About all

Blood pressure medicine that starts with an a: The request could not be satisfied

Содержание

Types of Blood Pressure Medications

Prescription blood pressure drugs come in many classes

Many blood pressure medications, known as antihypertensives, are available by prescription to lower high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension). There are a variety of classes of high blood pressure medications and they include a number of different drugs.

Overviews of the classes of blood pressure medications

Summaries of some of the major types of commonly prescribed cardiovascular medications are provided here.

  • For your information and reference, we have included generic names as well as major trade names to help you identify what you may be taking. However, this information does not signify a recommendation or endorsement from the American Heart Association.
  • If your prescription medication isn’t on this list, remember that your healthcare provider and pharmacist are your best sources of information.
  • It’s important to discuss all of the drugs you take with your doctor and understand their desired effects and possible side effects.
  • Never stop taking a medication and never change your dose or frequency without first consulting your doctor.

Patients taking ACE-i and ARBs who contract COVID-19 should continue treatment, unless otherwise advised by their physician

The classes of blood pressure medications include:

Diuretics

Diuretics help the body get rid of excess sodium (salt) and water and help control blood pressure. They are often used in combination with additional prescription therapies.

Generic name Common brand names
Thiazide diuretics
chlorthalidone Hygroton*
chlorothiazide Diuril*
hydrochlorothiazide Esidrix*, Hydrodiuril*, Microzide*
indapamide Lozol*
metolazone Mykrox*, Zaroxolyn*
Potassium-sparing diuretics
amiloride hydrochloride Midamar*
spironolactone Aldactone*
triamterene Dyrenium*
Loop diuretic
furosemide Lasix*
bumetanide Bumex*
Combination diuretics
amiloride hydrochloride + hydrochlorothiazide Moduretic*
spironolactone + hydrochlorothiazide Aldactazide*
triamterene + hydrochlorothiazide Dyazide*, Maxzide*

Some noted possible side effects from diuretics:

  • Some of these drugs may decrease your body’s supply of the mineral potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. If your doctor recommends it, you could prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar)*, spironolactone (Aldactone)* or triamterene (Dyrenium)* are called “potassium sparing” agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone, but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide*, Dyazide*, Maxzide* or Moduretic*.
  • Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn’t common and can be managed by other treatment.
  • People with diabetes may find that diuretic drugs increase their blood sugar level. A change in medication, diet, insulin or oral anti-diabetic dosage corrects this in most cases.
  • Impotence may occur.

Beta-blockers

Beta-blockers reduce the heart rate, the heart’s workload and the heart’s output of blood, which lowers blood pressure.

Generic name Common brand names
acebutolol Sectral*
atenolol Tenormin*
betaxolol Kerlone*
bisoprolol fumarate Zebeta*
carteolol hydrochloride Cartrol*
metoprolol tartrate Lopressor*
metoprolol succinate Toprol-XL*
nadolol Corgard*
penbutolol sulfate Levatol*
pindolol* Visken*
propranolol hydrochloride* Inderal*
solotol hydrochloride Betapace*
timolol maleate* Blocadren*
Combination beta-blocker/diuretic
hydrochlorothiazide and bisoprolol Ziac*

Some noted possible side effects of beta-blockers:

  • Insomnia
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Tiredness or depression
  • Slow heartbeat
  • Symptoms of asthma
  • Impotence may also occur
  • If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely.
  • If you have been prescribed beta-blockers, consult your healthcare provider prior to conception if you are considering pregnancy or if there is a chance you could become pregnant. If you discover that you are pregnant consult your healthcare provider as soon as possible to determine the safest medication for you at this time.

ACE inhibitors

Angiotensin is a chemical that causes the arteries to become narrow, especially in the kidneys but also throughout the body. ACE stands for Angiotensin-converting enzyme. ACE inhibitors help the body produce less angiotensin, which helps the blood vessels relax and open up, which, in turn, lowers blood pressure.

Generic name Common brand names
benazepril hydrochloride Lotensin*
captopril Capoten*
enalapril maleate Vasotec*
fosinopril sodium Monopril*
lisinopril Prinivel*, Zestril*
moexipril Univasc*
perindopril Aceon*
quinapril hydrochloride Accupril*
ramipril Altace*
trandolapril Mavik*

Some noted possible side effects of ACE inhibitors:

  • Skin rash
  • Loss of taste
  • Chronic dry, hacking cough
  • In rare instances, kidney damage
  • Women who are taking ACE inhibitors or ARBs for high blood pressure should not become pregnant while on this class of drugs. If you’re taking an ACE inhibitor or an ARB and think you might be pregnant, see your doctor immediately. These drugs have been shown to be dangerous to both mother and baby during pregnancy. They can cause low blood pressure, severe kidney failure, excess potassium (hyperkalemia) and even death of the newborn.

Angiotensin II receptor blockers

These drugs block the effects of angiotensin, a chemical that causes the arteries to become narrow. Angiotensin needs a receptor- like a chemical “slot” to fit into or bind with- in order to constrict the blood vessel. ARBs block the receptors so the angiotensin fails to constrict the blood vessel. This means blood vessels stay open and blood pressure is reduced.

Generic name Common brand names
candesartan Atacand*
eprosartan mesylate Teveten*
irbesarten Avapro*
losartan potassium Cozaar*
telmisartan Micardis*
valsartan Diovan*

Some noted possible side effects of Angiotensin II receptor blockers:

  • May cause occasional dizziness.
  • ARBs should not be used during pregnancy. Medications that act directly on the renin-angiotensin system can cause injury or even death to a developing fetus. When pregnancy is detected, consult your healthcare professional as soon as possible.

Calcium channel blockers

This drug prevents calcium from entering the smooth muscle cells of the heart and arteries. When calcium enters these cells, it causes a stronger and harder contraction, so by decreasing the calcium, the hearts’ contraction is not as forceful. Calcium channel blockers relax and open up narrowed blood vessels, reduce heart rate and lower blood pressure.

Generic name Common brand names
amlodipine besylate Norvasc*, Lotrel*
bepridil Vasocor*
diltiazem hydrochloride Cardizem CD*, Cardizem SR*, Dilacor XR*, Tiazac*
felodipine Plendil*
isradipine DynaCirc*, DynaCirc CR*
nicardipine Cardene SR*
nifedipine Adalat CC*, Procardia XL*
nisoldipine Sular*
verapamil hydrochloride Calan SR*, Covera HS*, Isoptin SR*, Verelan*

Some noted possible side effects of calcium channel blockers:

  • Palpitations
  • Swollen ankles
  • Constipation
  • Headache
  • Dizziness

Alpha blockers

These drugs reduce the arteries’ resistance, relaxing the muscle tone of the vascular walls.

Generic name Common brand names
doxazosin mesylate Cardura*
prazosin hydrochloride Minipress*
terazosin hydrochloride Hytrin*

Some noted possible side effects of alpha blockers:

Alpha-2 Receptor Agonists

These drugs reduce blood pressure by decreasing the activity of the sympathetic (adrenaline-producing) portion of the involuntary nervous system. Methyldopa is considered a first line antihypertensive during pregnancy because adverse effects are infrequent for the pregnant woman or the developing fetus.

Generic name Common brand names
methyldopa  

Some noted possible side effects of Alpha-2 Receptor Agonists:

  • Methyldopa can cause drowsiness or dizziness

Combined alpha and beta-blockers

Combined alpha and beta-blockers are used as an IV drip for those patients experiencing a hypertensive crisis. They may be prescribed for outpatient high blood pressure use if the patient is at risk for heart failure.

Generic name Common brand names
carvedilol Coreg*
labetalol hydrochloride Normodyne*, Trandate*

A noted possible side effect of combined alpha and beta-blockers:

  • May cause a drop in blood pressure when you stand up

Central agonists

Central agonists also help decrease the blood vessels’ ability to tense up or contract. The central agonists follow a different nerve pathway than the alpha and beta-blockers, but accomplish the same goal of blood pressure reduction.

Generic name Common brand names
alpha methyldopa Aldomet*
clonidine hydrochloride Catapres*
guanabenz acetate Wytensin*
guanfacine hydrochloride Tenex*

Some noted possible side effects of central agonists:

  • Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet)* may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you’re in an upright position (standing or walking), and it may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication.
  • Clonidine (Catapres)*, guanabenz (Wytensin)* or guanfacine (Tenex)* may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you’re taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels.

Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors

These medications reduce blood pressure by blocking neurotransmitters in the brain. This blocks the smooth muscles from getting the “message” to constrict. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help.

Generic name Common brand names
guanadrel Hylorel*
guanethidine monosulfate Ismelin*
reserpine Serpasil*

Some noted possible side effects of peripheral adrenergic inhibitors:

  • Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren’t severe, and no treatment is required other than to change the dosage. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor immediately.
  • Guanadrel (Hylorel)* or guanethidine (Ismelin)* may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions and if they persist for more than a minute or two, contact your doctor. He/she may instruct you to reduce or omit the next dose of the medication.
  • When taking guanethidine, don’t stand in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure and fainting. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if either of these side effects occurs.

Blood vessel dilators (vasodilators)

Blood vessel dilators, or vasodilators, can cause the muscle in the walls of the blood vessels (especially the arterioles) to relax, allowing the vessel to dilate (widen). This allows blood to flow through better.

Generic name Common brand names
hydralazine hydrochloride Apresoline*
minoxidil Loniten*†

Some noted possible side effects of vasodilators:

  • Hydralazine (Apresoline)* may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn’t usually used by itself.
  • Minoxidil (Loniten)* is a potent drug that’s usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth.

† Used in severe cases or when kidney failure is present.

Types of Blood Pressure Medications

Prescription blood pressure drugs come in many classes

Many blood pressure medications, known as antihypertensives, are available by prescription to lower high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension). There are a variety of classes of high blood pressure medications and they include a number of different drugs.

Overviews of the classes of blood pressure medications

Summaries of some of the major types of commonly prescribed cardiovascular medications are provided here.

  • For your information and reference, we have included generic names as well as major trade names to help you identify what you may be taking. However, this information does not signify a recommendation or endorsement from the American Heart Association.
  • If your prescription medication isn’t on this list, remember that your healthcare provider and pharmacist are your best sources of information.
  • It’s important to discuss all of the drugs you take with your doctor and understand their desired effects and possible side effects.
  • Never stop taking a medication and never change your dose or frequency without first consulting your doctor.

Patients taking ACE-i and ARBs who contract COVID-19 should continue treatment, unless otherwise advised by their physician

The classes of blood pressure medications include:

Diuretics

Diuretics help the body get rid of excess sodium (salt) and water and help control blood pressure. They are often used in combination with additional prescription therapies.

Generic name Common brand names
Thiazide diuretics
chlorthalidone Hygroton*
chlorothiazide Diuril*
hydrochlorothiazide Esidrix*, Hydrodiuril*, Microzide*
indapamide Lozol*
metolazone Mykrox*, Zaroxolyn*
Potassium-sparing diuretics
amiloride hydrochloride Midamar*
spironolactone Aldactone*
triamterene Dyrenium*
Loop diuretic
furosemide Lasix*
bumetanide Bumex*
Combination diuretics
amiloride hydrochloride + hydrochlorothiazide Moduretic*
spironolactone + hydrochlorothiazide Aldactazide*
triamterene + hydrochlorothiazide Dyazide*, Maxzide*

Some noted possible side effects from diuretics:

  • Some of these drugs may decrease your body’s supply of the mineral potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. If your doctor recommends it, you could prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar)*, spironolactone (Aldactone)* or triamterene (Dyrenium)* are called “potassium sparing” agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone, but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide*, Dyazide*, Maxzide* or Moduretic*.
  • Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn’t common and can be managed by other treatment.
  • People with diabetes may find that diuretic drugs increase their blood sugar level. A change in medication, diet, insulin or oral anti-diabetic dosage corrects this in most cases.
  • Impotence may occur.

Beta-blockers

Beta-blockers reduce the heart rate, the heart’s workload and the heart’s output of blood, which lowers blood pressure.

Generic name Common brand names
acebutolol Sectral*
atenolol Tenormin*
betaxolol Kerlone*
bisoprolol fumarate Zebeta*
carteolol hydrochloride Cartrol*
metoprolol tartrate Lopressor*
metoprolol succinate Toprol-XL*
nadolol Corgard*
penbutolol sulfate Levatol*
pindolol* Visken*
propranolol hydrochloride* Inderal*
solotol hydrochloride Betapace*
timolol maleate* Blocadren*
Combination beta-blocker/diuretic
hydrochlorothiazide and bisoprolol Ziac*

Some noted possible side effects of beta-blockers:

  • Insomnia
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Tiredness or depression
  • Slow heartbeat
  • Symptoms of asthma
  • Impotence may also occur
  • If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely.
  • If you have been prescribed beta-blockers, consult your healthcare provider prior to conception if you are considering pregnancy or if there is a chance you could become pregnant. If you discover that you are pregnant consult your healthcare provider as soon as possible to determine the safest medication for you at this time.

ACE inhibitors

Angiotensin is a chemical that causes the arteries to become narrow, especially in the kidneys but also throughout the body. ACE stands for Angiotensin-converting enzyme. ACE inhibitors help the body produce less angiotensin, which helps the blood vessels relax and open up, which, in turn, lowers blood pressure.

Generic name Common brand names
benazepril hydrochloride Lotensin*
captopril Capoten*
enalapril maleate Vasotec*
fosinopril sodium Monopril*
lisinopril Prinivel*, Zestril*
moexipril Univasc*
perindopril Aceon*
quinapril hydrochloride Accupril*
ramipril Altace*
trandolapril Mavik*

Some noted possible side effects of ACE inhibitors:

  • Skin rash
  • Loss of taste
  • Chronic dry, hacking cough
  • In rare instances, kidney damage
  • Women who are taking ACE inhibitors or ARBs for high blood pressure should not become pregnant while on this class of drugs. If you’re taking an ACE inhibitor or an ARB and think you might be pregnant, see your doctor immediately. These drugs have been shown to be dangerous to both mother and baby during pregnancy. They can cause low blood pressure, severe kidney failure, excess potassium (hyperkalemia) and even death of the newborn.

Angiotensin II receptor blockers

These drugs block the effects of angiotensin, a chemical that causes the arteries to become narrow. Angiotensin needs a receptor- like a chemical “slot” to fit into or bind with- in order to constrict the blood vessel. ARBs block the receptors so the angiotensin fails to constrict the blood vessel. This means blood vessels stay open and blood pressure is reduced.

Generic name Common brand names
candesartan Atacand*
eprosartan mesylate Teveten*
irbesarten Avapro*
losartan potassium Cozaar*
telmisartan Micardis*
valsartan Diovan*

Some noted possible side effects of Angiotensin II receptor blockers:

  • May cause occasional dizziness.
  • ARBs should not be used during pregnancy. Medications that act directly on the renin-angiotensin system can cause injury or even death to a developing fetus. When pregnancy is detected, consult your healthcare professional as soon as possible.

Calcium channel blockers

This drug prevents calcium from entering the smooth muscle cells of the heart and arteries. When calcium enters these cells, it causes a stronger and harder contraction, so by decreasing the calcium, the hearts’ contraction is not as forceful. Calcium channel blockers relax and open up narrowed blood vessels, reduce heart rate and lower blood pressure.

Generic name Common brand names
amlodipine besylate Norvasc*, Lotrel*
bepridil Vasocor*
diltiazem hydrochloride Cardizem CD*, Cardizem SR*, Dilacor XR*, Tiazac*
felodipine Plendil*
isradipine DynaCirc*, DynaCirc CR*
nicardipine Cardene SR*
nifedipine Adalat CC*, Procardia XL*
nisoldipine Sular*
verapamil hydrochloride Calan SR*, Covera HS*, Isoptin SR*, Verelan*

Some noted possible side effects of calcium channel blockers:

  • Palpitations
  • Swollen ankles
  • Constipation
  • Headache
  • Dizziness

Alpha blockers

These drugs reduce the arteries’ resistance, relaxing the muscle tone of the vascular walls.

Generic name Common brand names
doxazosin mesylate Cardura*
prazosin hydrochloride Minipress*
terazosin hydrochloride Hytrin*

Some noted possible side effects of alpha blockers:

Alpha-2 Receptor Agonists

These drugs reduce blood pressure by decreasing the activity of the sympathetic (adrenaline-producing) portion of the involuntary nervous system. Methyldopa is considered a first line antihypertensive during pregnancy because adverse effects are infrequent for the pregnant woman or the developing fetus.

Generic name Common brand names
methyldopa  

Some noted possible side effects of Alpha-2 Receptor Agonists:

  • Methyldopa can cause drowsiness or dizziness

Combined alpha and beta-blockers

Combined alpha and beta-blockers are used as an IV drip for those patients experiencing a hypertensive crisis. They may be prescribed for outpatient high blood pressure use if the patient is at risk for heart failure.

Generic name Common brand names
carvedilol Coreg*
labetalol hydrochloride Normodyne*, Trandate*

A noted possible side effect of combined alpha and beta-blockers:

  • May cause a drop in blood pressure when you stand up

Central agonists

Central agonists also help decrease the blood vessels’ ability to tense up or contract. The central agonists follow a different nerve pathway than the alpha and beta-blockers, but accomplish the same goal of blood pressure reduction.

Generic name Common brand names
alpha methyldopa Aldomet*
clonidine hydrochloride Catapres*
guanabenz acetate Wytensin*
guanfacine hydrochloride Tenex*

Some noted possible side effects of central agonists:

  • Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet)* may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you’re in an upright position (standing or walking), and it may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication.
  • Clonidine (Catapres)*, guanabenz (Wytensin)* or guanfacine (Tenex)* may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you’re taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels.

Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors

These medications reduce blood pressure by blocking neurotransmitters in the brain. This blocks the smooth muscles from getting the “message” to constrict. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help.

Generic name Common brand names
guanadrel Hylorel*
guanethidine monosulfate Ismelin*
reserpine Serpasil*

Some noted possible side effects of peripheral adrenergic inhibitors:

  • Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren’t severe, and no treatment is required other than to change the dosage. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor immediately.
  • Guanadrel (Hylorel)* or guanethidine (Ismelin)* may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions and if they persist for more than a minute or two, contact your doctor. He/she may instruct you to reduce or omit the next dose of the medication.
  • When taking guanethidine, don’t stand in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure and fainting. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if either of these side effects occurs.

Blood vessel dilators (vasodilators)

Blood vessel dilators, or vasodilators, can cause the muscle in the walls of the blood vessels (especially the arterioles) to relax, allowing the vessel to dilate (widen). This allows blood to flow through better.

Generic name Common brand names
hydralazine hydrochloride Apresoline*
minoxidil Loniten*†

Some noted possible side effects of vasodilators:

  • Hydralazine (Apresoline)* may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn’t usually used by itself.
  • Minoxidil (Loniten)* is a potent drug that’s usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth.

† Used in severe cases or when kidney failure is present.

Types of Blood Pressure Medications

Prescription blood pressure drugs come in many classes

Many blood pressure medications, known as antihypertensives, are available by prescription to lower high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension). There are a variety of classes of high blood pressure medications and they include a number of different drugs.

Overviews of the classes of blood pressure medications

Summaries of some of the major types of commonly prescribed cardiovascular medications are provided here.

  • For your information and reference, we have included generic names as well as major trade names to help you identify what you may be taking. However, this information does not signify a recommendation or endorsement from the American Heart Association.
  • If your prescription medication isn’t on this list, remember that your healthcare provider and pharmacist are your best sources of information.
  • It’s important to discuss all of the drugs you take with your doctor and understand their desired effects and possible side effects.
  • Never stop taking a medication and never change your dose or frequency without first consulting your doctor.

Patients taking ACE-i and ARBs who contract COVID-19 should continue treatment, unless otherwise advised by their physician

The classes of blood pressure medications include:

Diuretics

Diuretics help the body get rid of excess sodium (salt) and water and help control blood pressure. They are often used in combination with additional prescription therapies.

Generic name Common brand names
Thiazide diuretics
chlorthalidone Hygroton*
chlorothiazide Diuril*
hydrochlorothiazide Esidrix*, Hydrodiuril*, Microzide*
indapamide Lozol*
metolazone Mykrox*, Zaroxolyn*
Potassium-sparing diuretics
amiloride hydrochloride Midamar*
spironolactone Aldactone*
triamterene Dyrenium*
Loop diuretic
furosemide Lasix*
bumetanide Bumex*
Combination diuretics
amiloride hydrochloride + hydrochlorothiazide Moduretic*
spironolactone + hydrochlorothiazide Aldactazide*
triamterene + hydrochlorothiazide Dyazide*, Maxzide*

Some noted possible side effects from diuretics:

  • Some of these drugs may decrease your body’s supply of the mineral potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. If your doctor recommends it, you could prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar)*, spironolactone (Aldactone)* or triamterene (Dyrenium)* are called “potassium sparing” agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone, but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide*, Dyazide*, Maxzide* or Moduretic*.
  • Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn’t common and can be managed by other treatment.
  • People with diabetes may find that diuretic drugs increase their blood sugar level. A change in medication, diet, insulin or oral anti-diabetic dosage corrects this in most cases.
  • Impotence may occur.

Beta-blockers

Beta-blockers reduce the heart rate, the heart’s workload and the heart’s output of blood, which lowers blood pressure.

Generic name Common brand names
acebutolol Sectral*
atenolol Tenormin*
betaxolol Kerlone*
bisoprolol fumarate Zebeta*
carteolol hydrochloride Cartrol*
metoprolol tartrate Lopressor*
metoprolol succinate Toprol-XL*
nadolol Corgard*
penbutolol sulfate Levatol*
pindolol* Visken*
propranolol hydrochloride* Inderal*
solotol hydrochloride Betapace*
timolol maleate* Blocadren*
Combination beta-blocker/diuretic
hydrochlorothiazide and bisoprolol Ziac*

Some noted possible side effects of beta-blockers:

  • Insomnia
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Tiredness or depression
  • Slow heartbeat
  • Symptoms of asthma
  • Impotence may also occur
  • If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely.
  • If you have been prescribed beta-blockers, consult your healthcare provider prior to conception if you are considering pregnancy or if there is a chance you could become pregnant. If you discover that you are pregnant consult your healthcare provider as soon as possible to determine the safest medication for you at this time.

ACE inhibitors

Angiotensin is a chemical that causes the arteries to become narrow, especially in the kidneys but also throughout the body. ACE stands for Angiotensin-converting enzyme. ACE inhibitors help the body produce less angiotensin, which helps the blood vessels relax and open up, which, in turn, lowers blood pressure.

Generic name Common brand names
benazepril hydrochloride Lotensin*
captopril Capoten*
enalapril maleate Vasotec*
fosinopril sodium Monopril*
lisinopril Prinivel*, Zestril*
moexipril Univasc*
perindopril Aceon*
quinapril hydrochloride Accupril*
ramipril Altace*
trandolapril Mavik*

Some noted possible side effects of ACE inhibitors:

  • Skin rash
  • Loss of taste
  • Chronic dry, hacking cough
  • In rare instances, kidney damage
  • Women who are taking ACE inhibitors or ARBs for high blood pressure should not become pregnant while on this class of drugs. If you’re taking an ACE inhibitor or an ARB and think you might be pregnant, see your doctor immediately. These drugs have been shown to be dangerous to both mother and baby during pregnancy. They can cause low blood pressure, severe kidney failure, excess potassium (hyperkalemia) and even death of the newborn.

Angiotensin II receptor blockers

These drugs block the effects of angiotensin, a chemical that causes the arteries to become narrow. Angiotensin needs a receptor- like a chemical “slot” to fit into or bind with- in order to constrict the blood vessel. ARBs block the receptors so the angiotensin fails to constrict the blood vessel. This means blood vessels stay open and blood pressure is reduced.

Generic name Common brand names
candesartan Atacand*
eprosartan mesylate Teveten*
irbesarten Avapro*
losartan potassium Cozaar*
telmisartan Micardis*
valsartan Diovan*

Some noted possible side effects of Angiotensin II receptor blockers:

  • May cause occasional dizziness.
  • ARBs should not be used during pregnancy. Medications that act directly on the renin-angiotensin system can cause injury or even death to a developing fetus. When pregnancy is detected, consult your healthcare professional as soon as possible.

Calcium channel blockers

This drug prevents calcium from entering the smooth muscle cells of the heart and arteries. When calcium enters these cells, it causes a stronger and harder contraction, so by decreasing the calcium, the hearts’ contraction is not as forceful. Calcium channel blockers relax and open up narrowed blood vessels, reduce heart rate and lower blood pressure.

Generic name Common brand names
amlodipine besylate Norvasc*, Lotrel*
bepridil Vasocor*
diltiazem hydrochloride Cardizem CD*, Cardizem SR*, Dilacor XR*, Tiazac*
felodipine Plendil*
isradipine DynaCirc*, DynaCirc CR*
nicardipine Cardene SR*
nifedipine Adalat CC*, Procardia XL*
nisoldipine Sular*
verapamil hydrochloride Calan SR*, Covera HS*, Isoptin SR*, Verelan*

Some noted possible side effects of calcium channel blockers:

  • Palpitations
  • Swollen ankles
  • Constipation
  • Headache
  • Dizziness

Alpha blockers

These drugs reduce the arteries’ resistance, relaxing the muscle tone of the vascular walls.

Generic name Common brand names
doxazosin mesylate Cardura*
prazosin hydrochloride Minipress*
terazosin hydrochloride Hytrin*

Some noted possible side effects of alpha blockers:

Alpha-2 Receptor Agonists

These drugs reduce blood pressure by decreasing the activity of the sympathetic (adrenaline-producing) portion of the involuntary nervous system. Methyldopa is considered a first line antihypertensive during pregnancy because adverse effects are infrequent for the pregnant woman or the developing fetus.

Generic name Common brand names
methyldopa  

Some noted possible side effects of Alpha-2 Receptor Agonists:

  • Methyldopa can cause drowsiness or dizziness

Combined alpha and beta-blockers

Combined alpha and beta-blockers are used as an IV drip for those patients experiencing a hypertensive crisis. They may be prescribed for outpatient high blood pressure use if the patient is at risk for heart failure.

Generic name Common brand names
carvedilol Coreg*
labetalol hydrochloride Normodyne*, Trandate*

A noted possible side effect of combined alpha and beta-blockers:

  • May cause a drop in blood pressure when you stand up

Central agonists

Central agonists also help decrease the blood vessels’ ability to tense up or contract. The central agonists follow a different nerve pathway than the alpha and beta-blockers, but accomplish the same goal of blood pressure reduction.

Generic name Common brand names
alpha methyldopa Aldomet*
clonidine hydrochloride Catapres*
guanabenz acetate Wytensin*
guanfacine hydrochloride Tenex*

Some noted possible side effects of central agonists:

  • Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet)* may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you’re in an upright position (standing or walking), and it may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication.
  • Clonidine (Catapres)*, guanabenz (Wytensin)* or guanfacine (Tenex)* may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you’re taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels.

Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors

These medications reduce blood pressure by blocking neurotransmitters in the brain. This blocks the smooth muscles from getting the “message” to constrict. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help.

Generic name Common brand names
guanadrel Hylorel*
guanethidine monosulfate Ismelin*
reserpine Serpasil*

Some noted possible side effects of peripheral adrenergic inhibitors:

  • Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren’t severe, and no treatment is required other than to change the dosage. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor immediately.
  • Guanadrel (Hylorel)* or guanethidine (Ismelin)* may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions and if they persist for more than a minute or two, contact your doctor. He/she may instruct you to reduce or omit the next dose of the medication.
  • When taking guanethidine, don’t stand in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure and fainting. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if either of these side effects occurs.

Blood vessel dilators (vasodilators)

Blood vessel dilators, or vasodilators, can cause the muscle in the walls of the blood vessels (especially the arterioles) to relax, allowing the vessel to dilate (widen). This allows blood to flow through better.

Generic name Common brand names
hydralazine hydrochloride Apresoline*
minoxidil Loniten*†

Some noted possible side effects of vasodilators:

  • Hydralazine (Apresoline)* may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn’t usually used by itself.
  • Minoxidil (Loniten)* is a potent drug that’s usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth.

† Used in severe cases or when kidney failure is present.

Compare Current High+Blood+Pressure Drugs and Medications with Ratings & Reviews




















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































lisinopril On Label RX 4284 Reviews
lisinopril Solution On Label RX 4284 Reviews
atenolol On Label RX 1269 Reviews
Bystolic On Label RX 900 Reviews
hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 860 Reviews
Diovan On Label RX 854 Reviews
amlodipine BESYLATE On Label RX 822 Reviews
metoprolol succinate On Label RX 758 Reviews
Norvasc On Label RX 673 Reviews
Toprol XL On Label RX 647 Reviews
losartan POTASSIUM On Label RX 615 Reviews
Benicar On Label RX 600 Reviews
metoprolol tartrate On Label RX 585 Reviews
lisinopril 20 mg-hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg tablet Angiotensin Inhibiting Agents On Label RX 513 Reviews
clonidine HCl On Label RX 442 Reviews
clonidine HCl ER On Label RX 442 Reviews
Cozaar On Label RX 418 Reviews
Diovan HCT On Label RX 418 Reviews
spironolactone On Label RX 387 Reviews
propranolol HCL On Label RX 378 Reviews
propranolol HCL ER On Label RX 378 Reviews
propranolol Solution On Label RX 378 Reviews
propranolol Capsule, Extended Release 24 hr (Capsule, ER hr) On Label RX 378 Reviews
carvedilol On Label RX 343 Reviews
Coreg On Label RX 327 Reviews
Azor On Label RX 321 Reviews
Benicar HCT On Label RX 291 Reviews
Exforge On Label RX 251 Reviews
Avapro On Label RX 238 Reviews
Lotrel On Label RX 230 Reviews
furosemide On Label RX 228 Reviews
furosemide Solution On Label RX 228 Reviews
verapamil ER On Label RX 223 Reviews
verapamil ER Capsule, Extended Release Pellets 24 hr On Label RX 223 Reviews
verapamil HCL On Label RX 223 Reviews
Lasix On Label RX 196 Reviews
Lasix 10 mg/mL oral solution On Label RX 196 Reviews
Hyzaar On Label RX 186 Reviews
Inderal tablet On Label RX 183 Reviews
losartan-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 181 Reviews
enalapril maleate On Label RX 180 Reviews
enalapril maleate Solution On Label RX 180 Reviews
Tekturna On Label RX 178 Reviews
Micardis On Label RX 177 Reviews
diltiazem 24HR ER On Label RX 170 Reviews
diltiazem HCl On Label RX 170 Reviews
diltiazem ER On Label RX 170 Reviews
diltiazem ER Capsule, Extended Release Degradable On Label RX 170 Reviews
diltiazem 12HR ER On Label RX 170 Reviews
diltiazem ER Tablet, Extended Release 24 hr On Label RX 170 Reviews
ramipril On Label RX 164 Reviews
Lopressor On Label RX 161 Reviews
Altace On Label RX 156 Reviews
triamterene-hydrochlorothiazid On Label RX 156 Reviews
Micardis HCT On Label RX 154 Reviews
labetalol HCL On Label RX 154 Reviews
Avalide On Label RX 150 Reviews
terazosin HCL On Label RX 141 Reviews
AMLODIPINE BESYLATE-BENAZEPRIL On Label RX 140 Reviews
hydralazine HCL On Label RX 136 Reviews
Atacand On Label RX 119 Reviews
benazepril HCL On Label RX 113 Reviews
doxazosin MESYLATE On Label RX 103 Reviews
doxazosin Tablet, Extended Release 24 hr On Label RX 103 Reviews
Tribenzor On Label RX 103 Reviews
triamterene 100 mg capsule Diuretics Off Label RX 100 Reviews
valsartan On Label RX 90 Reviews
prazosin HCL On Label RX 90 Reviews
nifedipine ER Tablet, Extended Release 24 hr On Label RX 88 Reviews
nifedipine On Label RX 88 Reviews
nifedipine ER On Label RX 88 Reviews
bisoprolol fumarate 5 mg tablet Beta-Blockers (Systemic) On Label RX 82 Reviews
Cartia XT On Label RX 80 Reviews
Aldactone On Label RX 79 Reviews
Ziac On Label RX 77 Reviews
chlorthalidone On Label RX 77 Reviews
Edarbyclor On Label RX 74 Reviews
Maxzide On Label RX 74 Reviews
Edarbi On Label RX 72 Reviews
guanfacine HCL ER On Label RX 71 Reviews
guanfacine HCL On Label RX 71 Reviews
Zestril On Label RX 70 Reviews
Cardizem CD On Label RX 69 Reviews
Dyazide On Label RX 69 Reviews
Tenex 2 mg tablet On Label RX 67 Reviews
Tenormin On Label RX 67 Reviews
Coreg CR On Label RX 66 Reviews
atenolol-chlorthalidone On Label RX 66 Reviews
Prinivil On Label RX 65 Reviews
Valturna tablet On Label RX 62 Reviews
nadolol On Label RX 60 Reviews
benazepril-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 59 Reviews
Catapres On Label RX 57 Reviews
Cardura On Label RX 56 Reviews
Procardia XL On Label RX 55 Reviews
Hytrin tablet On Label RX 55 Reviews
Exforge HCT On Label RX 54 Reviews
Nifedical XL 30 mg tablet,extended release On Label RX 52 Reviews
valsartan-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 51 Reviews
quinapril HCL On Label RX 50 Reviews
felodipine ER On Label RX 49 Reviews
Zestoretic On Label RX 48 Reviews
Vasotec On Label RX 48 Reviews
Cardizem Off Label RX 47 Reviews
Inderal LA On Label RX 47 Reviews
irbesartan On Label RX 47 Reviews
Accupril On Label RX 45 Reviews
Caduet On Label RX 45 Reviews
torsemide On Label RX 43 Reviews
Tekturna HCT On Label RX 41 Reviews
Sular On Label RX 40 Reviews
Sular Tablet, Extended Release 24 hr On Label RX 40 Reviews
Tarka On Label RX 39 Reviews
MAXZIDE-25 MG On Label RX 37 Reviews
telmisartan On Label RX 35 Reviews
bumetanide Off Label RX 34 Reviews
methyldopa On Label RX 34 Reviews
perindopril erbumine On Label RX 31 Reviews
minoxidil On Label RX 31 Reviews
Atacand HCT On Label RX 30 Reviews
indapamide On Label RX 29 Reviews
Mavik 2 mg tablet On Label RX 28 Reviews
metolazone On Label RX 28 Reviews
fosinopril SODIUM On Label RX 27 Reviews
Minipress On Label RX 26 Reviews
Tiazac On Label RX 26 Reviews
Zebeta 5 mg tablet On Label RX 26 Reviews
Microzide On Label RX 25 Reviews
irbesartan-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 25 Reviews
bisoprolol-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 25 Reviews
Prinzide tablet On Label RX 24 Reviews
olmesartan MEDOXOMIL On Label RX 24 Reviews
Aldomet tablet On Label RX 23 Reviews
Taztia XT On Label RX 23 Reviews
Nifediac CC tablet, extended release On Label RX 23 Reviews
Lotensin HCT On Label RX 22 Reviews
clonidine Patch, Transdermal Weekly On Label RX 22 Reviews
nebivolol tablet On Label RX 21 Reviews
Teveten On Label RX 21 Reviews
Plendil Tablet, Extended Release 24 hr On Label RX 21 Reviews
Twynsta On Label RX 20 Reviews
Corgard On Label RX 20 Reviews
METOPROLOL-HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE On Label RX 20 Reviews
captopril On Label RX 19 Reviews
candesartan CILEXETIL On Label RX 19 Reviews
DynaCirc CR Tablet, Extended Release 24 hr On Label RX 19 Reviews
Bumex tablet Off Label RX 19 Reviews
Lotensin On Label RX 18 Reviews
SPIRONOLACTONE-HCTZ On Label RX 18 Reviews
pindolol On Label RX 17 Reviews
Sectral 200 mg capsule On Label RX 17 Reviews
enalapril-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 17 Reviews
Inspra On Label RX 17 Reviews
Adalat CC On Label RX 16 Reviews
CATAPRES-TTS 2 Patch, Transdermal Weekly On Label RX 16 Reviews
Cardizem LA On Label RX 16 Reviews
DILT-XR On Label RX 16 Reviews
InnoPran XL On Label RX 16 Reviews
DynaCirc capsule On Label RX 15 Reviews
amlodipine-valsartan On Label RX 15 Reviews
diltiazem malate tablet, extended release On Label RX 15 Reviews
Demadex On Label RX 15 Reviews
olmesartan-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 14 Reviews
Tenoretic 50 On Label RX 13 Reviews
Apresoline tablet On Label RX 13 Reviews
DILT-CD On Label RX 13 Reviews
eplerenone On Label RX 13 Reviews
Edecrin Off Label RX 12 Reviews
CATAPRES-TTS 1 Patch, Transdermal Weekly On Label RX 12 Reviews
Tenoretic 100 On Label RX 12 Reviews
acebutolol HCL On Label RX 12 Reviews
telmisartan-hydrochlorothiazid On Label RX 11 Reviews
Accuretic On Label RX 11 Reviews
Zaroxolyn On Label RX 11 Reviews
propranolol-hydrochlorothiazid On Label RX 11 Reviews
Kapvay Off Label RX 10 Reviews
metoprolol SUCCINATE ER-HCTZ On Label RX 9 Reviews
Aceon 8 mg tablet On Label RX 9 Reviews
amiloride HCL On Label RX 9 Reviews
Kerlone tablet On Label RX 9 Reviews
nisoldipine Tablet, Extended Release 24 hr Calcium Channel Blockers On Label RX 9 Reviews
nisoldipine On Label RX 9 Reviews
Hydralazide tablet On Label RX 9 Reviews
Monopril tablet On Label RX 9 Reviews
enalapril-diltiazem tablet, extended release On Label RX 8 Reviews
Dilacor XR On Label RX 8 Reviews
carvedilol phosphate Capsule, Extended Release Multiphase 24 hr (Capsule, ER hr) On Label RX 8 Reviews
telmisartan-amlodipine On Label RX 8 Reviews
Verelan PM On Label RX 8 Reviews
CATAPRES-TTS 3 Patch, Transdermal Weekly On Label RX 8 Reviews
Lopressor HCT On Label RX 8 Reviews
bendroflumethiazide tablet RX 7 Reviews
Aldactazide On Label RX 7 Reviews
Calan On Label RX 7 Reviews
Dyrenium Off Label RX 7 Reviews
amiloride-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 7 Reviews
amlodipine-atorvastatin On Label RX 7 Reviews
Isoptin tablet On Label RX 6 Reviews
Moduretic tablet On Label RX 6 Reviews
aliskiren 300 mg tablet Angiotensin Inhibiting Agents On Label RX 6 Reviews
Matzim LA On Label RX 6 Reviews
trandolapril On Label RX 6 Reviews
AMLODIPINE-VALSARTAN-HCTZ On Label RX 6 Reviews
reserpine 0.25 mg tablet On Label RX 6 Reviews
chlorothiazide On Label RX 6 Reviews
Calan SR On Label RX 6 Reviews
hydralazine HCL Vial On Label RX 6 Reviews
Trandate On Label RX 6 Reviews
clonidine-chlorthalidone tablet On Label RX 6 Reviews
Hydrazide capsule On Label RX 5 Reviews
amlodipine-olmesartan On Label RX 5 Reviews
Amturnide tablet On Label RX 5 Reviews
Univasc On Label RX 5 Reviews
moexipril HCL On Label RX 5 Reviews
quinapril-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 5 Reviews
Lozol tablet On Label RX 5 Reviews
HydroDiuril tablet On Label RX 5 Reviews
Isoptin SR tablet, extended release On Label RX 5 Reviews
Corzide On Label RX 5 Reviews
Afeditab CR On Label RX 5 Reviews
Cardizem SR Capsule, Extended Release 12 hr (Capsule, ER hr) On Label RX 5 Reviews
hydralazine-hydrochlorothiazid capsule On Label RX 5 Reviews
Dutoprol On Label RX 4 Reviews
Diuril On Label RX 4 Reviews
labetalol HCL Syringe On Label RX 4 Reviews
Verelan On Label RX 4 Reviews
Vaseretic On Label RX 4 Reviews
Quinaretic tablet On Label RX 4 Reviews
Cardene SR On Label RX 4 Reviews
Normodyne tablet On Label RX 4 Reviews
fosinopril-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 4 Reviews
captopril-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 4 Reviews
Uniretic 12.5-15 MG tablet On Label RX 4 Reviews
Tenormin Calendar Pak tablet On Label RX 3 Reviews
Monopril HCT tablet On Label RX 3 Reviews
Lexxel tablet, extended release On Label RX 3 Reviews
isradipine On Label RX 3 Reviews
Nifedipine ER tablet, extended release On Label RX 3 Reviews
Nifedipine ER Tablet, Extended Release Osmotic Push (Tablet, Push) On Label RX 3 Reviews
Capoten tablet On Label RX 3 Reviews
OLMESARTAN-AMLODIPINE-HCTZ On Label RX 3 Reviews
aliskiren-valsartan tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
timolol maleate On Label RX 2 Reviews
Hydra-Zide capsule On Label RX 2 Reviews
Furoben 40 tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
Triamtazide capsule On Label RX 2 Reviews
Aquazide tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
Hychlor tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
azilsartan med-chlorthalidone tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
Esidrix tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
Diltzac ER On Label RX 2 Reviews
azilsartan medoxomil tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
candesartan-hydrochlorothiazid On Label RX 2 Reviews
Hydralazine Plus 50/50 capsule On Label RX 2 Reviews
betaxolol HCL On Label RX 2 Reviews
H-H-R tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
Midamor tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
Hygroton tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
Visken tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
Covera-HS Tablet, Extended Release 24 hr RX 2 Reviews
nicardipine HCL On Label RX 2 Reviews
Cleviprex Vial On Label RX 2 Reviews
Teveten HCT On Label RX 2 Reviews
Tekamlo 150 mg-5 mg tablet On Label RX 2 Reviews
moexipril 7.5 mg-hydrochlorothiazide 12.5 mg tablet Angiotensin Inhibiting Agents On Label RX 2 Reviews
Byvalson On Label RX 1 Reviews
Levatol tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Lasimide tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Aquazide-H tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Spironazide tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Spirochlor tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Ser-Ap-Es tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Procard tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Serpasil tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Trimax tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Naldol tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
perindopril-amlodipine tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
torsemide Solution On Label RX 1 Reviews
eprosartan MESYLATE On Label RX 1 Reviews
trandolapril-verapamil ER On Label RX 1 Reviews
Inderal XL On Label RX 1 Reviews
Oretic tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Aldoril D30 tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Aldoril D50 tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Sodium Edecrin Vial Off Label RX 1 Reviews
Blocadren tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
enalaprilat Vial On Label RX 1 Reviews
Vasotec Solution On Label RX 1 Reviews
hydroflumethiazide tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Inderide LA capsule, extended release On Label RX 1 Reviews
enalapril maleate-felodipine tablet, extended release On Label RX 1 Reviews
Vecamyl On Label RX 1 Reviews
Matzim LA 360 mg tablet,extended release On Label RX 1 Reviews
Enduron tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Hydro-Chlor tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
eprosartan-hydrochlorothiazide tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
methyldopa-hydrochlorothiazide On Label RX 1 Reviews
nadolol-bendroflumethiazide On Label RX 1 Reviews
timolol-hydrochlorothiazide tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
Thalitone tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
aliskiren 150 mg-amlodipine 5 mg tablet On Label RX 1 Reviews
THSC Verapamil HCl CR tablet, extended release On Label RX 0 Reviews
THSC Lisinopril tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
THSC Captopril tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
THSC Metoprolol Tartrate tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Ismelin tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Qbrelis On Label RX 0 Reviews
nebivolol-valsartan tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Apresazide capsule On Label RX 0 Reviews
Clorpres tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
penbutolol tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Kapspargo Sprinkle On Label RX 0 Reviews
Saluron tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Prestalia On Label RX 0 Reviews
Inderide-40/25 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Inderide-80/25 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Clonidine HCl W/Chlorthalidone tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Clonidine W/Chlorthalidone tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Combipres tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Methyldopa W/Chlorothiazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Minizide 2 capsule On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydralazine W/Hctz capsule On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hy-Zide capsule On Label RX 0 Reviews
Fumide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Delone tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Lo-Aqua tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Detue tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Altex tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Spirazone tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Naturetin-5 tablet RX 0 Reviews
Sk-Chlorothiazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Dithirex tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diurigen tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Chlorulan tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Kenuril 250 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Kenuril 500 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hctz/Reserpine/Hydralazine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Unipres tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Sae tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Serpex tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Seragen tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydroserpazine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Cherapas tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Panpres tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Seralazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Serapine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Marpres tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Serathide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
D-Pres tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hrh tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Serge tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydroap-Es tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydroserpine Plus tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Atenolol W/Chlorthalidone tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Propranolol Hcl W/Hctz tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Amiloride Hcl W/Hctz tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Spironolactone W/Hctz tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Aldarex Plus tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Altexide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Spirozide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Decozide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydrotone tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Triamterene W/Hctz capsule On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydroben tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Sonazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diulo tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Aquamet tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diaqua tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydrozide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hyclar 50 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
HHR tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Lorol tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Isoptin S.R. 240 mg tablet,extended release On Label RX 0 Reviews
Catapres-Tts 2 Patch, Transdermal Weekly On Label RX 0 Reviews
Catapres-Tts 3 Patch, Transdermal Weekly On Label RX 0 Reviews
Aldomet Solution On Label RX 0 Reviews
Aldomet Ester Hcl Injection Solution On Label RX 0 Reviews
Ingadine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Sandril tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Serpate tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Serpalan tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Sk-Reserpine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Reserpoid tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Serpatab tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Resa tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Sertina tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Serpanray tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Zepine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Adrolazine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Apresrex tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydralyn 25 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Aprex 25 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydralyn 50 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Aprex 50 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Minodyl tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Maxzide-25mg tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Carozide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Epaned On Label RX 0 Reviews
L-Dopres tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
aliskiren 150 mg-amlodipine 5 mg-hydrochlorothiazide 12.5 mg tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
nicardipine 20 mg/200 mL in sodium chloride(iso) intravenous piggyback Calcium Channel Blockers On Label RX 0 Reviews
nicardipine in dextrose,iso-os Piggyback On Label RX 0 Reviews
Cardene 20 mg/200 mL in sodium chloride(iso-osm) intravenous piggyback On Label RX 0 Reviews
Cardene in Dextrose 40 mg/200 mL intravenous piggyback On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydone tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Ezide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
nicardipine HCL-D5W Plastic Bag, Injection On Label RX 0 Reviews
Kapvay Dose Pack Tablet, Extended Release, (Tablet, ER, Pack) Off Label RX 0 Reviews
THSC Hydrochlorothiazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
THSC Atenolol tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
THSC Propranolol HCl tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
methyldopate HCL Vial On Label RX 0 Reviews
THSC Nifedipine CR tablet, extended release On Label RX 0 Reviews
THSC Furosemide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Propranolol HCl CR capsule, extended release On Label RX 0 Reviews
Spironolactone/HCTZ tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Cardene I.V. Solution, Intravenous Piggyback On Label RX 0 Reviews
aliskiren-hydrochlorothiazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
guanethidine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Cardene capsule On Label RX 0 Reviews
Minizide capsule On Label RX 0 Reviews
Aldoclor tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
L-Dopres-Hydrochlorothiazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
levamlodipine 5 mg tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
mecamylamine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Inversine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Bisoprolol Fumarate-HCTZ tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diuretic-Ap-Es tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diltiazem CD capsule, extended release On Label RX 0 Reviews
Nifedipine CR Osmotic Tablet, Extended Release Push (Tablet, ER Push) On Label RX 0 Reviews
Combipres-2 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Tri-Hydroserpine tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Tiadylt ER 360 mg capsule,extended release Calcium Channel Blockers On Label RX 0 Reviews
Combipres-3 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Aldoril-25 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Ser-A-Gen tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydrap-Es tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
3H W/R tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hylorel tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
guanadrel tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Mykrox tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
methyclothiazide On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hyserp tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Cam-Ap-Es tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Serpazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Uni-Serp tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Inderide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Verapamil HCl CR tablet, extended release On Label RX 0 Reviews
Verapamil HCl CR Capsule, Extended Release 24 hr (Capsule, ER hr) On Label RX 0 Reviews
Loniten tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
ethacrynate sodium Vial Off Label RX 0 Reviews
Zide-50 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
chlorothiazide sodium Vial On Label RX 0 Reviews
Naturetin tablet RX 0 Reviews
Trandate Solution On Label RX 0 Reviews
ethacrynic acid Off Label RX 0 Reviews
Aldoril-15 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Cartrol tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
carteolol tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
nicardipine HCL Vial On Label RX 0 Reviews
Senormin tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Aquatensen tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Combipres-1 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Normodyne Solution On Label RX 0 Reviews
Conjupri 5 mg tablet Calcium Channel Blockers On Label RX 0 Reviews
Pronol tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Wytensin tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
CaroSpir On Label RX 0 Reviews
Timolide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Rose-40 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Propranolol HCl Intensol Drops On Label RX 0 Reviews
Katerzia 1 mg/mL oral suspension Calcium Channel Blockers On Label RX 0 Reviews
amlodipine benzoate 1 mg/mL oral suspension On Label RX 0 Reviews
Triamterene-HCTZ capsule On Label RX 0 Reviews
guanabenz tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Tiamate Tablet, Extended Release 24 hr On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diucardin tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Demadex Solution On Label RX 0 Reviews
clevidipine Emulsion On Label RX 0 Reviews
Tenzide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Aqua-Cen tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydro-T tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
J-Zide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Loqua-50 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diurazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Kenazide H-50 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Kenazide E tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diltiazem HCL ER Capsule, Extended Release 12 hr (Capsule, hr) On Label RX 0 Reviews
Icn-Hythide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydrochlorulan tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydoril tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hyazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydro-D tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Loqua-25 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Kenazide H-25 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
M-Zide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydroaca tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hyclar 25 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Tri-Zide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydromal tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydro-Z-50 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydrozide-50 tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Biogroton tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hylidone tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Sk-Hydrochlorothiazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydrorex tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Dilt XR Capsule, Extended Release Degradable (Capsule, ER Degradable) On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diltiazem HCl CR capsule, extended release On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diltiazem HCl CR 120 mg/24hr capsule,extended release On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diltiazem HCl CR Capsule, Extended Release 12 hr (Capsule, ER hr) On Label RX 0 Reviews
Captopril-HCTZ tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Cardene I.V. Ampul On Label RX 0 Reviews
methyldopa-chlorothiazide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
prazosin-polythiazide capsule On Label RX 0 Reviews
SODIUM Diuril Vial On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hydro-PAR tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
hydralazine-reserpin-hcthiazid tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
guanethidine-hydrochlorothiazd tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Terazosin capsule On Label RX 0 Reviews
Isoptin S.R. tablet, extended release On Label RX 0 Reviews
Amiloride HCl-Hctz tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Betachron Capsule, Extended Release 24 hr (Capsule, ER hr) On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diltiazem ER Capsule, Extended Release Degradable (Capsule, Degradable) On Label RX 0 Reviews
Apresodrex tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Apresodex tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Hy-Es tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Capozide tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Teczem Tablet, Extended Release 24 hr On Label RX 0 Reviews
Esimil tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Apresoline-Esidrix tablet On Label RX 0 Reviews
Diltia XT capsule, extended release On Label RX 0 Reviews

List of High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Medications (214 Compared)

View information about lisinopril

lisinopril

4.9

512 reviews

Rx

D

N

Generic name: lisinopril systemic

Brand names: 

Prinivil,

Zestril,

Qbrelis

Drug class:
Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about amlodipine

amlodipine

4.0

543 reviews

Rx

C

N

Generic name: amlodipine systemic

Brand names: 

Norvasc,

Katerzia

Drug class:
calcium channel blocking agents

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about losartan

losartan

4.6

461 reviews

Rx

D

N

Generic name: losartan systemic

Brand name: 

Cozaar

Drug class:
angiotensin receptor blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about hydrochlorothiazide

hydrochlorothiazide

5.1

137 reviews

Rx

B

N X

Generic name: hydrochlorothiazide systemic

Brand names: 

Microzide,

Aquazide H,

Esidrix

Drug class:
thiazide diuretics

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about metoprolol

metoprolol

5.4

229 reviews

Rx

C

N X

Generic name: metoprolol systemic

Brand names: 

Lopressor,

Toprol-XL,

Kapspargo Sprinkle

Drug class:
cardioselective beta blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about atenolol

atenolol

6.7

112 reviews

Rx

D

N X

Generic name: atenolol systemic

Brand name: 

Tenormin

Drug class:
cardioselective beta blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about Norvasc

Norvasc

4.3

83 reviews

Rx

C

N

Generic name: amlodipine systemic

Drug class:
calcium channel blocking agents

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about Benicar

Benicar

7.2

109 reviews

Rx

D

N

Generic name: olmesartan systemic

Drug class:
angiotensin receptor blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about carvedilol

carvedilol

4.1

86 reviews

Rx

C

N X

Generic name: carvedilol systemic

Brand names: 

Coreg,

Coreg CR

Drug class:
non-cardioselective beta blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about furosemide

furosemide

4.8

13 reviews

Rx

C

N X

Generic name: furosemide systemic

Brand name: 

Lasix

Drug class:
loop diuretics

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about Cozaar

Cozaar

6.2

56 reviews

Rx

D

N

Generic name: losartan systemic

Drug class:
angiotensin receptor blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about clonidine

clonidine

6.2

90 reviews

Rx

C

N X

Generic name: clonidine systemic

Brand names: 

Catapres,

Catapres-TTS

Drug class:
antiadrenergic agents, centrally acting

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about Diovan

Diovan

6.4

60 reviews

Rx

D

N

Generic name: valsartan systemic

Drug class:
angiotensin receptor blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about hydrochlorothiazide / lisinopril

hydrochlorothiazide / lisinopril

5.9

66 reviews

Rx

D

N X

Generic name: hydrochlorothiazide / lisinopril systemic

Brand name: 

Zestoretic

Drug class:
ACE inhibitors with thiazides

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, Prescribing Information

View information about Bystolic

Bystolic

6.1

198 reviews

Rx

C

N X

Generic name: nebivolol systemic

Drug class:
cardioselective beta blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about Lopressor

Lopressor

6.2

10 reviews

Rx

C

N X

Generic name: metoprolol systemic

Drug class:
cardioselective beta blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about Toprol-XL

Toprol-XL

6.9

33 reviews

Rx

C

N X

Generic name: metoprolol systemic

Drug class:
cardioselective beta blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about Avapro

Avapro

5.2

37 reviews

Rx

D

N

Generic name: irbesartan systemic

Drug class:
angiotensin receptor blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about enalapril

enalapril

5.2

16 reviews

Rx

D

N

Generic name: enalapril systemic

Brand names: 

Vasotec,

Epaned

Drug class:
Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about Lasix

Lasix

4.6

9 reviews

Rx

C

N X

Generic name: furosemide systemic

Drug class:
loop diuretics

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about valsartan

valsartan

5.5

120 reviews

Rx

D

N

Generic name: valsartan systemic

Brand name: 

Diovan

Drug class:
angiotensin receptor blockers

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about Prinivil

Prinivil

5.5

10 reviews

Rx

D

N

Generic name: lisinopril systemic

Drug class:
Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about spironolactone

spironolactone

5.4

38 reviews

Rx

C

N X

Generic name: spironolactone systemic

Brand names: 

Aldactone,

CaroSpir

Drug class:
potassium-sparing diuretics, aldosterone receptor antagonists

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

View information about Zestril

Zestril

6.7

12 reviews

Rx

D

N

Generic name: lisinopril systemic

Drug class:
Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
Prescribing Information

View information about hydralazine

hydralazine

2.7

67 reviews

Rx

C

N

Generic name: hydralazine systemic

Brand name: 

Apresoline

Drug class:
vasodilators

For consumers:
dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals:
A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

10 Common High Blood Pressure Medications

High blood pressure—or hypertension—occurs when blood flows through your blood vessels with too much force. If you have high blood pressure, you’re one of about 85 million American adults who also have it. However, many people do not even know they have high blood pressure because there are usually no obvious symptoms. This fact is why high blood pressure gets the name “silent killer.” It can lead to life-threatening complications, such as heart attack and stroke, without warning signs.

If your doctor diagnoses high blood pressure, you will probably need to make some lifestyle changes. However, medication for consistent blood pressure control is a vital part of treatment.

Classes of Blood Pressure Medications

Drugs that treat high blood pressure are known as antihypertensives. There are many so-called “classes” of antihypertensives and many drugs within each class. This results in a large number of drugs doctors can use to treat high blood pressure. To assist doctors in choosing treatment, they follow guidelines and recommendations from experts in the field.

Commonly prescribed classes of hypertension medications include:

  • Thiazide diuretics. These drugs work by increasing the amount of fluid the body eliminates through urination. A lot of people call diuretics “water pills.” By also reducing your body’s volume of blood, pressure on the artery walls decreases. Common side effects of diuretics are increased urination, thirst, dizziness, and sensitivity to sunlight.

  • Calcium channel blockers. This class relaxes blood vessels and decreases heart rate. Possible side effects include heart palpitations, ankle swelling, constipation, headache, and dizziness.

  • ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors. These drugs block an enzyme to reduce the body’s amount of angiotensin. Less angiotensin helps relax blood vessels. Common side effects of ACE inhibitors are skin rash and a dry cough.

  • Angiotensin II receptor blockers. This class directly blocks angiotensin to relax blood vessels. Common side effects are dizziness and lightheadedness, especially when standing up from a seated position.

  • Beta blockers. These drugs block adrenalin, lower blood pressure by decreasing your heart rate and the force of each beat.

When choosing among these classes, your doctor will consider many factors, including your other health conditions and your race. For example, African American people benefit most from starting treatment with a thiazide diuretic or a calcium channel blocker, studies show. However, someone with diabetes may benefit more from using an ACE inhibitor.

After starting treatment, your doctor will regularly monitor your blood pressure. It may be necessary to adjust the dose, change drugs, or add a second drug to control your blood pressure. Your doctor can choose this second drug from any of the first-line classes. In some cases, your doctor may need to consider another antihypertensive class, such as beta blockers.

Common Medications for High Blood Pressure

Within each class of antihypertensive drug, your doctor has more choices to make. Some classes contain just a few drug options. Others, such as ACE inhibitors, include many drugs. Finding the right choice for you may involve some trial and error. Here is a summary of 10 drugs commonly prescribed for high blood pressure:

  1. Amlodipine (Norvasc) is a calcium channel blocker. You usually take it once a day. Most people find once daily dosing to be convenient and easy to remember. Amlodipine is also a treatment for angina.

  2. Benazepril (Lotensin) is an ACE inhibitor. At low doses, you usually take it once a day. Your doctor may recommend splitting higher doses to twice a day.

  3. Chlorthalidone (Hygroton) is a thiazide diuretic. The usual dose is once a day with food, preferably breakfast. It also treats fluid retention from conditions like heart failure.

  4. Enalapril (Vasotec) is an ACE inhibitor. For high blood pressure, you usually take it once a day. It is also a treatment for heart failure.

  5. Hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril, Microzide) is a thiazide diuretic. It comes as a capsule or tablet you typically take once a day. Like other thiazide diuretics, it also treats fluid retention, or edema.

  6. Irbesartan (Avapro) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker. The usual dose is once daily. It is also a treatment for kidney problems in people with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) is an ACE inhibitor. It is also a drug you usually take once a day. Lisinopril is also a treatment for heart failure.

  8. Losartan (Cozaar) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker. In most cases, the dose is once a day. Doctors also use it to decrease the risk of stroke in people with an enlarged heart.

  9. Metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL) is a beta blocker. It comes in both an immediate-release and an extended-release form. It also helps lower the risk of repeat heart attacks and treats angina and congestive heart failure.

  10. Valsartan (Diovan) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker. It is also a treatment for heart failure and to improve survival after a heart attack. For high blood pressure, you usually take it once a day.

There are many other options available for treating high blood pressure. If you are experiencing side effects or are otherwise not happy with your current medicine, talk with your doctor. It may be possible to try a different drug and get better results. Healthy lifestyle habits also help lower blood pressure. Doctors prescribe regular physical activity and a low-salt diet to compliment the effect of your blood pressure medication.

Medications Used to Treat High Blood Pressure

Blood Pressure Classification Systolic Diastolic
Normal Less than 120 mmHg

 
Less than 80 mmHg
Elevated 120 to 129 mmHg

 
Less than 80 mmHg
Hypertension stage 1* 130 to 139 mmHg Between 80 to 89 mmHg
Hypertension stage 2* At least 140 mmHg At least 90 mmHg

*Classification only requires one of the listed criteria to be present.

If there is a difference between the systolic pressure (top number) and diastolic blood pressure (bottom number), the higher one determines the stage.

Deciding When Medication Is Needed

Doctors generally use a stepwise approach to managing hypertension in their patients. For the vast majority of people, the goal of treatment is to achieve a blood pressure of less than 120/80 mmHg.

Step 1 involves engaging in lifestyle modifications that have been shown to reduce blood pressure. These include adopting a heart-healthy diet, losing weight (if needed), participating in regular exercise, and so on.

These changes may be implemented alone, but may or may not be sufficient to manage your condition. Given this, they may also be used in combination with one or more high blood pressure medications.

The initiation of a single anti-hypertensive medication is reasonable in adults with stage 1 hypertension and a BP goal <130/80 mm Hg.

However, if you have stage 2 hypertension and your average blood pressure is more than 20 mmHg above goal, your doctor may recommend combination drug therapy.

Deciding whether or not to start medication for your high blood pressure requires a thoughtful discussion with your doctor. In some cases, the decision is obvious. For example, medication is strongly advised if a patient has hypertension and another medical condition, like type 2 diabetes mellitus.

That said, other cases are less straightforward. For example, if you are over the age of 75, the potential risks of taking medication may not outweigh the potential benefits.

Hypertension Doctor Discussion Guide

Get our printable guide for your next doctor’s appointment to help you ask the right questions.

Email the Guide

Send to yourself or a loved one.

Sign Up

This Doctor Discussion Guide has been sent to {{form.email}}.

There was an error. Please try again.

Drug Types and Choices in Treatment

If you and your doctor decide that taking a medication for your hypertension is the best approach, then the next step is choosing which one (or more) to start.

There are five major categories of medications that have been proven effective in treating hypertension:

Combination therapy would involve taking two anti-hypertensive medications, each from a different drug category.

Verywell / JR Bee

Generally speaking, drugs from each of these classes tend to work equally well in controlling hypertension. That said, individuals may respond quite differently. Doctors have no way of predicting this ahead of time, so they and patients must settle for an educated trial-and-error approach.

In “guessing” on the best initial single drug to try, most experts now recommend beginning either with calcium channel blockers and ARB/ACE inhibitors. While there are no hard and fast rules about which drugs to use in which people, there are certain tendencies that are useful in selecting single-drug therapy.

For instance, African American patients tend to do better with thiazide diuretics or calcium channel blockers. In addition, patients with certain medical conditions may benefit from one drug versus another.

For example, individuals with hypertension who also have diabetes or chronic kidney disease with albuminuria (when a person’s urine contains high levels of the protein albumin) are generally prescribed an ACE inhibitor or an ARB (if an ACE inhibitor is not tolerated).

Likewise, having a particular medical condition may sway a doctor away from prescribing a certain anti-hypertensive medication. For example, ACE inhibitors are contraindicated in people with a history of angioedema or in women who are pregnant.

Most Common Hypertension Drugs

It is not possible to list every high blood pressure medication here, but the following list is reasonably complete. The brand name(s) of each drug is listed first, followed by the generic name.

Diuretics

Diuretics (“water pills”) increase the amount of sodium and water excreted into the urine by the kidneys. It is thought that diuretics lower blood pressure mainly by reducing the volume of fluid in the blood vessels.

Examples of diuretics commonly used for hypertension:

  • Thalidone, also sold as Tenoretic and Clorpres, (chlorthalidone)
  • HydroDiuril, also sold as Microzide and Esidrix (hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Lozol (indapamide)

Diuretics less commonly used for hypertension include:

  • Diamox (acetazolamide)
  • Zaroxolyn, also sold as Mykrox (metolazone)
  • Midamor (amiloride hydrochloride)
  • Bumex (bumetanide)
  • Edecrin (ethacrynic acid)
  • Lasix (furosemide)
  • Aldactone (spironolactone)
  • Demadex (torsemide)
  • Dyrenium (triamterene)

Calcium Channel Blockers

Calcium channel blockers can reduce blood pressure by dilating the arteries and, in some cases, reducing the force of the heart’s contractions.

Examples of calcium channel blockers include:

  • Norvasc (amlodipine)
  • Cardizem, also sold as Dilacor and Tiazac, (diltiazem)
  • Plendil (felodipine)
  • DynaCirc (isradipine)
  • Cardene (nicardipine)
  • Procardia XL, also sold as Adalat CC, (nifedipine)
  • Sular (nisoldipine)
  • Verelan, also sold as Calan, (verapamil)

ARBs

The angiotensin II receptor blockers (so-called ARBs) also reduce blood pressure by dilating the arteries. ARBs are generally thought of as superior to ACE inhibitors due to better efficacy and fewer adverse effects.

Options include:

  • Atacand (candesartan)
  • Avapro (irbesartan)
  • Cozaar (losartan)
  • Micardis (telmisartan)
  • Diovan (valsartan)

ACE Inhibitors

The angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) can lower blood pressure by dilating the arteries.

Popular ACE inhibitors include:

  • Lotensin (benazepril)
  • Capoten (captopril)
  • Vasotec, also sold as Vaseretic (enalapril)
  • Monopril (fosinopril)
  • Prinivil, also sold as Zestril (lisinopril)
  • Univasc (moexipril)
  • Accupril (quinapril)
  • Altace (ramipril)
  • Mavik (trandolapril)

Beta-Blockers

Beta-blockers are no longer considered a first-line, single-drug therapy for hypertension unless a patient has ischemic heart disease, heart failure, or arrhythmias. These drugs block the effect of adrenaline on the cardiovascular system, slow the heart rate, and reduce stress on the heart and the arteries.

Some beta-blockers include:

  • Sectral (acebutolol)
  • Bystolic (nebivolol)
  • Tenormin (atenolol)
  • Kerlone (betaxolol)
  • Zebeta, also sold as Ziac (bisoprolol)
  • Cartrol (carteolol)
  • Coreg (carvedilol)
  • Normodyne, also sold as Trandate (labetalol)
  • Lopressor, also sold as Toprol (metoprolol)
  • Corgard (nadolol)
  • Levatol (penbutolol)
  • Inderal, Inderal LA (propranolol)
  • Blocadren (timolol)

Less Commonly Used Hypertension Drugs

These options may be considered in certain circumstances, but are less commonly used:

  • Catapres (clonidine)
  • Cardura (doxazosin)
  • Wytensin (guanabenz)
  • Tenex (guanfacine)
  • Apresoline (hydralazine hydrochloride)
  • Aldomet (methyldopa)
  • Minipress (prazosin)
  • Serpasil (reserpine)
  • Hytrin (terazosin)

Combination Drugs for Hypertension

Several clinical trials have been conducted that offer substantial guidance in choosing appropriate combination therapy for hypertension.

The best scientific evidence (from the ACCOMPLISH trial) suggests that clinical outcomes (including the risk of stroke, heart attack, and cardiovascular death) are most improved with combination therapy when a long-acting calcium channel blocker is used together with an ACE inhibitor or an ARB. So, today most doctors will try this combination first.

If the blood pressure remains elevated with combination therapy using a calcium channel blocker plus an ACE inhibitor or ARB drug, a thiazide drug will usually be added as a third drug. And if this combination still fails to control the blood pressure, a fourth drug (usually spironolactone, a non-thiazide diuretic) may be added.

The vast majority of patients with hypertension will achieve successful therapy long before a third or fourth drug needs to be considered. The rare individual who fails to respond adequately to this kind of combination therapy should be referred to a hypertension specialist.

Numerous combination drugs have been marketed for hypertension, and it is almost impossible to keep track of new ones that come along, or old ones that fade away.

The following list includes most of the commonly prescribed combination drugs used for hypertension:

  • Moduretic (amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Lotrel (amlodipine and benazepril)
  • Tenoretic (atenolol and chlorthalidone)
  • Lotensin HCT (benazepril and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Ziac (bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Capozide (captopril and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Vaseretic (enalapril and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Lexxel (felodipine and enalapril)
  • Apresazide (hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Prinzide, also sold as Zestoretic (lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Hyzaar (losartan and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Aldoril (methyldopa and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Lopressor HCT (metoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Corzide (nadolol and bendroflumethiazide)
  • Inderide (propranolol and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Aldactazide (spironolactone and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Dyazide, also sold as Maxide (triamterene and hydrochlorothiazide)
  • Tarka (verapamil extended-release and trandolapril)

Interestingly, research has found that combining anti-hypertensive drugs has a significantly greater effect (about five times greater) on lowering a person’s blood pressure than simply doubling the dose of a single agent.

Avoiding Adverse Effects

Any of the drugs used to treat hypertension has the potential of causing problems. And when choosing the best drug regimen for treating a person with hypertension, it is critical to find a drug (or drugs) that not only effectively reduces blood pressure, but that is also well tolerated.

In general, lower doses of blood pressure medicine are as effective as higher doses and cause fewer side effects.

While each of the myriads of hypertension drugs has its own individual side effect profile, for the most part, the potential adverse effects of these drugs are related to their category.

The major category-related adverse effects are:

  • Thiazide diuretics: Hypokalemia (low potassium levels), frequent urination, worsening of gout
  • Calcium channel blockers: Constipation, swelling of the legs, headache
  • ACE inhibitors: Cough, loss of sense of taste, hyperkalemia (elevated potassium levels)
  • ARBs: Allergic reactions, dizziness, hyperkalemia
  • Beta-blockers: Worsening of dyspnea in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma; sexual dysfunction; fatigue; depression; worsening of symptoms in people with peripheral artery disease

With so many drugs to choose from, it is rare that a doctor will ask a person with hypertension to tolerate significant adverse effects.

A Word From Verywell

Hypertension is an extremely common medical problem that can have severe consequences if not treated adequately. However, with so many treatment options, you should expect your doctor to find a therapeutic regimen that will greatly decrease your risk of a bad outcome from hypertension—without disrupting your everyday life. If you are experiencing any troublesome side effects, be sure to talk to your doctor about finding a treatment regimen that you can tolerate better.

Heart attack

Symptoms of a heart attack

Common signs and symptoms of a heart attack include:

  • Chest pain or discomfort (angina pectoris) may present with a feeling of tightness, tightness, fullness, or pain in the center of the chest. With a heart attack, pain usually lasts for a few minutes and may increase and decrease in intensity.
  • Discomfort in the upper body, including arms, neck, back, jaw, or abdomen.
  • Difficulty breathing.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Cold sweat.
  • Dizziness or fainting.
  • Women are less likely to have chest pain.

Emergency treatment for heart attack

The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology recommend:

  • If you think you are having a heart attack, call (03) right away. After calling (03), you need to chew an aspirin tablet. Be sure to inform the paramedic about this, then an additional dose of aspirin is not required.
  • Angioplasty, also called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), is a procedure that must be performed within 90 minutes of the onset of a heart attack. Patients suffering from a heart attack must be transported to a hospital equipped to perform PCI.
  • Fibrinolytic therapy should be given within 30 minutes of a heart attack if the center performing PCI is not available. The patient should be transferred to the PCI unit without delay.

Secondary prevention of heart attack

Additional preventive measures are needed to help prevent another heart attack. Before discharge, you need to discuss with your inpatient doctor:

  • Control of blood pressure and cholesterol levels (statins, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers are prescribed at discharge).
  • Aspirin and the antiplatelet drug clopidogrel (Plavix), which many patients must take on a regular basis.Prasugrel (Effient) is a new drug that can be used as an alternative to clopidogrel for patients.
  • Cardiac rehabilitation and regular exercise.
  • Weight normalization.
  • Smoking cessation.

Introduction

The heart is a complex organ of the human body. Throughout life, it constantly pumps blood, supplying oxygen and vital nutrients to all body tissues through the arterial network.To accomplish this strenuous task, the heart muscle itself needs a sufficient amount of oxygenated blood, which is delivered to it through the network of coronary arteries. These arteries carry oxygen-rich blood to the muscular wall of the heart (myocardium).

A heart attack (myocardial infarction) occurs when blood flow to the heart muscle is blocked, tissue is deprived of oxygen and part of the myocardium dies.

Ischemic heart disease is the cause of heart attacks.Coronary artery disease is the end result of atherosclerosis, which interferes with coronary blood flow and reduces the delivery of oxygenated blood to the heart.

Heart attack

Heart attack (myocardial infarction) is one of the most serious outcomes of atherosclerosis. It can happen for two reasons:

  • If a crack or rupture develops in an atherosclerotic plaque. Platelets are trapped in this area for sealing and a blood clot (thrombus) forms.A heart attack can occur if a blood clot completely blocks the passage of oxygen-rich blood to the heart.
  • If an artery becomes completely blocked due to a gradual increase in atherosclerotic plaque. A heart attack can occur if insufficient oxygen-rich blood passes through this area.

Angina pectoris

Angina, the main symptom of coronary artery disease, is usually perceived as chest pain.There are two types of angina pectoris:

  • stable angina pectoris. This is predictable chest pain that can usually be managed with lifestyle changes and certain medications, such as low doses of aspirin and nitrates.
  • unstable angina. This situation is much more serious than stable angina and is often an intermediate stage between stable angina and heart attack. Unstable angina is part of a condition called acute coronary syndrome.

Acute coronary syndrome

Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a severe and sudden heart condition that, with the necessary intensive treatment, does not turn into a full-blown heart attack. Acute coronary syndrome includes:

  • unstable angina. Unstable angina is a potentially serious condition in which chest pain is persistent but blood tests do not show markers of heart attack.
  • myocardial infarction without ST segment elevation (not Q-myocardial infarction).Diagnosed when blood tests and ECGs reveal a heart attack that does not capture the full thickness of the heart muscle. The damage to the arteries is less severe than with a major heart attack.

Patients diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may be at risk of heart attack. Doctors analyze the patient’s medical history, various tests, and the presence of certain factors that help predict which ACS patients are most at risk of developing a more serious condition.The severity of chest pain alone does not necessarily indicate the severity of the heart injury.

Risk factors

The risk factors for heart attack are the same as the risk factors for coronary heart disease. These include:

Age

The risk of coronary heart disease increases with age. About 85% of people who die from cardiovascular disease are over 65 years of age. In men, on average, the first heart attack develops at the age of 66.

Floor

Men are at a greater risk of developing coronary artery disease and heart attacks at an earlier age than women.The risk of cardiovascular disease in women increases after menopause, and they begin to suffer from angina more than men.

Genetic factors and family inheritance

Several genetic factors increase the likelihood of developing risk factors such as diabetes, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

Race and ethnicity

African Americans have the highest risk of heart disease due to their high incidence of high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity.

Medical prerequisites

Obesity and metabolic syndrome. Excessive fat storage, especially around the waist, can increase the risk of heart disease. Obesity also contributes to the development of high blood pressure, diabetes, which affect the development of heart disease. Obesity is especially dangerous when it is part of metabolic syndrome, a pre-diabetic condition associated with heart disease. This syndrome is diagnosed when three of the following conditions are present:

  • Abdominal obesity.
  • Low HDL cholesterol.
  • High triglyceride levels.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Insulin resistance (diabetes or prediabetes).

Elevated cholesterol levels. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the “bad” cholesterol responsible for many heart problems. Triglycerides are another type of lipids (fatty molecules) that can be harmful to the heart. High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) is the “good” cholesterol that helps protect against heart disease.Doctors analyze a “total cholesterol” profile, which includes measurements of LDL, HDL, and triglycerides. The ratios of these lipids can affect the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

High blood pressure. High blood pressure (hypertension) is associated with the development of coronary artery disease and heart attack. Normal blood pressure figures are below 120/80 mm Hg. High blood pressure is generally considered to be blood pressure greater than or equal to 140 mmHg. (systolic) or greater than or equal to 90 mm Hg.Art. (diastolic). Prehypertension is blood pressure with numbers 120 – 139 systolic or 80 – 89 diastolic, it indicates an increased risk of developing hypertension.

Diabetes. Diabetes, especially for people whose blood sugar levels are not well controlled, significantly increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. In fact, heart disease and strokes are the leading causes of death in people with diabetes. People with diabetes also have a high risk of developing hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, bleeding disorders, kidney disease, and nerve dysfunctions, all of which can lead to heart damage.

Lifestyle factors

Reduced physical activity. Exercise has a number of effects that benefit the heart and circulation, including cholesterol and blood pressure levels and weight maintenance. People who are sedentary are almost twice as likely to have heart attacks as people who exercise regularly.

Smoking. Smoking is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular disease.Smoking can raise blood pressure, disrupt lipid metabolism, and make platelets very sticky, increasing the risk of blood clots. Although heavy smokers are at the greatest risk, people who smoke as little as three cigarettes a day have a high risk of blood vessel damage, which can lead to impaired blood supply to the heart. Regular exposure to secondhand smoke also increases the risk of heart disease in nonsmokers.

Alcohol. Drinking alcohol in moderation (one glass of dry red wine a day) can help raise your “good” cholesterol (HDL) levels.Alcohol can also prevent blood clots and inflammation. In contrast, drunkenness harms the heart. In fact, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for alcoholics.

Diet. Diet can play an important role in protecting the heart, especially by reducing dietary sources of trans fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol, and limiting salt intake, which contributes to high blood pressure.

NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors

All non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with the exception of aspirin, are a risk factor for the heart.NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors may increase the risk of death in patients who have had a heart attack. The risk is greatest at higher doses.

NSAIDs include over-the-counter drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motril) and prescription drugs such as diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren). Celecoxib (Celebrex), a COX-2 inhibitor that is available in the United States, has been associated with cardiovascular risks such as heart attack and stroke. Patients who have had heart attacks should consult their doctor before taking any of these medications.

The American Heart Association recommends that patients who have or are at risk of heart disease primarily use non-drug methods of pain relief (eg, physical therapy, exercise, weight loss to reduce stress on joints, and heat or cold therapy). If these methods do not work, patients should take low doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol) or aspirin before using NSAIDs, and the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (Celebrex) should be used last.

Forecast

Heart attacks can be fatal, become chronic, or lead to complete recovery. The long-term prognosis for life expectancy and quality of life after a heart attack depends on its severity, the damage to the heart muscle, and the preventive measures taken thereafter.

Patients who have had a heart attack have a higher risk of having another heart attack. Although there are no tests that can predict whether another heart attack will occur, patients themselves can avoid another heart attack by following a healthy lifestyle and adhering to treatment.Two thirds of patients who have had a heart attack do not take the necessary steps to prevent it.

A heart attack also increases the risk of other heart problems, including abnormal heart rhythms, heart valve damage, and stroke.

People at greatest risk. A heart attack is always more serious in some people, such as:

  • Elderly.
  • People with heart disease or multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
  • People with heart failure.
  • People with diabetes.
  • People on continuous dialysis.
  • Women are more likely to die of a heart attack than men. The risk of death is highest in young women.

Factors that occur during a heart attack that increase the severity.

The presence of these conditions during a heart attack can contribute to a worsening prognosis:

  • Arrhythmias (heart rhythm disturbances).Ventricular fibrillation is a dangerous arrhythmia and one of the leading causes of early death from heart attack. Arrhythmias are more likely to occur within the first 4 hours of a heart attack and are associated with high mortality. However, patients who are successfully treated have the same long-term prognosis as patients without arrhythmias.
  • Cardiogenic shock. This very dangerous situation is associated with very low blood pressure, decreased urinary output, and metabolic disturbances. Shock occurs in 7% of heart attacks.
  • Heart block, the so-called atrioventricular (AV) block, is a condition in which the electrical conduction of nerve impulses to the muscles in the heart is slowed down or interrupted. Although heart block is dangerous, it can be effectively treated with a pacemaker and rarely causes any long-term complications in surviving patients.
  • Heart failure. The damaged heart muscle is unable to pump the blood necessary for the tissues to function.Patients experience fatigue, shortness of breath, and fluid retention in the body.

Symptoms

Heart attack symptoms can vary. They may come on suddenly and be severe, or they may progress slowly, starting with mild pain. Symptoms can differ between men and women. Women are less likely than men to have classic chest pain, they are more likely to experience shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, back pain and jaw pain.

Common signs and symptoms of heart attack include:

  • Chest pain.Chest pain or discomfort (sore throat) is the main symptom of a heart attack and can be felt as a feeling of tightness, tightness, fullness, or pain in the center of the chest. Patients with coronary artery disease who have stable angina often experience chest pain that lasts a few minutes and then goes away. With a heart attack, pain usually lasts more than a few minutes and may go away but then return.
  • Upper body discomfort. People who are experiencing a heart attack may feel discomfort in their arms, neck, back, jaw, or stomach.
  • Difficulty breathing may be accompanied by chest pain or no pain.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Cold sweat.
  • Dizziness or fainting.

The following symptoms are less common with a heart attack:

  • Sharp pain when breathing or coughing.
  • Pain that is mainly or only in the middle or lower abdomen.
  • Pain that can be caused by touch.
  • Pain that can be caused by movement or pressing on the chest wall or arm.
  • Pain that is constant and lasts for several hours (do not wait several hours if you suspect that a heart attack has begun).
  • Pain that is very short and lasts for a few seconds.
  • Pain that spreads to the legs.
  • However, these signs do not always rule out serious heart disease.

Painless ischemia

Some people with severe coronary artery disease may not have angina. This condition is known as painless ischemia. It is a dangerous condition because patients do not have alarming symptoms of heart disease. Some studies show that people with painless ischemia have a greater risk of complications and mortality than those with angina pain.

What to do in case of a heart attack

People who are experiencing symptoms of a heart attack should follow these steps:

  • For patients with angina pectoris – take one dose of nitroglycerin (a tablet under the tongue or in an aerosol form) when symptoms appear.Then another dose every 5 minutes, up to three doses, or until pain decreases.
  • Call (03) or dial the local emergency number. This should be done first if three doses of nitroglycerin do not relieve chest pain. Only 20% of heart attacks occur in patients with previously diagnosed angina. Therefore, anyone who develops symptoms of a heart attack should contact emergency services.
  • The patient should chew aspirin (250 – 500 mg), which should be reported to the arrived emergency service, since an additional dose of aspirin in this case does not need to be taken.
  • A patient with chest pain should be transported immediately to the nearest emergency room, preferably by ambulance. Traveling on your own is not recommended.

Diagnostics

When a patient with chest pain is admitted to the hospital, the following diagnostic steps are taken to identify heart problems and, if present, their severity:

  • The patient should inform the doctor about any symptoms that may indicate heart problems or possibly other serious medical conditions.
  • Electrocardiogram (ECG) – a record of the electrical activity of the heart. It is a key tool for determining if chest pains are related to heart problems and, if so, how severe they are.
  • Blood tests reveal an increase in the levels of certain factors (troponins and CPK-MB), which indicate heart damage (the doctor will not wait for results before starting treatment, especially if he suspects a heart attack).
  • Imaging techniques, including echocardiography and perfusion scintigraphy, help rule out a heart attack if you have any questions.

Electrocardiogram (ECG)

An electrocardiogram (ECG) measures and records the electrical activity of the heart, the ECG waves correspond to the contraction and relaxation of certain structures in different parts of the heart. Certain waves on the ECG are named with the corresponding letters:

  • R. P-waves are associated with atrial contractions (two chambers in the heart that receive blood from the organs).
  • QRS. The complex is associated with ventricular contractions (the ventricles are the two main pumping chambers in the heart.)
  • T and U. These waves accompany ventricular contractions.

Doctors often use terms such as PQ or PR interval. This is the time it takes for the electrical impulse to travel from the atria to the ventricles.

ST segment elevation and Q wave definition are the most important in the diagnosis and treatment of heart attack.

ST segment elevation: Heart attack. Elevation of the ST segment is an indicator of a heart attack. It indicates that the artery of the heart is blocked and the heart muscle is damaged to its full thickness.Q-myocardial infarction (myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation) develops.

However, ST elevation does not always mean that the patient is having a heart attack. Inflammation of the bursa (pericarditis) is another cause of ST segment elevation.

Without ST segment elevation: angina pectoris and acute coronary syndrome.

A depressed or horizontal ST segment suggests conduction abnormalities and cardiovascular disease, even if no angina is present at present.ST segment changes occur in about half of patients with various heart diseases. However, in women, ST segment changes can occur without heart problems. In such cases, laboratory tests are needed to determine the extent of damage to the heart, if any. Thus, one of the following conditions may develop:

  • Stable angina (blood test or other test results do not show any major problems and chest pain disappears).During this period, in 25 – 50% of people with angina pectoris or painless ischemia, normal ECG values ​​are recorded.
  • Acute coronary syndrome (ACS). It requires intensive treatment until it turns into a massive heart attack. ACS includes either unstable angina or myocardial infarction without ST-segment elevation (not Q-myocardial infarction). Unstable angina is a potentially serious event with persistent chest pain, but blood tests do not reveal markers of heart attack.In non-Q myocardial infarction, blood tests detect a heart attack, but the damage to the heart is less severe than in a full-blown heart attack.

Echocardiogram (ECHOKG)

An echocardiogram is a non-invasive technique that uses ultrasound to visualize the heart. It is possible to determine the damage and mobility of areas of the heart muscle. Echocardiography can also be used as an exercise test to detect the location and extent of damage to the heart muscle during illness or shortly after hospital discharge.

Radionucleide methods (stress test with thallium)

Allows to visualize the accumulation of radioactive tracers in the heart area. They are usually given intravenously. This method allows you to evaluate:

  • Severity of unstable angina when less expensive diagnostic methods are not effective.
  • Severity of chronic coronary heart disease.
  • Success of surgery for coronary heart disease.
  • Whether a heart attack has occurred.
  • Localization and degree of damage to the heart muscle during illness or shortly after discharge from the hospital after suffering a heart attack.

The procedure is non-invasive. It is a reliable method for a variety of severe heart conditions and can help determine if damage is due to a heart attack. The radioactive isotope thallium (or technetium) is injected into the patient’s vein. It binds to red blood cells and travels with the blood through the heart.The isotope can be traced to the heart using special cameras or scanners. Images can be synchronized with ECG. The test is performed at rest and during exercise. If damage is detected, the image is retained for 3 or 4 hours. Damage caused by a heart attack will persist on re-scans, and damage caused by angina will be leveled.

Angiography

Angiography is invasive. It is used for patients with angina pectoris confirmed by stress tests or other methods and for patients with acute coronary syndrome.Procedure progress:

  • A narrow tube (catheter) is inserted into an artery, usually an arm or leg, and then passed through the vessels to the coronary arteries.
  • A contrast agent is injected through a catheter into the coronary arteries and a recording is made.
  • This results in images of the coronary arteries showing obstructions to blood flow.

Biological markers

When heart cells are damaged, they release various enzymes and other substances into the bloodstream.Elevated levels of these markers of heart damage in the blood or urine can help identify a heart attack in patients with severe chest pain and help guide treatment. Tests like these are often done in the emergency room or hospital if a heart attack is suspected. Most commonly identified markers:

  • troponins. Cardiac troponin T and I proteins are released when the heart muscle is damaged. These are the best diagnostic signs of heart attacks.They can help diagnose and confirm the diagnosis in patients with ACS.
  • myocardial creatine kinase (CPK-MB). CPK-MB is a standard marker, but its sensitivity is less than that of troponin. Elevated levels of CPK-MB can be observed in people without heart disease.

Treatment

Treatments for heart attack and acute coronary syndrome include:

  • Oxygen therapy.
  • Relief of pain and discomfort with the use of nitroglycerin or morphine.
  • Correction of arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm).
  • Blocking further blood clotting (if possible) using aspirin or clopidogrel (Plavix) and anticoagulants such as heparin.
  • The opening of the artery in which the cow flow has been disturbed should be made as soon as possible by performing angioplasty or with the help of drugs that dissolve the blood clot.
  • Beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are prescribed to improve the function of the heart muscle and coronary arteries.

Immediate actions

The same for patients with both ACS and heart attack.

Oxygen. It is usually given through a tube into the nose or through a mask.

Aspirin. The patient is given aspirin if it has not been taken at home.

Medicines for relieving symptoms:

  • Nitroglycerin. Most patients will receive nitroglycerin both during and after a heart attack, usually under the tongue. Nitroglycerin lowers blood pressure and dilates blood vessels, increasing blood flow to the heart muscle.Nitroglycerin is sometimes given intravenously (recurrent angina, heart failure, or high blood pressure).
  • Morphine. Morphine not only relieves pain and reduces anxiety, but also dilates blood vessels, increasing the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart. Morphine can lower blood pressure and make it easier for the heart. Other drugs can be used as well.

Removal of obstruction of coronary circulation: emergency angioplasty or thrombolytic therapy

In a heart attack, clots form in the coronary arteries that obstruct coronary flow.Removal of clots in the arteries should be done as soon as possible, this is the best approach to improve survival and reduce the amount of damage to the heart muscle. Patients should be admitted to specialized medical centers as quickly as possible.

Standard medical and surgical procedures include:

  • Angioplasty, also called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), is the preferred procedure for emergency opening of arteries.Angioplasty should be performed promptly for patients with a heart attack, preferably within 90 minutes of arriving at the hospital. In most cases, a stent is placed in the coronary artery, which creates an internal scaffold and improves the patency of the coronary artery.
  • Thrombolytics dissolve the clot and are the standard drugs used to open arteries. Thrombolytic therapy should be given within 3 hours of symptom onset. Patients who are admitted to a hospital unable to perform PCI should receive thrombolytic therapy and be transferred to a PCI center without delay.
  • Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is sometimes used as an alternative to PCI.

Thrombolytics

Thrombolytic or fibrinolytic drugs are recommended as an alternative to angioplasty. These drugs dissolve the clot, or blood clot, that is responsible for blocking an artery and causing cardiovascular death.

Generally speaking, thrombolysis is considered a good choice for patients with myocardial infarction in the first 3 hours. Ideally, these medications should be given within 30 minutes of arriving at the hospital unless angioplasty is being performed.Other situations where thrombolytics are used:

  • The need for long-term transportation.
  • Long period of time before PCI.
  • Failure of PCI.

Thrombolytics should be avoided or used with great caution in the following patients after a heart attack:

  • In patients over 75 years old.
  • If symptoms persist for more than 12 hours.
  • Pregnant women.
  • People who have recently suffered an injury (especially a head injury) or surgery.
  • People with exacerbation of peptic ulcer disease.
  • Patients who have undergone long-term cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
  • When taking anticoagulants.
  • Patients who have suffered a major loss of cows.
  • Stroke patients.
  • Patients with uncontrolled high blood pressure, especially when the systolic pressure is above 180 mm.Hg

Standard thrombolytic drugs are recombinant tissue plasminogen activators (TAP): Alteplase (Actelise) and Reteplase (Retalize), as well as the new tenecteplase (Metalize). A combination of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy is also used to prevent clot enlargement and the formation of a new one.

Rules for the administration of thrombolytics. The sooner thrombolytics are given after a heart attack, the better. Thrombolytics are most effective during the first 3 hours.They can still help up to 12 hours after a heart attack.

Complications. Hemorrhagic stroke usually occurs on the first day and is the most serious complication of thrombolytic therapy, but fortunately this rarely occurs.

Revascularization procedures: angioplasty and bypass surgery

Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also called angioplasty, and coronary artery bypass grafting are standard surgeries to improve coronary blood flow.These are known as revascularization surgeries.

  • Emergency angioplasty / PCI is a standard procedure for heart attacks and must be performed within 90 minutes of its onset. Studies have shown that balloon angioplasty and stenting are not able to prevent heart complications in patients when they are performed 3 to 28 days after a heart attack.
  • Coronary artery bypass grafting is usually used as elective surgery, but can sometimes be performed after a heart attack, with unsuccessful angioplasty or thrombolytic therapy.It is usually performed over several days to allow the heart muscle to heal.
    Most patients are suitable for thrombolytic therapy or angioplasty (although not all centers are equipped for PCI).

Angioplasty / PCI includes the following steps:

  • A narrow catheter (tube) is inserted into the coronary artery.
  • The vessel lumen is restored when a small balloon is inflated (balloon angioplasty).
  • After deflation of the balloon, the vessel lumen increases.
  • To keep the lumen of an artery open for a long time, a device called a coronary stent is used – an expandable metal mesh tube that is implanted into an artery during angioplasty. The stent can consist of bare metal, or it can be coated with a special drug that is slowly released into the adjacent wall of the vessel.
  • The stent restores the vessel lumen.

Complications occur in about 10% of patients (about 80% of them during the first day). Best results are achieved in hospitals with experienced staff. Women who undergo angioplasty after a heart attack have a higher risk of death than men.
Restenosis after angioplasty. Narrowing after angioplasty (restenosis) can occur within a year after surgery and requires a repeat of the PCI procedure.

Drug eluting stents that are coated with sirolimus or paclitaxel may help prevent restenosis.They may be better than a bare metal stent for patients who have had a heart attack, but they can also increase the risk of blood clots.

It is very important for patients with drug-eluting stents to take aspirin and clopidogrel (Plavix) for at least 1 year after stenting to reduce the risk of blood clots. Clopidogrel, like aspirin, helps prevent platelets from sticking together. If, for some reason, patients are unable to take clopidogrel along with aspirin after angioplasty and stenting, bare metal stents should be implanted without drug coating.Prasugrel is a newer alternative to clopidogrel.

Coronary bypass surgery (CABG). It is an alternative to angioplasty in patients with severe angina pectoris, especially those with two or more occluded arteries. This is a very aggressive procedure:

  • The chest opens and blood is pumped using a heart-lung machine.
  • During the main stage of the operation, the heart stops.
  • Bypassing the closed sections of the arteries, shunts are sewn, which are taken during the operation from the patient’s leg, or from the arm and chest. Thus, blood flows to the heart muscle through shunts bypassing the closed sections of the arteries.

Mortality in CABG after a heart attack is significantly higher (6%) than when the operation is performed as planned (1-2%). How and when it should be used after a heart attack remains controversial.

Treatment of patients with shock or heart failure

Seriously ill patients with heart failure or who are in a state of cardiogenic shock (it includes a decrease in blood pressure and other disorders) are intensively treated and monitored: they give oxygen, inject fluids, regulate blood pressure, dopamine, dobutamine and other drugs are used.

Heart failure. Furosemide is administered intravenously. Patients may also be given nitrates and ACE inhibitors if there is no sharp drop in blood pressure when indicated. Thrombolytic therapy or angioplasty may be done.

Cardiogenic shock. The intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (IABP) procedure can help patients with cardiogenic shock when used in combination with thrombolytic therapy. A balloon catheter is used that inflates and descends into the aorta during certain phases of the cardiac cycle, thus increasing blood pressure.Also, an angioplasty procedure can be performed.

Treatment of arrhythmias

Arrhythmia is a heart rhythm disorder that can occur when oxygen is deficient and is a dangerous complication of a heart attack. A fast or slow heart rate is common in people with a heart attack and is usually not a dangerous sign.

Extrasystole or a very fast rhythm (tachycardia) can lead to ventricular fibrillation. This is a life-threatening arrhythmia in which the ventricles of the heart contract very rapidly, not providing sufficient cardiac output.The pumping action of the heart, necessary to maintain blood circulation, is lost.

Prevention of ventricular fibrillation. People who develop ventricular fibrillation are not always exposed to arrhythmia prevention, and there are currently no effective drugs to prevent arrhythmias during a heart attack.

  • Potassium and magnesium levels must be monitored and maintained.
  • The use of intravenous and oral beta blockers may help prevent arrhythmias in some patients.

Treatment for ventricular fibrillation:

  • Defibrillators. Patients who develop ventricular arrhythmias are given an electrical shock with a defibrillator to restore normal rhythm. Some studies show that implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) can prevent further arrhythmias and are used in patients who remain at risk of recurrence of these arrhythmias.
  • Antiarrhythmic drugs.Antiarrhythmic drugs include lidocaine, procainamide, or amiodarone. Amiodarone or another antiarrhythmic drug may be used later to prevent subsequent arrhythmias.

Treatment of other arrhythmias. People with atrial fibrillation are at high risk for stroke after a heart attack and should receive anticoagulants such as warfarin (Coumadin). There are also bradyarrhythmias (very slow rhythm disturbances) that often develop with a heart attack and can be treated with atropine or pacemakers.

Medicines

Aspirin and other antiplatelet agents

Anticoagulants are used in all stages of heart disease. They are classified as antiplatelet agents or anticoagulants. They are used along with thrombolytics and to prevent heart attacks. Anticoagulant therapy is associated with the risk of bleeding and stroke.

Antiplatelet drugs. They inhibit the adhesion of platelets in the blood and therefore help prevent blood clots. Platelets are very small and disc-shaped.They are essential for blood clotting.

  • Aspirin. Aspirin is an antiplatelet drug. Aspirin should be taken immediately after the onset of a heart attack. An aspirin tablet can either be swallowed or chewed. Better to chew an aspirin tablet – this will speed up its action. If the patient has not taken aspirin at home, it will be given to him in the hospital, then it must be taken daily. The use of aspirin in patients with heart attack has been shown to reduce mortality.It is the most common antiplatelet agent used in people with cardiovascular disease and is recommended to be taken daily at a low dose on an ongoing basis.
  • Clopidogrel (Plavix) – belongs to the thienopyridine series drugs, this is another antiplatelet drug. Clopidogrel is taken either immediately or after percutaneous intervention and is used in patients with heart attacks and after initiation after thrombolytic therapy. Patients receiving a drug eluting stent should take clopidogrel with aspirin for at least 1 year to reduce the risk of blood clots.Patients hospitalized for unstable angina should receive clopidogrel if they are unable to take aspirin. Clopidogrel should also be used in patients with unstable angina pectoris for whom invasive procedures are planned. Even conservatively treated patients should continue to take clopidogrel for up to 1 year. Some patients will need to take clopidogrel on an ongoing basis. Prasugrel is a new thienopyridine that can be used in place of clopidogrel.It should not be used by patients who have had a stroke or transient ischemic attack.
  • Inhibitors of IIb / IIIa receptors. These are powerful blood-thinning drugs such as abciximab (Reopro), tirofiban (Aggrastat). They are given intravenously in a hospital and can also be used for angioplasty and stenting.

Anticoagulants. They include:

  • Heparin is usually given during treatment with thrombolytic therapy for 2 days or more.
  • Other intravenous anticoagulants may also be used – Bivalirudin (Angiomax), Fondaparinux (Arixtra) and enoxaparin (Lovenox).
  • Warfarin (Coumadin).

There is a risk of bleeding with all of these drugs.

Beta blockers

Beta blockers reduce the oxygen demand of the heart muscle, slow down the heart rate and lower blood pressure. They are effective in reducing deaths from cardiovascular disease.Beta blockers are often given to patients early in their hospitalization, sometimes intravenously. Patients with heart failure or who may develop cardiogenic shock should not receive intravenous beta blockers. Long-term oral beta-blocker therapy for patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease, especially after heart attacks, is recommended in most cases.

These drugs include propranolol (Inderal), carvedilol (Koreg), bisoprolol (Zebeta), acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), labetalol (Normodin), metoprolol, and esmolol (Breviblock).

Treatment of a heart attack. The beta blocker metoprolol may be given within the first few hours after a heart attack to reduce damage to the heart muscle.

Preventive use after a heart attack. Beta blockers are taken orally on a long-term basis (as maintenance therapy) after the first heart attack to help prevent recurrent heart attacks.

Side effects of beta blockers include fatigue, lethargy, vivid dreams and nightmares, depression, memory loss, and dizziness.They can lower your HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels. Beta-blockers are divided into non-selective and selective drugs. Non-selective beta-blockers such as carvedilol and propranolol can cause bronchial smooth muscle contraction, leading to bronchospasm. Patients with bronchial asthma, emphysema or chronic bronchitis should not take non-selective beta-blockers.

Patients should not stop taking these drugs abruptly. Stopping beta blockers abruptly can lead to a sharp increase in heart rate and high blood pressure.It is recommended to slowly reduce the dosage until it is completely discontinued.

Statins and other lipid-lowering drugs that lower cholesterol

After admission to hospital for acute coronary syndrome or heart attack, patients should not interrupt statins or other drugs if their LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels are elevated. Some doctors recommend that your LDL cholesterol should be below 70 mg / dL.

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) are important drugs for the treatment of heart attack patients, especially those at risk of developing heart failure.ACE inhibitors should be given on the first day to all heart attack patients unless contraindicated. Patients with unstable angina or acute coronary syndrome should receive ACE inhibitors if they show signs of heart failure or signs of decreased left ventricular ejection fraction on echocardiography. These drugs are also widely used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension) and are recommended as first-line therapy for people with diabetes and kidney damage.

ACE inhibitors include captopril (Capoten), ramipril, enalapril (Vasotec), quinapril (Accupril), Benazepril (Lotenzin), perindopril (Aceon), and lisinopril (Prinivil).

Side effects. Side effects of ACE inhibitors are rare, but may include coughing, an excessive drop in blood pressure, and allergic reactions.

Calcium channel blockers

Calcium channel blockers may provide relief in patients with unstable angina, whose symptoms do not improve with nitrates and beta-blockers, or are used in patients for whom beta-blockers are contraindicated.

Secondary prevention

Patients can reduce the risk of a second heart attack by following certain preventive measures, which are explained when they are discharged from the hospital. Compliance with a healthy lifestyle, in particular a certain diet, is important in preventing heart attacks and must be followed.

Blood pressure. Target blood pressure numbers should be less than 130/80 mm Hg.

LDL cholesterol (“bad” cholesterol) should be substantially less than 100 mg / dL.All patients who have had a heart attack should receive a statin recommendation prior to hospital discharge. It is also important to control your cholesterol levels by reducing your saturated fat intake to less than 7% of your total calories. You need to increase your intake of omega-3 fatty acids (fish, fish oil rich in them) to reduce triglyceride levels.

Physical exercise. Duration 30-60 minutes, 7 days a week (or at least at least 5 days a week).

Weight loss.Combining exercise with a healthy diet rich in fresh fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy can help you lose weight. Your body mass index (BMI) should be 18.5-24.8. Waist circumference is also a risk factor for developing a heart attack. Waist circumference for men should be less than 40 inches (102 cm) and women less than 35 inches (89 centimeters).

Smoking. It is absolutely important to quit smoking. In addition, exposure to tobacco smoke (secondhand smoke) should be avoided.

Disaggregates. Your doctor may recommend that you take aspirin (75-81 mg) on ​​a daily basis. If you have a drug eluting stent implant, you should take clopidogrel (Plavix) or prasugrel (Effient) along with aspirin for at least 1 year after your surgery. (Aspirin is also recommended for some patients as a primary prevention of heart attack.)

Other medicines. Your doctor may recommend that you take ACE inhibitors or beta blockers on an ongoing basis.It is also important to get a flu shot every year.

Rehabilitation. Physical rehabilitation

Physical rehabilitation is extremely important after a heart attack. Rehabilitation may include:

  • Walking. The patient usually sits in a chair on the second day, and begins walking on the second or third day.
  • Most patients have a low level of exercise tolerance early in their recovery.
  • After 8-12 weeks, many patients, even those with heart failure, experience the benefits of exercise.Exercise advice is also given at discharge.
  • Patients usually return to work after about 1–2 months, although the timing may vary depending on the severity of the condition.

Sexual activity after a heart attack is very low risk and generally considered safe, especially for people who engage in it regularly. The feelings of closeness and love that accompany healthy sex can help offset depression.

Emotional Rehabilitation

Depression occurs in many patients with ACS and heart attack. Research shows that depression is a major predictor of mortality for both women and men. (One reason may be that depressed patients take their medications less regularly.)

Psychotherapy, especially cognitive behavioral therapy, can be very helpful. For some patients, it may be advisable to take certain types of antidepressants.

Information provided by the website: www.sibheart.ru

Increased blood pressure

INCREASED BLOOD PRESSURE – the patient may be disturbed by headaches, nausea, vomiting, visual disturbances, chest pains, weakness and other complaints.

What to do if there is a hypertensive crisis

Right. Most importantly, when the first symptoms appear, it is necessary to take a drug that will lower blood pressure in a short time.Talk to your doctor about what kind of medicine and in what dosage you need to keep with you in case of a hypertensive crisis.

It will not be superfluous to take a sedative medicine (for example, “Tricardine”). It is necessary to provide an influx of fresh air, for example, open a vent or window. If the attack was accompanied by a feeling of paresthesia, nausea and vomiting, impaired vision or speech, it is imperative to call an ambulance.

Wrong. A common mistake that can be made in a hypertensive crisis is to take a blood pressure lowering drug that is used regularly.These are the drugs that are taken every day for hypertension to stabilize the condition. Their use during a crisis is practically pointless. Such drugs have a long-term and cumulative effect, and in this situation, exactly those are needed that will begin their “work” quickly.

Do not panic and drink pill after pill. Many of them take effect at least 20 minutes after ingestion. Very often, in a person who has had a hypertensive crisis, who has taken a large dose of drugs, the pressure simply “drops” to low values.This can lead to irregular heart rhythm.

If a hypertensive crisis is accompanied by tachycardia (palpitations), tremors and agitation, you need to take medicine that will remove these symptoms. For example, “Anaprilin” (40 mg), or “Moxonidine” (0.2 – 0.4 mg), which should be chewed. You can use “Carvedilol” (12.5 – 25 mg). Such drugs are especially indicated when the heart rate is over 80 beats per minute.

If systolic and diastolic (upper and lower) pressure is increased, you should take Captopril (or Capoten) – 12.5 – 25 mg.Its action begins within 15-20 minutes.

Another drug that can help in such situations is Furosemide (40 mg), a drug with a diuretic effect. It begins to act within 30-60 minutes. The drug is more often used in the edematous version of the crisis, when there is pasty legs (a small degree of swelling of the skin and tissue), edema under the eyes. In many patients, this condition can appear after excessive salt intake.

There is one nuance when using Captopril (Capotena) and Furosemide.Their action ends after 4 hours, since the active substance is excreted from the body. Therefore, if after a given period of time the pressure rises again, these drugs can be taken again.

Typically, in uncomplicated crises, the pressure decreases within 30-60 minutes. But it is necessary to monitor your condition and control the pressure within the next 6 hours.

Changes in speech, gait, the appearance of foci of paresthesia, dark or light flies in front of the eyes, loss of vision for a second, severe nausea and vomiting, severe dizziness – all these symptoms require an urgent call to the ambulance team.

pressure 4

pressure 4

Search requests:
combined drug for pressure and cholesterol, order pressure 4, anaprilin increases blood pressure.

tonosil reviews 2020 september, head pressure treatment with folk remedies, hypertension proteins, mazda pressure sensors, drugs to lower the pulse without lowering pressure

pressure sensors mazda pressure – 4 (four) letters. Dear user, the site is developing and exists only on advertising revenue – please disable the blocker.Search by definition pressure, search by mask, crossword assistant, solving scanwords and crosswords online, crossword dictionary. Pascal (newton per square meter). Bar. Millimeter of mercury (torr). Micron of mercury (10-3 torr). Millimeter of water (or water) column. Atmosphere. The atmosphere is physical. The atmosphere is technical. strong pressure 4 letters Choose which letter the desired word begins with. Press to deprive softness, evenness of 4 letters. Torr. Pressure unit 4 letters.Traction. The movement of gases, smoke, caused by a pressure difference of 4 letters. The units of measurement for pressure or stress are quantities used in mechanics. We suggest that you familiarize yourself with the reference information that will help translate the initial data of the magnitude indicators. Pressure units, pressure conversion tables. Conversion of values. Table 1. Conversion of units of measurement of pressure (their ratio) unit of pressure. Alternative descriptions. (torus) the name of an off-system unit of pressure equal to 1/760 atm.; the same as 1 mm Hg; named after E. Torricelli. unit of measurement for atmospheric pressure. Conversion of units of measurement of pressure. Absolute, gauge and vacuum pressure. Pressure Converter. drugs for lowering the pulse without lowering pressure tones andes and semolina high pressure pump price

pills for high pressure reviews
tones andes free download
80 years old hypertension
Combined drug for blood pressure and cholesterol
anaprilin increases blood pressure
tonos reviews 2020 september
head pressure treatment with folk remedies
proteins of hypertension

Advise Tonosil patients.It is not only effective, but also a unique medication that helps to normalize blood pressure. The uniqueness of the drug is provided by a synergistic effect. This means that each active ingredient complements and enhances the action of the other. Tonosil has no contraindications and side effects. The drug not only stabilizes blood pressure, but also eliminates the cause of the development of hypertension. Tonosil is a natural remedy for blood pressure that fights against the source of hypertension, and not just masks its symptoms.The drug is recommended by leading cardiologists and therapists who prescribe it to people of different ages. It is known that high blood pressure is dangerous for humans, it can provoke a stroke or heart attack. Therefore, it is extremely important to choose a drug for hypertension. There are many new products on the pharmaceutical market, and one of them is the drug Tonosil. Antihypertensive drug with a central mechanism of action. In the stem structures of the brain (rostral layer of the lateral ventricles) moxonidine Medicines, Antihypertensive drugs.Active ingredient Composition and release form of the drug Pharmacological action Pharmacokinetics Indications. If you have problems with blood pressure, feel free to take either physiotens or moxonidine-sz, do not take clonidine! LinkReport. Reviews of the drug are positive, they confirm its effectiveness in lowering blood pressure, both with rapid relief and with long-term treatment. Moxonidine price where to buy. We offer to buy the drug Maxidin 0.15, we deliver orders to Kemerovo, the price of the drug Maxidin 0.15 can be found on this page.11. Maxidine 0.15 is used as an immunomodulatory agent for the treatment of rhinitis, conjunctivitis and keratoconjunctivitis of various etiologies. Moxonidine is a centrally acting antihypertensive drug. Release form and composition. Film-coated tablets: round, biconvex, pink to pale pink; the cross section shows 2 layers – a film membrane and a core of almost white color (7, 10 and 14 pieces each. Measures of assistance. Therapeutic action and composition. Contraindications to use.How to take Moxonidine. Reviews of doctors about the drug. Is there a connection between living in a big city and high blood pressure (BP)? At what pressure to take Moxonidine and what detailed instructions for use. Physiotens tablets (moxonidine 0.4 mg). These medications are already quite serious and are not taken with one-time pressure surges from stress or overwork. Prescribe long courses when already. Maxidin pressure pills with explanations of professionals and a description of the methodology. Moxonidine differs from similar drugs from pressure in some similarity to 2-adrenergic receptors.The drug for pressure maksidin. Content. 1 At what pressure are Moxonidin tablets prescribed (SZ, Canon): instructions for use. Moxonidine is a remedy for arterial hypertension of any severity. Instructions for use indicate that tablets are 0.2 mg, 0.3 mg, 0.4 mg SZ.

pressure 4

My blood pressure began to rise quite early, now I suffer from headaches, rapid fatigue, and yet I still have to go to work. On the advice of a doctor I knew, I ordered Tonosil over the Internet.It is convenient to take because it is a concentrated elixir. Truth or divorce, that the medicine really cleans blood vessels and reduces. It is important to understand that hypertension can provoke a fatal attack, so you should always have first aid supplies at hand. HYPERTENSION from hypertension – Divorce! Not a medicine or dietary supplement. People with high blood pressure, be careful. Divorce!!! They work for a sucker! received an order today. 40 capsules for 27,300 tenge. There is a quality certificate for GoodPrice LLC and this certificate has expired.The manufacturer of this crap is another Inteksika LLC. I called the cool center, they can’t help me with anything, please contact me by e-mail with pretensions. Reviews of cardiologists: truth or divorce. Hypertensive is a unique drug for hypertension, the natural components of which enhance each other’s action and do not cause addiction to the body. The ingredients are natural. Hypertens – reviews of doctors about drops from high blood pressure. Composition, instructions for the use of drugs for hypertension. It is used for tachycardia and hypertension.Is hypertensive a divorce? Hypertensive is not a medicinal (medical) drug. Congratulations on the fact that in search of this information about the drug for hypertension Hyperten, you have come to this article. Hello everyone. I want to share a review on the drops for hypertension – Hypertens. Therefore, I was in the eternal search for natural remedies for hypertension. Hypertension from hypertension – real reviews: truth or divorce ?. Hypertension is a problem due to which a person constantly experiences high blood pressure.The silent killer has a tremendous burden. Hypertensive divorce or medication? Search for documents on this miracle of medicine. At the moment, there are simply no real reviews about Hyperten, the Internet is filled with advertising, selling sites and platforms representing this one. pressure 4 . tones of the andes and semolina. Reviews, instructions for use, composition and properties. One of the important factors in increasing blood pressure is stress. If you can build your life in such a way as to reduce stressful situations, stop reacting to them too much, then you will feel the effect quite quickly.Especially if there are no bad habits, you will follow. How to quickly relieve pressure. Modern medical science does not rule out Ways to lower blood pressure without drugs. Such simple exercises will not only help reduce blood pressure, but also calm down in general. To lower the pressure, brew the tea with cold water and let it brew for 3-5 minutes. The number of patients complaining of blood pressure problems is constantly growing. Usually, the pressure rises with increased physical exertion, changes in weather conditions, in stressful situations.What is the fastest (urgent) way to reduce blood pressure at home without using medication? Lotions and compresses with apple cider vinegar will help lower blood pressure in literally a quarter of an hour without using pills for hypertension and other medications. Soak in vinegar. It is possible to reduce the pressure at home without medication urgently and for a long time only at the first stage of hypertension with the help of folk remedies, massage, breathing exercises and alternative techniques. How to quickly lower blood pressure at home.How to permanently lower blood pressure without medication. Let us remind you once again: the above methods to reduce blood pressure at home are emergency measures. How to quickly reduce pressure without pills, urgently. High blood pressure should definitely be reduced. The already depleted blood vessels of the brain may not withstand and burst. In medical language, this condition is called acute cerebrovascular accident, in the people it is. After 50 years, every second person in Russia suffers from high blood pressure.Most people know about the disease, but almost half of the fellow citizens are treated on their own. 9 ways to quickly lower blood pressure at home – what pills and foods. What foods lower blood pressure? How to lower blood pressure without medication? Hypertension is one of the most widespread diseases in the world. Almost a third of the adult population suffers from this disease. Fast ways to reduce blood pressure without medication. If you have an attack, do not grab the pills right away. In addition to the harmful effect on the gastrointestinal tract, the uncontrolled use of drugs for.

reviews about hypertension

reviews about hypertension

Keywords:
normio drug for pressure price, order reviews about hypertension, what to do with high blood pressure.

medicine for pressure on the letter m, combination drugs for pressure of a new generation, hypertension diabetes mellitus treatment, hypertension 1 risk 4, low pressure cause symptoms and treatment

hypertension 1 risk 4 I suffer from hypertension, constantly high blood pressure, especially in the evening, my head hurts unbearably.I don’t know what to do with myself. K Hereditary hypertension. The upper limit was 250/150, this is when the tongue and legs are taken away and braided. And only then did they begin normal treatment. Hypertension is not a cold. Most likely it will be forever. Only a doctor can prescribe the necessary treatment. Interview, examination, analyzes, diary of observations of blood pressure, prescription of drugs – strictly individually. The main thing is not. Therefore, only a qualified cardiologist is capable of choosing drugs for hypertension that would not harm, but only help.Diet for hypertension – reviews. Recommend 100%. Efficiency. I have had hypertension for many years. I was constantly taking medications for blood pressure, vasodilators and noticed that my heart often ached. Divorce!!! They work for a sucker! received an order today. 40 capsules for 27,300 tenge. There is a quality certificate for GoodPrice LLC and this certificate is expired. The manufacturer of this crap is another Inteksika LLC. I called the cool center, they can’t help me with anything, please contact me by e-mail with pretensions. Help with advice.over the past year there have been 2 hypertensive crises. after which I was diagnosed with grade 1 hypertension. And this is at 25. Who was examined for hypertension, but the cause was never found? How are you being treated, and are you being treated at all, do you feel pressure? low blood pressure cause symptoms and treatment popular pressure drugs hypertensive medical care

pressure norms by age in women
eye pressure treatment drops
hypertension mkb 10
normio drug for blood pressure price
what to do with high pressure
medicine for pressure on the letter m
new generation combination drugs for pressure
hypertension diabetes mellitus treatment

However, there are negative reviews about this tool.Therefore, our editors decided to find out the reason why they appear. It turned out that there are unscrupulous people who sell a fake on the Internet. Normally, blood pressure should correspond to values ​​of 120/80 by mercury. Such indicators indicate good health, normal working capacity and the absence of serious problems with the cardiovascular system. But due to various reasons, for example, stressful situations, overwork, malnutrition, changes in weather conditions, bad habits and other factors, sharp changes in these values ​​are possible.What should be the rate of blood pressure in children and adults. Why you should often measure your blood pressure, what consequences of hypertension can lead to. If the pressure is 100 to 60, it is better to focus on the accompanying symptoms. Hypotension is often accompanied by weakness, nausea (up to vomiting), headache, fainting. Similar signs are required. Tables of normal blood pressure and human heart rate by years (ages). What pressure is considered normal: one that lies in the range from 110 to 70 to 130 to 85.Average value, which is referred to as classic healthy. Human pressure standards by age. What is pulse pressure. General information. As a general rule, any initial medical examination begins with a check of the main indicators of normal human functioning. DBP = 63 + (0.1 years of life) + (0.15 weight in kg.). Let’s take as an example. The blood pressure norm for this person with the age of 60 years and weighing 70 kg is equal to 146 / 79.5. Second formula: This formula calculates the blood pressure rate.The level of pressure is an individual concept, and may differ even in absolutely healthy people. The normal pressure is considered to be 120/80 mm Hg. These are indicators of pressure at rest in a middle-aged person (20-40). They are considered optimal for the full functioning of the body. What is the normal pressure and pulse of a person from birth to old age? Normal arterial blood pressure of a person and pulse. The normal pressure of a person by years is indicated in the standard age tables that each doctor has.According to them, he verifies the data obtained and draws appropriate conclusions. The meaning of the upper and lower digits. A pressure of 130 to 60 speaks of pathologies of the cardiovascular system and not only. Find out how to improve results, what is the danger of low blood pressure, what are needed. Normal blood pressure values ​​in men. women, children. Blood pressure rate by age, table of upper and lower pressure in women, men, children. Update: October 2019. Until u. Blood pressure (BP) and everything related to it.What is the normal pressure? Low and high blood pressure. Causes, symptoms, how to control the level.

reviews of hypertension

My mom read about this drug on the Internet. But I do not trust these things, but at the insistence of my mother I still ordered Tonosil as an addition to her main treatment. Himself, by the way, too. Hypertension is the most common disease of the circulatory system that affects people of all ages. The best folk remedies for hypertension: 5 most effective recipes.Treatment of hypertension with fresh juices, a list of drugs for high blood pressure and recommendations for enriching the diet with magnesium. It is possible to cure hypertension forever at home only at the first stage, as well as in some cases of grade 2 hypertension. How to keep the pressure normal? Hypertension is a common medical condition. Find out what folk remedies can help you to lower high blood pressure. There are herbal remedies for lowering blood pressure.Many plants, due to a point or complex effect on the body, contribute not only. Attention! It is impossible to treat hypertension with medicines on your own, otherwise an overdose may develop. The fact is that hypertension is actually not a disease, but rather a compensatory reaction of the body to a very specific reason for a decrease in blood circulation in important organs. High blood pressure reasons. What to do and how to treat it at home quickly and effectively. Symptoms. Possible complications of hypertension.How to treat hypertension at home quickly. How to treat a disease if you cannot take pills? Herbs have a fairly strong effect and sometimes help against diseases better than medications. The correct selection of the remedy will relieve hypertension at home and improve overall well-being. Aloe as a medicine. Aloe is a plant. How to treat and cure hypertension at home? Hypertension (hypertension) is called a persistent increase in blood pressure, when, when measuring it, either the upper figures are higher than 139 or the lower ones are higher than 89 mm Hg.This is not a situation where. Hypertension: treatment with folk remedies at home. How to treat hypertension with nutrition. As practice shows, traditional methods of treating hypertension in old age also help to normalize the condition if the course of the disease has not yet been completely started. All the more so. Among the most common diseases of mankind, hypertension, or, as it is called in a scientific way, chronic arterial hypertension, has taken a firm place. How to treat hypertension with folk remedies: the best recipes for pressure with lemon, garlic, viburnum, cranberries, motherwort.Motherwort for hypertension: folk recipes. Video: How to treat hypertension at home? If, with repeated measurements of blood pressure, its indicators. reviews of hypertension . popular drugs for pressure. Reviews, instructions for use, composition and properties. – The numbers to which it is necessary to reduce the pressure in people with hypertension are called target. For most patients, this pressure should not be higher. What do the pressure numbers mean: upper and lower blood pressure. If symptoms of hypertension are present, then using folk methods to quickly cope with high blood pressure will not work! It is better to go through the diagnostics thoroughly.Differences in the types of hypertension are associated with the mechanism of increasing pressure. The numbers of the lower arterial pressure indicate the degree of resistance of the peripheral arteries, the patency of blood vessels. Hypertension is a persistently high blood pressure in a person. The numbers of the lower arterial pressure indicate the degree of resistance of the peripheral arteries, the patency of blood vessels. This is the main thing that means. Home Heart disease Pressure and pulse. The meaning of the digits when measuring. Among the most common complications of hypertension: heart attacks, renal dysfunction.In addition, hypertension can impair vision and be detrimental. Surprisingly, the causes of hypertension and hypotension are sometimes the same – stress, the influence of hereditary factors, depression. Meaning of digits when measuring blood pressure. Hypertension in diabetes mellitus is a fairly common occurrence, since these diseases are closely related. Blood pressure numbers may change with age. Most. Arterial hypertension, hypertension, is a condition that is characterized.What do the blood pressure numbers mean? What is BP? What blood pressure is considered normal? Reasons for deviating from the norm of blood pressure.

.