About all

Anti nausea dramamine: Dramamine®-N Multi-Purpose Formula 18 ct

OTC Relief for Nausea and Vomiting

Things to consider

Healthy adults usually don’t experience side effects from antiemetic medicines. Side effects can be a concern for older adults or people who have health problems.

The most common side effects of bismuth subsalicylate are:

  • Darkened stools or tongue.
  • Constipation.
  • Ringing sound in the ears (tinnitus).

These are short-term side effects.

Antihistamines may make you feel sleepy. This can affect your ability to drive or operate machines. It may be hard for you to think clearly. Alcohol can increase the drowsiness caused by antihistamines. They may also cause your mouth and eyes to feel dry.

Who shouldn’t take OTC antiemetic medicines?

Some people are allergic to aspirin or other salicylate medicines. They shouldn’t take bismuth subsalicylate. Don’t give bismuth subsalicylate to children 12 years of age or younger. Don’t give it to children or teenagers who may have the flu or chickenpox. This increases their risk for Reye syndrome. This is a serious illness that can lead to death.

Before taking an antihistamine, talk to your doctor if you have any of the following problems:

  • Glaucoma.
  • Trouble urinating (from an enlarged prostate gland).
  • Breathing problems, such as asthma, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis.
  • Thyroid disease.
  • Heart disease.
  • High blood pressure.

Can OTC antiemetic medicines cause problems with any other medicines I take?

Bismuth subsalicylate may affect how well some medicines work. It also may cause side effects if combined with other medicines. Ask your doctor before taking bismuth subsalicylate if you also take:

  • Blood-thinning medicines.
  • Medicines for gout.
  • Medicines for arthritis.
  • Medicines for diabetes.

Ask your doctor before taking bismuth subsalicylate if you take pain relievers or cold medicines. These medicines may contain aspirin, which is a salicylate. You may get too much salicylate if you take more than 1 of these medicines at a time.

Talk to your doctor before taking an antihistamine if you take sleeping pills, sedatives, or muscle relaxants. Many OTC cold and allergy medicines contain antihistamines. If you use more than 1 of these medicines, you may get more antihistamine than you intend.

Some prescription medicines have side effects similar to the side effects of antihistamines. These could include dry mouth and drowsiness. Talk with your doctor before taking these medicines at the same time.

The NASA Space Treatment That Will Cure Your Seasickness

Packing for a two-week trip through the Arctic on a nuclear icebreaking ship sounds like an extraordinary endeavor, but it’s all part of the job for Dr. Joanne Feldman, Assistant Clinical Professor at UCLA’s Department of Emergency Medicine and a polar expedition physician with Quark Expeditions. Dr. Feldman, better known as Dr. Jo, has become an expert in motion sickness treatment through many seasons of braving the high seas on expedition ships to both the Arctic and Antarctic; and her specialty in wilderness emergency medicine and experience as a physician with the U. S. Antarctic Program at Palmer Station primed her for the challenges of experiencing life at the extremes. For the less seasoned on the seas, Dr. Jo is a resource as well as a potentially lifesaving presence. Condé Nast Traveler‎ spoke with her onboard the ship 50 Years of Victory as it powered through ice near the North Pole:

Let’s say a traveler is going on their first boat vacation—a cruise or an expedition trip—and they’re worried about having motion sickness. Should they take Dramamine? Is that the “go to” for a first-timer?

For most people, Dramamine works if the seas aren’t big. Dramamine has two different formularies. One is meclizine and one is dimenhydrinate, which is Benadryl plus a stimulant. One is drowsy and the other is non-drowsy; that’s how they come off, but the same name, “Dramamine,” is used in the two different formulations.

So if someone is leaving on a last-minute trip, could they just grab Benadryl in a pinch?

Supposedly they can, although it’s not as effective. I think that if you’re in a pinch and you have nothing else, then I would do it. You want to use an antihistamine, and I’m going to go into detail because this is cool to know.

The reason we get seasick is because we’re getting different information going to our brain, and our brain doesn’t know what to do. The way I know I’m moving on a ship is three ways. One is visually: from looking out a window I can see that I’m moving. Two is [that] my inner ears with the semicircular canals tell us that we’re moving, and it’s sending signals to the brain. And three is proprioception: my butt right now, or my feet when I’m standing. You know you’re moving because all of a sudden you have more pressure on one side…and then more pressure on the other.

The problem when we’re seasick is our brain gets confused, because if I’m inside and I can’t see that we’re moving, my inner ear tells me I’m moving but my eyes tell me I’m not moving, and my proprioception tells me I am moving. So there’s a conflict between the eye and the inner ear and, as a result, our body gets confused and that’s what seasickness is. We get nauseated, or we sometimes feel a spinning sensation. By knocking out the information coming from our inner ear…for some reason that overrules everything else and that is how the medications work. It gets rid of the stimulus coming from your inner ear. It’s the same thing with vertigo. When people get vertiginous, we give them an antihistamine like meclizine too, for that.

Dramamine, (dimenhydrinate) dosing, indications, interactions, adverse effects, and more

  • aclidinium

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of aclidinium by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • albuterol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and albuterol decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • alfentanil

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and alfentanil both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • alprazolam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and alprazolam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • amitriptyline

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and amitriptyline both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • amobarbital

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and amobarbital both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • amoxapine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and amoxapine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • anticholinergic/sedative combos

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of anticholinergic/sedative combos by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • apomorphine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and apomorphine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • arformoterol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and arformoterol decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • aripiprazole

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and aripiprazole both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • armodafinil

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and armodafinil decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • ashwagandha

    Minor (1)ashwagandha increases effects of dimenhydrinate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. May enhance CNS depression.

  • atracurium

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of atracurium by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • atropine

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of atropine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • atropine IV/IM

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of atropine IV/IM by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • azelastine

    Monitor Closely (1)azelastine and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • baclofen

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and baclofen both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • belladonna alkaloids

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of belladonna alkaloids by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • belladonna and opium

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and belladonna and opium both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of belladonna and opium by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • benperidol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and benperidol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • benzphetamine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and benzphetamine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • benztropine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of benztropine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • brexanolone

    Monitor Closely (1)brexanolone, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases toxicity of the other by sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • brimonidine

    Minor (1)brimonidine increases effects of dimenhydrinate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Increased CNS depression.

  • brompheniramine

    Monitor Closely (1)brompheniramine and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • buprenorphine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and buprenorphine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • buprenorphine buccal

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and buprenorphine buccal both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • butabarbital

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and butabarbital both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • butalbital

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and butalbital both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • butorphanol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and butorphanol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • caffeine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and caffeine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • calcium/magnesium/potassium/sodium oxybates

    Serious – Use Alternative (1)dimenhydrinate, calcium/magnesium/potassium/sodium oxybates.
    Either increases effects of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Avoid or Use Alternate Drug. Profound sedation, respiratory depression, coma, and death may result if coadministered. Reserve concomitant prescribing of these drugs in patients for whom other treatment options are inadequate. Limit dosages and durations to the minimum required. Monitor closely for signs of respiratory depression and sedation.

  • carbinoxamine

    Monitor Closely (1)carbinoxamine and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • carisoprodol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and carisoprodol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • chloral hydrate

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and chloral hydrate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • chlordiazepoxide

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and chlordiazepoxide both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • chlorpheniramine

    Monitor Closely (1)chlorpheniramine and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • chlorpromazine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and chlorpromazine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • chlorzoxazone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and chlorzoxazone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • cinnarizine

    Monitor Closely (1)cinnarizine and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • cisatracurium

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of cisatracurium by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • clemastine

    Monitor Closely (1)clemastine and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • clobazam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate, clobazam. Other (see comment). Use Caution/Monitor.
    Comment: Concomitant administration can increase the potential for CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression).

  • clomipramine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and clomipramine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • clonazepam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and clonazepam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • clorazepate

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and clorazepate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • clozapine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and clozapine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • codeine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and codeine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • cyclizine

    Monitor Closely (1)cyclizine and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of cyclizine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • cyclobenzaprine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and cyclobenzaprine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of cyclobenzaprine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • cyproheptadine

    Monitor Closely (1)cyproheptadine and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dantrolene

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and dantrolene both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • darifenacin

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of darifenacin by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • desflurane

    Monitor Closely (1)desflurane and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • desipramine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and desipramine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • deutetrabenazine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and deutetrabenazine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dexchlorpheniramine

    Monitor Closely (1)dexchlorpheniramine and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dexfenfluramine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and dexfenfluramine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dexmedetomidine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and dexmedetomidine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dexmethylphenidate

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and dexmethylphenidate decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dextroamphetamine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and dextroamphetamine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dextromoramide

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and dextromoramide both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • diamorphine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and diamorphine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • diazepam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and diazepam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • diazepam intranasal

    Monitor Closely (1)diazepam intranasal, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases effects of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. Coadministration may potentiate the CNS-depressant effects of each drug.

  • dicyclomine

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of dicyclomine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • diethylpropion

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and diethylpropion decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • difenoxin hcl

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and difenoxin hcl both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • diphenhydramine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and diphenhydramine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of diphenhydramine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • diphenoxylate hcl

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and diphenoxylate hcl both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dipipanone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and dipipanone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dobutamine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and dobutamine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dopamine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and dopamine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dopexamine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and dopexamine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • dosulepin

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and dosulepin both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • doxepin

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and doxepin both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • doxylamine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and doxylamine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • droperidol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and droperidol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • eluxadoline

    Serious – Use Alternative (1)dimenhydrinate, eluxadoline.
    Either increases effects of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Avoid or Use Alternate Drug. Avoid coadministration with other drugs that cause constipation. Increases risk for constipation related serious adverse reactions.

  • ephedrine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and ephedrine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • epinephrine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and epinephrine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • epinephrine racemic

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and epinephrine racemic decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • esketamine intranasal

    Monitor Closely (1)esketamine intranasal, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases toxicity of the other by sedation. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely.

  • estazolam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and estazolam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • ethanol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and ethanol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • etomidate

    Monitor Closely (1)etomidate and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • eucalyptus

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate and eucalyptus both increase sedation. Minor/Significance Unknown.

  • fenfluramine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and fenfluramine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • fentanyl

    Monitor Closely (1)fentanyl, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases toxicity of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Coadministration of fentanyl with anticholinergics may increase risk for urinary retention and/or severe constipation, which may lead to paralytic ileus.

  • fentanyl intranasal

    Monitor Closely (1)fentanyl intranasal, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases toxicity of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Coadministration of fentanyl with anticholinergics may increase risk for urinary retention and/or severe constipation, which may lead to paralytic ileus.

  • fentanyl transdermal

    Monitor Closely (1)fentanyl transdermal, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases toxicity of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Coadministration of fentanyl with anticholinergics may increase risk for urinary retention and/or severe constipation, which may lead to paralytic ileus.

  • fentanyl transmucosal

    Monitor Closely (1)fentanyl transmucosal, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases toxicity of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Coadministration of fentanyl with anticholinergics may increase risk for urinary retention and/or severe constipation, which may lead to paralytic ileus.

  • fesoterodine

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of fesoterodine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • flavoxate

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of flavoxate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • flibanserin

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and flibanserin both increase sedation. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Risk for sedation increased if flibanserin is coadministration with other CNS depressants.

  • fluphenazine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and fluphenazine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • flurazepam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and flurazepam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • formoterol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and formoterol decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • gabapentin

    Monitor Closely (1)gabapentin, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases effects of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Coadministration of CNS depressants can result in serious, life-threatening, and fatal respiratory depression. Use lowest dose possible and monitor for respiratory depression and sedation.

  • gabapentin enacarbil

    Monitor Closely (1)gabapentin enacarbil, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases effects of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Coadministration of CNS depressants can result in serious, life-threatening, and fatal respiratory depression. Use lowest dose possible and monitor for respiratory depression and sedation.

  • glycopyrrolate

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of glycopyrrolate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • glycopyrrolate inhaled

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of glycopyrrolate inhaled by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • glycopyrronium tosylate topical

    Monitor Closely (1)glycopyrronium tosylate topical, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases effects of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. Coadministration of glycopyrronium tosylate topical with other anticholinergic medications may result in additive anticholinergic adverse effects.

  • gotu kola

    Monitor Closely (1)gotu kola increases effects of dimenhydrinate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. May enhance CNS depression.

  • haloperidol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and haloperidol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • hawthorn

    Monitor Closely (1)hawthorn increases effects of dimenhydrinate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. May enhance CNS depression.

  • henbane

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of henbane by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • homatropine

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of homatropine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • hops

    Monitor Closely (1)hops increases effects of dimenhydrinate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. May enhance CNS depression.

  • hyaluronidase

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate decreases effects of hyaluronidase by Other (see comment). Use Caution/Monitor.
    Comment: Antihistamines, when given in large systemic doses, may render tissues partially resistant to the action of hyaluronidase. Patients may require larger amounts of hyaluronidase for equivalent dispersing effect.

  • hydromorphone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and hydromorphone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • hydroxyzine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and hydroxyzine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • hyoscyamine

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of hyoscyamine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • hyoscyamine spray

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of hyoscyamine spray by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • iloperidone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and iloperidone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • imipramine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and imipramine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • incobotulinumtoxinA

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate, incobotulinumtoxinA.
    Either increases effects of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. Use of anticholinergic drugs after administration of botulinum toxin-containing products may potentiate systemic anticholinergic effects.

  • ipratropium

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of ipratropium by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • isoproterenol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and isoproterenol decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • kava

    Monitor Closely (1)kava increases effects of dimenhydrinate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. May enhance CNS depression.

  • ketamine

    Monitor Closely (1)ketamine and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • ketotifen, ophthalmic

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and ketotifen, ophthalmic both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • lasmiditan

    Monitor Closely (1)lasmiditan, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases effects of the other by sedation. Use Caution/Monitor. Coadministration of lasmiditan and other CNS depressant drugs, including alcohol have not been evaluated in clinical studies. Lasmiditan may cause sedation, as well as other cognitive and/or neuropsychiatric adverse reactions.

  • lemborexant

    Monitor Closely (1)lemborexant, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases effects of the other by sedation. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Dosage adjustment may be necessary if lemborexant is coadministered with other CNS depressants because of potentially additive effects.

  • levalbuterol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and levalbuterol decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • levorphanol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and levorphanol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • lisdexamfetamine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and lisdexamfetamine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • lofepramine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and lofepramine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • lofexidine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and lofexidine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • loprazolam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and loprazolam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • lorazepam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and lorazepam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • lormetazepam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and lormetazepam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • loxapine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and loxapine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • loxapine inhaled

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and loxapine inhaled both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • lurasidone

    Monitor Closely (1)lurasidone, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases toxicity of the other by Other (see comment). Use Caution/Monitor.
    Comment: Potential for increased CNS depressant effects when used concurrently; monitor for increased adverse effects and toxicity.

  • maprotiline

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and maprotiline both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • marijuana

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and marijuana both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • meclizine

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of meclizine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • melatonin

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and melatonin both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • meperidine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and meperidine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • meprobamate

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and meprobamate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • metaproterenol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and metaproterenol decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • metaxalone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and metaxalone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • methadone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and methadone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • methamphetamine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and methamphetamine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • methocarbamol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and methocarbamol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • methscopolamine

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of methscopolamine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • methylenedioxymethamphetamine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and methylenedioxymethamphetamine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • metoclopramide intranasal

    Serious – Use Alternative (1)dimenhydrinate, metoclopramide intranasal.
    Either increases effects of the other by Other (see comment). Avoid or Use Alternate Drug.
    Comment: Avoid use of metoclopramide intranasal or interacting drug, depending on importance of drug to patient.

  • midazolam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and midazolam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • midazolam intranasal

    Monitor Closely (1)midazolam intranasal, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases toxicity of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Concomitant use of barbiturates, alcohol, or other CNS depressants may increase risk of hypoventilation, airway obstruction, desaturation, or apnea and may contribute to profound and/or prolonged drug effect.

  • midodrine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and midodrine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • mirtazapine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and mirtazapine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • modafinil

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and modafinil decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • morphine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and morphine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • motherwort

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and motherwort both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • moxonidine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and moxonidine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • nabilone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and nabilone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • nalbuphine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and nalbuphine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • nettle

    Minor (1)nettle increases effects of dimenhydrinate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. (High dose nettle; theoretical interaction) May enhance CNS depression.

  • norepinephrine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and norepinephrine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • nortriptyline

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and nortriptyline both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • olanzapine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and olanzapine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • onabotulinumtoxinA

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of onabotulinumtoxinA by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • opium tincture

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and opium tincture both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • orphenadrine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and orphenadrine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • oxazepam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and oxazepam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • oxybutynin

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of oxybutynin by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • oxybutynin topical

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of oxybutynin topical by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • oxybutynin transdermal

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of oxybutynin transdermal by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • oxycodone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and oxycodone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • oxymorphone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and oxymorphone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • paliperidone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and paliperidone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • pancuronium

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of pancuronium by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • papaveretum

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and papaveretum both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • papaverine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and papaverine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • passion flower

    Monitor Closely (1)passion flower increases effects of dimenhydrinate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. May enhance CNS depression.

  • pentazocine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and pentazocine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • pentobarbital

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and pentobarbital both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • perphenazine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and perphenazine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • phendimetrazine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and phendimetrazine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • phenobarbital

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and phenobarbital both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • phentermine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and phentermine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • phenylephrine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and phenylephrine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • phenylephrine PO

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and phenylephrine PO decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor. .

  • pholcodine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and pholcodine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • pimozide

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and pimozide both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • pirbuterol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and pirbuterol decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • pitolisant

    Serious – Use Alternative (1)dimenhydrinate decreases effects of pitolisant by Other (see comment). Avoid or Use Alternate Drug.
    Comment: Pitolisant increases histamine levels in the brain; therefore, h2 receptor antagonists that cross the blood-brain barrier may reduce the efficacy of pitolisant.

  • pralidoxime

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of pralidoxime by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • pregabalin

    Monitor Closely (1)pregabalin, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases effects of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Coadministration of CNS depressants can result in serious, life-threatening, and fatal respiratory depression. Use lowest dose possible and monitor for respiratory depression and sedation.

  • primidone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and primidone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • prochlorperazine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and prochlorperazine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • promethazine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and promethazine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • propantheline

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of propantheline by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • propofol

    Monitor Closely (1)propofol and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • propylhexedrine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and propylhexedrine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • protriptyline

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and protriptyline both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • quazepam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and quazepam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • quetiapine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and quetiapine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • ramelteon

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and ramelteon both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • rapacuronium

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of rapacuronium by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • rimabotulinumtoxinB

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate, rimabotulinumtoxinB.
    Either increases effects of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. Anticholinergics may enhance botulinum toxin effects. Closely monitor for increased neuromuscular blockade.

  • risperidone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and risperidone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • rocuronium

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of rocuronium by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • sage

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate and sage both increase sedation. Minor/Significance Unknown.

  • salmeterol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and salmeterol decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • scopolamine

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of scopolamine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • scullcap

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and scullcap both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • secobarbital

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and secobarbital both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • secretin

    Serious – Use Alternative (1)dimenhydrinate decreases effects of secretin by pharmacodynamic antagonism. Avoid or Use Alternate Drug. Concomitant use of anticholinergic drugs may cause a hyporesponse to stimulation testing with secretin. Discontinue anticholinergic drugs at least 5 half-lives before administering secretin.

  • sevoflurane

    Monitor Closely (1)sevoflurane and dimenhydrinate both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • shepherd’s purse

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and shepherd’s purse both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • Siberian ginseng

    Minor (1)Siberian ginseng increases effects of dimenhydrinate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. May enhance CNS depression.

  • sodium oxybate

    Serious – Use Alternative (1)dimenhydrinate, sodium oxybate.
    Either increases effects of the other by pharmacodynamic synergism. Avoid or Use Alternate Drug. Profound sedation, respiratory depression, coma, and death may result if coadministered. Reserve concomitant prescribing of these drugs in patients for whom other treatment options are inadequate. Limit dosages and durations to the minimum required. Monitor closely for signs of respiratory depression and sedation.

  • solifenacin

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of solifenacin by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • stiripentol

    Monitor Closely (1)stiripentol, dimenhydrinate.
    Either increases effects of the other by sedation. Use Caution/Monitor. Concomitant use stiripentol with other CNS depressants, including alcohol, may increase the risk of sedation and somnolence.

  • sufentanil

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and sufentanil both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • tapentadol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and tapentadol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • temazepam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and temazepam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • terbutaline

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and terbutaline decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • thioridazine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and thioridazine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • thiothixene

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and thiothixene both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • tiotropium

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of tiotropium by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • tolterodine

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of tolterodine by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • topiramate

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and topiramate both increase sedation. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely.

  • tramadol

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and tramadol both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • trazodone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and trazodone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • triazolam

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and triazolam both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • triclofos

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and triclofos both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • trifluoperazine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and trifluoperazine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • trihexyphenidyl

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of trihexyphenidyl by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • trimipramine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and trimipramine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • triprolidine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and triprolidine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • trospium chloride

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of trospium chloride by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • valerian

    Monitor Closely (1)valerian increases effects of dimenhydrinate by pharmacodynamic synergism. Use Caution/Monitor. May enhance CNS depression.

  • vecuronium

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases toxicity of vecuronium by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Additive anticholinergic effects.

  • warfarin

    Minor (1)dimenhydrinate increases effects of warfarin by unknown mechanism. Minor/Significance Unknown.

  • xylometazoline

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and xylometazoline decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • yohimbine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate increases and yohimbine decreases sedation. Effect of interaction is not clear, use caution. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • ziconotide

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and ziconotide both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • ziprasidone

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and ziprasidone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • zotepine

    Monitor Closely (1)dimenhydrinate and zotepine both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.

  • The Pharmacologic Management of Motion Sickness

    US Pharm. 2015;40(12):34-38.

    ABSTRACT: Motion sickness is a common malady in the general population; however, the exact mechanism through which it occurs is not completely known. Some people are more susceptible to motion sickness than others. Several effective pharmacologic treatments are available, including both prescription and OTC medications. Although there are several OTC options for motion sickness, it is important for pharmacists to consider individual patient characteristics before making a recommendation. All agents can cause unwanted side effects and have precautions for specific patient populations.

    Motion sickness is a common occurrence for many people during travel. The brain normally receives signals from the inner ears, eyes, muscles, and joints. Motion sickness occurs when the motion perceived visually does not match that sensed by the brain.1 Motion sickness can manifest during air travel and in cars or trains, but it occurs most frequently during boat travel (seasickness). It can begin suddenly, with signs and symptoms including dizziness, nausea, and vomiting.2

    Susceptibility to motion sickness varies among individuals. Children aged 2 to 12 years are more susceptible to the condition than those aged <2 years. Women are more likely than men to experience motion sickness, especially during pregnancy or menstruation or in those taking hormone therapy.Patients with a history of migraines may be more likely to experience motion sickness. Additionally, motion sickness may be caused by certain medications, including but not limited to macrolides, metronidazole, morphine, digoxin, and some selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.3,4 Numerous treatment and prevention options for motion sickness exist, as described in TABLE 1. Both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic agents are available.

    Scopolamine

    Scopolamine is one of the most commonly prescribed medications for the treatment or prevention of motion sickness. This agent prevents motion sickness via its anticholinergic effects. Additionally, it decreases gastrointestinal secretions and motility and inhibits the secretion of saliva and sweat.5,6 Although scopolamine is available in several dosage forms, the most common form used for motion sickness is the transdermal patch.

    Early studies were conducted in healthy volunteers who participated in the Spacelab missions in the 1970s and 1980s.7-9 Multiple studies were conducted to compare the scopolamine transdermal patch with placebo and antihistamines (dimenhydrinate, promethazine). In addition, various dosages of scopolamine were compared. In these trials, scopolamine was demonstrated to be superior to placebo for preventing motion sickness.

    Comparisons of scopolamine and antihistamines have yielded varying results. Overall, the efficacy of scopolamine was found to be similar to that of dimenhydrinate and greater than that of promethazine.7-9 In sea studies including patients with and without a history of motion sickness, transdermal scopolamine was more efficacious than placebo for preventing motion sickness.10-13 Concerning the time of application, there was a greater benefit when the patch was applied 8 to 16 hours before motion exposure than when it was applied <4 hours beforehand.14,15

    In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, Pyykkö and colleagues evaluated the use of transdermal scopolamine and oral dimenhydrinate for treatment of motion sickness.16 Patients received one transdermal scopolamine patch, two transdermal scopolamine patches, oral dimenhydrinate 100 mg, or placebo. The scopolamine patches were applied 6 to 8 hours before motion exposure. Both scopolamine groups and the dimenhydrinate group experienced a greater reduction in nausea compared with the placebo group. Dimenhydrinate was more effective than the single scopolamine patch for reducing nausea. Adverse effects (AEs) in all groups were minimal, with gait disturbances occurring occasionally after application of two scopolamine patches.16

    Price and colleagues compared transdermal scopolamine and dimenhydrinate for prevention of seasickness.14 Patients were given a transdermal scopolamine patch, oral dimenhydrinate, or placebo. The transdermal scopolamine patch was applied 4 to 16 hours before patients sailed on a ship for 7 to 8 hours; dimenhydrinate and placebo were administered 1.5 hours before motion exposure and 2.5 hours after motion began. Scopolamine and dimenhydrinate provided greater protection than placebo, but a direct comparison of scopolamine and dimenhydrinate was not completed. AEs associated with treatment included dry mouth, drowsiness, and blurred vision, and only dry mouth occurred more frequently with scopolamine than with dimenhydrinate.14

    Dahl and colleagues conducted a study comparing scopolamine patches to meclizine 25 mg and placebo for prevention of motion sickness.9 Scopolamine patches were applied 12 hours before motion exposure, and oral tablets were taken 2 hours before exposure. Scopolamine subjects experienced less nausea compared with subjects given meclizine or placebo.

    Finally, a Cochrane review of 14 randomized, controlled trials involving 1,025 patients evaluated the use of scopolamine for sea- or laboratory-induced motion sickness.17 Many comparators, including placebo, were assessed. Scopolamine provided a greater reduction in nausea compared with placebo; however, there was no difference in the occurrence of vomiting. In comparisons of scopolamine with antihistamines, two randomized, controlled trials determined scopolamine to be superior to meclizine and one randomized, controlled trial found scopolamine to be equivalent to dimenhydrinate.

    Antihistamines

    Antihistamines are commonly used to treat or prevent motion sickness. Since most of the agents in this class are OTC, they are easily accessible to the general public. Several antihistamines can be used to treat or prevent motion sickness. Specifically, antihistamines with central cholinergic blocking properties have proven efficacy in treating or preventing motion sickness.18 Thus, the anti–motion sickness effects of antihistamines are due not to the blockade of histamine1 receptors, but rather to their effects as central-acting anticholinergics.2,19 First-generation antihistamines are both peripheral and central-acting.20 Consequently, the antihistamines used to treat motion sickness are generally first-generation agents.

    The most widely used medications in this class include diphenhydramine, dimenhydrinate (two of the most-studied motion-sickness drugs available in the U.S.), chlorpheniramine, meclizine, and promethazine.2,18,19 Second-generation antihistamines, such as cetirizine and fexofenadine, have been considered, but have not proven efficacious. This is likely because their central-acting properties are insufficient.21

    In an evaluation of 16 anti–motion sickness drugs, Wood and Graybiel found that dimenhydrinate 50 mg was more effective than meclizine 50 mg.22 At low doses, chlorpheniramine has proven efficacy in preventing motion sickness, but its use is limited because its strong central effects result in excessive drowsiness.19 Meclizine, the longest-acting agent in this class, is widely used owing to its accessibility and marketing, although it has lower efficacy compared with other antihistamines and scopolamine, as described above in the study by Dahl and colleagues.9,18,19 Promethazine, which has the strongest antihistaminic and anticholinergic properties, is the most effective antihistamine in the class. Compared with scopolamine, promethazine is only slightly less effective in preventing motion sickness.23

    Ginger Root

    Although ginger is most commonly used as a culinary spice, it is believed to have many medicinal properties, including the treatment of motion sickness. Animal studies have concluded that ginger may enhance gastrointestinal transport and provide antiemetic effects.24 Ginger is also thought to affect gastric motility, antral contractions, and corpus motor response.25-29

    A case report describes a reduction in disequilibrium and nausea with ginger root.30 Additionally, Grøntved and colleagues conducted a comparison of ginger root and placebo for prevention of seasickness.31 The population included naval cadets who were not accustomed to sailing on the high seas. Participants were given ginger 1 g or placebo. Ginger root resulted in reduced vomiting and cold sweats compared with placebo. Trends toward reductions in nausea and vertigo were seen, but statistical significance was not reached.31

    Lien and colleagues compared two doses of ginger and placebo for the prevention of nausea associated with motion sickness in 13 patients with a history of motion sickness.32 Patients received ginger 1 g or 2 g or placebo before undergoing induced motion. Patients given ginger had less nausea, a prolonged time to nausea onset, and a shorter recovery time.

    Ginger may cause diarrhea, gastric reflux, flatulence, and mouth irritation.24,33 Owing to ginger’s anticholinergic properties, caution should be exercised in elderly patients, patients with renal or hepatic impairment, and patients with pyloric, urinary/bladder, or intestinal obstruction.24,33 Ginger can result in drug interactions. It may enhance the effects of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, which can potentially result in toxicity, mainly bleeding. It may also inhibit the activity of some antihypertensive agents.34-37

    Other Agents

    Other pharmacologic agents have been investigated for the treatment of motion sickness, including sympathomimetics (e.g., d-amphetamine and ephedrine), other antiemetics, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, and tricyclic antidepressants.4,18,19,21 The mechanism by which sympathomimetics like amphetamine prevent motion sickness is unclear.19 Initially, it was thought that these agents increased the amount of norepinephrine in the central nervous system (CNS), which in turn countered the increased acetylcholine activity responsible for motion sickness.38 This notion was called into question after Takeda and colleagues proved that these medications do not increase CNS catecholamines.39 The latest theory targets the increase in dopamine.40

    When used alone or in combination with scopolamine or promethazine, d-amphetamine is a viable prophylactic option.38 Owing to its stimulant properties, d-amphetamine also helps reduce the sedating effects of antihistamines or scopolamine.18 Ephedrine can be substituted for d-amphetamine as a noncontrolled option, but has shown less effective.41

    The 5-HT3 (serotonin) blocker ondansetron has been studied for treatment and prevention of motion sickness based on its antiemetic effects in patients receiving chemotherapy. Two randomized, controlled trials involving patients with sea- or laboratory-induced motion sickness found no difference between ondansetron and placebo, however.42,43 Levine and colleagues have suggested that ondansetron may be ineffective because of its site of action, as it works at the vagal afferent receptor or the chemoreceptor trigger zone.44

    A small number of studies have investigated the use of phenytoin for preventing motion sickness. Although the evidence appears promising, more studies must be performed before phenytoin can be determined a viable option.45,46 Lastly, the tricyclic antidepressant doxepin, which has strong antihistaminic, adrenergic, and anticholinergic effects, has been used to treat motion sickness. In a comparison of doxepin with a combination of scopolamine and amphetamine, Kohl and Lewis found doxepin alone to be as effective as the combination for preventing motion sickness.40

    Conclusion

    The treatment options discussed in this article have been studied to various degrees, with varying results. Several trials support the view that scopolamine is the most effective treatment option. While other options may be less effective, they are easily accessible and have proven helpful. Furthermore, it is important to keep individual patient characteristics in mind when a treatment option is being selected.

    All treatment options have common, unwanted side effects that occur to various degrees. Because most of these medications work through anticholinergic effects, the most common AEs are drowsiness, dry mouth, dizziness, and blurred vision.18,19,47 In particular, scopolamine can also cause drowsiness, blurred vision, dilated pupils, euphoria, amnesia, and fatigue.5,6 The most common AE with the transdermal route is dry mouth. Although motion sickness occurs to varying degrees in different people and its etiology is not precisely known, several effective pharmacologic treatment options are available. Nonpharmacologic agents are appealing, but evidence supporting their use is inconsistent.

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    10. Parrott AC, Jones R. Effects of transdermal scopolamine upon psychological test performance at sea. Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1985;28:419-423.
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    19. Zajonc TP, Roland PS. Vertigo and motion sickness. Part I: vestibular anatomy and physiology. Ear Nose Throat J. 2005;84:581-584.
    20. Cheung B, Hofer K. Lack of gender difference in motion sickness induced by vestibular Coriolis cross-coupling. J Vestib Res. 2003;12:191-200.
    21. Cheung BS, Heskin R, Hofer KD. Failure of cetirizine and fexofenadine to prevent motion sickness. Ann Pharmacother. 2003;37:173-177.
    22. Wood CD, Graybiel A. Evaluation of sixteen anti-motion sickness drugs under controlled laboratory conditions. Aerosp Med. 1968;39:1341-1344.
    23. Wood CD, Stewart JJ, Wood MJ, et al. Therapeutic effects of antimotion sickness medications on the secondary symptoms of motion sickness. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1990;61:157-161.
    24. White B. Ginger: an overview. Am Fam Physician. 2007;75:1689-1691.
    25. Micklefield GH, Redeker Y, Meister V, et al. Effects of ginger on gastroduodenal motility. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1999;37:341-346.
    26. Phillips S, Hutchinson S, Ruggier R. Zingiber officinale does not affect gastric emptying rate. A randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Anaesthesia. 1993;48:393-395.
    27. Mowrey DB, Clayson DE. Motion sickness, ginger, and psychophysics. Lancet. 1982;1:655-657.
    28. Stewart JJ, Wood MJ, Wood CD, Mims ME. Effects of ginger on motion sickness susceptibility and gastric function. Pharmacology. 1991;42:111-120.
    29. Shariatpanahi ZV, Taleban FA, Mokhtari M, Shahbazi S. Ginger extract reduces delayed gastric emptying and nosocomial pneumonia in adult respiratory distress syndrome patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit. J Crit Care. 2010;25:647-650.
    30. Schechter JO. Treatment of disequilibrium and nausea in the SRI discontinuation syndrome. J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59:431-432.
    31. Grøntved A, Brask T, Kambskard J, Hentzer E. Ginger root against seasickness. A controlled trial on the open sea. Acta Otolaryngol. 1988;105:45-49.
    32. Lien H-C, Sun WM, Chen Y-H, et al. Effects of ginger on motion sickness and gastric slow-wave dysrhythmias induced by circular vection. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2003;284:G481-G489.
    33. Chrubasik S, Pittler MH, Roufogalis BD. Zingiberis rhizoma: a comprehensive review on the ginger effect and efficacy profiles. Phytomedicine. 2005;12:684-701.
    34. Mousa SA. Antithrombotic effects of naturally derived products on coagulation and platelet function. Methods Mol Biol. 2010;663:229-240.
    35. Stanger MJ, Thompson LA, Young AJ, Lieberman HR. Anticoagulant activity of select dietary supplements. Nutr Rev. 2012;70:107-117.
    36. Spolarich AE, Andrews L. An examination of the bleeding complications associated with herbal supplements, antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications. J Dent Hyg. 2007;81:67.
    37. Ulbricht C, Chao W, Costa D, et al. Clinical evidence of herb-drug interactions: a systematic review by the natural standard research collaboration. Curr Drug Metab. 2008;9:1063-1120.
    38. Wood CD, Manno JE, Manno BR, et al. The effect of antimotion sickness drugs on habituation to motion. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1986;57:539-542.
    39. Takeda N, Morita M, Yamatodani A, et al. Catecholaminergic responses to rotational stress in rat brain stem: implications for amphetamine therapy of motion sickness. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1990;61:1018-1021.
    40. Kohl RL, Lewis MR. Mechanisms underlying the antimotion sickness effects of psychostimulants. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1987;58:1215-1218.
    41. Tokola O, Laitinen LA, Aho J, et al. Drug treatment of motion sickness: scopolamine alone and combined with ephedrine in real and simulated situations. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1984;55:636-641.
    42. Muth ER, Elkins AN. High dose ondansetron for reducing motion sickness in highly susceptible subjects. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007;78:686-692.
    43. Hershkovitz D, Asna N, Shupak A, et al. Ondansetron for the prevention of seasickness in susceptible sailors: an evaluation at sea. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2009;80:643-646.
    44. Levine ME, Chillas JC, Stern RM, Knox GW. The effects of serotonin (5-HT3) receptor antagonists on gastric tachyarrhythmia and the symptoms of motion sickness. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2000;71:1111-1114.
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    46. Stern RM, Uijtdehaage SH, Muth ER, Koch KL. Effects of phenytoin on vection-induced motion sickness and gastric myoelectric activity. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1994;65:518-521.
    47. Golding JF. Motion sickness susceptibility. Auton Neurosci. 2006;129:67-76.
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    Best motion sickness treatments for kids in 2019

    The first time your kid pukes in the car, you might be totally caught off guard. What just happened? All you were trying to do was take a little ride to see grandma and grandpa and now here you are, pulled over at a random gas station, desperately hoping that you have enough wipes, brought a change of clothes and can get the smell out.

    Yes, I’ve experienced it.

    As a mom whose kid has gotten both car and plane sick (yes, fellow passengers, your worst nightmare come true), motion sickness is nothing new. Yet every time it happens, it’s the worst.

    Kids are prone to car sickness starting around two years of age, says Dr. Kevin Dahlman, a pediatrician and medical director of Aurora Children’s Health in Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin. Nausea, dizziness and vomiting can happen when the brain receives conflicting messages: “Your inner ear, which manages balance, and eyes, which perceive motion, don’t match with how you’re feeling,” he said.

    When your kid is sitting in a car seat, they’re often not focused on what’s going on outside. That disconnect triggers the symptoms.

    Of course, many lucky kids never experience car sickness. But, if yours do, here’s what you need to prevent car sickness, manage symptoms, and (unfortunately), clean up if it happens, according to a pediatrician.

    Top motion sickness treatments

    • 1. Dramamine Motion Sickness Relief for Kids, $4, Amazon

    Starting at age 2, your kid can take dimenhydrinate, an antihistamine that prevents nausea and vomiting. You probably know it best as Dramamine. While you can give them the adult version (read the label; they may take a half tablet if they’re young), the benefit to the kid’s formula is that it’s a chewable, grape-flavored tablet, which can make them more likely to take it without fuss. Plus, the handy travel case makes it easy to pop in your purse.

    • 2. Children’s Benadryl, $5, Amazon

    You probably think of this antihistamine as suitable for allergies, but diphenhydramine is another option and safe for kids over the age of 2, said Dahlman. Meds are best used when you’re going to be in the car for an hour or two, he said. Have them take the medication an hour before travel. Warning: It will likely make them sleepy, which can be an added benefit — if they’re snoozing they’re not throwing up — but you also don’t want them to arrive at the destination drowsy.

    • 3. The Ginger People Gin Gins Original Chewy Ginger Candy, $2, Thrive Market

    Ginger is a natural remedy to settle an upset stomach. This ginger comes in the form of a candy, which can be a benefit when you’re trying to give it to your kid. These chews are also individually packaged, so they’re easy to grab on the go.

    • 4. The Ginger People Ginger Rescue Chewable Ginger in Mighty Mango, $4, Thrive Market

    Another option when your kid’s tummy feels off, the mango-flavored chewable doesn’t taste as much of ginger.

    • 5. Sea-Band Wristband, Child, $6, Amazon

    “Some studies show acupressure bands can decrease symptoms of motion sickness, while others say there is no difference,” said Dahlman. That said, there’s no risk in trying them, and you may get good results, he added.

    • 6. Travel Scavenger Hunt Card Game, $7, Amazon

    If your kid is prone to puking, Dahlman recommends that they look out the window. “When you focus on the outside, you’re better at perceiving motion, and it’s distracting, too,” he said. So, encourage a scavenger hunt game. Make it up yourself by having them pick out things they see that are “red” or “begin with the letter C,” or use a card game to help build excitement.

    • 7. Regal Games Original Travel Bingo, $8, Amazon

    Getting the whole family involved can also be the distraction your kid needs to avoid nausea. (Just know where yours falls; some get sick by looking at words, while others need something to do.) This throwback game gets the whole family in on the action.

    • 8. Bumkins Kids Long Sleeve Smock, $15, Amazon

    If you have a perennial puker on your hands, a long-sleeved “bib” is a must. (Yes, it’s horrifying that you need one, but here we are.) This art smock fits kids three to five, has a pocket at the bottom to catch anything, and is easy to remove and clean.

    • 9. Disposable Barf Bags, $16, Amazon

    When your kid is a bit older, they can tell you when they’re not feeling great. Or, they’ll show signs like cold sweats or paleness, said Dahlman. At that point, you can help them out by passing one of these back. If you’re going to carry a barf bag, might as well make it a cute and funny one.

    And, before you go: one word on vomit cleanup. The post-puke smell is almost impossible to get out, and it’s tempting to try to use whatever you can to clean a car seat. However, harsh cleansers can compromise car seat material. Always read your car manufacturer’s recommendations for cleaning; often, they suggest a mild soap on the cover and recommend skipping using soap on the straps at all.

    Want more parenting tips? Check out:

    Does your child get motion sickness? Here’s how to help.

    Motion sickness is a common problem in pediatric medicine. Children, like adults, suffer from car-sickness or become sea-sick while boating. Experts estimate that one-third to two-thirds of people suffer from motion sickness. Motion sickness is almost twice as common in females as compared to males. Motion sickness is thought to be secondary to a sensory mismatch where the individual senses motion that is not happening in their environment. Typical symptoms include: nausea, sweating, vomiting and dizziness.

    Prior to giving your child medication, try some simple steps to avoid motion sickness.

    • Let them eat prior to travel and even while traveling, but avoid heavy, greasy or strong-smelling foods.

    • Place them in a seat that allows the child to see out of a window.

    • Continue to keep the “air moving” in the vehicle. You may even give them their own fan.

    • Minimize the use of books and iPad/tablets during trips.

    • Encourage them to sit in an area of less motion (the middle of the boat) and to face forward.

    • Encourage them to focus on the horizon or fixed point

    • Do not allow them to use binoculars or cameras

    Motion sickness medications

    There are four main motion sickness medications: dimenhydrinate, meclizine, transdermal scopolamine and ginger. These are the “generic” names for the various medications and are sold in a huge variety of brand names. To add to the confusion, all four medications are available by the brand name “Dramamine”.

    Dimenhydrinate is known as “Classic Dramamine.” It is over-the-counter and safe for use in children 2 years old and up. It needs to be re-dosed every 6 to 8 hours. Side effects include dizziness, drowsiness, impaired coordination, headache, stomachache and dry mouth.

    Meclizine is often referred to by the brand name Bonine or called “Less Drowsy Dramamine.”  It is also over-the-counter, but it is only dosed once a day. While it has similar side effects as dimenhydrinate, these side effects (especially the drowsiness) occur less often. Unfortunately, meclizine is only approved for children 12 years old and up.

    Transdermal scopolamine is a prescription patch. These patches are then worn behind an individual’s ear, and the medication is released transdermally (across the skin).  A single patch can be worn for 3 days. Transdermal scopolamine is approved for children 12 years old and up. The side effect profile is identical to dimenhydrinate, but like meclizine thought to occur less often.

    Ginger can also help with motion sickness. While there are numerous alternative medicine approaches to motion sickness, ginger has the best research to support its use. Most of the studies used 1 to 2 grams of ginger. Ginger does not seem to have as many side effects the “traditional” medications. 

     

    Most car or boat rides can be addressed without need for medications. Gregory Gordon, MD

    My motion sickness recommendations

    Most car or boat rides can be addressed without need for medications. Certainly, short car rides around town are not “worthy” of medications. In practice, we find few if any children get sea sick on large cruise ships. For long road trips or off-shore fishing, some children will need medications. Ginger is a reasonable alternative to other medications, but often only available in capsules. For children 2 to 12 years old, dimenhydrinate is really their only choice. For people 12 years old and older, meclizine or transdermal scopolamine offer similar motion sickness protection with relatively less side effects.

    Motion sickness during pregnancy | BabyCenter

    Yes, you’re more likely to suffer from motion sickness when you’re pregnant. But if you’re experiencing nausea and vomiting now and it’s never been a problem before, it could just as easily be morning sickness, particularly if it’s early in your pregnancy. With similar symptoms, the two are very difficult to tell apart.

    Interestingly, if you suffered from motion sickness before becoming pregnant, you’re more likely to experience morning sickness during pregnancy. If you’ve started feeling nauseated a lot of the time, but vomit only when you travel, you may have a combination of the two.

    Motion sickness is a relatively common problem encountered when people travel by car, by airplane, and particularly by boat. It occurs when your body’s balance-sensing system – which includes your inner ear, your eyes, and the sensory nerves in your skin, muscles, and joints – sends conflicting messages to the brain. If your inner ear senses motion, for instance, but your eyes don’t, the result is a queasy feeling that may have you reaching for an airsickness bag.

    To help ward off motion sickness in a car, sit in the front seat, open the window for fresh air, and focus on the horizon or a distant object. In an airplane, ask for a seat over the wing, where the ride will be smoothest. On a boat, stay on deck and gaze at the horizon.

    Frequent light, non-greasy snacks may help soothe a queasy stomach, and it’s probably best to avoid having a large, heavy meal just before traveling.

    Though research is scant and results are conflicting, some women say that wearing an acupressure wristband helps with motion sickness as well as morning sickness.

    Can I take medications for motion sickness during pregnancy?

    To get relief from motion sickness, you can use over-the-counter drugs that contain dimenhydrinate (Dramamine) or diphenhydramine (Benadryl). These are low-risk for pregnant women, though it’s always wise to check with your doctor or midwife before taking any medications during pregnancy.

    Although Benadryl is best known as an antihistamine taken for allergies, it’s also used to reduce nausea. Because both Dramamine and Benadryl can make you drowsy, don’t take either medication if you’re driving.

    Don’t combine Dramamine and Benadryl – take one or the other, because taking them together could compound your drowsiness.

    Also, if you’re already taking prescription Bonjesta or Diclegis (vitamin B6 and doxylamine) for morning sickness, don’t add Dramamine or Benadryl to your regimen.

    Talk to your provider before using the prescription drug scopolamine (Scopace) during pregnancy. It’s not dangerous for your baby, but your response to it can be different while you’re pregnant. It can cause side effects such as dry mouth, dizziness, and fatigue.

    Keep in mind that few studies test drugs in pregnant women, which means there’s not enough data to completely rule out risk, even for over-the-counter medications. That’s why it’s important to check with your healthcare provider before taking any medicines while pregnant.

    Dramina instructions for use, price in pharmacies in Ukraine, analogues, composition, indications | Dramina tablets by Jadran – Galenski Laboratorij d.d.

    active ingredient of the drug Dramina – dimensionhydrinate – refers to the derivatives of ethanolamine. Dimenhydrinate is a blocker of H 1 -receptors, has antiemetic, sedative, antimuscarinic, antihistamine effects. Reduces the excitability of the vomiting center of the central nervous system.

    Dimenhydrinate is rapidly absorbed after oral administration.C max in blood plasma is reached 15-30 minutes after ingestion and lasts for 4-6 hours.

    About 98–99% of dimensionhydrinate binds to blood plasma proteins. Dimenhydrinate passes through the placental barrier and enters breast milk.

    Dimenhydrinate metabolism is carried out mainly in the liver. It is excreted from the body within 24 hours, mainly in the form of metabolites, in a smaller amount – unchanged by the kidneys. T1 / 2 ½ from blood plasma – about 5-10 hours.

    • Prevention and elimination of nausea and vomiting due to manifestations of sea and air sickness, with the use of radiation therapy, medicines and after surgery;
    • symptomatic treatment of Meniere’s disease and other disorders of the vestibular apparatus.

    Prevention and elimination of nausea and vomiting due to manifestations of sea and air sickness, with the use of radiation therapy, drugs and after surgery

    Adults and children over the age of 12 years: 50 mg (1 tablet) 30-60 minutes before the start of the trip, then, as needed, 50-100 mg every 4-6 hours, but not more than 400 mg / day.

    Children aged 6–12 years: 25–50 mg (½ – 1 tablet) every 6–8 hours if necessary, but not more than 150 mg / day.

    Children aged 2-6 years: 25 mg (½ tablet) every 6-8 hours if necessary, but not more than 75 mg / day.

    For Meniere’s disease and other disorders of the vestibular apparatus

    Adults: 50-100 mg (1-2 tablets) every 4-6 hours as needed, without exceeding the maximum daily dose of 400 mg (8 tablets).

    Elderly patients should take an initial dose of 25 mg (½ tablet).

    In case of liver failure, the dose should be reduced by 2 times.

    In case of renal insufficiency, it is used in the usual dose.

    hypersensitivity to dimensionhydrinate, diphenhydramine, as well as to other antihistamines of a similar structure, hypersensitivity to other components of the drug. Eclampsia, epilepsy (especially in children), severe renal failure, severe liver failure, acute asthma attack, pheochromocytoma, porphyria, prostatic hyperplasia with urinary retention, angle-closure glaucoma, increased intracranial pressure.During pregnancy and breastfeeding. Children under 2 years of age.

    from the nervous system: dizziness, headache, drowsiness, agitation, insomnia, depression, fatigue, increased reaction time, muscle weakness, impaired coordination of movements, tremor.

    From the side of the organ of vision: possible blurred vision, diplopia.

    On the part of the organ of hearing and vestibular apparatus: tinnitus.

    From the side of the cardiovascular system: tachycardia, arrhythmia, angina attacks, arterial hypotension.

    From the digestive system: stomach pain, diarrhea or constipation, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, increased appetite, weight gain.

    Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: Hypersensitivity to light, rash, urticaria.

    From the immune system: angioedema.

    From the urinary system: Difficulty urinating.

    Others: arthralgia, decreased sweating, dry mucous membranes.

    should be used with caution in patients with renal and / or hepatic impairment.

    Application during pregnancy or lactation . The drug is contraindicated during pregnancy. Dimenhydrinate passes into breast milk in small amounts, therefore, breastfeeding should be discontinued during treatment.

    The ability to influence the reaction rate when driving or working with other mechanisms . Taking the drug can cause drowsiness, impaired coordination of movements, dizziness, an increase in reaction time, therefore, when using dimensionhydrinate, you should refrain from driving or working with mechanisms with an increased risk of injury.

    Children . The safety and efficacy of using the drug in children under 2 years of age have not been established, therefore, the drug is not prescribed to children of this age category.

    dimensionhydrinate can enhance the depressing effect on the central nervous system of drugs such as hypnotics, sedatives, tranquilizers, antidepressants, antipsychotic (neuroleptics), antiepileptic, and alcoholic beverages. The drug can enhance the anticholinergic effect of other drugs.The drug may hide the side effects of ototoxic agents (eg aminoglycosides).

    symptoms: dry mouth, nose, throat, flushing and redness of the face, difficulty breathing, skin rashes; arrhythmia, tachycardia, a sharp decrease in blood pressure with possible loss of consciousness; drowsiness, CNS depression or agitation with hallucinations, convulsions.

    Rarely possible visual impairment, tinnitus; difficulty urinating; stomach pain, increased or decreased appetite.

    Treatment: No specific antidote. Symptomatic therapy is aimed at eliminating the clinical manifestations of an overdose: gastric lavage, the appointment of enterosorbents and drugs aimed at increasing blood pressure, infusion therapy, etc.

    at a temperature not exceeding 25 ° C.

    Date added: 10/29/2021

    Dramina tablets 50 mg, No. 5: instructions, prices, analogs, order with delivery

    Instruction:

    COMPOSITION

    active substance: dimensionhydrinate

    1 tablet contains 50 mg of dimensionhydrinate

    povidone, crospovidone.

    READING

    Prevention and elimination of nausea and vomiting due to manifestations of seasickness and air sickness, with the use of radiation therapy, drugs and after surgery.
    Symptomatic treatment of Meniere’s disease and other disorders of the vestibular apparatus.

    CONTRAINDICATIONS

    Hypersensitivity to dimensionhydrinate, diphenhydramine, as well as to antihistamines of a similar structure, hypersensitivity to other components of the drug.Eclampsia, epilepsy (especially in children), severe renal failure, severe liver failure, acute asthma attack, pheochromocytoma, porphyria, prostatic hyperplasia with urinary retention, glaucoma, increased intracranial pressure. During pregnancy and breastfeeding. Age up to 2 years.

    METHOD OF APPLICATION AND DOSES

    Prevention and elimination of nausea and vomiting due to manifestations of seasickness and air sickness, with the use of radiation therapy, drugs and after surgery.

    Adults and children over 12 years of age: 50 mg (1 tablet) 30-60 minutes before the start of the trip, then, as needed, 50-100 mg every 4-6 hours, but not more than 400 mg / day.

    Children aged 6 to 12 years, 25-50 mg (1 / 2-1 tablet) every 6-8 hours if necessary, but not more than 150 mg / day.

    more than 75 mg / day.

    For Meniere’s disease and other disorders of the vestibular apparatus.

    Adults 50-100 mg (1-2 tablets) every 4-6 hours if necessary, not exceeding the maximum daily dose of 400 mg (8 tablets).

    Elderly patients should use an initial dose of 25 mg (1/2 tablet).

    In case of hepatic insufficiency, the dose should be reduced by 2 times.

    In case of renal insufficiency, use the usual dose.

    CHILDREN

    The safety and efficacy of the drug in children under 2 years of age have not been established, therefore, the drug is not prescribed to children of this age category.

    How to avoid nausea during a long bus ride?

    A long bus trip is stressful for the body, because no one is immune from motion sickness in transport.Someone perfectly tolerates the road, someone experiences slight nausea and dizziness, and someone can become very ill. It depends on the characteristics of the body, the vestibular apparatus of a person and the intensity of motion sickness. The reason for this discomfort is the passenger’s susceptibility to traffic, when the position of the head during the trip directly affects the well-being. The thing is that a weak vestibular apparatus misinforms the body system, which causes unpleasant sensations in the form of nausea, vomiting, sweating, pallor and dizziness.And before ordering a bus for excursions, you should carefully study the question of how to deal with possible discomfort during the trip.

    What is recommended to do on the road for prevention?

    Even if the symptoms of motion sickness are not observed, it is recommended to take the necessary measures to make the trip in the transport comfortable. In order for discomfort not to spoil the trip, you need to take the following measures:

    • Before getting on the bus, drink warm tea;
    • on the road regularly drink water in small sips;
    • Do not overeat before the trip – heavy food will weaken the body;
    • while driving, look towards the horizon;
    • To touch with your feet in a chair, as if imitating walking – this will deceive the body;
    • for a trip, it is better to choose a time closer to the night when you can sleep;
    • Buy menthol drops at the pharmacy and occasionally inhale their smell.

    What should I do if I feel unwell while traveling?

    It often happens that business, sightseeing, corporate trips on the bus end for passengers with discomfort and nausea. What to do if the transport began to get seasick? Or if you have dizziness, sweating, if you get hot / cold?

    • Doctors recommend taking some dry green tea with you. As soon as nausea begins to torment, you need to chew it a little, and the attack, as a rule, recedes;
    • The same effect has a slice of lemon and a slice of ginger – the nausea passes;
    • from motion sickness in transport is excellently helped by a decoction with mint.Before the trip, you should brew the infusion in a thermos and, if you feel discomfort, drink it in small sips on the bus;
    • Each passenger on the road must have a fan with them to refresh their face;
    • It is imperative to take medications with you that will help you survive motion sickness, for example, Dramina, Aviamarin or Gastricumel tablets.

    How to protect yourself from nausea in transport?

    So that a comfortable ride does not turn into an unpleasant ordeal, it is recommended that you adopt tips that, following which, will help you survive motion sickness.

    1. It is strictly forbidden to drink alcohol either before the trip, let alone in transport, even light beer. This will only weaken the body’s resistance on the road;
    2. It is strongly recommended to sit on the bus only in the front seats, in extreme cases – in the middle, because in the “tail” of the transport it makes you sick more intensely;
    3. During the trip, it is better to calmly rest your head on the back of the chair or just look at the road. If you turn your head, you can provoke dizziness;
    4. Many people in transport prefer to listen to music with headphones.It should be calm, but by no means heavy, otherwise the effect will be like alcohol;
    5. For the prevention of motion sickness, it is better to go on an empty or half-starved stomach in order to avoid physiological troubles during possible nausea.