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Minor Electric Shocks & Burns: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments

Electric Shock Overview

An electric shock occurs when a person comes into contact with an electrical energy source. Electrical energy flows through a portion of the body causing a shock. Exposure to electrical energy may result in no injury at all or may result in devastating damage or death.

Burns are the most common injury from electric shock.

Electric Shock Causes

Adolescents and adults are prone to high voltage shock caused by mischievous exploration and exposure at work. About 1,000 people in the United States die each year as a result of electrocution. Most of these deaths are related to on-the-job injuries.

Many variables determine what injuries may occur, if any. These variables include the type of current (AC or DC), the amount of current (determined by the voltage of the source and the resistance of the tissues involved), and the pathway the electricity takes through the body. Low voltage electricity (less than 500 volts) does not normally cause significant injury to humans. Exposure to high voltage electricity (greater than 500 volts) has the potential to result in serious damage.

Continued

If you are going to help someone who has sustained a high voltage shock, you need to be very careful that you don’t become a second victim of a similar electrical shock. If a high voltage line has fallen to the ground, there may be a circle of current spreading out from the tip of the line. Your best bet may be to call 911. The electric company will be notified so that the power can be shut off. A victim who has fallen from a height or sustained a severe shock causing multiple jerks may have a serious neck injury and should not be moved without first protecting the neck.

Children are not often seriously injured by electricity. They are prone to shock by the low voltage (110-220 volts) found in typical household current. In children aged 12 years and younger, household appliance electrical cords and extension cords caused more than 63% of injuries in one study. Wall outlets were responsible for 15% of injuries.

Electric Shock Symptoms

A person who has suffered an electric shock may have very little external evidence of injury or may have obvious severe burns. The person could even be in cardiac arrest.

  • Burns are usually most severe at the points of contact with the electrical source and the ground. The hands, heels, and head are common points of contact.
  • In addition to burns, other injuries are possible if the person has been thrown clear of the electrical source by forceful muscular contraction. Consideration should be given to the possibility of a spine injury. The person may have internal injuries especially if they are experiencing any shortness of breath, chest pain, or abdominal pain.
  • Pain in a hand or foot or a deformity of a part of the body may indicate a possible broken bone resulting from the electric shock.
  • In children, the typical electrical mouth burn from biting an electric cord appears as a burn on the lip. The area has a red or dark, charred appearance.

When to Seek Medical Care

For a high-voltage shock, seek care at a hospital’s emergency department. Following a low-voltage shock, call the doctor for the following reasons:

  • It has been more than 5 years since your last tetanus booster
  • Burns that are not healing well
  • Burns with increasing redness, soreness, or drainage
  • Any electric shock in a pregnant woman

A person shocked by high voltage (500 volts or more) should be evaluated in the emergency department. It may be prudent to get prehospital care, usually obtained by calling 911. Following a low-voltage shock, go to the emergency department for the following concerns:

  • Any noticeable burn to the skin
  • Any period of unconsciousness
  • Any numbness, tingling, paralysis, vision, hearing, or speech problems
  • Confusion
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Seizures
  • Any electric shock if you’re more than 20 weeks’ pregnant
  • Any other worrisome symptoms

Exams and Tests

At the Emergency Department, the doctor’s primary concern is to determine if significant unseen injury exists. Injury may occur to muscles, the heart, or the brain from the electricity or to any bones or other organs from being thrown from the electric source.

The doctor may order various tests depending on the history and physical examination. Tests may include any or none of the following:

  • ECG to check the heart
  • Complete blood count
  • Blood or urine test or both for muscle enzymes (would indicate significant muscle injury)
  • X-rays to look for fractures or dislocations, both of which may be caused by a near electrocution
  • CT scan

Electric Shock Treatment Self-Care at Home

Brief low-voltage shocks that do not result in any symptoms or burns of the skin do not require care. For any high-voltage shock, or for any shock resulting in burns, seek care at a hospital’s emergency department. A doctor should evaluate electric cord burns to the mouth of a child.

Medical Treatment

Treatment depends on the severity of the burns or the nature of other injuries found.

  • Burns are treated according to severity.
    • Minor burns may be treated with topical antibiotic ointment and dressings.
    • More severe burns may require surgery to clean the wounds or even skin grafting.
    • Severe burns on the arms, legs, or hands may require surgery to remove damaged muscle or even amputation.
  • Other injuries may require treatment.
    • Eye injuries may require examination and treatment by an ophthalmologist, an eye specialist.
    • Broken bones require splinting, casting, or surgery to stabilize the bones.
    • Internal injuries may require observation or surgery.

Next Steps Prevention

Steps to prevent electrical injury depend primarily on the age of people involved.

  • For children younger than 12 years, most electrical injuries are caused by power cords. Inspect your power cords and extension cords. Replace any cords that have broken or cracked external covering and any cord that has exposed wire.
    • Do not allow children to play with any electrical cord.
    • Limit use of extension cords and be sure the cord is rated for the current (measured in amps) that will be drawn by the device being powered.
    • Use outlet covers to protect infants from exploring electrical outlets.
    • Update old, ungrounded electrical outlets to grounded (3-prong) systems. Replace outlets near any water (sink, tub) with fused (GFCI) outlets.
  • In children older than 12 years, most electrical injuries result from exploring and activities around high-power systems. Explain to adolescent children that they should not climb on power towers, play near transformer systems, or explore electrified train rails or other electrical systems.
  • Among adults, use of common sense can help reduce electrical injury. People who work with electricity should always check that the power is off before working on electrical systems. Avoid use of any electrical device near water. Be careful of standing in water when working with electricity.
  • Use caution when outdoors during a thunderstorm containing lightning. Protect yourself from lightning strikes by seeking shelter in a sturdy building or crouching low and away from trees and metal objects if caught outdoors.

 

Outlook

Recovery from electric shock depends on the nature and severity of the injuries. The percentage of the body surface area burned is the most important factor affecting prognosis.

If someone who has received an electric shock does not suffer immediate cardiac arrest and does not have severe burns, they are likely to survive.

Infection is the most common cause of death in people hospitalized following electrical injury.

Electrical damage to the brain may result in a permanent seizure disorder, depression, anxiety, or other personality changes.

Multimedia

Media file 1: Electric shock, contact injury to hand. Photograph by Timothy G. Price, MD.

Media file 2: Electric shock burns due to current flow through metal framed glasses. Photograph by Timothy G. Price, MD.

Media file 3: Electric shock injury to the foot. Photograph courtesy of William Smock, MD.

Media file 4: Electric shock injury to the hand. Photograph courtesy of William Smock, MD.

Synonyms and Keywords

electric shock, electrocution, electrical burn, high voltage shock

Symptoms, treatment, and when to seek help

When an electrical current touches or flows through the body, it is known as an electric shock. It can happen wherever there is live electricity. The effects of electric shock range from none at all to severe injury and death.

Roughly 5% of burn unit admissions in the United States are due to electrical injuries. Anyone who has received a high voltage shock or an electrical burn should seek medical advice immediately.

This article will look at the symptoms of an electric shock, advice regarding first aid, and when to seek medical help.

An electric shock occurs when an electrical current passes from a live outlet to a part of the body.

Electric shock can result from contact with:

  • faulty electrical appliances or machinery
  • household wiring
  • electrical power lines
  • lightning
  • electricity outlets

There are four main types of injuries that result from electrical contact:

  • Flash: A flash injury typically causes superficial burns. They occur as a result of an arc flash, which is a type of electrical explosion. The current does not penetrate the skin.
  • Flame: These injuries occur when an arc flash causes a person’s clothes to ignite. The current may or may not pass the skin.
  • Lightning: These involve short but high voltage electrical energy. The current flows through a person’s body.
  • True: The person becomes a part of the circuit, and the electricity enters and exits the body.

Shocks from touching electrical outlets or from small appliances in the home rarely cause serious injury. However, prolonged contact may cause harm.

The let-go threshold is the level where a person’s muscles contract meaning that they are unable to let go of the electrical source until someone safely removes it. This table shows the body’s response to different intensities of current, measured in milliamps (mA):

According to a 2019 article, the domestic electricity running through a typical U.S. household is 110 volts (V), with some appliances needing 240 V. Industrial and power lines may carry more than 100,000 V.

The same article states that high-voltage currents of 500 V and more can cause deep burns, while low-voltage currents consisting of 110–120 V can result in muscle spasms.

A person can get an electrical shock through contact with an electrical current from a small household appliance, wall outlet, or extension cord. These shocks rarely cause severe trauma or complications.

Roughly half of the electrocutions occur in the workplace. High risk occupations for non-fatal electrocutions include:

  • construction
  • leisure and hospitality
  • education and health services
  • accommodation and food services
  • manufacturing

Several factors can affect how serious injury from electric shock is, including:

  • the intensity of the current
  • the type of current— alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC)
  • which part of the body the current reaches
  • how long a person has exposure to the current
  • resistance to the current

The symptoms of electric shock depend on many factors. Injuries from low-voltage shocks are most likely to be superficial, while prolonged exposure to electrical current may cause deeper burns.

Secondary injuries can occur following an electric shock. A person may respond by jerking away, which might cause them to lose balance or fall and injure another part of their body.

Short-term side effects

Depending on the severity, immediate effects of an electrical injury may include:

  • burns
  • irregular heartbeat
  • seizures
  • tingling or prickling sensation
  • loss of consciousness
  • headaches

Some people may experience unpleasant sensations but do not have apparent physical damage, whereas others may experience a lot of pain and obvious tissue damage.

Those who have not experienced a significant injury or cardiac abnormalities after 24–48 hours after electrocution are unlikely to develop them.

More severe side effects can include:

Long-term side effects

One study found that people who had received an electric shock were no more likely to experience heart problems 5 years after the incident, compared to those who had not.

A person may experience a variety of symptoms, including psychological, neurologic, and physical symptoms.

Symptoms may include:

Anyone who has a burn caused by an electric shock or has experienced an electric shock should seek advice from a medical professional.

Minor electric shocks, such as those from small household appliances, do not typically need medical treatment. However, a person should see a doctor if they have experienced electrocution.

If someone has received a high voltage shock, call 911 right away.

If a person has experienced a serious electric shock, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) give the following advice for how to respond:

  • Do not touch the person as they may be in contact with the electrical source.
  • Call 911 or have someone else call 911.
  • If safe to do so, turn off the source of electricity. If it is not safe, use a non-conducting object made of wood, cardboard, or plastic to move the source away.
  • Once they are away from the electrical source, check the person’s pulse, and see if they are breathing. If their breathing is shallow, begin CPR immediately.
  • If the person is faint or pale, lay them down with the head lower than their body and keep the legs elevated.
  • A person should not touch any burns or remove burned clothing.

To perform CPR, a person should:

  1. Place hands on one on top of the other in the middle of the chest. Using the body weight, push down hard and fast and administer compressions 2 inches deep. The aim is to deliver 100 compressions per 60 seconds.
  2. Deliver rescue breaths. To do this, make sure the person’s mouth is clear, tilt their head back, lift the chin, pinch their nose closed, and blow into the person’s mouth to make the chest rise. Perform two rescue breaths and continue compressions.
  3. Repeat the process until help arrives, or the person begins breathing.

At the ED, the doctor will perform a thorough physical exam to assess potential external and internal damage. Potential tests include:

  • electrocardiogram (ECG) to monitor the heart’s rhythm
  • computed tomographic (CT) scan to check the health of the brain, spine, and chest
  • blood test
  • pregnancy test (for pregnant women only)

Not every person who experiences electric shock needs to visit the emergency department (ED). Follow this advice:

  • Call 911 if a person experiences a high voltage shock of 500 V or more.
  • Go to the ED if a person experiences a low-voltage shock resulting in a burn. Do not try to treat the burn at home.
  • If a person experiences a low-voltage shock with no burn injury, visit a doctor to ensure no damage has occurred.

Electric shocks can cause injuries that are not always visible. Depending on how high the voltage was, the injury may be fatal. However, if a person survives the initial electrocution, a person should seek medical attention to ensure that no injuries have occurred.

Anyone who thinks an individual has had a severe electric shock, call 911 right away.

Even after a minor shock, a person should see a doctor.

Electric shocks and the injuries they can cause range from minor to severe. Many electric shocks occur in the home, so check household appliances regularly for signs of damage.

People working in environments during the installation of electrical systems should take particular care and always follow safety regulations.

If a person has experienced a severe electric shock, administer first aid if it is safe to do so and call 911.

Symptoms, treatment, and when to seek help

When an electrical current touches or flows through the body, it is known as an electric shock. It can happen wherever there is live electricity. The effects of electric shock range from none at all to severe injury and death.

Roughly 5% of burn unit admissions in the United States are due to electrical injuries. Anyone who has received a high voltage shock or an electrical burn should seek medical advice immediately.

This article will look at the symptoms of an electric shock, advice regarding first aid, and when to seek medical help.

An electric shock occurs when an electrical current passes from a live outlet to a part of the body.

Electric shock can result from contact with:

  • faulty electrical appliances or machinery
  • household wiring
  • electrical power lines
  • lightning
  • electricity outlets

There are four main types of injuries that result from electrical contact:

  • Flash: A flash injury typically causes superficial burns. They occur as a result of an arc flash, which is a type of electrical explosion. The current does not penetrate the skin.
  • Flame: These injuries occur when an arc flash causes a person’s clothes to ignite. The current may or may not pass the skin.
  • Lightning: These involve short but high voltage electrical energy. The current flows through a person’s body.
  • True: The person becomes a part of the circuit, and the electricity enters and exits the body.

Shocks from touching electrical outlets or from small appliances in the home rarely cause serious injury. However, prolonged contact may cause harm.

The let-go threshold is the level where a person’s muscles contract meaning that they are unable to let go of the electrical source until someone safely removes it. This table shows the body’s response to different intensities of current, measured in milliamps (mA):

According to a 2019 article, the domestic electricity running through a typical U.S. household is 110 volts (V), with some appliances needing 240 V. Industrial and power lines may carry more than 100,000 V.

The same article states that high-voltage currents of 500 V and more can cause deep burns, while low-voltage currents consisting of 110–120 V can result in muscle spasms.

A person can get an electrical shock through contact with an electrical current from a small household appliance, wall outlet, or extension cord. These shocks rarely cause severe trauma or complications.

Roughly half of the electrocutions occur in the workplace. High risk occupations for non-fatal electrocutions include:

  • construction
  • leisure and hospitality
  • education and health services
  • accommodation and food services
  • manufacturing

Several factors can affect how serious injury from electric shock is, including:

  • the intensity of the current
  • the type of current— alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC)
  • which part of the body the current reaches
  • how long a person has exposure to the current
  • resistance to the current

The symptoms of electric shock depend on many factors. Injuries from low-voltage shocks are most likely to be superficial, while prolonged exposure to electrical current may cause deeper burns.

Secondary injuries can occur following an electric shock. A person may respond by jerking away, which might cause them to lose balance or fall and injure another part of their body.

Short-term side effects

Depending on the severity, immediate effects of an electrical injury may include:

  • burns
  • irregular heartbeat
  • seizures
  • tingling or prickling sensation
  • loss of consciousness
  • headaches

Some people may experience unpleasant sensations but do not have apparent physical damage, whereas others may experience a lot of pain and obvious tissue damage.

Those who have not experienced a significant injury or cardiac abnormalities after 24–48 hours after electrocution are unlikely to develop them.

More severe side effects can include:

Long-term side effects

One study found that people who had received an electric shock were no more likely to experience heart problems 5 years after the incident, compared to those who had not.

A person may experience a variety of symptoms, including psychological, neurologic, and physical symptoms.

Symptoms may include:

Anyone who has a burn caused by an electric shock or has experienced an electric shock should seek advice from a medical professional.

Minor electric shocks, such as those from small household appliances, do not typically need medical treatment. However, a person should see a doctor if they have experienced electrocution.

If someone has received a high voltage shock, call 911 right away.

If a person has experienced a serious electric shock, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) give the following advice for how to respond:

  • Do not touch the person as they may be in contact with the electrical source.
  • Call 911 or have someone else call 911.
  • If safe to do so, turn off the source of electricity. If it is not safe, use a non-conducting object made of wood, cardboard, or plastic to move the source away.
  • Once they are away from the electrical source, check the person’s pulse, and see if they are breathing. If their breathing is shallow, begin CPR immediately.
  • If the person is faint or pale, lay them down with the head lower than their body and keep the legs elevated.
  • A person should not touch any burns or remove burned clothing.

To perform CPR, a person should:

  1. Place hands on one on top of the other in the middle of the chest. Using the body weight, push down hard and fast and administer compressions 2 inches deep. The aim is to deliver 100 compressions per 60 seconds.
  2. Deliver rescue breaths. To do this, make sure the person’s mouth is clear, tilt their head back, lift the chin, pinch their nose closed, and blow into the person’s mouth to make the chest rise. Perform two rescue breaths and continue compressions.
  3. Repeat the process until help arrives, or the person begins breathing.

At the ED, the doctor will perform a thorough physical exam to assess potential external and internal damage. Potential tests include:

  • electrocardiogram (ECG) to monitor the heart’s rhythm
  • computed tomographic (CT) scan to check the health of the brain, spine, and chest
  • blood test
  • pregnancy test (for pregnant women only)

Not every person who experiences electric shock needs to visit the emergency department (ED). Follow this advice:

  • Call 911 if a person experiences a high voltage shock of 500 V or more.
  • Go to the ED if a person experiences a low-voltage shock resulting in a burn. Do not try to treat the burn at home.
  • If a person experiences a low-voltage shock with no burn injury, visit a doctor to ensure no damage has occurred.

Electric shocks can cause injuries that are not always visible. Depending on how high the voltage was, the injury may be fatal. However, if a person survives the initial electrocution, a person should seek medical attention to ensure that no injuries have occurred.

Anyone who thinks an individual has had a severe electric shock, call 911 right away.

Even after a minor shock, a person should see a doctor.

Electric shocks and the injuries they can cause range from minor to severe. Many electric shocks occur in the home, so check household appliances regularly for signs of damage.

People working in environments during the installation of electrical systems should take particular care and always follow safety regulations.

If a person has experienced a severe electric shock, administer first aid if it is safe to do so and call 911.

Symptoms, treatment, and when to seek help

When an electrical current touches or flows through the body, it is known as an electric shock. It can happen wherever there is live electricity. The effects of electric shock range from none at all to severe injury and death.

Roughly 5% of burn unit admissions in the United States are due to electrical injuries. Anyone who has received a high voltage shock or an electrical burn should seek medical advice immediately.

This article will look at the symptoms of an electric shock, advice regarding first aid, and when to seek medical help.

An electric shock occurs when an electrical current passes from a live outlet to a part of the body.

Electric shock can result from contact with:

  • faulty electrical appliances or machinery
  • household wiring
  • electrical power lines
  • lightning
  • electricity outlets

There are four main types of injuries that result from electrical contact:

  • Flash: A flash injury typically causes superficial burns. They occur as a result of an arc flash, which is a type of electrical explosion. The current does not penetrate the skin.
  • Flame: These injuries occur when an arc flash causes a person’s clothes to ignite. The current may or may not pass the skin.
  • Lightning: These involve short but high voltage electrical energy. The current flows through a person’s body.
  • True: The person becomes a part of the circuit, and the electricity enters and exits the body.

Shocks from touching electrical outlets or from small appliances in the home rarely cause serious injury. However, prolonged contact may cause harm.

The let-go threshold is the level where a person’s muscles contract meaning that they are unable to let go of the electrical source until someone safely removes it. This table shows the body’s response to different intensities of current, measured in milliamps (mA):

According to a 2019 article, the domestic electricity running through a typical U.S. household is 110 volts (V), with some appliances needing 240 V. Industrial and power lines may carry more than 100,000 V.

The same article states that high-voltage currents of 500 V and more can cause deep burns, while low-voltage currents consisting of 110–120 V can result in muscle spasms.

A person can get an electrical shock through contact with an electrical current from a small household appliance, wall outlet, or extension cord. These shocks rarely cause severe trauma or complications.

Roughly half of the electrocutions occur in the workplace. High risk occupations for non-fatal electrocutions include:

  • construction
  • leisure and hospitality
  • education and health services
  • accommodation and food services
  • manufacturing

Several factors can affect how serious injury from electric shock is, including:

  • the intensity of the current
  • the type of current— alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC)
  • which part of the body the current reaches
  • how long a person has exposure to the current
  • resistance to the current

The symptoms of electric shock depend on many factors. Injuries from low-voltage shocks are most likely to be superficial, while prolonged exposure to electrical current may cause deeper burns.

Secondary injuries can occur following an electric shock. A person may respond by jerking away, which might cause them to lose balance or fall and injure another part of their body.

Short-term side effects

Depending on the severity, immediate effects of an electrical injury may include:

  • burns
  • irregular heartbeat
  • seizures
  • tingling or prickling sensation
  • loss of consciousness
  • headaches

Some people may experience unpleasant sensations but do not have apparent physical damage, whereas others may experience a lot of pain and obvious tissue damage.

Those who have not experienced a significant injury or cardiac abnormalities after 24–48 hours after electrocution are unlikely to develop them.

More severe side effects can include:

Long-term side effects

One study found that people who had received an electric shock were no more likely to experience heart problems 5 years after the incident, compared to those who had not.

A person may experience a variety of symptoms, including psychological, neurologic, and physical symptoms.

Symptoms may include:

Anyone who has a burn caused by an electric shock or has experienced an electric shock should seek advice from a medical professional.

Minor electric shocks, such as those from small household appliances, do not typically need medical treatment. However, a person should see a doctor if they have experienced electrocution.

If someone has received a high voltage shock, call 911 right away.

If a person has experienced a serious electric shock, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) give the following advice for how to respond:

  • Do not touch the person as they may be in contact with the electrical source.
  • Call 911 or have someone else call 911.
  • If safe to do so, turn off the source of electricity. If it is not safe, use a non-conducting object made of wood, cardboard, or plastic to move the source away.
  • Once they are away from the electrical source, check the person’s pulse, and see if they are breathing. If their breathing is shallow, begin CPR immediately.
  • If the person is faint or pale, lay them down with the head lower than their body and keep the legs elevated.
  • A person should not touch any burns or remove burned clothing.

To perform CPR, a person should:

  1. Place hands on one on top of the other in the middle of the chest. Using the body weight, push down hard and fast and administer compressions 2 inches deep. The aim is to deliver 100 compressions per 60 seconds.
  2. Deliver rescue breaths. To do this, make sure the person’s mouth is clear, tilt their head back, lift the chin, pinch their nose closed, and blow into the person’s mouth to make the chest rise. Perform two rescue breaths and continue compressions.
  3. Repeat the process until help arrives, or the person begins breathing.

At the ED, the doctor will perform a thorough physical exam to assess potential external and internal damage. Potential tests include:

  • electrocardiogram (ECG) to monitor the heart’s rhythm
  • computed tomographic (CT) scan to check the health of the brain, spine, and chest
  • blood test
  • pregnancy test (for pregnant women only)

Not every person who experiences electric shock needs to visit the emergency department (ED). Follow this advice:

  • Call 911 if a person experiences a high voltage shock of 500 V or more.
  • Go to the ED if a person experiences a low-voltage shock resulting in a burn. Do not try to treat the burn at home.
  • If a person experiences a low-voltage shock with no burn injury, visit a doctor to ensure no damage has occurred.

Electric shocks can cause injuries that are not always visible. Depending on how high the voltage was, the injury may be fatal. However, if a person survives the initial electrocution, a person should seek medical attention to ensure that no injuries have occurred.

Anyone who thinks an individual has had a severe electric shock, call 911 right away.

Even after a minor shock, a person should see a doctor.

Electric shocks and the injuries they can cause range from minor to severe. Many electric shocks occur in the home, so check household appliances regularly for signs of damage.

People working in environments during the installation of electrical systems should take particular care and always follow safety regulations.

If a person has experienced a severe electric shock, administer first aid if it is safe to do so and call 911.

Symptoms, treatment, and when to seek help

When an electrical current touches or flows through the body, it is known as an electric shock. It can happen wherever there is live electricity. The effects of electric shock range from none at all to severe injury and death.

Roughly 5% of burn unit admissions in the United States are due to electrical injuries. Anyone who has received a high voltage shock or an electrical burn should seek medical advice immediately.

This article will look at the symptoms of an electric shock, advice regarding first aid, and when to seek medical help.

An electric shock occurs when an electrical current passes from a live outlet to a part of the body.

Electric shock can result from contact with:

  • faulty electrical appliances or machinery
  • household wiring
  • electrical power lines
  • lightning
  • electricity outlets

There are four main types of injuries that result from electrical contact:

  • Flash: A flash injury typically causes superficial burns. They occur as a result of an arc flash, which is a type of electrical explosion. The current does not penetrate the skin.
  • Flame: These injuries occur when an arc flash causes a person’s clothes to ignite. The current may or may not pass the skin.
  • Lightning: These involve short but high voltage electrical energy. The current flows through a person’s body.
  • True: The person becomes a part of the circuit, and the electricity enters and exits the body.

Shocks from touching electrical outlets or from small appliances in the home rarely cause serious injury. However, prolonged contact may cause harm.

The let-go threshold is the level where a person’s muscles contract meaning that they are unable to let go of the electrical source until someone safely removes it. This table shows the body’s response to different intensities of current, measured in milliamps (mA):

According to a 2019 article, the domestic electricity running through a typical U.S. household is 110 volts (V), with some appliances needing 240 V. Industrial and power lines may carry more than 100,000 V.

The same article states that high-voltage currents of 500 V and more can cause deep burns, while low-voltage currents consisting of 110–120 V can result in muscle spasms.

A person can get an electrical shock through contact with an electrical current from a small household appliance, wall outlet, or extension cord. These shocks rarely cause severe trauma or complications.

Roughly half of the electrocutions occur in the workplace. High risk occupations for non-fatal electrocutions include:

  • construction
  • leisure and hospitality
  • education and health services
  • accommodation and food services
  • manufacturing

Several factors can affect how serious injury from electric shock is, including:

  • the intensity of the current
  • the type of current— alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC)
  • which part of the body the current reaches
  • how long a person has exposure to the current
  • resistance to the current

The symptoms of electric shock depend on many factors. Injuries from low-voltage shocks are most likely to be superficial, while prolonged exposure to electrical current may cause deeper burns.

Secondary injuries can occur following an electric shock. A person may respond by jerking away, which might cause them to lose balance or fall and injure another part of their body.

Short-term side effects

Depending on the severity, immediate effects of an electrical injury may include:

  • burns
  • irregular heartbeat
  • seizures
  • tingling or prickling sensation
  • loss of consciousness
  • headaches

Some people may experience unpleasant sensations but do not have apparent physical damage, whereas others may experience a lot of pain and obvious tissue damage.

Those who have not experienced a significant injury or cardiac abnormalities after 24–48 hours after electrocution are unlikely to develop them.

More severe side effects can include:

Long-term side effects

One study found that people who had received an electric shock were no more likely to experience heart problems 5 years after the incident, compared to those who had not.

A person may experience a variety of symptoms, including psychological, neurologic, and physical symptoms.

Symptoms may include:

Anyone who has a burn caused by an electric shock or has experienced an electric shock should seek advice from a medical professional.

Minor electric shocks, such as those from small household appliances, do not typically need medical treatment. However, a person should see a doctor if they have experienced electrocution.

If someone has received a high voltage shock, call 911 right away.

If a person has experienced a serious electric shock, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) give the following advice for how to respond:

  • Do not touch the person as they may be in contact with the electrical source.
  • Call 911 or have someone else call 911.
  • If safe to do so, turn off the source of electricity. If it is not safe, use a non-conducting object made of wood, cardboard, or plastic to move the source away.
  • Once they are away from the electrical source, check the person’s pulse, and see if they are breathing. If their breathing is shallow, begin CPR immediately.
  • If the person is faint or pale, lay them down with the head lower than their body and keep the legs elevated.
  • A person should not touch any burns or remove burned clothing.

To perform CPR, a person should:

  1. Place hands on one on top of the other in the middle of the chest. Using the body weight, push down hard and fast and administer compressions 2 inches deep. The aim is to deliver 100 compressions per 60 seconds.
  2. Deliver rescue breaths. To do this, make sure the person’s mouth is clear, tilt their head back, lift the chin, pinch their nose closed, and blow into the person’s mouth to make the chest rise. Perform two rescue breaths and continue compressions.
  3. Repeat the process until help arrives, or the person begins breathing.

At the ED, the doctor will perform a thorough physical exam to assess potential external and internal damage. Potential tests include:

  • electrocardiogram (ECG) to monitor the heart’s rhythm
  • computed tomographic (CT) scan to check the health of the brain, spine, and chest
  • blood test
  • pregnancy test (for pregnant women only)

Not every person who experiences electric shock needs to visit the emergency department (ED). Follow this advice:

  • Call 911 if a person experiences a high voltage shock of 500 V or more.
  • Go to the ED if a person experiences a low-voltage shock resulting in a burn. Do not try to treat the burn at home.
  • If a person experiences a low-voltage shock with no burn injury, visit a doctor to ensure no damage has occurred.

Electric shocks can cause injuries that are not always visible. Depending on how high the voltage was, the injury may be fatal. However, if a person survives the initial electrocution, a person should seek medical attention to ensure that no injuries have occurred.

Anyone who thinks an individual has had a severe electric shock, call 911 right away.

Even after a minor shock, a person should see a doctor.

Electric shocks and the injuries they can cause range from minor to severe. Many electric shocks occur in the home, so check household appliances regularly for signs of damage.

People working in environments during the installation of electrical systems should take particular care and always follow safety regulations.

If a person has experienced a severe electric shock, administer first aid if it is safe to do so and call 911.

Symptoms, treatment, and when to seek help

When an electrical current touches or flows through the body, it is known as an electric shock. It can happen wherever there is live electricity. The effects of electric shock range from none at all to severe injury and death.

Roughly 5% of burn unit admissions in the United States are due to electrical injuries. Anyone who has received a high voltage shock or an electrical burn should seek medical advice immediately.

This article will look at the symptoms of an electric shock, advice regarding first aid, and when to seek medical help.

An electric shock occurs when an electrical current passes from a live outlet to a part of the body.

Electric shock can result from contact with:

  • faulty electrical appliances or machinery
  • household wiring
  • electrical power lines
  • lightning
  • electricity outlets

There are four main types of injuries that result from electrical contact:

  • Flash: A flash injury typically causes superficial burns. They occur as a result of an arc flash, which is a type of electrical explosion. The current does not penetrate the skin.
  • Flame: These injuries occur when an arc flash causes a person’s clothes to ignite. The current may or may not pass the skin.
  • Lightning: These involve short but high voltage electrical energy. The current flows through a person’s body.
  • True: The person becomes a part of the circuit, and the electricity enters and exits the body.

Shocks from touching electrical outlets or from small appliances in the home rarely cause serious injury. However, prolonged contact may cause harm.

The let-go threshold is the level where a person’s muscles contract meaning that they are unable to let go of the electrical source until someone safely removes it. This table shows the body’s response to different intensities of current, measured in milliamps (mA):

According to a 2019 article, the domestic electricity running through a typical U.S. household is 110 volts (V), with some appliances needing 240 V. Industrial and power lines may carry more than 100,000 V.

The same article states that high-voltage currents of 500 V and more can cause deep burns, while low-voltage currents consisting of 110–120 V can result in muscle spasms.

A person can get an electrical shock through contact with an electrical current from a small household appliance, wall outlet, or extension cord. These shocks rarely cause severe trauma or complications.

Roughly half of the electrocutions occur in the workplace. High risk occupations for non-fatal electrocutions include:

  • construction
  • leisure and hospitality
  • education and health services
  • accommodation and food services
  • manufacturing

Several factors can affect how serious injury from electric shock is, including:

  • the intensity of the current
  • the type of current— alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC)
  • which part of the body the current reaches
  • how long a person has exposure to the current
  • resistance to the current

The symptoms of electric shock depend on many factors. Injuries from low-voltage shocks are most likely to be superficial, while prolonged exposure to electrical current may cause deeper burns.

Secondary injuries can occur following an electric shock. A person may respond by jerking away, which might cause them to lose balance or fall and injure another part of their body.

Short-term side effects

Depending on the severity, immediate effects of an electrical injury may include:

  • burns
  • irregular heartbeat
  • seizures
  • tingling or prickling sensation
  • loss of consciousness
  • headaches

Some people may experience unpleasant sensations but do not have apparent physical damage, whereas others may experience a lot of pain and obvious tissue damage.

Those who have not experienced a significant injury or cardiac abnormalities after 24–48 hours after electrocution are unlikely to develop them.

More severe side effects can include:

Long-term side effects

One study found that people who had received an electric shock were no more likely to experience heart problems 5 years after the incident, compared to those who had not.

A person may experience a variety of symptoms, including psychological, neurologic, and physical symptoms.

Symptoms may include:

Anyone who has a burn caused by an electric shock or has experienced an electric shock should seek advice from a medical professional.

Minor electric shocks, such as those from small household appliances, do not typically need medical treatment. However, a person should see a doctor if they have experienced electrocution.

If someone has received a high voltage shock, call 911 right away.

If a person has experienced a serious electric shock, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) give the following advice for how to respond:

  • Do not touch the person as they may be in contact with the electrical source.
  • Call 911 or have someone else call 911.
  • If safe to do so, turn off the source of electricity. If it is not safe, use a non-conducting object made of wood, cardboard, or plastic to move the source away.
  • Once they are away from the electrical source, check the person’s pulse, and see if they are breathing. If their breathing is shallow, begin CPR immediately.
  • If the person is faint or pale, lay them down with the head lower than their body and keep the legs elevated.
  • A person should not touch any burns or remove burned clothing.

To perform CPR, a person should:

  1. Place hands on one on top of the other in the middle of the chest. Using the body weight, push down hard and fast and administer compressions 2 inches deep. The aim is to deliver 100 compressions per 60 seconds.
  2. Deliver rescue breaths. To do this, make sure the person’s mouth is clear, tilt their head back, lift the chin, pinch their nose closed, and blow into the person’s mouth to make the chest rise. Perform two rescue breaths and continue compressions.
  3. Repeat the process until help arrives, or the person begins breathing.

At the ED, the doctor will perform a thorough physical exam to assess potential external and internal damage. Potential tests include:

  • electrocardiogram (ECG) to monitor the heart’s rhythm
  • computed tomographic (CT) scan to check the health of the brain, spine, and chest
  • blood test
  • pregnancy test (for pregnant women only)

Not every person who experiences electric shock needs to visit the emergency department (ED). Follow this advice:

  • Call 911 if a person experiences a high voltage shock of 500 V or more.
  • Go to the ED if a person experiences a low-voltage shock resulting in a burn. Do not try to treat the burn at home.
  • If a person experiences a low-voltage shock with no burn injury, visit a doctor to ensure no damage has occurred.

Electric shocks can cause injuries that are not always visible. Depending on how high the voltage was, the injury may be fatal. However, if a person survives the initial electrocution, a person should seek medical attention to ensure that no injuries have occurred.

Anyone who thinks an individual has had a severe electric shock, call 911 right away.

Even after a minor shock, a person should see a doctor.

Electric shocks and the injuries they can cause range from minor to severe. Many electric shocks occur in the home, so check household appliances regularly for signs of damage.

People working in environments during the installation of electrical systems should take particular care and always follow safety regulations.

If a person has experienced a severe electric shock, administer first aid if it is safe to do so and call 911.

Electrical Shock or Burn | Michigan Medicine

Topic Overview

When you touch a light switch to turn on a light, you may receive a minor electrical shock. You may feel tingling in your hand or arm. Usually, this tingling goes away in a few minutes. If you do not have damage to the skin or other symptoms, there is no reason to worry.

If your skin is burned by electricity, there is cause for concern. Electrical burns may look minor at first. But the burn may be more serious if tissues along the path of the electrical current are damaged. All the damage from these burns might not be seen for up to 10 days after the burn. There might be burns where the electrical current enters the body and also where it leaves the body.

When electricity passes though your body, the electricity may injure blood vessels, nerves, and muscles. The electrical current may cause rapid and severe swelling in the throat and lungs, making it hard for a person to breathe. As the electrical current passes through the heart muscle, heartbeat problems can develop.

Electricity passing through your body can be powerful enough to cause a fall. This can cause other injuries such as fractures. Electricity can also cause strong muscle contractions that can cause injury.

Lightning strike

The skin burn from lightning strikes may not be severe. Lightning current usually flows over the body (flashover) and does not injure deeper organs or tissues, which is the reason some people can survive a lightning strike. A direct lightning strike can occur when a person is holding or wearing metal objects. Lightning can also strike objects near a person, and some of the lightning current can travel to the person indirectly (called a splash). The electrical current from lightning can cause the same problems as from other electrical sources, depending on how direct the strike is. Participating in outdoor sports activities increases your risk of being struck by lightning.

You need to be evaluated by a doctor if you have been struck by lightning, even if the injury appears minor. Burns from a lightning strike or electrical power also need to be evaluated by a doctor.

Stun guns and tasers

Stun guns and tasers are called “electronic weapons.” They are handheld weapons that use electricity to stun a person. The electricity causes uncontrollable muscle contractions. After being stunned with electricity, the person usually falls to the ground.

These weapons are less likely to cause death or injury than other weapons, such as handguns. But stun guns and tasers can cause serious medical problems, such as irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias). Others types of injuries include burns, cuts, muscle problems (rhabdomyolysis), twisting of a testicle (testicular torsion), and miscarriage.

First aid for electric shock

Any person in life can expect emergencies in which decisions must be made instantly, and the lives of other people can sometimes depend on these decisions. Knowledgeable means protected. So that you do not get overwhelmed by panic in an extreme situation, you must know the basic rules of rescue in case of electric shock. With electric shock, a person is seized by convulsions and spasm of the vocal cords.Under the influence of a spasm, a person is unable to call for help. Electrical Shock Symptoms – Convulsive unnatural muscle contraction.

  • Nausea, dizziness, cold sweat.
  • Clouding of the mind and loss of consciousness.
  • Pale and blue lips.
  • Violation of cardiac activity.
  • Respiratory arrest.

First aid should be provided to the victim immediately, immediately after the accident.

FIRST AID MEASURES

  • Attempt to eliminate the current source. If there is a switch in the room, then immediately turn it off, unscrew the plugs or unplug the appliance. – Never touch the injured person with your bare hands while the mains voltage is present. You can also be seriously hurt. For these purposes, you can take any wooden stick with which to flip the cord, or put on rubber gloves and push the victim away from the power source.- If the victim is conscious, lay him down and call an ambulance. – Before the doctors arrive, try to assess the patient’s condition. If the victim is in a difficult position, unconscious, it is necessary to carefully monitor his current state: to measure the pulse and listen to the heartbeat. If cardiac arrest occurs, immediately begin mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and chest compressions. In this case, the victim should be warmed up with warm blankets, heating pads or clothing. – Sterile dressings should be applied to the burned areas.If the affected area is small, then you can use bandages, but if it is quite large, then you can use clean sheets for these purposes. Do not smear burns with ointments, sprinkle with powders or spray with aerosols. In general, in this case, the basic rules for treating burns apply.
  • If the victim has fractures, the broken limb should be fixed motionlessly with a splint. – Regardless of the state of health, the victim should be taken to the hospital in a lying state, on a stretcher, since at any time a heart attack or respiratory arrest may occur.It should be remembered that the consequences of an electric shock may not appear immediately, but after a few hours or even days. Therefore, for some time the victim must be under compulsory medical supervision.
  • 90,015 90,000 Teachers – IDGC of Urals, OJSC

    Dear colleagues!

    Here are the guidelines for conducting an extracurricular hour on the topic “Electrical Safety”, which will help to inform children about the dangers of electric current.You can familiarize yourself with them on this page, or download them in PDF format

    Power engineers of IDGC of Urals call for vigilance and compliance with the rules of safe behavior when interacting with electricity. This is especially true for children and adolescents. In order to protect children from the unwanted effects of electric current, we adults are obliged to constantly teach children the basics of life safety. It’s so SCARY when the cause of a tragic accident is five minutes that we did not devote to our children.

    Among children of different ages, cases of electrical injuries are unevenly distributed, to a greater extent, children of primary school age fall under the influence of electric current.

    Particular attention should be paid to interaction with this particular age group and to more closely organize work with parents.

    These guidelines were developed by the specialists of IDGC of Urals for life safety teachers, class leaders of educational institutions, personnel of health camps for children.They present the basic rules of behavior with electricity at home and on the street for an extra-curricular hour “Electrical Safety”.

    You can download:

    Plan for an extracurricular hour on the topic “Electrical Safety”

    1. Introduction

    2. Electric shock hazard notion

    3. Effect of electric current on the body

    4. Rules of conduct with electricity in everyday life

    5. Rules of conduct near power facilities

    6. Help to the victim of electric current

    7. Electrical Safety Signs

    8. Test for knowledge of key electrical safety rules

    Introduction

    Dear guys! You are well aware of the important role electricity plays in everyday life and study.It gives us light, warmth, sets in motion various mechanisms that facilitate human labor.

    Electricity has taken such a firm place in our life that now it is simply impossible to do without it. She is our irreplaceable assistant. But, providing tremendous help to people, electricity is fraught with mortal danger for those who do not know or neglect the rules of electrical safety, do not know how to handle household appliances, and violate the rules of behavior near power facilities.

    Electric shock hazard notion

    Electrical installations of any voltage pose a danger to human life.Remember: there is no safe electric current!

    Electrical installations are equipment that is used by power engineers, as well as all household electrical appliances that surround us in everyday life.

    A person, touching live parts of electrical installations and bare wires that are energized, turns out to be included in an electrical circuit. Under the influence of voltage, an electric current flows through his body, which disrupts the normal functioning of the body, which causes convulsions, stops breathing and stops the heart.Overheating of certain parts of the body causes severe burns. A person dies or becomes disabled.

    The greater the amount of current flowing through the body, the more dangerous it is!

    The higher the voltage under which the person is, the greater the current.

    A voltage of 12 volts is considered safe. The most widespread in industry, agriculture and everyday life are electrical networks with voltages of 220 and 380 volts (220 volts – for lighting and household appliances, 380 volts – for three-phase electric motors of machines and mechanisms).This voltage is economically beneficial, but very dangerous for humans.

    The largest number of fatal accidents occurs with people who are under 220 and 380 volts.

    Electrical appliances that you use at home and at school, electrical grids and substations that you pass by in the yard, outdoors and in the field are safe during normal operation. Power engineers have taken care to exclude accidental contact with live parts. All electrical installations have fencing, warning signs and safety posters and are locked.

    However, with various insulation damage, wire breakage, lifting on poles, penetration into substations and electrical panels, there is a real threat to life.

    That is why it is so important for everyone to know the rules for handling electrical devices and wiring, to warn a friend in time from dangerous pranks near power lines and substations, to be able to protect themselves and other people when a network breakdown is detected.

    The effect of electric current on the body

    The danger of electric current is that a person does not have special senses to detect electric current at a distance.Electric current is odorless, colorless and silent. It is impossible without special devices to feel whether a given part of an electrical installation is energized or not. This leads to the fact that people are often not aware of the actual danger and do not take the necessary protective measures.

    Of great importance in the outcome of the defeat is the path traversed by the current in the human body. The lesion will be more severe if the heart, chest, brain and spinal cord are in the path of the current.The most dangerous paths for the passage of current through a person are: hand-feet, hand-hand.

    The immediate causes of death for an electric shock are cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest due to chest muscle paralysis, and electrical shock. The most unfavorable outcome of an electric shock to a person will be in cases where wet hands have touched electrical appliances or an electrical wire in a damp or hot room.

    Electric shock can take the following forms:

    • cardiac or respiratory arrest when electric current passes through the body
    • electric burn
    • mechanical injury due to muscle contraction under the influence of current
    • electric arc blinding

    Death usually results from cardiac arrest or respiratory arrest, or both. The muscles of the body contract under the action of an electric current.If a person picks up an energized piece of equipment, they may not be able to pull away without assistance. Moreover, he may be attracted to a dangerous place. Under the action of alternating current, the muscles periodically contract with the frequency of the current, but the pause between contractions is not enough to free themselves.

    Electric shock damage is determined by the strength of the current and the duration of its exposure. The lower the resistance of the human body, the higher the current.Resistance is reduced by the following factors:

    • high voltage
    • skin moisture
    • long exposure time
    • increase in the content of carbon dioxide in the air
    • high air temperature
    • carelessness, mental and psychological unpreparedness for a possible electric shock

    The central nervous system suffers most from the action of electric current.Due to its damage, breathing and cardiac activity are disturbed. Areas of the body with the least resistance (i.e. more vulnerable):

    • lateral surfaces of the neck, temples
    • the back of the hand, the surface of the palm between the thumb and forefinger
    • hand above the hand
    • shoulder, back
    • front leg

    Electric burns are much more difficult to heal than conventional thermal burns. Some of the consequences of an electrical injury can appear in a few hours, days, months.The victim must live for a long time in a “sparing” mode and be under the supervision of specialists.

    Rules of conduct with electricity in everyday life

    The rules for handling electrical appliances are not complicated and easy to remember:

    1. DO NOT use electrical appliances without adult permission.

    2. YOU MUST NOT independently replace bulbs and fuses, repair electrical wiring and household appliances, open the back covers of televisions and radios, install bells, switches and sockets.Have an adult or an electrician do it!

    3. DO NOT use switches, wall outlets, plugs, bell buttons with broken covers, or household appliances with damaged, charred or twisted cords. THIS IS VERY DANGEROUS! YOU SHOULD NOT ignore such facts. Inform adults about the damage in a timely manner! REMEMBER , smashing the covers of switches, bells, sockets out of mischief, damaging the electrical wiring, you, thereby, commit an offense equal to a crime, as this can lead to the death of people.

    4. DO NOT use faulty electrical appliances. If the TV, refrigerator or vacuum cleaner smells of burnt rubber, if sparks are visible, you must immediately disconnect the device from the mains and tell adults about the faulty device.

    5. DO NOT repair or disassemble electrical appliances yourself.

    6. Switching off the appliance DO NOT pull the cord .It is necessary to grasp the plug and gently remove it from the socket.

    7. DON’T play with electrical outlets. If you see a faulty outlet, switch, bare wire, DO NOT touch anything and tell an adult about it right away!

    8. REMEMBER , electricity hates being near water. In order not to get an electric shock, DO NOT touch the switched on electrical appliances with wet hands or wipe the electrical appliances with a damp cloth.

    Rules of conduct near power facilities

    Power facilities are overhead and cable power transmission lines, substations, transformer substations, distribution points.

    Overhead power lines with voltages of 35, 110 kilovolts and above are responsible for the power supply of cities and towns. Overhead and cable power lines with a voltage of 6 and 10 kilovolts are responsible for power supply within cities and towns, as well as rural settlements.Power lines with a voltage of 380 volts provide electricity to apartment buildings, and 220 volts – to individual apartments.

    Substations and high-voltage power transmission lines are divided into voltage classes: 35 and 110 kilovolts and above, and transformer substations with a voltage of 6-10 kilovolts are just those transformer boxes.

    Substations are designed to reduce the voltage in the alternating current network and for the distribution of electricity. Transformer substations are located in every settlement and, due to their ubiquity, pose a particular danger to the population!

    All power facilities pose a real danger to life!

    Remember the simple rules:

    1. Under no circumstances DO NOT touch or even come close to broken wires hanging or lying on the ground.An electric shock can be obtained even a few meters from the wire due to the step voltage. Therefore, let’s agree: consider any wire or electrical appliance energized! Even if two dozen people touched him before you. And suddenly, at the same time, when you took it in hand, someone a few meters away from you turned on the switch! If, nevertheless, a person has fallen into the zone of “step tension”, it is impossible to tear off the soles from the ground. You should move towards the distance from the wire in a “goose step” – the heel of the walking leg, without taking off from the ground, is placed on the toe of the other leg.Remember, when you see a broken wire lying on the ground, in no case do not approach it closer than 8 meters.

    2. LETHAL DANGER to climb on the supports of high-voltage power lines, play under them, make fires, break insulators on the supports, throw wire and other objects on the wires, launch kites under the wires.

    3. If you see a broken wire, open or damaged doors of transformer booths or electrical panels, DO NOT TOUCH ANYTHING and inform adults immediately.

    4. In no case DO NOT open staircase electrical panels located at the entrances of houses, climb onto the roofs of houses and buildings where electrical wires pass nearby, enter transformer booths, switchboard and other electrical rooms, touch electrical equipment, wires with your hands.

    5. In the summer, while on a hike, or going fishing, DANGEROUS to stop for rest near overhead power lines, or substations and fish under the wires of the power line.

    Help for an electric shock victim

    It must be remembered that a person who has been struck by an electric shock can be saved, brought back to life, if it is correct and, most importantly, quickly to help him.

    Remember! You should not take measures to save the victim yourself. It is better followed by adults or energy specialists. Call them for help immediately!

    A person who is well aware of the Rules for freeing a victim from electric shock and first aid can provide effective assistance to a victim of electric shock.

    What actions should an adult take to provide assistance?

    • Call an ambulance
    • Assess the situation and, if possible, release the victim from the action of electric current
    • Provide first aid before the arrival of the ambulance

    Never touch the victim immediately. He may still be under the influence of an electric current. Touching an injured person can also be hit.It is necessary to turn off the power source (unscrew the plugs, turn off the switch). If this is not possible, it is necessary to move the power source away from yourself and from the victim with a dry, non-conductive object (branch, wooden stick).

    If it is necessary to drag the victim away from the mains wire, it must be remembered that the human body through which the current passed conducts current in the same way as an electric wire. Therefore, you should not touch the exposed parts of the victim’s body with your bare hands, you can only touch dry parts of his clothes, but it is better to wear rubber gloves or wrap your hands with dry silk cloth.

    After the cessation of the action of the electric current, it is necessary to pay attention to the presence of signs of life (respiration and pulse on large vessels). In the absence of signs of breathing and pulse, urgent resuscitation measures are needed: a closed heart massage and artificial ventilation (artificial respiration). Examine exposed areas of the victim’s body. Always look for two burns (where the electric current enters and exits). Apply a sterile or clean tissue to the burned areas.Do not use a blanket or towel for this purpose – the fibers from them can adhere to the burnt surface. To improve the functioning of the heart, blood flow to it should be increased. To do this, lay the victim so that his chest is slightly lower than the legs.

    Anyone injured by electric shock should be hospitalized as soon as possible.

    Electrical Safety Signs

    To prevent accidental entry into electrical installations, and thereby prevent electric shock to people, there are special warning signs and posters.They are hung out or applied to the supports of overhead power lines of any voltage, the doors of various electrical panels in which electrical equipment is located, on fences and fences enclosing electrical installations. The presence of such signs implies a prohibition on the part of the population from entering electrical installations or climbing a power transmission line.

    Signs warn a person of the danger of electric shock. Neglecting them, let alone taking them off and ripping them off, is unacceptable!

    Dear guys!

    Do not grieve your parents with your rash actions! Stop, warn your comrade against dangerous pranks near power facilities! By doing this you will save his life!

    Upon detection of wire breakage, sparking, damage to supports, insulators, open or damaged doors of transformer substations or electrical panels, detection of torn signs and posters on electrical safety, in order to avoid accidents, you must immediately inform adults or call 112 .

    Sometimes it seems that trouble can happen to anyone, but not to us. This is a misleading impression!

    Be careful guys! Take care of your life and the lives of your friends!

    Test for knowledge of key electrical safety rules

    1. Where does man meet electricity?

    2. What are the main causes of electric shock to a person?

    3. Why is it dangerous to use electrical appliances without adult permission?

    4. Can I use a TV, kettle, vacuum cleaner if they are out of order?

    5. What should I do if the contacts spark in the outlet and smells like burnt?

    6. Why shouldn’t you touch the bare wire ends?

    7. How should you behave on the street in order not to get an electric shock?

    8. What should you pay attention to when choosing a place to play? And for fishing?

    9. What should you do if you see a broken wire on the street?

    10. How to provide first aid to an electric shock victim?

    11. What do the warning signs mean?

    Download (22.8 mb)

    Memo “First aid in case of electric shock”

    How to give first aid in case of electric shock

    An electric shock is the case when a person must be shown honey.workers, even if first aid was provided competently.

    The current can hit internal organs, for example, the heart or lungs, but this will not be noticeable right away, and problems will appear later. For the same reason, after a strong electric shock, it is necessary to constantly observe the victim, check his health, if necessary, immediately show the medical staff.

    However, it is in our power to take measures to preserve human health, to save his life after being electrocuted, until an ambulance arrived at the scene.help.

    Algorithm of actions in providing assistance to an electric shock victim

    Call the medical team as soon as possible and start saving the person. It is better if several people do this at the same time. The algorithm of your actions:

    1. If possible, immediately turn off the electrical installation, part of which the victim touched. It is necessary to stop the effect of the current on him as soon as possible. The consequences will depend on how long the current will act.It can be very difficult or impossible for a person to unclench his hand or move away when an electric current hits, therefore urgent outside help is required.

    2. When it is not possible to turn off the installation, and a person holds on to the edge of a cable or wire, the cable can be cut off with an ax or other similar tool. The ax should have an insulated handle – wood or plastic. It must be dry.

    3. In electrical installations up to 1000 Volts, the use of improvised means is allowed (all of them must be dry and insulated).To pull a person, you can use wooden sticks, boards, dry ropes. Provided the affected person has dry clothing, pull on them. In this case, you need to be careful and observe precautions, take care of your own safety: do not touch the person himself, his bare skin, as well as any metal objects and wet things.

    4. In electrical installations above 1000 Volts, special tools and protective equipment must already be used: dielectric gloves, boots or galoshes, as well as insulating rods and tongs.

    Protection against electric shock

    1. Place a dry wooden board or plywood under the fallen victim.

    2. Check for a pulse on both the wrist and neck.

    3. Check the pupils: Pupils that are too wide will indicate that the blood supply to the victim’s brain has been severely impaired.

    Further actions depend on the state of the person after exposure to the current.

    First aid for electric shock

    The simplest measures are taken if he is conscious. The affected person must be provided with peace. While you are waiting for medical help, put him as comfortably as possible, cover him with a blanket, constantly check his breathing and pulse. In the presence of burns, bruises or fractures, appropriate first aid is required. If nothing like this is found, do not try to give the victim any medications.

    A person who has lost consciousness also needs peace. It is important to check if he is breathing while doing this. It is necessary to lay it on a soft mat, to unbutton the clothes on it so that it does not interfere with breathing, to provide oxygen access. Also, rescue measures include cleansing the mouth: blood and mucus can accumulate in its cavity. Before the arrival of the medical team, you need to try to warm the victim, as well as monitor the state of his breathing.

    The algorithm of action includes artificial respiration and chest compressions if the victim does not show signs of life or is breathing intermittently.Before starting these procedures, as in the previous case, you need to free the affected person from the restraining clothing, and also clean his oral cavity. Continue to do artificial respiration and massage until the person comes to his senses or the medical staff arrives.

    Electrical safety for the population

    One of the features of electric current is that it
    invisible, has no smell or color, therefore it can be detected without special
    a person cannot.An electric current strikes suddenly when a person
    turns out to be “included” in the current path. In this case, the current damages the tissue
    all the way through the human body.

    Electric shock can occur when
    approaching an unacceptably close, dangerous distance to those under
    voltage to live parts, as well as when a person gets under
    called “step voltage” occurring in the area where wires fall to ground
    operating power lines.

    Is homemade
    electricity”?

    Whole
    home “electric park”, operates from a 220 volt network. Current strength,
    which flows in the wires of our apartments is 5 – 10 amperes, which is deadly
    dangerous. Already with a current strength of 0.1-0.15 amperes, a person cannot on their own
    come off the electrical wire.

    From
    household appliances, washing machines are the most dangerous: they are usually installed
    in damp rooms, near a water supply system, and an electric cable is thrown,
    usually just on the floor.Electric heaters are dangerous. Electrical devices,
    having a metal case, are more dangerous than devices in a plastic case.

    A mortally dangerous situation in everyday life occurs when a person,
    touching an uninsulated wire, at the same time touching the ground with his feet
    or rests the other hand on grounded objects, such as a battery
    heating or water pipe.

    Which
    voltage, current, frequency is considered dangerous?

    Current,
    passing through the human body, affects the central and peripheral
    nervous systems, causing disruption or arrest of the heart and breathing.Also
    in case of electric shock, you can get an electrical burn, mechanical
    injury due to muscle contraction under the influence of current and electrical blinding
    arc. Death is usually due to cardiac arrest, or breathing, or both.
    another.

    More
    in all, the central nervous system suffers from the action of an electric current.
    Due to its damage, breathing and cardiac activity are disturbed. Most
    vulnerable areas of the body are the lateral surfaces of the neck, temples, back
    side of the palm; the surface of the palm between the thumb and forefinger, hand
    in the area above the hand, shoulder, back, front of the leg, acupuncture points,
    located in different places of the body.

    AC and DC currents are almost equally dangerous.
    Under the influence of direct current, the muscles of the body contract. If a person took up
    an energized piece of equipment, it may not be able to
    come off without help. Moreover, he may be attracted
    to a dangerous place. Under the influence of alternating current, the muscles periodically contract
    with the frequency of the current, but the pause between contractions is not enough to free oneself.

    What
    factors influence the degree of damage from electric current?

    Value
    the current passing through the human body depends on the resistance of the skin. When
    a person touches a wire that is energized above about 240 volts,
    the current pierces the skin. If a current flows through the wire, the magnitude of which is not yet
    fatal but sufficient to cause involuntary contraction
    muscles of the hand (the hand seems to “stick” to the wire), then the resistance of the skin gradually
    decreases, and, in the end, the current reaches fatal for humans
    magnitudes.A person who is in such a dangerous situation should as soon as possible
    help, trying to “tear” it from the wire, without exposing
    danger yourself. The lower the resistance of the human body, the higher the current.

    Resistance
    decreases under the influence of the following factors:

    • high voltage;
    • skin moisture;
    • long exposure time;
    • lowering the partial pressure of oxygen in the air: in the mountains, in
      in poorly ventilated rooms, a person becomes significantly more vulnerable;
    • increase in the content of carbon dioxide in the air;
    • high air temperature;
    • carelessness, mental unpreparedness for a possible electrical
      blow: the human body is so peculiarly arranged that the intellect
      can control body resistance.

    What
    to do to avoid danger

    Before
    in total, all instructions and safety measures must be followed:

    • if
      you change a light bulb, plugs, wash the refrigerator or electric stove, turn off
      device from the mains;
    • not
      pull the plug out of the socket by pulling the cord: sooner or later it will break;
    • don’t take it
      by the electrical plug with a wet hand;
    • sockets
      should be installed as far as possible from sinks, baths;
    • not
      wrap switches and sockets with insulating tape;
    • using
      extension cord, after finishing work, first unplug it and then
      roll into a ring;
    • not
      drive a nail into the wall if you don’t know where the hidden electrical wiring goes;
    • follow
      so that sockets and other connectors do not spark, heat up, do not crackle;
    • watch
      so that the instrument wires are not pinched by furniture, doors, window
      frame, did not touch gas pipes and radiators;
    • not
      it is recommended to walk under high voltage power lines.Created
      with them in the air, electrical voltage has a harmful effect on the body;
    • not
      you should approach a broken wire on power lines, you may
      hit the step voltage;
    • at
      Do not touch the side of the trolleybus with your hand. Trolleybus body
      may be energized due to insulation breakdown. Better jump in
      trolley, not to enter; jump out, not go out: so that there is no situation,
      when one foot is on the ground and the other is on the step of the trolleybus.Electric trains and
      trams are not dangerous in this respect, because they are always grounded;
    • if you are engaged in the electrification of a country house, watch out for
      so that the wires leading to the house do not fall into the area of ​​possible falling trees.

    What
    what to do if someone gets an electric shock?

    Immediately
    provide assistance, first of all, freeing the victim from the impact
    electricity. To do this, you need to de-energize the apartment (turn the switch,
    switch, unscrew the plug, etc.etc.) or at least drag the person away from the
    places of contact with current. When doing this, you must wear rubber gloves or
    wrap your hand with a dry cloth. If available, wear rubber
    boots or put dry boards, rubber mat or, in extreme
    case, rolled dry clothes. PROTECT YOURSELF !!!

    If
    the person is conscious, put him on the floor with his legs raised by 25-30
    centimeters, and if he is unconscious – horizontally, on his back, on something
    solid.Open all windows and vents (the victim needs fresh air),
    rub the body, let the ammonia sniff. If a person is burned, do not
    use water to revive him.

    Immediately
    call an ambulance or take the victim to a doctor.

    At
    cardiac arrest and respiratory arrest, start artificial respiration immediately and
    heart massage or find someone who has these skills.

    REMEMBER !!!
    Even if a person regains consciousness and says that everything is fine with him, his
    must be delivered to a medical institution, i.e.j. consequences from exposure
    electric current may appear after a few hours and lead to more
    serious consequences, up to death.

    Why in damp rooms
    possible electric shock to a person, even if he
    touches the glass bulb of an electric light bulb?

    Glass bottle
    an electric light bulb, covered with a layer of moisture, conducts an electric current,
    which, under certain conditions, can cause damage to a person.

    Why is it dangerous to touch the masts
    high voltage, because the wires with current are separated from them by whole garlands
    insulators?

    Ideal insulators are not
    exists. Even the porcelain from which high-voltage insulators are made changes
    its properties depending on the weather. Slightly dusty and damp
    the surface of the insulator serves as a current conductor. Considering that by wire
    there is a high voltage current, then its leakage, even a small one, will be dangerous for
    human life.

    Why is it dangerous to be near
    where the broken high voltage wire touches the ground?

    Earth,
    being a conductor of electric current, it becomes, as it were, a continuation
    wires. The current path is not interrupted and it spreads over the ground. Any point on
    the surface of the earth located in the current spreading zone at the time of its spreading
    receives a certain electrical potential, which decreases as
    distance from the point of contact of the wire with the ground.Electric shock
    current occurs when a person’s feet touch two points on the ground that have
    different electrical potentials.

    Step voltage is the potential difference located on
    step distance. The wider the step, the greater the potential difference, the more likely
    defeat. A dangerous wire is formed around a wire that is broken and lying on the ground.
    zone with a radius of 8-10 meters. When entering the step voltage zone, a person is threatened
    danger if he has not even touched the wire.Leave the danger area near
    a wire lying on the ground, you need to jump with two legs or steps without interruption
    feet off the ground and without creating a gap between the feet (the heel of the walking foot
    without taking off from the ground, put to the toe of the other leg) at a distance not
    less than 8-10 meters.

    Why is it dangerous during a thunderstorm
    stand in the crowd?

    During a thunderstorm, it is dangerous to stand in
    crowds because the vapors released when people breathe increase
    electrical conductivity of air.

    Why
    a lightning rod removes lightning from a person, and a tree, on the contrary, promotes a strike?

    Generally lightning rod
    removes lightning, but in no case should you think that if you become in time
    thunderstorms under a lightning rod, it will always protect against lightning strikes. If you will be
    stand even a short distance from the lightning rod, then in your body at the moment
    lightning strike, an induced charge is formed, between it and the charge of the lightning rod
    a spark discharge can easily occur.

    Why lightning passing
    through a tree, can deviate and pass through a person standing near the tree?

    If
    you are standing in the steppe at a distance of tens of meters from a lonely tree, then
    you are better protected from lightning strikes than if there was no tree.
    The electric current passes mainly through the section of the circuit with less resistance.
    If the human body turns out to be the best conductor, then the electric current will pass
    through it, not through the tree.

    Rules for the use of household electrical appliances

    Date of publication: .

    Why do you need to know the rules for using electrical appliances?

    Electrical appliances are our faithful friends and assistants. Although they are not alive, but iron, but you need to handle them carefully and carefully. Electric current, without which no device will work, can be very dangerous.In order not to suffer from improper handling of electricity, we will get acquainted with the basic rules for using electrical appliances, which everyone should know.

    Rule one:

    Do not insert foreign objects into the socket!

    As you already know, the socket is designed to connect electrical appliances to the network, and not at all for your fingers. However, it is dangerous to put not only fingers into the outlet, but also foreign objects, especially metal: nails, wire, knitting needles, hairpins.These items are good conductors of electrical current! The current on them, like on a bridge, will instantly transfer to your hand, and hit as if you had thrust your finger into the socket.

    Rule two:

    Do not touch bare wires with your hands!

    The wires through which the electric current flows to the devices have insulation protection. This means that the metal wire, where the electricity flows, is placed in another wire, plastic, rubber, with a fabric winding.And rubber, and plastic, and fabric are insulators through which the current does not pass and cannot harm anyone. But it happens that the insulating sheath of the wire is damaged, and the dangerous metal wire is exposed. It is very dangerous. If you touch a bare wire when the device is turned on, you can get an electric shock.

    Therefore, before connecting the device to the network, check whether metal wires are peeking out from under the insulating sheath. If so, never use such a device until it has been repaired!

    Third rule:

    Do not touch the switched on devices with wet hands!

    Remember that water is a conductor of electrical current.She, like metal objects, is a bridge over which electricity is transferred to a person. If you touch a switched on electrical appliance with wet hands, you risk getting an electric shock.

    Remember:

    Before turning on, turning off or doing anything else with an electrical appliance, wipe your hands dry!

    Remember, young friend:

    Current does not like wet hands.

    Before turning on the device.

    We need to wipe our hands!

    Fourth rule:

    Do not wipe the switched on electrical appliances with a damp cloth!

    Water, which is in a damp cloth, serves as a conductor for electric current, like water on wet hands.If you want, for example, to wipe the TV turned on, then first turn off the device, and then dust it off.

    Rule Five:

    Do not use electrical appliances while touching water!

    As you already know, water is an excellent conductor-bridge for electric current, so never touch water and a powered appliance at the same time!

    Do not hold one hand under the running water, while the other turn on the electric stove or washing machine.Never use electrical appliances while lying in the bathroom!

    Rule six:

    Do not leave switched on electrical appliances unattended!

    When leaving home, always check that the lights are out, the TV, tape recorder, electric heater, iron and other electrical appliances are turned off. Electrical appliances left unattended are often the cause of fire.

    The seventh rule:

    Do not fall asleep when the TV, tape recorder, electric heater and other household electrical appliances are on!

    Eighth rule:

    Do not plug more than three electrical appliances into one socket!

    Rule nine:

    Do not wrap light bulbs in flammable materials (cloth, paper, oilcloth, etc.)etc.).

    How to behave in the event of an electrical appliance fire.

    We hope that all appliances in your home are in perfect working order and will never light up. But, unfortunately, for various reasons, electrical appliances can ignite and cause a fire. In order not to get into a dangerous situation, you need to know the basic rules of conduct in the event of a fire in electrical appliances.

    Rule one:

    If the device caught fire and the parents are at home, then they need to immediately inform them about the incident!

    Rule two:

    If you are alone, then you need to remember the basic rule:

    Under no circumstances should the device be extinguished with water while it is plugged in!

    First you need to turn off the device, that is, remove the plug from the socket, and only then

    fill with water.If there is no water nearby, you can cover the device with a blanket, cover with

    sand, earth.

    Third rule:

    If you see that you cannot cope with the fire, then you need to leave the apartment or house and call adults.

    To call the fire brigade, dial 101.

    Fourth rule:

    If it is impossible to leave the house and you do not have a telephone, then you need to look out the window and attract the attention of people.

    It is necessary to shout loudly and persistently: Fire! Fire! Dial 01!

    Information for adults! How to help a child who has suffered an electric shock.

    Sadly, our children do not always listen to us and sometimes act in their own way. To prevent the child from being damaged by electricity, measures must be taken in advance.

    All sockets must be fitted with special current-proof plugs.

    Try to hide all electrical wires so that it is difficult for babies to reach them.

    If the child nevertheless stuck his finger or object into the socket and shocks him, it is necessary to push or pull the baby by the edge of the clothing or belt. For safety, you need to stand on a dry board, rubber mat, or a stack of newspapers or books. Wrap your hand with a dry cloth or wear a rubber glove.

    If a child grasps a bare wire, the device must be disconnected from the mains immediately. If for some reason this cannot be done, then you should cut the wire with an ax with a dry wooden handle or have a bite to eat with nippers with well-insulated handles.You can move the wire aside with a dry stick.

    After the current has ceased, it is necessary to lay the child on a flat surface, cover him and immediately call a doctor.


    1RONPR Office for South Administrative District
    Main Directorate of EMERCOM of Russia in Moscow

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    What you need to know about protection against electric shock?

    As we know, circuit breakers protect electrical equipment well, but not a person from electric shock.Simple automata do not react to a current leak of 30 mA. This can easily lead to paralysis of human respiration. In order to prevent such situations, special devices have been developed that react to the leakage of even small currents. These devices are called RCDs and differential circuit breakers.

    To protect yourself from electrical injuries, first of all, it is necessary to connect the enclosures of electrical appliances to the ground loop. When a short circuit occurs in an electrical appliance, it falls on the case; due to the machine, it turns off in a short period of time.Thanks to this, a person will not have time to get an electric shock. It happens that insulation damage can be in the wiring itself. Then a RCBO is used for protection – a differential protection device.

    How does RCBO work?

    A current transformer installed in the RCBO measures the current passing through the device and transfers the measurements to a differential relay or electronic board. If the incoming and outgoing currents are equal, then the insulation of the wiring is good.

    If there is a leakage current that bypasses the RCBO, the device is immediately turned off. If the chassis of electrical appliances is properly grounded, an electric shock can be avoided.

    UZO or Difavtomat?

    Here you need to take into account the following points: for increased protection against electric shock, as a rule, an RCD or a residual current switch is used. If you need to save space in the shield, then it is worth using difavtomats.

    RCBOs with built-in overcurrent protection, or otherwise, a differential circuit breaker, do not need to be additionally protected, they combine the functions of a circuit breaker and an RCD. Visually, on such devices, the letter B, C or D is indicated in front of the rated current.

    The most important characteristic of RCBOs to pay attention to is the rated residual current. Devices with a rated residual current (leakage current) of 10 mA can be used to power individual electrical appliances (for example, a separate outlet), 30 mA for group lines (for example, all sockets in one room), and devices with 100, 300 and 500 mA should be used on entering an apartment, house or industrial premises.This is due to the fact that even the new insulation of conductors is not ideal and has leakage currents, which requires coarsening of the protection with an increase in the length of the conductors.

    Correct application of differential protection significantly reduces electrical injuries, protects the life of your loved ones and your property!

    You can buy everything you need in our catalog.

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    90,000 WHAT TO DO IF I HAVE AN ELECTRIC SHOCK?

    It is difficult to imagine modern life without electricity.More precisely, it is completely impossible, because every day, hour, minute of our life is associated with objects that exist only due to the influence of the current. Therefore, in the enlightened world of illuminated and charged objects, in which the words “tension” and “strength” have a real physical effect, it is important to know what to do if the current struck a person and what not to do so as not to become a victim yourself.

    Emergency doctor of the Presidential Clinic Evgeny Mitin again
    talks about the rules of first aid, this time about how to act in case of electric shock.


    This material is directed to non-professionals who witness an accident so that they can provide first aid before the arrival of the medical team.

    SAFETY ABOVE TOTAL

    Imagine a situation: a person lies in front of us unconscious, what happened to him for sure, we don’t even know.But a wire located next to it, or an electrical object, give us reason to believe that the person has suffered from the effects of the current. (If we ourselves have witnessed defeat, then, of course, such conclusions are useless).

    And so, we are already ready to go to the rescue, but before rushing into the battle for life, it is important to remember the rules of salvation in such situations:

    1. STOP the electricity supply, turn off the breaker, and only then proceed to the rescue.Remember that both the person and the surface the work cable is on are capable of conducting current. Therefore, any careless movement can make you a victim of an unfortunate incident.

    2. CALL THE AMBULANCE. It is advisable that all these actions are performed not by one person, but by several – this way it will be possible to save time, which in an urgent situation is more important than ever.

    3. TAKE AN OBJECT with the help of which it will be possible to remove the wire at a safe distance for you and the victim.A branch of a tree, or something made of plastic and rubber, is best suited – these materials do not conduct current.

    4. AS ONLY YOU HAVE SECURE YOUR OWN SAFETY, you should not run to the rescue anyway: you need to approach the victim with a small shuffling movement of the legs, the so-called “goose step” – the heel of one leg, without taking off from the ground, is put to the toe of the other leg.

    Why is it important? A damaged wire, especially if there is still voltage in it, is dangerous even from a distance.There were such cases that a person did not even have time to come into contact with the current, as he fell backwards from its influence: the whole thing is in the step voltage that arises between the legs of a person walking in the area where the fallen working cables or wires are located. This tension increases with increasing stride length, and vice versa. Therefore, you need to move in short steps, without lifting your feet from the ground, even if you are convinced that the power supply is cut off. Vigilance and accuracy in this situation is the best help.

    AX TO HELP US

    As soon as we are next to the victim, it is necessary to eliminate the source of the injury, but not with bare hands, but by the very object that does not conduct current. We were lucky to find a branch nearby.

    Previously, for all types of work with electricity and wires, it was always recommended to put an ax next to it. They could cut the cable and stop the current in an emergency.But it is possible without an ax, the main thing is to turn off the electricity supply and throw the striking wire at a safe distance.

    FIRST NON-MEDICAL CARE

    We made sure of safety, got to the victim, removed all damaging wires and cables – now we can start providing first non-medical aid.

    1. Assess the person’s condition, check his pulse and breathing if he is unconscious.

    2. If they are violated, try to restore these vital functions – do chest compressions and artificial respiration.

    3. Continue resuscitation until an ambulance arrives.

    ON SECURITY AGAIN

    The above points will help reduce the risk of electric shock for the rescuer himself. But you need to understand that the risk, especially in the case of electricity, still remains.Therefore if we see that we cannot provide assistance to the victim without endangering ourselves, we should not do this. We already have one victim, who needs the second?

    Consider a case: a man is lying on the roof of an electric train, he has been electrocuted due to contact with networks and wires. In order to get it out of there, you need to climb onto the roof. But if we follow this logic, then we will also be struck by the current. Therefore, it is better to call specialists for help, who will first turn off the electricity and lower the victim from the surface of the car.

    HOW NOT TO BECOME A VICTIM?


    We described a situation in which we had to be rescuers, but still, what to do, or rather what not to do, so as not to be in the victim’s place ourselves?

    First, let us explain that the causes of electric shock, of course, can be many: from a lightning strike to contact with an electrical appliance in our kitchen.But each situation has its own “NOT”, which it is desirable to follow in order not to suffer.

    1. During a thunderstorm, of course, it is better to be at home. But if you find yourself on the street, then you should not hide under tall trees, lampposts, in a metal booth, and be near power lines. Lightning strikes an object that is close to it. From our side, it may be the tallest object in the area, most often metal.That is why, in villages, lightning rods are a metal pike, which, in the event of an impact, takes it upon itself, protecting houses in the vicinity from the effects of lightning.