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Bite that turns into rash: Papular urticaria: Symptoms, causes, and treatment

Papular urticaria: Symptoms, causes, and treatment

Papular urticaria is an allergic skin reaction that typically results from insect bites. Itchy bumps often appear on uncovered areas of the skin, such as the face, forearms, and legs.

Papular urticaria is a common condition, especially in the summer months. Bumps on the skin occur due to a hypersensitivity to bug bites. It usually occurs in children but can also affect adults traveling to new areas.

One unique characteristic of this skin disorder is that scratching an area affected by a bug bite can trigger the inflammation of old bites. As a result, it can appear as though there are more new bites than there really are.

Read more about papular urticaria symptoms, treatment options, and when to contact a doctor.

The first symptoms of papular urticaria are usually bumps that are:

  • itchy
  • inflamed
  • raised
  • the same color as the surrounding skin or red on lighter skin

The bumps may appear in a curved pattern or a line, particularly if the bites are from bed bugs or fleas.

Although they can occur anywhere on the body, the bumps typically appear on exposed areas, such as the legs, forearms, and face.

The bumps — also called hives — are usually very itchy. People often have the urge to scratch, but doing so can break the skin. This can cause infections and scarring.

Each bump usually remains on the skin for a few days up to several weeks. The bumps may disappear quickly, only to reappear elsewhere. Papular urticaria tends to recur, and a new bite can trigger an old reaction.

Although it can look similar, papular urticaria is different from scabies, a skin condition caused by burrowing mites. Scabies is a contagious condition that causes rashes, sores, and thick crusts that last weeks. Scabies bumps are usually smaller and flatter in appearance than those that result from papular urticaria.

How can people identify bug bites?

Many insects in the United States can potentially cause a reaction, leading to papular urticaria. The most common causes are insects that live on cats and dogs, such as fleas and mites. Bed bugs are another common cause.

However, any biting insect can cause papular urticaria.

A 2017 study identified risk factors that made children more likely to get papular urticaria, including:

  • having household pets, which can lead to fleas
  • using a mattress without springs
  • daily use of public transportation
  • living in a warm, tropical climate
  • living in a geographic area heavily infested with insects
  • having siblings with a history of atopic dermatitis
  • being under 7 years old
  • being affected by poverty
  • having a soil or earth floor in the main bedroom of a house

Papular urticaria in children

Although papular urticaria can affect anyone, it is more prevalent in children than adults. It commonly occurs in children who are 2–7 years old.

As papular urticaria results from a hypersensitivity to bug bites, people become less likely to get it with time. As children become more and more desensitized to common bug bites, they will “outgrow” the condition. Children tend to get papular urticaria because they have never been exposed to a certain insect bite before and have not yet become desensitized to it.

The bumps will usually go away on their own, but over-the-counter (OTC) medications and creams can ease discomfort, reduce swelling, and prevent infection.

If a person is experiencing serious itching or pain, or the bumps do not resolve, they should contact a healthcare professional. A doctor can perform tests to rule out other causes, such as scabies and dermatitis.

The bumps usually go away on their own. People can use OTC creams and medications to manage discomfort but may need a prescription for stronger steroid creams.

Treatments for papular urticaria include:

  • oral antihistamine medication
  • antiseptic cream to prevent secondary infection
  • steroid cream

However, the best way to manage the condition is to take preventive measures. People should cover their skin when outside, wear insect repellent, and treat household pets for fleas.

If a person has papular urticaria, it is also important to get rid of any sources of infestation. They can do this by:

  • treating household pets with flea medication
  • wearing protective clothing
  • using insect repellent
  • treating pet bedding with flea spray
  • spraying an area with insecticide
  • treating carpets and upholstery with a pyrethroid spray, being sure to vacuum afterward
  • checking mattresses for signs of bed bugs

How can people treat hives (urticaria)?

The main complication of papular urticaria is infection. As the condition causes itchy bumps, people can feel a strong urge to scratch.

This can lead to infections through germs on the fingers and nails entering the skin. Skin infections can cause pain and inflammation, which can worsen the condition.

Papular urticaria is a preventable condition.

The best ways to avoid it are by:

  • covering the skin when outside
  • using insect-repellent spray
  • keeping the home free of bugs
  • treating pets with anti-flea medication

Over time, most children and adults will become desensitized to papular urticaria.

If a person does get papular urticaria, it usually resolves on its own.

Here are some questions people often ask about papular urticaria.

How do you get rid of papular urticaria?

OTC preparations, such as oral antihistamines, antiseptic creams, and topical steroid creams, can help. In some cases, a doctor may prescribe a stronger medication.

How do you treat papular urticaria at home?

To reduce itching, a person can apply cool compresses or taking an oatmeal bath. Sometimes, spending time in another location, for instance, on holiday, may provide relief.

Taking measures to avoid or prevent fleas and bed bugs can reduce the risk of bites and papular urticaria in the home. This may involve using insecticide sprays and treating pets with anti-flea medications.

Which bugs cause papular urticaria?

Any biting insects can cause it, notably bed bugs and fleas that live on pets. Other possible causes include mosquitoes, gnats, bird mites, carpet beetles, caterpillars, and other insects. However, it can be difficult to distinguish a trigger since it stems from a sensitization process rather than a specific bite.

Papular urticaria is a skin reaction to an insect bite. It can either be an allergy or hypersensitivity. Symptoms include small, raised bumps that are itchy and painful.

The condition usually resolves on its own, and people can manage it with OTC antihistamines and creams. People should avoid scratching the bumps, as this can lead to infection.

Papular urticaria: Symptoms, causes, and treatment

Papular urticaria is an allergic skin reaction that typically results from insect bites. Itchy bumps often appear on uncovered areas of the skin, such as the face, forearms, and legs.

Papular urticaria is a common condition, especially in the summer months. Bumps on the skin occur due to a hypersensitivity to bug bites. It usually occurs in children but can also affect adults traveling to new areas.

One unique characteristic of this skin disorder is that scratching an area affected by a bug bite can trigger the inflammation of old bites. As a result, it can appear as though there are more new bites than there really are.

Read more about papular urticaria symptoms, treatment options, and when to contact a doctor.

The first symptoms of papular urticaria are usually bumps that are:

  • itchy
  • inflamed
  • raised
  • the same color as the surrounding skin or red on lighter skin

The bumps may appear in a curved pattern or a line, particularly if the bites are from bed bugs or fleas.

Although they can occur anywhere on the body, the bumps typically appear on exposed areas, such as the legs, forearms, and face.

The bumps — also called hives — are usually very itchy. People often have the urge to scratch, but doing so can break the skin. This can cause infections and scarring.

Each bump usually remains on the skin for a few days up to several weeks. The bumps may disappear quickly, only to reappear elsewhere. Papular urticaria tends to recur, and a new bite can trigger an old reaction.

Although it can look similar, papular urticaria is different from scabies, a skin condition caused by burrowing mites. Scabies is a contagious condition that causes rashes, sores, and thick crusts that last weeks. Scabies bumps are usually smaller and flatter in appearance than those that result from papular urticaria.

How can people identify bug bites?

Many insects in the United States can potentially cause a reaction, leading to papular urticaria. The most common causes are insects that live on cats and dogs, such as fleas and mites. Bed bugs are another common cause.

However, any biting insect can cause papular urticaria.

A 2017 study identified risk factors that made children more likely to get papular urticaria, including:

  • having household pets, which can lead to fleas
  • using a mattress without springs
  • daily use of public transportation
  • living in a warm, tropical climate
  • living in a geographic area heavily infested with insects
  • having siblings with a history of atopic dermatitis
  • being under 7 years old
  • being affected by poverty
  • having a soil or earth floor in the main bedroom of a house

Papular urticaria in children

Although papular urticaria can affect anyone, it is more prevalent in children than adults. It commonly occurs in children who are 2–7 years old.

As papular urticaria results from a hypersensitivity to bug bites, people become less likely to get it with time. As children become more and more desensitized to common bug bites, they will “outgrow” the condition. Children tend to get papular urticaria because they have never been exposed to a certain insect bite before and have not yet become desensitized to it.

The bumps will usually go away on their own, but over-the-counter (OTC) medications and creams can ease discomfort, reduce swelling, and prevent infection.

If a person is experiencing serious itching or pain, or the bumps do not resolve, they should contact a healthcare professional. A doctor can perform tests to rule out other causes, such as scabies and dermatitis.

The bumps usually go away on their own. People can use OTC creams and medications to manage discomfort but may need a prescription for stronger steroid creams.

Treatments for papular urticaria include:

  • oral antihistamine medication
  • antiseptic cream to prevent secondary infection
  • steroid cream

However, the best way to manage the condition is to take preventive measures. People should cover their skin when outside, wear insect repellent, and treat household pets for fleas.

If a person has papular urticaria, it is also important to get rid of any sources of infestation. They can do this by:

  • treating household pets with flea medication
  • wearing protective clothing
  • using insect repellent
  • treating pet bedding with flea spray
  • spraying an area with insecticide
  • treating carpets and upholstery with a pyrethroid spray, being sure to vacuum afterward
  • checking mattresses for signs of bed bugs

How can people treat hives (urticaria)?

The main complication of papular urticaria is infection. As the condition causes itchy bumps, people can feel a strong urge to scratch.

This can lead to infections through germs on the fingers and nails entering the skin. Skin infections can cause pain and inflammation, which can worsen the condition.

Papular urticaria is a preventable condition.

The best ways to avoid it are by:

  • covering the skin when outside
  • using insect-repellent spray
  • keeping the home free of bugs
  • treating pets with anti-flea medication

Over time, most children and adults will become desensitized to papular urticaria.

If a person does get papular urticaria, it usually resolves on its own.

Here are some questions people often ask about papular urticaria.

How do you get rid of papular urticaria?

OTC preparations, such as oral antihistamines, antiseptic creams, and topical steroid creams, can help. In some cases, a doctor may prescribe a stronger medication.

How do you treat papular urticaria at home?

To reduce itching, a person can apply cool compresses or taking an oatmeal bath. Sometimes, spending time in another location, for instance, on holiday, may provide relief.

Taking measures to avoid or prevent fleas and bed bugs can reduce the risk of bites and papular urticaria in the home. This may involve using insecticide sprays and treating pets with anti-flea medications.

Which bugs cause papular urticaria?

Any biting insects can cause it, notably bed bugs and fleas that live on pets. Other possible causes include mosquitoes, gnats, bird mites, carpet beetles, caterpillars, and other insects. However, it can be difficult to distinguish a trigger since it stems from a sensitization process rather than a specific bite.

Papular urticaria is a skin reaction to an insect bite. It can either be an allergy or hypersensitivity. Symptoms include small, raised bumps that are itchy and painful.

The condition usually resolves on its own, and people can manage it with OTC antihistamines and creams. People should avoid scratching the bumps, as this can lead to infection.

Airborne infections

A reminder for parents.

Measles is a viral infection with a very high susceptibility. If a person has not had measles or has not been vaccinated against this infection, then after contact with the patient, infection occurs in almost 100% of cases. The measles virus is highly volatile. The virus can spread through ventilation pipes and elevator shafts – at the same time, children living on different floors of the house get sick.

The period from contact with a person with measles to the appearance of the first signs of the disease lasts from 7 to 14 days.

The disease begins with a severe headache, weakness, fever up to 40 degrees C. A little later, a runny nose, cough and almost complete lack of appetite join these symptoms.

Very characteristic of measles is the appearance of conjunctivitis – inflammation of the mucous membrane of the eyes, which is manifested by photophobia, lacrimation, sharp redness of the eyes, and subsequently – the appearance of purulent discharge. These symptoms last 2 to 4 days.

On the 4th day of illness, a rash appears that looks like small red spots of various sizes (from 1 to 3 mm in diameter), with a tendency to merge. The rash occurs on the face and head (it is especially characteristic of its appearance behind the ears) and spreads throughout the body for 3-4 days. It is very characteristic of measles that the rash leaves behind pigmentation (dark spots that persist for several days), which disappears in the same sequence as the rash appears.

Serious complications can occur with measles. These include inflammation of the lungs (pneumonia), inflammation of the middle ear (otitis media), and sometimes such a formidable complication as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain).

It must be remembered that after measles has been transferred for a sufficiently long period of time (up to 2 months), immunosuppression is noted, so the child can get sick with some cold or viral disease, so you need to protect him from excessive stress, if possible, avoid contact with sick children.

Long-lasting immunity develops after measles. All those who have had measles become immune to this infection.

The only reliable protection against the disease is vaccination against measles, which is included in the National Immunization Schedule.

Rubella is an airborne viral infection. As a rule, children who stay in the same room for a long time with the child who is the source of infection get sick. Rubella in its manifestations is very similar to measles, but it is much easier.

The period from contact to the first signs of illness lasts from 14 to 21 days.

Rubella begins with an increase in the occipital lymph nodes and an increase in body temperature up to 38 degrees C. A runny nose joins a little later, and sometimes a cough. A rash appears 2 to 3 days after the onset of the disease. Rubella is characterized by a pink, punctate rash that begins with a rash on the face and spreads throughout the body. Rubella rash, unlike measles, never merges, there may be a slight itch. The period of rashes can be from several hours, during which there is no trace of the rash, up to 2 days.

The treatment for rubella is to relieve the main symptoms – fight fever, if any, treat the common cold, expectorants.

Complications from rubella are rare.

After exposure to rubella, immunity also develops, re-infection is extremely rare, but can occur.

Therefore, it is very important to get the rubella vaccine, which, like the measles vaccine, is included in the National Immunization Schedule.

Mumps (mumps) is a childhood viral infection characterized by acute inflammation in the salivary glands.

Infection occurs by airborne droplets. Susceptibility to this disease is about 50-60% (that is, 50-60% of those who were in contact and who were not ill and not vaccinated get sick).

It can take 11 to 23 days from contact with a sick mumps to the onset of illness.

Mumps begins with a rise in body temperature up to 39 degrees C and severe pain in or under the ear, aggravated by swallowing or chewing. At the same time, salivation increases. Swelling quickly grows in the area of ​​​​the upper part of the neck and cheeks, touching this place causes severe pain in the child. Unpleasant symptoms disappear within three to four days: body temperature decreases, swelling decreases, pain disappears.

However, quite often mumps ends with inflammation in the glandular organs, such as the pancreas (pancreatitis), gonads. Past pancreatitis in some cases leads to diabetes mellitus. Inflammation of the gonads (testicles) is more common in boys. This significantly complicates the course of the disease, and in some cases may result in infertility. In especially severe cases, mumps can be complicated by viral meningitis (inflammation of the meninges), which is severe.

After an illness, a strong immunity is formed, but complications can lead to disability.

The only reliable protection against the disease is vaccination against mumps, which is included in the National Immunization Schedule.

Varicella (chickenpox) is a typical childhood infection. Mostly young children or preschoolers are ill. Susceptibility to the causative agent of chickenpox (the virus that causes chickenpox refers to herpes viruses) is also quite high. About 80% of contact persons who have not been ill before develop chickenpox.

It takes 14 to 21 days from the moment of contact with a person with chickenpox until the first signs of the disease appear.

The disease begins with a rash. Usually it is one or two reddish spots, similar to a mosquito bite. These elements of the rash can be located on any part of the body, but most often they first appear on the stomach or face. Usually the rash spreads very quickly – new elements appear every few minutes or hours. Reddish spots, which at first look like mosquito bites, the next day take the form of bubbles filled with transparent contents. These blisters are very itchy. The rash spreads throughout the body, to the limbs, to the scalp. In severe cases, there are elements of the rash on the mucous membranes – in the mouth, nose, on the conjunctiva of the sclera, genitals, intestines. By the end of the first day of the disease, the general state of health worsens, the body temperature rises (up to 40 degrees C and above). The severity of the condition depends on the number of lesions. If there are elements of the rash on the mucous membranes of the pharynx, nose and on the conjunctiva of the sclera, then pharyngitis, rhinitis and conjunctivitis develop due to the addition of a bacterial infection. Bubbles open in a day or two with the formation of sores, which are covered with crusts.

Headache, feeling unwell, fever persist until new rashes appear. This usually happens within 3 to 5 days. Within 5-7 days after the last sprinkling, the rash disappears.

The treatment of chickenpox is to reduce itching, intoxication and prevent bacterial complications. The elements of the rash must be lubricated with antiseptic solutions (as a rule, this is an aqueous solution of brilliant green or manganese). Treatment with coloring antiseptics prevents bacterial infection of rashes, allows you to track the dynamics of the appearance of rashes. It is necessary to monitor the hygiene of the mouth and nose, eyes – you can rinse your mouth with a solution of calendula, the mucous membranes of the nose and mouth also need to be treated with antiseptic solutions.

Chickenpox complications include myocarditis – inflammation of the heart muscle, meningitis and meningoencephalitis (inflammation of the meninges, brain matter), inflammation of the kidneys (nephritis). Fortunately, these complications are quite rare. After chickenpox, as well as after all childhood infections, immunity develops. Re-infection happens, but very rarely.

Scarlet fever is the only childhood infection caused not by viruses but by bacteria (group A streptococcus). This is an acute disease transmitted by airborne droplets. Infection through household items (toys, dishes) is also possible. Children of early and preschool age are ill. The most dangerous in terms of infection are patients in the first two to three days of the disease.

Scarlet fever begins very acutely with fever up to 39 degrees C, vomiting, headache. The most characteristic symptom of scarlet fever is angina, in which the mucous membrane of the pharynx has a bright red color, swelling is pronounced. The patient notes a sharp pain when swallowing. There may be a whitish coating on the tongue and tonsils. The tongue subsequently acquires a very characteristic appearance (“crimson”) – bright pink and coarsely granular.

By the end of the first beginning of the second day of illness, the second characteristic symptom of scarlet fever appears – a rash. It appears immediately on several parts of the body, most densely located in the folds (elbow, inguinal). Its distinguishing feature is that the bright red punctate scarlatinal rash is located on a red background, which gives the impression of a general confluent redness. When pressed on the skin, a white stripe remains. The rash can be spread all over the body, but there is always a clear (white) area of ​​skin between the upper lip and nose, as well as the chin. Itching is much less pronounced than with chickenpox.

Rash lasts up to 2 to 5 days. The manifestations of sore throat persist a little longer (up to 7-9 days).

Scarlet fever is usually treated with antibiotics because scarlet fever is a germ that can be eliminated with antibiotics and strict bed rest. Also very important is the local treatment of angina and detoxification (removal of toxins from the body that are formed during the vital activity of microorganisms – for this they give plenty of drink). Vitamins, antipyretics are shown. Scarlet fever also has quite serious complications. Before the use of antibiotics, scarlet fever often ended in the development of rheumatism with the formation of acquired heart defects or kidney disease. Currently, subject to well-prescribed treatment and careful adherence to recommendations, such complications are rare.

Almost exclusively children suffer from scarlet fever, because with age a person acquires resistance to streptococci. Those who have been ill also acquire strong immunity.

Whooping cough is an acute infectious disease that is characterized by a long course. The hallmark of the disease is a spasmodic cough.

The mechanism of infection transmission is airborne. A feature of whooping cough is the high susceptibility of children to it, starting from the first days of life.

It takes from 3 to 15 days from the moment of contact with a person with whooping cough until the first signs of the disease appear. A feature of whooping cough is a gradual increase in coughing within 2 to 3 weeks after its onset.

Typical symptoms of whooping cough:

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • thatm which is gradually turning into attacks of spasmodic cough (a series of cough jerks, quickly following each other on one exhalation) with convulsive inspiration, accompanied by a whistling lingering sound. In infants, such a cough can lead to respiratory arrest. Attacks of coughing are worse at night and end in the release of a small amount of viscous sputum, sometimes vomiting;

• puffiness of the face, hemorrhages in the sclera;

• • • Tongue frenulum (due to trauma to the edges of the teeth, because during a coughing fit the tongue protrudes to the limit, its tip is bent upwards).

Whooping cough is often complicated by bronchitis, otitis, pneumonia, rectal prolapse, umbilical and inguinal hernia.

After having had whooping cough for a long time (several months), coughing fits may return, especially if the child catches a cold or during physical exertion.

The only reliable prevention against whooping cough is DTP vaccination, a vaccine that is included in the National Immunization Schedule. Parents’ fears about the harmful effects of the vaccine are unfounded. The quality of the DTP vaccine is not inferior in its properties to vaccines produced in other countries.

Acute intestinal infections is a large group of diseases that occur with more or less similar symptoms, but can be caused by a huge number of pathogens: bacteria, viruses, protozoa.

In summer, the number of intestinal infections in children inevitably increases. There are several reasons for this.

Firstly, in summer a large amount of raw vegetables, fruits and berries are consumed, on the unwashed surface of which a huge number of microbes, including potentially dangerous ones, live.

Secondly, in summer children spend a lot of time outdoors, and not always even their parents remember that eating with clean hands is a mandatory rule.

The third reason: in the summer, getting into food (dairy products, meat, fish, broths), some pathogens multiply at a tremendous speed and quickly reach an amount that successfully breaks through the protective barriers of the gastrointestinal tract.

From the moment the pathogen enters the gastrointestinal tract to the onset of the disease, it can take from several hours to 7 days.

The disease begins with fever, malaise, weakness, lethargy. Appetite is sharply reduced, nausea, vomiting quickly joins. The chair is liquid, frequent with impurities. The consequence of fluid loss is dryness of the mucous membranes and skin, facial features are sharpened, the child loses weight, urinates little. Painful facial expression. If your child has the above signs of illness, call the doctor immediately. Self-medication is unacceptable.

Prevention of intestinal infections requires strict adherence to general hygiene measures at home, when preparing food and while eating.

During the summer, all foodstuffs should be protected from flies. Ready food should be stored in the refrigerator: at a low temperature, even if microbes get into the food, they will not be able to multiply. The disease can also be caused by illegibility when buying products that are eaten without heat treatment – from the hands, outside the markets, where they do not pass sanitary control. When swimming in open water, in no case should water be swallowed. If you eat on the beach, wipe your hands with at least special wet wipes.

And remember that parental example is the best way to teach a child.

Tuberculosis to a greater extent the respiratory organs, as well as all organs and systems of the body.

People with tuberculosis are the source of infection. The most common is the air way of infection. Transmission factors are nasopharyngeal mucus, sputum and dust containing bacteria.

The multiplication of tuberculosis bacteria in the child’s body leads to significant functional disorders with intoxication phenomena: irritability or, conversely, lethargy, fatigue, headache, sweating. Body temperature rises to 37.2 – 37.3o, sleep and appetite are disturbed. With a long course of the disease, the child loses weight, the skin becomes pale, and there is a tendency to inflammatory diseases. For children, a reaction from the lymph nodes is typical: they increase in size, become dense. If left untreated, the disease can progress to more severe forms.

For the diagnosis of tuberculosis intoxication, it is important to determine infection with the help of tuberculin tests, and for children from 12 years old, also with the help of fluorography.

For the prevention of tuberculosis, it is very important to: lead a healthy lifestyle, strictly observe sanitary and hygienic rules: wash hands before eating, do not eat unwashed vegetables and fruits, as well as dairy products that have not passed sanitary control, eat well, play sports, pay attention to changes in health status.

An important point for the prevention of tuberculosis is the annual Mantoux test, which gives a positive result when pathogenic bacteria enter the child’s body.

main causes and varieties – “Sensitive”

Patients with a rash often turn up at a dermatologist’s appointment at the Yeysk “Sensitive” medical center – this is the most common reason for contacting this specialist. Consider the most common types of rash in manifestation:

Insect Bite: Many insects have substances in their bodies that they transmit with their bite in order to strike the enemy. In humans, these substances cause redness at the site of the bite, itching, pain, and swelling. If it is a flea bite, then a bright red spot will appear at the bite site, painful, with irritation around. If a person is in an area where earth fleas are common, then multiple bites will give the impression of an allergic-type rash.

Infectious erythema: is caused by the B19 paravirus, also called slapped cheek syndrome, and is manifested by a red, shiny rash on the cheeks. This rash is followed by clusters of red papules and spreads over the arms and trunk within four days. Sunlight and heat exacerbate skin manifestations.

Impetigo: a red spot appears on the skin around the mouth and nose, it is very itchy. In young children under 2 years of age, such spots with large and medium blisters appear on the trunk, arms and legs. The disease is highly contagious and affects children, especially those with weak immune systems.

Herpes zoster : a viral disease that presents with a rash similar to chickenpox. This rash spreads, forming a solid red streak, and is quite painful.

Scabies : caused by a subcutaneous mite, is a contagious disease that manifests itself as a rash around the navel and between the fingers. The rash is very itchy, especially at night, blisters and pain appear from scratching.

Eczema: may appear on the site of chafing or incompletely healed wounds. It manifests itself in the form of a dry scaly spot on the skin with severe pain, gradually the skin cracks, becomes rough.

Scarlet fever: is caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, manifests itself with red patches that develop into a thin pink-red rash, like a sunburn, and the skin becomes visibly rough. In addition to manifestations on the skin, a person develops a sore throat and fever with fever.

Rheumatic fever: is caused by streptococcus and most commonly affects children aged 5-15 years. It is manifested by small but painful skin seals, a red rash and swelling of the tonsils with an inflammatory process.

Mononucleosis: a viral disease whose symptoms include a pink rash that is similar to that of measles. In this case, a person experiences pain throughout the body at an elevated temperature.

Ringworm: is caused by a fungus that primarily affects the top layer of the scalp and nails.