinate 15 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: citric acid, D&C Yellow No. 10, FD&C Yellow No. 6, flavour, propylene glycol, sodium benzoate, sorbitol, and sucrose.

Children’s Suppositories
Each white, opaque suppository contains dimenhydrinate 25 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: polyethylene glycol, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide. This medication does not contain gluten or tartrazine.

Children’s Chewable Tablet
Each round, flat, light purple, cherry-flavored tablet with bevelled edge intagliated GRAVOL 15 on one side, plain on the other side, contains dimenhydrinate 15 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: alumina, aspartame, cellulose, citric acid, FD&C Red No. 40, flavors, magnesium stearate, methacrylic acid copolymer, monoglycerides, polyethylene glycol, sorbitol and starch (corn). Gluten- and tartrazine-free.

Chewable Tablets for Adults
Each round, flat, light pink, orange-flavoured, bevelled-edged tablet, intagliated with “GRAVOL 50” on one side and bisected on the other side, contains dimenhydrinate 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: alumina, aspartame, cellulose, citric acid, FD&C Yellow No. 6, flavours, magnesium stearate, methacrylic acid copolymer, monoglycerides, polyethylene glycol, sorbitol, and starch (corn). This medication does not contain gluten or tartrazine.

Softgel Capsules
Each pink, translucent, softgel capsule, printed in white “Gravol”, contains dimenhydrinate 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: D&C Red No. 33, gelatin, glycerin, mannitol, methylparaben, polyethylene glycol, povidone, propylparaben, sorbitol, and water.

L/A Caplets 100 mg
Each red-white, bilayer, film-coated caplet, intagliated “GRAVOL” on one side, contains dimenhydrinate 25 mg for immediate release and dimenhydrinate 75 mg for sustained release. Nonmedicinal ingredients: butyl hydroxytoluene, calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, FD&C Red No. 40, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, polyethylene oxide, and starch.

How should I use this medication?

Motion sickness, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and spinning sensation (vertigo): The usual adult dose of the tablets is 50 mg to 100 mg taken every 4 hours as needed. Do not take more than 400 mg in a 24-hour period. The dose of the long-acting form of dimenhydrinate tablets is 100 mg every 8 to 12 hours, with a maximum of 3 tablets in a 24-hour period. The usual adult dose of dimenhydrinate suppository is 50 mg to 100 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed.

If you are taking dimenhydrinate for motion sickness, the first dose should be taken at least 30 minutes and preferably 1 to 2 hours before departure.

Pre-radiation therapy (radiation sickness): In adults, 50 mg to 100 mg of dimenhydrinate may be given as a suppository or injection, 30 to 60 minutes before receiving radiation therapy. This dose may be repeated as needed up to a maximum of 400 mg over a 24-hour period.

Surgery: To control nausea and vomiting following surgery in adults, the usual dose is 50 mg to 100 mg taken by mouth or 50 mg of injection into a muscle before surgery. After surgery, similar doses can be used up to a maximum dose of 400 mg in a 24-hour period.

Children:  Follow the dosing instructions provided to you by your doctor or pharmacist or the ones provided with the product being used. This medication should not be used for children or infants under one year old.

For children 2 to 6 years old, the dose of dimenhydrinate liquid or tablets is 15 mg to 25 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed to a maximum of 75 mg in a 24-hour period. For the suppositories, the dose in this age group is 12.5 mg to 25 mg. Do not give more than one dose of the suppository form unless recommended by your doctor.

For children 6 to 8 years old, the dose of dimenhydrinate liquid or tablets is 25 mg to 50 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed to a maximum of 150 mg in a 24-hour period. For the suppositories, the dose in this age group is 12.5 mg to 25 mg every 8 to 12 hours as needed.

For children 8 to 12 years old, the dose of dimenhydrinate liquid or tablets is 25 mg to 50 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed to a maximum of 150 mg in a 24-hour period. For the suppositories, the dose in this age group is 25 mg to 50 mg every 8 to 12 hours as needed.

For children 12 years of age and older, the dose of dimenhydrinate liquid or tablets is 50 mg every 4 to 6 hours as needed to a maximum of  300 mg in a 24-hours period. For the suppositories, the dose in this age group is 50 mg every 8 to 12 hours as needed.

Chewable tablets and liquid are available for children or adults who are unable to swallow the tablets. When using the liquid, use an oral syringe to measure each dose of the liquid as it gives a more accurate measurement than household teaspoons.

Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are using the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to use this medication exactly as recommended by your doctor or pharmacist.

Store this medication at room temperature and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not use this medication if you:

  • are allergic to dimenhydrinate or any ingredients of the medication
  • have chronic lung diseases such as chronic bronchitis or emphysema
  • have difficulty passing urine due to an enlarged prostate (prostatic hypertrophy)
  • have glaucoma

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is used in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who uses this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people using this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • constipation
  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • dry mouth
  • excitement (especially in children)
  • lack of energy

Although most of the side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • blurred vision or any change in vision
  • confusion
  • difficulty passing urine

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • rapid, shallow breathing
  • seizure
  • symptoms of a severe allergic reaction (e. g., difficulty breathing; hives; swelling of the face, mouth, tongue, or throat)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Alcohol: Alcohol may add to the side effects of dimenhydrinate (e.g., drowsiness) and should be avoided when using this medication.

Drowsiness: This medication can cause drowsiness, affecting your ability to drive or operate machinery. Avoid these and other hazardous tasks until you know how dimenhydrinate affects you.

Glaucoma: This medication may cause the symptoms of glaucoma (increased pressure in the eye) to become worse. If you have glaucoma, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. Report any changes in vision to your doctor as soon as possible while you are taking this medication.

Prostate Problems: This medication may cause the symptoms of an enlarged prostate to become worse. If you have an enlarged prostate, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: This medication passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking dimenhydrinate, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: The safety and effectiveness of using this medication have not been established for children under one year of age. Caregivers of children between 1 and 2 years old should contact their child’s doctor before giving dimenhydrinate.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

There may be an interaction between dimenhydrinate and any of the following:

  • aclidinium
  • alcohol
  • amphetamines (e.g., dextroamphetamine, lisdexamphetamine)
  • antihistamines (e.g., cetirizine, doxylamine, diphenhydramine, hydroxyzine, loratadine)
  • antipsychotics (e.g., chlorpromazine, clozapine, haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone)
  • aripiprazole
  • atropine
  • azelastine
  • barbiturates (e. g., phenobarbital, butalbital)
  • belladonna
  • benzodiazepines (e.g., diazepam, lorazepam, oxazepam)
  • benztropine
  • buprenorphine
  • buspirone
  • chloral hydrate
  • disopyramide
  • donepezil
  • dronabinol
  • droperidol
  • efavirenz
  • flavoxate
  • galantamine
  • general anesthetics (medications used to put people to sleep before surgery)
  • glucagon
  • glycopyrrolate
  • hyaluronidase
  • ipratropium
  • kava kava
  • ketotifen
  • methotrimeprazine
  • magnesium sulfate
  • metyrosine
  • mirabegron
  • mirtazapine
  • muscle relaxants (e.g., baclofen, cyclobenzaprine, methocarbamol, orphenadrine)
  • nabilone
  • narcotic pain relievers (e.g., codeine, fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone)
  • olopatadine
  • oxybutynin
  • perampanel
  • potassium chloride
  • pramipexole
  • rivastigmine
  • ropinirole
  • rufinamide
  • scopolamine
  • secretin
  • seizure medications (e. g., clobazam, ethosuximide, felbamate, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, topiramate, valproic acid, zonisamide)
  • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; e.g., citalopram, duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline)
  • tapentadol
  • thalidomide
  • thiazide diuretics (water pills; e.g., hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, metolazone)
  • tiotropium
  • tolterodine
  • tramadol
  • tranylcypromine
  • tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline, imipramine)
  • umeclidinium
  • zolpidem
  • zopiclone

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Gravol

Dimenhydrinate – an overview | ScienceDirect Topics

Theophylline

[SED-15, 3361; SEDA-32, 15]

Nervous system A 55-year-old man developed status epilepticus, caused by theophylline intoxication, followed by an amnesic syndrome [71A]. He had severely impaired bilateral temporal functions on neuropsychological testing and imaging studies showed corresponded bilateral hippocampal damage progressing to atrophy. His memory deficits persisted.

Immunologic Dimenhydrinate consists of two drugs: diphenhydramine, an ethanolamine antihistamine, and 8-chlorotheophylline, a xanthine derivative that reduces the sedating properties of diphenhydramine.

A 27-year-old woman had an anaphylactic reaction 10 minutes after taking dimenhydrinate 50 mg A pruritic rash on the palms, which rapidly spread to the soles and the flexural surfaces of the elbows, was followed after 30 minutes by vomiting, diarrhea, and pain in the lower abdomen [72A]. The symptoms resolved spontaneously within an hour. She had often taken dimenhydrinate in the past without any reactions. Skin prick tests with dimenhydrinate were positive, the intensity of the reaction increasing with concentration; they were negative with diphenhydramine, dimetindene, cetirizine and levocetirizine, and desloratadine. Anhydrous theophylline, choline theophyllinate, and aminophylline all gave positive results.

Drug administration route In a healthy 64-year-old man, an intrathecal injection of theophylline, in mistake for bupivacaine, caused tetanic muscle spasms in the calves and leg cramps [73A]. General anesthesia proceeded without complications, but he later developed weakness in the legs, which may or may not have been related to the injection of theophylline.

Drug–drug interactions Ciprofloxacin The risk of theophylline toxicity following the use of ciprofloxacin has been examined in a nested case-control study of 77 251 individuals aged more than 65 years who were taking theophylline, of whom 14 746 also received ciprofloxacin [74C]. Each of 180 patients who were hospitalized with theophylline toxicity was compared with 50 age- and sex-matched controls. Those who had theophylline toxicity were significantly more likely to have used ciprofloxacin in the 14 days preceding admission than not (adjusted OR = 1.86; 95% CI = 1.18, 2.93). In contrast, there was no such association with a combination of other antibiotics (levofloxacin, co-trimoxazole, cefuroxime; adjusted OR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.38, 1.62). Ciprofloxacin exposure is therefore associated with a significantly increased risk of theophylline toxicity, presumably through inhibition of CYP1A2.

Roflumilast In an open, two-period, crossover study theophylline 375 mg bd had no significant effect on either roflumilast 500 micrograms/day or its active metabolite, roflumilast-N-oxide, apart from a clinically unimportant 28% increase in roflumilast AUC [75c].

Tacrolimus In a 38-year-old man who was taking tacrolimus 10 mg/day, mycophenolic acid 1500 mg/day, and prednisone 10 mg/day after renal transplantation, the blood tacrolimus concentration was 5.5–7.0 μg/l [76A]. When theophylline 300 mg/day was added, the blood tacrolimus concentration rose to 21 μg/l and renal function deteriorated. The dose of tacrolimus was reduced to 8 mg/day, but the blood concentration rose further to 25 μg/l. When the tacrolimus dosage was reduced to 2 mg/day the blood tacrolimus concentration fell to 9 μg/l and renal function normalized.

Active substance DIMENHYDRINATUM | Directory of medicines Compendium

USPDDN, RTECS: 8-Chloroteophylline, compound with 2- (diphenylmethoxy) – N , N -dimethylethylamine (1: 1).
RTECS: 2- (benzhydryloxy) – N, N -dimethylethylamine compound with 8-chlorotheophylline; or benzhydryl- β -dimethylaminoethylether 8-chloroteophylline.
HSDB: 2- (diphenylmethoxy) – N, N -dimethylethylamine 8-chloroteophyllinate; or 2- (benzhydryloxy) – N, N -dimethylethylamine 8-chloroteophyllinate.
NLM: o-benzhydryl (dimethylamino) ethanol) 8-chloroteophyllinate.

M m = 469.98 Yes. Melting point – 204.5 ° C; log P (octanol-water) = –0.39; solubility in water – 3000 mg / l at a temperature of 25 ° C.

Release form: tablets.

Medicinal preparations containing the active substance DIMENHYDRINATE

drugs used for vestibular disorders

drugs used for vestibular disorders

anticholinergic, antiemetic, antihistamine, used for vertigo.Dimenhydrinate is a complex compound: the chlorotheophylline salt of the known antihistamine diphenhydramine and contains about 55% diphenhydramine and 45% 8-chlortheophylline. The pharmacological activity of dimensionhydrinate is due to diphenhydramine, which has a deprimating effect on the central nervous system, has anticholinergic, antiemetic, antihistamine and local anesthetic activity.

It is assumed that the mechanism of action of dimensionhydrinate in dizziness and motion sickness is due to the suppression of stimulation of the vestibular apparatus due to anticholinergic action.Dimenhydrinate inhibits labyrinth stimulation for 3 hours after administration.

The exact mechanisms of antiemetic action have not been established. Dimenhydrinate suppresses the gag reflex when apomorphine is administered, but is ineffective in vomiting induced by emetogenic chemotherapy. With prolonged use, the antiemetic activity of dimensionhydrinate may decrease.

Due to the central M-anticholinergic action, dimensionhydrinate can have a significant sedative effect. The deprimatory effect on the central nervous system develops after a few days of using dimensionhydrinate.

After oral administration, it is well absorbed in the digestive tract. The antiemetic effect develops within 15-30 minutes after administration, 20-30 minutes after intramuscular administration and immediately after intravenous administration. Duration of action – 3-6 hours. It is widely distributed in the body, including the central nervous system. The degree of binding to plasma proteins is 78%. There are no data on the metabolism of dimensionhydrinate. The active component of dimensionhydrinate, diphenhydramine, is metabolized in the liver and excreted mainly in the form of metabolites within 24 hours.The minimum amount of unchanged substance is excreted in the urine. T ½ diphenhydramine – 3.5 hours

prevention or elimination of nausea, vomiting, dizziness or vertigo associated with motion sickness (airborne, motion sickness), indomitable vomiting of pregnant women.

inside, regardless of food intake.

To prevent nausea / vomiting with motion sickness (airborne, motion sickness), adults are prescribed 50 mg 30-60 minutes before the start of the trip, then 50-100 mg every 4-6 hours as needed, but not more than 400 mg / day.Adults with vertigo (including Meniere’s syndrome), nausea / vomiting, indomitable vomiting of pregnant women – 50-100 mg every 4-6 hours if necessary, not exceeding the maximum daily dose of 400 mg. Elderly patients are prescribed at a lower initial dose.

Children aged 6-12 years – 25-50 mg every 6-8 hours as needed, but not more than 150 mg / day; children aged 2-5 years – 12.5-25 mg every 6-8 hours as needed, not exceeding a daily dose of 75 mg. Efficacy and safety in neonates and infants have not been established.

For patients with severe hepatic impairment, the dose should be reduced. With renal failure, dose reduction is not required.

absolute – hypersensitivity to dimensionhydrinate, dimensionhydramine and 8-chloroteophylline, infancy. Relative – BA, COPD, pulmonary emphysema, bronchitis, arrhythmias, constipation, ileus, pyloric stenosis and other gastrointestinal obstruction, severe liver disease, angle-closure glaucoma, wearing contact lenses, breastfeeding, traumatic brain injury, prostatic hypertrophy, obstruction of the urinary tract, urinary retention, depression (may worsen the clinical picture of the disease or have other negative effects).

general malaise, dyspepsia, anorexia, diarrhea, constipation, arterial hypotension, palpitations, sinus tachycardia, dizziness, ataxia, drowsiness, insomnia, increased excitability, headache, tinnitus, blurred vision, hallucinations, delirium, pore hemolytic dysuria, urinary retention, photosensitivity, purpura, bullous rash, urticaria.

can cause drowsiness, therefore, when taking dimensionhydrinate, you should not do potentially hazardous work that requires increased attention and a quick reaction.

Alcohol should be avoided during treatment with dimensionhydrinate.

Dimenhydrinate can mask the clinical picture of acute appendicitis, and also cause a pseudo-increase in the level of theophylline in the blood when it is determined by the immunological method.

should not be used concurrently with other H 1 -receptor blockers, benzatropine, MAO inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, phenothiazines, barbiturates, anxiolytics, antipsychotic, sedative and hypnotics, opioid receptor agonists.

instructions, use, analogues of the drug, composition, indications, contraindications, side effects in the reference book of medicines from UNIAN

Application of Dimenhydrinate

Dimenhydrinate – composition and release form of the drug

Dimenhydrinate: how to take the drug

Dimenhydrinate – contraindications, side effects

Analogs Dimenhydrinat

Dimenhydrinate is a remedy for motion sickness and nausea.

Application Dimenhydrinate

  • Prevention and elimination of nausea and vomiting due to manifestations of sea and air sickness, when using radiation therapy, drugs (except for drugs used for chemotherapy for cancer and after surgery.
  • Symptomatic treatment of Meniere’s disease and other disorders of the vestibular apparatus.

Dimenhydrinate

– composition and form of preparation

Composition .

Active ingredient : Dimenhydrinate;

1 tablet contains 50 mg of dimensionhydrinate;

Excipients : microcrystalline cellulose, croscarmellose sodium, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, sunset yellow dye FCF (E 110).

Dosage form . Pills.

Dimenhydrinate

: How to take the drug

Take orally, with or without food. The tablet can be taken with a little water.

Prevention and elimination of nausea and vomiting due to manifestations of sea and air sickness, when using radiation therapy, drugs and after surgery

For the prevention of sea and air sickness, the recommended dose should be taken at least half an hour before boarding a vehicle ( plane or ship).

Adults and children over 12 years of age:

The recommended dose is 50 mg (1 tablet) 30-60 minutes before the start of the trip, the reception can be repeated if necessary, 50-100 mg every 4-6 hours.

The maximum daily dose should not exceed 400 mg.

Children aged 6-12 years:

The recommended dose is 25-50 mg (1 / 2-1 tablet), the dose can be repeated if necessary every 6-8 hours. The maximum daily dose should not exceed 150 mg.

Children aged 2-6 years:

The recommended dose is 25 mg (1/2 tablet), the dose can be repeated if necessary every 6-8 hours. The maximum daily dose should not exceed 75 mg.

The maximum daily dose in pediatric practice should not exceed 5 mg / kg.

Elderly patients should use an initial dose of 25 mg (1/2 tablet).

For Meniere’s disease and other disorders of the vestibular apparatus

Large: 50-100 mg (1-2 tablets) every 4-6 hours if necessary, not exceeding the maximum daily dose of 400 mg.

Use with caution in patients with renal and / or hepatic impairment.

In case of liver failure, the dose should be reduced by 2 times.

For renal insufficiency, the usual dose.

Children

The efficacy and safety of using the drug in children under 2 years of age have not been established. The drug can be used by children aged 2 years and older.

Dimenhydrinate – contraindications, side effects

Contraindication.

Hypersensitivity to dimensionhydrinate and other antihistamines of a similar structure or to any of the excipients that make up the product.

Vuzkokutov glaucoma, increased intracranial pressure, pheochromocytoma, porphyria, prostatic hyperplasia with urinary retention, epilepsy, eclampsia, acute asthma attack, severe liver failure, severe renal failure (creatinine clearance ≤ 25 mmol / min).

Adverse reactions.

From the nervous system: dizziness, headache, drowsiness, agitation, insomnia, depression, fatigue, increased reaction time, muscle weakness, impaired coordination of movements, tremor, anxiety, impaired concentration.

On the part of the zor organs in : visual impairment, increased intraocular pressure, possibly blurred vision, diplopia.

On the part of the hearing organs : tinnitus.

From the side of the cardiovascular system : tachycardia, arrhythmia, angina attacks, arterial hypotension.

From the gastrointestinal tract : stomach pain, diarrhea, constipation, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, increased or decreased appetite, weight gain.

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders : allergic reactions, photosensitivity, exfoliative dermatitis, rashes, urticaria.

From the lymphatic and hematopoietic systems : hemolytic anemia.

From the immune system : angioedema.

From the urinary system : urinary disorders, difficulty urinating.

From the hepatobiliary system : impaired liver function, cholestatic jaundice.

Others : arthralgia, decreased sweating, dry mucous membranes.

Long-term use of dimensionhydrinate can lead to drug dependence.

Analogs Dimenhydrinate

Avertid

Arlevert

Be-steedi

Betagistin

Betaserc

Vazoserk

Vergostin

Vestibo

Westinormyrzin

Vestibo

Westinormogerin

Source: State Register of Medicines of Ukraine. The instructions are published with abbreviations for information only.Before use, consult your doctor and read the instructions carefully. Self-medication can be harmful to your health.

DIMENHYDRINATE is … What is DIMENHYDRINATE?

DIMENHYDRINATE
DIMENHYDRINATE (Dimenhydrinatum) *. 8-Chloroteophyllinate b-dimethylamino-ethyl ether of benzhydrol (diphenhydramine). Synonyms: Daedalon, Daedalon, Adrasine, Anausin, Anautin, Andramine, Antemin, Antivomit, Aviomarin, Chloranautine, Daldalon, Diphenhydramintheoclat, Dramamin, Dramyl, Emedyl, Marevit, Menhydrinate, Nausera, Permitan, Teminin, Travelinate, Nausera, Permital, Teminin,Available in tablets of 0.05 g (50 mg) in a package of 10 pieces. It is used to prevent and stop the manifestations of sea and air sickness, with nausea and vomiting of various origins, with Meniere’s disease, etc. Assign inside (before meals), depending on the patient’s condition, 0.05 – O, 1 g (1 – 2 tablets) 4 – 6 times a day. For the prevention of air sickness and seasickness, 1 – 2 tablets are prescribed half an hour before boarding an airplane or ship. Possible side effects: dry mouth, drowsiness, impaired accommodation.These phenomena are eliminated by decreasing the dose. Storage: List B.

Dictionary of Medicines.
2005.

  • Dimexidum
  • Dimenhydrinatum

See what “DIMENHYDRINATE” is in other dictionaries:

  • Dimenhydrinate – (Dimenhydrinate) Chemical compound IUPAC … Wikipedia

  • Dedalon – Dimenhydrinate Chemical compound IUPAC 2 benzhydryloxy N, N dimethyl ethanamine; 8 chloro 1,3 dimethyl 7H ​​purine 2,6 dione Gross formula … Wikipedia

  • Dramina – Dimenhydrinate Chemical compound IUPAC 2 benzhydryloxy N, N dimethyl ethanamine; 8 chloro 1,3 dimethyl 7H ​​purine 2,6 dione Gross formula … Wikipedia

  • Dadalon – Dimenhydrinate Chemical compound IUPAC 2 benzhydryloxy N, N dimethyl ethanamine; 8 chloro 1,3 dimethyl 7H ​​purine 2,6 dione Gross formula … Wikipedia

  • Dimenhydrinatum – DIMENHYDRINATE (Dimenhydrinatum) *.8 Chloroteophyllinate b dimethylamino ethyl ether of benzhydrol (diphenhydramine). Synonyms: Daedalon, Daedalon, Adrasine, Anausin, Anautin, Andramine, Antemin, Antivomit, Aviomarin, Chloranautine, Daldalon, … … Dictionary of Medicines

  • Anti-emetic drugs – medicines used to prevent and eliminate nausea and vomiting. Among P. s. distinguish between drugs of central, peripheral and mixed action. P. s. central actions have a direct depressing effect on … … Medical Encyclopedia

  • Synkapton – Latin name Synkapton ATX: ›› N02CA72 Ergotamine in combination with psycholeptics Pharmacological group: Alpha adrenomimetics Nosological classification (ICD 10) ›› G43 Migraine Composition and form of release Film-coated tablets1 … … Glossary of medicines

  • Ciel – Active ingredient ›› Dimenhydrinate * (Dimenhydrinate *) Latin name Siel ATX: ›› R06AX Antihistamines for systemic use other Pharmacological groups: Antiemetics ›› h2 antihistamines … … Dictionary of medicines

  • Blockers of histamine receptors – (synonyms: histamine antagonists, histamine blockers) drugs that eliminate the physiological effects of histamine by blocking the receptors of cells sensitive to it.In clinical practice, blockers are used for two of the three well-known … Medical Encyclopedia

  • DIMEDROL – Active ingredient ›› Diphenhydramine * (Diphenhydramine *) Latin name Dimedrolum Pharmacological groups: h2 antihistamines ›› Hypnotics Composition and release form Substance for the preparation of dosage forms (powder, … … Dictionary of medicines

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

This document, provided by Lexicomp ® , contains all the information you need to know about the drug, including the indications, route of administration, side effects, and when you should contact your healthcare provider.

Trade names: USA

Dramamine [OTC] [DSC]; Driminate [OTC]; GoodSense Motion Sickness [OTC]

Trade names: Canada

Gravol

What is this drug used for?

  • For motion sickness.
  • It is used to treat and prevent nausea and vomiting.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE taking this drug?

All forms of issue:

  • If you are allergic to dimensionhydrinate or any of the other ingredients of this medicine.
  • If you are allergic to this drug, any of its ingredients, other drugs, foods or substances. Tell your doctor about your allergy and how it manifested itself.
  • if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed.

Injection:

  • If the patient is a newborn or infant. This drug contains benzyl alcohol. Benzyl alcohol can cause severe and sometimes deadly side effects in newborns or babies.Do not give this drug to newborns or babies.

This list of drugs and diseases that may be adversely associated with this drug is not exhaustive.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all medicines you take (both prescription and over-the-counter, natural products and vitamins) and your health problems. You need to make sure that this drug is safe for your medical condition and in combination with other drugs you are already taking.Do not start or stop taking any drug or change the dosage without your doctor’s approval.

What do I need to know or do while I am taking this drug?

All forms of issue:

  • Tell all healthcare providers that you are taking this drug. These are doctors, nurses, pharmacists and dentists.
  • Avoid driving or other activities that require increased attention until you see how this drug affects you.
  • If you are allergic to tartrazine (FD&C Yellow No. 5), consult your doctor. Some products contain tartrazine.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol while taking this drug.
  • Consult your doctor before using marijuana, other forms of cannabis, prescription or over-the-counter drugs that may slow you down.
  • If you are 65 years of age or older, use this drug with caution.You may have more side effects.
  • Use with caution in children. Consult your doctor.
  • Ask a doctor before giving this drug to children under 2 years of age.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. The benefits and risks of taking this drug during pregnancy will need to be discussed.

Chewable Tablets:

  • If you have PKU, talk to your doctor.Some foods contain phenylalanine.

What side effects should I report to my doctor immediately?

WARNING. In rare cases, some people with this drug can cause serious and sometimes deadly side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms, which may be associated with a serious side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction such as rash, hives, itching, reddened and swollen skin with blistering or scaling, possibly associated with fever, wheezing or wheezing, tightness in the chest or throat, difficulty breathing, swallowing or speaking, unusual hoarseness, swelling in the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Obstruction of the urinary tract.
  • Pain when urinating.
  • Rapid heartbeat.
  • Blurred vision.
  • Anxiety.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

Any medicine can have side effects. However, many people have little or no side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if these or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Dizziness.
  • Sleepiness.
  • Dry mouth, nose, or throat.
  • Thickening of the nasal or pharyngeal mucosa.
  • Nervous tension and agitation.
  • Headache.
  • Lack of hunger.
  • Sleep disorders.
  • Feeling tired or weak.

This list of potential side effects is not exhaustive. If you have any questions about side effects, please contact your doctor.Talk to your doctor about side effects.

You can report side effects to the National Health Office.

You can report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-332-1088. You can also report side effects at https://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

What is the best way to take this drug?

Use this drug as directed by your healthcare practitioner. Read all the information provided to you.Follow all instructions strictly.

All oral preparations:

  • Take this medication with or without food.
  • Take this medication 30-60 minutes before travel if you are taking it for seasickness.

Solution (syrup):

  • Doses of liquid preparation should be measured with caution. Use the dispenser that comes with the medicine. If a dispenser is not included in the package, ask your pharmacist for a dosing product for this drug.

Chewable Tablets:

  • Chew thoroughly before swallowing.

Suppositories:

  • Apply the candle to the rectum.
  • Wash hands before and after use.
  • Take 30-60 minutes before travel if you are using this drug for motion sickness.

Injection:

  • For intramuscular or intravenous injection.

What should I do if a dose of a drug is missed?

Oral preparations and suppositories:

  • If you are taking this medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you can.
  • If it is time for your next dose, do not take the missed dose and then return to your normal dose schedule.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or an additional dose.
  • In most cases, this drug is used as needed. Do not take this medicine more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Injection:

  • Call your doctor for further instructions.

How do I store and / or discard this drug?

Oral preparations and suppositories:

  • Store in original packaging at room temperature.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in the bathroom.

Injection:

  • If you need to store this drug at home, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist for information about how to store it.

All forms of issue:

  • Store all medicines in a safe place. Keep all medicines out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Dispose of unused or expired drugs.Do not empty into toilet or drain unless directed to do so. If you have any questions about the disposal of your medicinal products, consult your pharmacist. Your area may have drug recycling programs.

General information on medicinal products

  • If your health does not improve or even worsens, see your doctor.
  • You should not give your medicine to anyone and take other people’s medicines.
  • Some medicines may come with other patient information sheets. If you have questions about this drug, talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other healthcare professional.
  • Some medicines may come with other patient information sheets. Check with your pharmacist. If you have questions about this drug, talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other healthcare professional.
  • If you think there has been an overdose of a drug, call a Poison Control Center immediately or seek medical attention. Be prepared to tell or show which drug you took, how much and when it happened.

Use of information by consumer and limitation of liability

This information should not be used to make decisions about taking this or any other drug. Only the attending physician has the necessary knowledge and experience to make decisions about which drugs are appropriate for a particular patient.This information does not guarantee that the drug is safe, effective, or approved for the treatment of any disease or specific patient. Here are only brief general information about this drug. It does NOT contain all available information on the possible use of the drug with instructions for use, warnings, precautions, information about interactions, side effects and risks that may be associated with this drug. This information should not be construed as a guide to treatment and does not replace the information provided to you by your healthcare professional.Check with your doctor for complete information on the possible risks and benefits of taking this drug. Use of this information is governed by the Lexicomp End User License Agreement available at https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/solutions/lexicomp/about/eula.

Copyright

© UpToDate, Inc. and its affiliates and / or licensors, 2021. All rights reserved.

Dimenhydrinate + Cinnarizine – instructions for use

The most common adverse reactions in clinical studies when using the combination of Dimenhydrinate + Cinnarizine were lethargy (including drowsiness, lethargy, fatigue, stupidity), which was observed in about 8% of patients, and dry mouth. which has been observed in approximately 5% of patients in clinical trials.These side reactions, as a rule, are characterized by a mild course and disappear within a few days, even with continued therapy.

Below is the frequency of adverse reactions when using the combination of Dimenhydrinate + Cinnarizine, obtained from clinical studies, as well as from spontaneous reports.

Possible adverse reactions are given in accordance with the classification of the World Health Organization (WHO) in descending order of frequency: very often (≥1 / 10), often (≥1 / 100, <1/10), infrequently ( ≥1 / 1,000, <1/100), rare (≥1 / 10,000, <1/1000), very rare (<1/10 000), frequency unknown (available data estimate impossible).

Disorders of the blood and lymphatic system

Very rare: leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, aplastic anemia;

Frequency unknown: reversible agranulocytosis *.

Immune system disorders

Rare: hypersensitivity reactions (eg skin reactions).

Nervous system disorders

Often: drowsiness, headache;

Uncommon: paresthesia, amnesia, tinnitus, tremors, anxiety, convulsions;

Frequency unknown: paradoxical excitability (especially in children) *, extrapyramidal symptoms **.

Visual impairment

Rare: visual impairment;

Frequency unknown: worsening of the course of existing angle-closure glaucoma *.

Digestive system disorders

Often: dry mouth, abdominal pain;

Uncommon: dyspepsia, nausea, diarrhea;

Frequency unknown: constipation **, cholestatic jaundice **.

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders

Uncommon: increased sweating, skin rash;

Rare: photosensitivity reactions;

Frequency unknown: lupus-like skin reactions **, lichen planus **.

Disorders of the urinary system

Rare: Difficulty urinating.

Disorders of the respiratory system, chest and mediastinal organs

Frequency unknown: feeling of tightness in the chest **.

General disorders

Frequency unknown: weight gain **.

* Side effects recorded with the use of dimensionhydrinate, / cite>

** Side effects recorded with the use of cinnarizine

What is dimensionhydrinate?

Dimenhydrinate is an antihistamine that is primarily used to treat or prevent motion sickness and symptoms of nausea, or to relieve symptoms of nausea from conditions such as Meniere’s disease.This over-the-counter medicine is sometimes only available with a prescription. Like all medicines, this antihistamine has several noted drug interactions and side effects. Some people may have medical conditions that are contraindicated for using it.

Typically, antihistamines treat symptoms such as dizziness, dizziness, nausea and vomiting. They act on areas of the brain that can induce vomiting and can help provide a calming effect that reduces symptoms.Dimenhydrinate in particular is well known for its antiemetic properties and is often used for mild to moderate motion sickness. The drug is sometimes indicated to prevent nausea during chemotherapy, but doctors do not always find it effective enough. Other more potent antiemetics may be more appropriate in some circumstances.

Most commonly, people can find over-the-counter formulations of dimensionhydrinate. Generally, tablets and elixirs are the most common forms.The drug can be sold under different brand names, and there can be mixtures for adults and children. Stronger versions come in injectable and intravenous forms, and prescription pills may also be available in some countries.

Dimenhydrinate has a short list of side effects. The most noted is drowsiness, which is common with antihistamines. Some people feel an increase in dizziness when they use this drug. Others may continue to vomit or have an upset stomach.Additional side effects include blurred vision, dry mouth, and decreased urination. On rare occasions, people experience hallucinations with this drug, but usually only if they significantly exceed the recommended amounts.

There are drugs and other substances that can interact with dimensionhydrinate. Alcohol can definitely cause increased drowsiness and dizziness and should be avoided. Many opioid pain relievers, sleeping pills, tranquilizers, and psychoactive medications can cause great drowsiness.These medications should not necessarily be avoided, but you should seek the advice of your doctor regarding the use of this antihistamine.

Likewise, any ongoing health problem requires discussion with a physician before using dimensionhydrinate. Some patients are advised to avoid this medication. This is usually not recommended for those with an enlarged prostate, bladder problems, or conditions that affect urinary frequency.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *