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Can you drink with diflucan: Mixing Fluconazole & Alcohol (Interactions & Risks)

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Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Fluconazole?

Dec 16, 2017

patty asked

I took a one day fluconazole dose, 150 mg pill, for a yeast infection. Is it OK to drink alcohol two days later? How long before it leaves your system?

Answer

There is no drug interaction between fluconazole and alcohol, but it generally is not recommended to drink alcohol while recovering from an infection. Alcohol has the propensity to decrease immune function, at least acutely (1). In addition, it can potentially worsen medication side effects, including:

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Upset stomach

What Is Fluconazole?

Fluconazole, also known by the brand name Diflucan, is a systemic anti-fungal that is commonly used for yeast infections and oral thrush infections. It is generally well tolerated but has been known to cause headache, nausea and abdominal pain.

An interesting characteristic of fluconazole is its ability to eradicate many fungal infections, including vaginal fungal infections, in a single dose. This is due to how fluconazole works and the relatively long half life of the drug.

How Does Fluconazole Work?

Fluconazole works by inhibiting the synthesis of a vital component (ergosterol) of the fungal cell membrane. A single dose of fluconazole has a reported half life of 30-50 hours (2). In general, a drug takes about 5 half lives to be completely metabolized and eliminated from the body. This essentially means that the drug is present and active in the body for 6 to 10 days! That is why a single dose is effective for eradicating infections.

After a single dose, symptoms tend to get better after 1 to 3 days and the majority of infections are cleared in 7 to 10 days. The clinical cure rate with single doses of fluconazole is around 69%, which is why sometimes doctors will recommend taking a second dose of fluconazole 7 days after the initial dose.

Problems With Alcohol And Fluconazole

In regard to taking alcohol after fluconazole administration, there is no drug interaction as mentioned above. However, if you are experiencing any symptoms from medication use such as nausea or abdominal pain, alcohol may worsen those side effects. Fluconazole lasts in the body for a considerable period of time, 6 to 10 days. If you wish to completely avoid alcohol while the drug is present, you would need to wait that period of time.

Fluconazole: medicine to treat fungal infections including nail infections

Follow the advice from your doctor. If you buy fluconazole in a pharmacy, follow the instructions that come with the medicine.

It’s important to complete the course of medicine even if you feel better.

You can take fluconazole capsules and liquid with or without food.

Fluconazole capsules are either 50mg, 150mg or 200mg. Swallow the capsules whole with a drink of water. It is best to take your capsules at the same time each day.

The liquid usually comes in 2 different strengths:

  • 50mg fluconazole in a 5ml spoonful (50mg/5ml)
  • 200mg fluconazole in a 5ml spoonful (200mg/5ml)

Use the plastic spoon that comes with your medicine to measure your dose. Do not use a kitchen teaspoon, as this will not give you the right amount.

Dosage for capsules or liquid

These are the usual doses for adults:

  • oral (mouth) thrush – 50mg a day, taken for 7 to 14 days
  • vaginal thrush or balanitis – 150mg, taken as a single dose
  • vaginal thrush that keeps coming back – 150mg, taken once every 72 hours for the first 3 doses, then take 150mg once a week for 6 months
  • candida infections (in your blood or elsewhere in your body) – 200mg to 800mg a day for several weeks
  • cryptococcal meningitis – 200mg to 800mg a day for several weeks
  • to stop cryptococcal meningitis coming back – 200mg a day, taken long term
  • to prevent fungal infections if you have a weakened immune system (a low white blood cell count) – 50mg to 400mg a day, until your white blood cell count improves

For children, your doctor will work out the right dose depending on the infection and your child’s age and weight.

If you take your fluconazole once every 72 hours, or once a week, it may help to use a calendar and mark the days when you need to take it.

What if I forget to take a dose?

If you forget a dose, take it as soon as you remember, unless it’s nearly time for your next dose. In this case, just skip the missed dose and take your next one as normal.

Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed dose.

If you forget doses often, it may help to set an alarm to remind you. You could also ask your pharmacist for advice on other ways to remember your medicines.

What if I take too much?

Accidentally taking 1 or 2 extra doses is unlikely to harm you.

Can you drink while taking fluconazole?

Fluconazole and Alcohol

You should avoid or limit drinking alcohol while taking fluconazole. Since both can cause headaches and stomach discomfort, drinking alcohol while taking fluconazole may worsen these side effects.

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In respect to this, does alcohol make fluconazole less effective?

When you drink, it weakens your immune system, so it may make it more difficult for you to get past the infection that led to your need for Diflucan in the first place. You may confuse this with alcohol making Diflucan ineffective when in reality the medicine is just as effective as it would be ordinarily.

Beside above, how long after taking fluconazole will symptoms go away? Fluconazole 150 mg capsules are an antifungal medication used to treat vaginal yeast infections caused by the yeast known as Candida. It works by stopping the growth of Candida. It usually starts to work within one day, but it may take 3 days for your symptoms to improve and up to 7 days for your symptoms to disappear.

Moreover, can you drink alcohol while taking fluconazole 150mg?

Yes, it should be okay to have a drink of alcohol with the one dose of fluconazole. There are no known interactions between alcohol and fluconazole. Of course, when drinking alcohol it should always be in moderation.

Can you drink alcohol while taking antifungal medication?

Ketoconazole should only be used to treat fungal infections when other medications are not available or cannot be tolerated. Do not drink any alcoholic beverages during your treatment with ketoconazole because drinking alcoholic beverages may increase the risk that you will develop liver damage.

Differences, similarities, and which is better for you

Drug overview & main differences | Conditions treated | Efficacy | Insurance coverage and cost comparison | Side effects | Drug interactions | Warnings | FAQ

Vaginal yeast infections are a relatively common and very treatable condition that many women face. These infections are typically caused by an overgrowth of a fungal group known as candida albicans, which is present in the normal vaginal flora of most women. When certain conditions allow the overgrowth of vaginal candida, also known as candidiasis, it leads to symptoms that may include vaginal tenderness, itching, discharge, and/or odor. The sensitivity of this condition leaves many women looking for a quick and effective treatment option. Monistat and Diflucan are two treatment options for vulvovaginal candidiasis.

What are the main differences between Monistat vs. Diflucan?

Monistat is an over-the-counter treatment option for vaginal yeast infections. It (miconazole) fights fungal infections by decreasing the production of ergosterol. This causes damage to the cell wall of the fungus, allowing the escape of nutrients needed for the fungus to thrive.

Monistat  (Monistat coupons) comes in a variety of treatment combinations which can include vaginal ovules (suppositories) and/or vaginal creams for both internal and external applications. There are products for one-day, three-day, or seven-day treatment durations. Many of the Monistat (What is Monistat?) formulations have generic options available. Over the counter use of Monistat products is not intended for anyone under the age of 12.

Diflucan (fluconazole) (Diflucan coupons) is a prescription treatment for yeast infections that works in a similar fashion to Monistat in that it decreases the production of ergosterol. The damage this causes to the cell wall membrane will not allow the fungus to live. Diflucan (What is Diflucan?) is available as an oral tablet in 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg strengths. It is also available as an oral suspension and injectable solution. Obtaining a prescription for Diflucan requires evaluation by a physician, and in some cases, a specimen may be required. Diflucan can be prescribed in both children and adults.

Main differences between Monistat vs. Diflucan
Drug class Azole antifungal Azole antifungal
Brand/generic status Brand and generic available Brand and generic available
What is the generic name? Miconazole Fluconazole
What form(s) does the drug come in? Vaginal ovule (suppository) and cream Oral tablet and suspension, injectable
What is the standard dosage? Combination of internal and external vaginal application for 1, 3, or 7 days 150 mg as a one time dose, or every other day for 3 total doses
How long is the typical treatment? 1-7 days 1-14 days
Who typically uses the medication? Females 12 years of age or older Adults or children under doctor’s orders

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Conditions treated by Monistat vs. Diflucan

Monistat formulations are intended for the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (vaginal yeast infections) in females who have been previously diagnosed with a vaginal yeast infection and are having recurring symptoms. Monistat is not intended for use by anyone who has never been diagnosed with a vaginal yeast infection. Women who are having first-time symptoms consistent with a vaginal yeast infection but have never been diagnosed should be evaluated by a physician first.

Diflucan is also indicated for the treatment of vaginal yeast infections but has a variety of other approved uses which include candida growth in the urinary tract, abdomen, heart, esophagus, oral cavity, blood, and bone. Diflucan may also be used in the treatment of fungal growth on the nails and feet. Patients who are immunocompromised may benefit from prophylactic treatment with Diflucan to prevent fungal overgrowth. A rare condition, cryptococcal meningitis, may also be treated with Diflucan. A Diflucan treatment duration for vaginal yeast infections can range from one to 14 days depending on the treatment history and complexity of the patient’s infection.

Vaginal candidiasis Yes Yes
Oropharyngeal candidiasis No Yes
Esophageal candidiasis No Yes
Candiduria No Yes
Candidemia No Yes
Endocarditis No Yes
Cryptococcal meningitis No Yes
Candidiasis prophylaxis No Yes
Tinea corporis, Tinea pedis, Tinea versicolor No Yes
Coccidioidomycosis No Yes (off-label)

Is Monistat or Diflucan more effective?

Monistat and Diflucan are each effective treatment options for vaginal yeast infections and have been compared in a variety of ways. In some women, vaginal yeast infections may be recurrent and bothersome, and the simplicity of a one-day treatment option may be the most appealing. In a study comparing the single-dose treatment of Monistat and Diflucan, Diflucan was found to have slightly higher cure rates, verified by lab tests and symptomatic improvement, though these differences were not statistically significant. More importantly, short term clinical cure was achieved in 94% of Monistat patients and 100% of Diflucan patients. Therefore, both Monistat and Diflucan are highly effective treatment options for vaginal yeast infections.

One factor that is important in women affected by vaginal yeast infections is how quickly the symptoms begin to show resolution. Vaginal tenderness, itching, and odor can be extremely bothersome, and if left untreated, can affect other lifestyle activities. A study published in 2015 compared the time to symptomatic relief of vaginal itching, burning, and irritation when treated locally with a one-day miconazole combination treatment (1200 mg ovule + external cream) or systemically with single-dose fluconazole 150 mg. The results of this study found that local treatment with miconazole resulted in relief of at least one symptom in one hour versus four hours with systemic fluconazole treatment. Furthermore, all symptoms were relieved in four hours with local miconazole treatment versus sixteen hours with systemic fluconazole treatment. The time it takes to achieve symptomatic relief is an important factor when choosing the best treatment course.

Only your physician can diagnose a vaginal yeast infection and decide what course of treatment is best for you in treating initial and recurring infections.

Coverage and cost comparison of Monistat vs. Diflucan

Monistat is an over-the-counter medication, and may not be covered by Medicare or other prescription insurance plans. The retail cost of Monistat can range from $18 to $24 depending on the formulation. Your doctor can prescribe Monistat, even though a prescription is not required. With a prescription, you can purchase Monistat for around $15 with a SingleCare coupon.

Get the SingleCare prescription discount card

Diflucan is only available by prescription and is usually covered by Medicare and most other insurance plans. The average retail price of a single 150 mg dose of Diflucan is around $80. With a coupon from SingleCare, you can obtain the generic for around $8.

Typically covered by insurance? No Yes
Typically covered by Medicare? No Yes
Standard dosage 3-day combination pack Single 150 mg dose
Typical Medicare copay N/A <$10 depending on coverage
SingleCare cost $15-$19 $7-$8

Common side effects of Monistat and Diflucan

Monistat and Diflucan are generally both well tolerated. The most common adverse events for Monistat products are irritation, burning, and itching. These may be difficult to discern from the symptoms relating to the vaginal yeast infection.

Diflucan may cause headaches in a significant number of patients. Other side effects of Diflucan may include skin rash, dizziness, and gastrointestinal intolerance.

This may not be a complete list of side effects. Your doctor or pharmacist can provide a complete list and additional information on the side effects of Monistat and Diflucan.

Side Effect Applicable? Frequency Applicable? Frequency
Local irritation Yes Not defined No n/a
Local itching Yes Not defined No n/a
Local burning Yes Not defined No n/a
Headache No n/a Yes 2-13%
Skin rash No n/a Yes 2%
Dizziness No n/a Yes 1%
Nausea No n/a Yes 2-7%
Abdominal pain No n/a Yes 2-6%
Diarrhea No n/a Yes 2-3%

Source: Monistat (DailyMed) Diflucan (DailyMed)

Drug interactions of Monistat vs. Diflucan

Monistat is generally very safe to take with other medications. There is a chance that intravaginal use of miconazole products may result in enough significant systemic absorption to interfere with Coumadin (warfarin) metabolism, causing an increase in plasma levels of warfarin. Therefore, intravaginal use of miconazole in patients taking warfarin is generally not recommended as a precaution.

Diflucan is a strong inhibitor of cytochrome P-450 enzyme subtype CYP2C19, as well as a moderate inhibitor of subtypes CYP2C9 and CYP3A4. This results in a variety of potential drug interactions as these enzymes play important roles in the processing and absorption of many other drugs. Diflucan may interact with blood thinners, antibiotics, oral contraceptives, and other commonly used medications. In addition, Diflucan has been associated with an adverse event known as QT prolongation, a serious irregular heart rhythm. When Diflucan is taken with other drugs that cause QT prolongation, their effects may be potentiated and this effect is potentially fatal. Drugs whose QT prolongation effect may be increased when taken with Diflucan include amiodarone, astemizole, pimozide, quinidine, quetiapine, and erythromycin.

The following table provides a sample of drug interactions, but may not be a complete list. A medical professional can provide additional information and a complete list of interactions.

Warnings of Monistat vs. Diflucan

Women experiencing symptoms of a vaginal yeast infection for the very first time should consult their physician for confirmation of the diagnosis before initiating treatment with any product.

Monistat may interfere with the integrity of latex products and therefore may damage products such as condoms or diaphragms. While using Monistat, you should refrain from using other vaginal products such as tampons, douches, or spermicides. Vaginal intercourse is not recommended while using Monistat products. Monistat products may cause skin sensitivities such as itching, burning, and irritation. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, you should consult with your doctor before using Monistat.

Diflucan has been associated with rare, but serious, liver damage and should be used with caution in patients with pre-existing hepatic disease. Your doctor may monitor your liver enzymes while on Diflucan, especially if you are on it for an extended duration of treatment. Rare cases of a life-threatening allergic reaction, also known as anaphylaxis, to Diflucan have been reported. Diflucan should be avoided in pregnancy, especially the first trimester.

Frequently asked questions about Monistat vs. Diflucan

What is Monistat?

Monistat is an over-the-counter treatment for vaginal yeast infections. It is available in a variety of treatment options which include vaginal ovules and creams. Treatment duration with Monistat may be one, three, or seven days depending on the product chosen.

What is Diflucan?

Diflucan is a prescription medication used to treat vaginal yeast infections, as well as a variety of other fungal infections. It is available as an oral tablet or solution, as well as an injection. Treatment of vaginal yeast infections may range from one to fourteen days depending on the complexity of the infection.

Are Monistat and Diflucan the same?

While both Monistat and Diflucan are antifungal medications used to treat vaginal yeast infections, they are not the same. Monistat is available for purchase without a prescription and is used locally in the vaginal area. Diflucan is a prescription medication and is taken orally for systemic absorption.

Is Monistat or Diflucan better?

Monistat and Diflucan are both proven, effective treatments for vaginal yeast infections. Monistat may provide a faster resolution of symptoms such as itching, burning, and irritation. Diflucan has a more broad use in fungal infections other than vaginal candidiasis.

Can I use Monistat or Diflucan while pregnant?

Diflucan should not be used while pregnant. In general, local antifungals, such as Monistat, are the preferred products to treat vaginal yeast infections while pregnant. You should consult with your physician before using Monistat products while pregnant.

Can I use Monistat or Diflucan with alcohol?

Alcohol is not contraindicated with either Monistat or Diflucan. You should consult with your doctor prior to consuming alcohol while on Diflucan as it has been known to cause rare hepatotoxicity. Patients who consume alcohol on a regular basis may be at an increased risk of liver damage.

Does Monistat work better than Diflucan?

Monistat and Diflucan have shown similar effective cure rates for vaginal candidiasis. Monistat has been shown to provide resolution of local symptoms such as itching, burning, and irritation faster than Diflucan.

Can I use fluconazole and Monistat together?

Monistat and fluconazole each effectively achieve resolution of vaginal yeast infections independently. Miconazole used intravaginally results in some systemic absorption and may interact with oral, systemically absorbed fluconazole. These medications should not be used together without the consent and monitoring of your physician.

How long should it take for Diflucan to work?

Diflucan begins resolving symptoms in 4 hours, with complete resolution in as soon as 16 hours for uncomplicated cases. More complex cases or repeated infections may require longer treatment durations to achieve complete resolution.

Fluconazole for fungal infections – Diflucan

About fluconazole

Type of medicine An antifungal medicine
Used for Fungal infections
Also called Azocan®; Diflucan®; Canesten Oral®
Available as Capsules, oral liquid medicine and injection

Many types of fungi live harmlessly on our skin. However, some types of fungi can thrive and multiply on the surface of our bodies and cause infections of the skin, mouth or vagina. The most common fungi to cause skin infections are the tinea group of fungi. A common fungal infection of the mouth and vagina is called thrush. This is caused by an overgrowth of a yeast (which is a type of fungus) called candida.

Fungal infections sometimes occur within the body also. You are more at risk of developing an internal fungal infection if your immune system does not work properly. For example, if you are having chemotherapy, or if you are taking medicines for rheumatic disease, or if you have HIV/AIDS. Internal fungal infections can be serious.

You will have been prescribed fluconazole to treat a fungal infection, or to help prevent a fungal infection from developing. It works by killing yeast and fungi.

Fluconazole is available on prescription, and it can also be bought at pharmacies, without a prescription, for the treatment of vaginal thrush.

Before taking fluconazole

Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking fluconazole it is important that your doctor or pharmacist knows:

  • If you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • If you have a heart rhythm problem.
  • If you have problems with the way your liver works, or any problems with the way your kidneys work.
  • If you have a rare inherited blood condition called porphyria.
  • If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines you are taking which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines. This is important because fluconazole can interfere with a number of other medicines and cause problems.
  • If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine.

How to take fluconazole

  • Before you start the treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside the pack. It will give you more information about fluconazole and will provide you with a full list of the side-effects which you may experience from taking it.
  • There are several strengths of fluconazole capsule available – 50 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg. Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you what dose to take and how often to take it, as this will depend upon the nature of your infection/condition. The dose will be printed on the label of the pack to remind you of what was said. Fluconazole can be taken at any time of day, and can be taken either before or after a meal. Swallow the capsule with a drink of water.
  • Infections such as vaginal thrush can be treated with a single 150 mg dose; other infections require a course of treatment possibly lasting a number of weeks.
  • If you have been prescribed a course of treatment, remember to continue taking the capsules/medicine until the course is finished. Fluconazole is usually prescribed as a once-daily dose. If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If you do not remember until the following day, skip the missed dose. Do not take two doses together to make up for a forgotten dose.

Getting the most from your treatment

  • Remember to keep any regular appointments with your doctor. This is so your doctor can check on your progress. If you are taking a course of fluconazole, you may need to have a blood test to check that it is not affecting your liver if you are taking it for more than one month.
  • If your symptoms do not improve despite taking fluconazole, speak again with your pharmacist or doctor so that your infection can be investigated further.
  • If you buy any medicines, always check with a pharmacist that they are safe to take with fluconazole.

Can fluconazole cause problems?

Along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side-effects although not everyone experiences them. The table below contains some of the most common ones associated with fluconazole. You will find a full list in the manufacturer’s information leaflet supplied with your medicine. The unwanted effects often improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine, but speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome.

Common fluconazole side-effects (these affect fewer than 1 in 10 people)
What can I do if I experience this?
Feeling sick (nausea) or being sick (vomiting), stomach ache, diarrhoea Stick to simple foods and drink plenty of water
Headache Drink plenty of water and ask your pharmacist to recommend a suitable painkiller. If the headaches continue, let your doctor know
Skin rash Let your doctor know about this
Changes to some blood test results Your doctor will check for these if needed

If you experience any other symptoms which you think may be due to fluconazole, discuss them with your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

How to store fluconazole

  • Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.
  • Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.

Important information about all medicines

Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else might have taken an overdose of this medicine go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Take the container with you, even if it is empty.

If you are having an operation or dental treatment, tell the person carrying out the treatment which medicines you are taking.

This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours.

Do not keep out-of-date or unwanted medicines. Take them to your local pharmacy which will dispose of them for you.

If you have any questions about this medicine ask your pharmacist.

Diflucan One – Uses, Side Effects, Interactions

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Fluconazole 150 mg capsules are an antifungal medication used to treat vaginal yeast infections caused by the yeast known as Candida. It works by stopping the growth of Candida. It usually starts to work within one day, but it may take 3 days for your symptoms to improve and up to 7 days for your symptoms to disappear.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

Each hard, white, gelatin capsule, marked with the Pfizer logo, contains 150 mg of fluconazole. Nonmedicinal ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, lactose, magnesium stearate, maize starch, and sodium lauryl sulfate; capsule shell: gelatin and titanium dioxide.

How should I use this medication?

The recommended dose of fluconazole for vaginal candidiasis (yeast) infections is a single 150 mg dose.

Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is very important that this medication be taken as suggested by your doctor or pharmacist.

Store this medication at room temperature and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take this medication if you:

  • are allergic to fluconazole or any ingredients of the medication
  • are taking the medication cisapride
  • are taking the medication terfenadine when fluconazole is taken in doses greater than 400 mg daily
  • What side effects are possible with this medication?

    Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

    The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

    The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

    Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

    • diarrhea
    • headache
    • nausea
    • stomach pain

    Although most of the side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

    Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

    • signs of liver problems (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, weight loss, yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, dark urine, pale stools)

    Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

    • signs of a serious allergic reaction (i.e., abdominal cramps, difficulty breathing, nausea and vomiting, or swelling of the face and throat)
    • signs of a severe skin reaction such as blistering, peeling, a rash covering a large area of the body, a rash that spreads quickly, or a rash combined with fever or discomfort

    Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

    Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

    Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

    General: If this is your first yeast infection, if you have frequent yeast infections or heart disease, if you have another yeast infection within 2 months after taking this medication, or if you have multiple sexual partners or change partners often, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking this medication. This medication should only be taken as a single dose.

    The following symptoms are not caused by a yeast infection. Contact your doctor for treatment advice, if you experience them:

    • abdominal pain
    • discharge with a foul odour
    • fever or chills
    • lower back or shoulder pain
    • nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
    • painful urination

    If your symptoms have not improved in 3 days or disappeared in 7 days, contact your doctor.

    Grapefruit juice: Taking fluconazole at the same time as drinking grapefruit juice may cause fluconazole to build up in the body and cause side effects. Avoid drinking grapefruit juice if you are taking this medication.

    Intercourse and birth control: Vaginal intercourse should be avoided when women have a yeast infection. This will help reduce the risk of infecting your sexual partner(s).

    This medication works in the body for several days after you take the dose. To avoid the risks of harm to the developing baby, if you are child-bearing age and may become pregnant, be sure to use an effective form of birth control for 7 days after taking this medication.

    QT prolongation: This medication can cause changes in the electrical activity of the heart, called QT prolongation. If you have heart disease, abnormal electrolyte levels (e.g., potassium, sodium), or are taking other medications that can cause QT prolongation (e.g., quinidine, amiodarone), discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

    Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. Women who take fluconazole for vaginal yeast infections and who may become pregnant should useadequate birth control for seven days after a dose of fluconazole.

    Breast-feeding: This medication passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking fluconazole, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

    Children and adolescents: The safety and effectiveness of fluconazole 150 mg capsules have not been established for the treatment of vaginal candidiasis in children under 12 years of age.

    What other drugs could interact with this medication?

    There may be an interaction between fluconazole and any of the following:

    • alpha blockers (e.g., alfuzosin, doxazosin, silodosin, tamsulosin)
    • amantadine
    • amiodarone
    • amphotericin B
    • anti-cancer medications (e.g., cabazitaxel, docetaxel; doxorubicin; etoposide, ifosfamide, irinotecan, vincristine)
    • antihistamines (e.g., cetirizine, doxylamine, diphenhydramine, hydroxyzine, loratadine)
    • anti-psychotic medications (e.g., clozapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone)
    • anti-rejection medications (e.g., pimecrolimus, sirolimus, tacrolimus)
    • apixaban
    • aprepitant
    • asunaprevir
    • other azole anti-fungals (e.g., ketoconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole)
    • benzodiazepines (e.g., alprazolam, chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, clorazepate, diazepam, flurazepam, midazolam, triazolam)
    • birth control pills
    • bosentan
    • bromocriptine
    • buprenorphine
    • buspirone
    • calcitriol
    • calcium channel blockers (e.g., amlodipine, diltiazem, nifedipine, verapamil)
    • cannabis
    • carvedilol
    • celecoxib
    • cimetidine
    • chloral hydrate
    • chloroquine
    • cisapride
    • clopidogrel
    • colchicine
    • conivaptan
    • corticosteroids (e.g., budesonide, dexamethasone, methylprednisolone, prednisolone, prednisone)
    • cyclosporine
    • dabigatran
    • dapsone
    • degarelix
    • didanosine
    • disopyramide
    • dofetilide
    • domperidone
    • dronedarone
    • eliglustat
    • eplerenone
    • estrogens (e.g., conjugated estrogen, estradiol, ethinyl estradiol)
    • fingolimod
    • flutamide
    • formoterol
    • galantamine
    • guanfacine
    • HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs; e.g., delaviridine, efavirenz, etravirine, nevirapine)
    • HIV protease inhibitors (e.g., atazanavir, indinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir)
    • indapamide
    • ivabradine
    • ivacaftor
    • lidocaine
    • lithium
    • lomitapide
    • losartan
    • macrolide antibiotics (e.g., clarithromycin, erythromycin)
    • maprotiline
    • maraviroc
    • mefloquine
    • methadone
    • mifepristone
    • moclobemide
    • mirtazapine
    • modafinil
    • montelukast
    • naloxegol
    • narcotic pain relievers (e.g., codeine, fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone)
    • nefazodone
    • nitrates (e.g., isosorbide dinitrate, isosorbide mononitrate)
    • octreotide
    • oxycodone
    • pentamidine
    • phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil)
    • procainamide
    • propafenone
    • praziquantel
    • primaquine
    • progestins (e.g., dienogest, levonorgestrel, medroxyprogesterone, norethindrone)
    • proton pump inhibitors (e.g., lansoprazole, omeprazole)
    • quinidine
    • quinine
    • quinolone antibiotics (e.g., ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin)
    • rifabutin
    • rifampin
    • rilpivirine
    • rivaroxaban
    • romidepsin
    • salmeterol
    • seizure medications (e.g., carbamazepine, gabapentin, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, topiramate)
    • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; e.g., citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline)
    • serotonin antagonists (anti-emetic medications; e.g., granisetron, ondansetron)
    • simeprevir
    • solifenacin
    • sotalol
    • “statin” cholesterol medications (e.g., atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin)
    • sulfonamide antibiotics (e.g., sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole, sulfisoxazole)
    • sulfonylureas (e.g., glipizide, glyburide)
    • tacrolimus
    • tamoxifen
    • tetrabenazine
    • tetracycline
    • theophyllines (e.g., aminophylline, oxtriphylline, theophylline)
    • tolterodine
    • ticagrelor
    • ticlopidine
    • tolvaptan
    • trabectedin
    • tramadol
    • trazodone
    • tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline, imipramine, nortriptyline)
    • trimethoprim
    • tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., bosutinib, dasatinib, imatinib, nilotinib)
    • ulipristal
    • venlafaxine
    • warfarin
    • zafirlukast
    • zidovudine
    • zolpidem
    • zopiclone

    If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

    • stop taking one of the medications,
    • change one of the medications to another,
    • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
    • leave everything as is.

    An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

    Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

    All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Diflucan-One

    4 Habits That Lead To Yeast Infections

    We tend to think of yeast infections as problems that rear their heads whenever they please, regardless of what we do. Of course, like any health condition, there certainly is an element of chance in when you might one. But there are a few common habits that might unknowingly put us at a higher risk.

    E8HTP0 Overhead of Glass of Beer on Table in SunlightAlamy Stock Photo

    If you want to avoid yeast infections—or at least, keep them to a minimum—here are four things to try not to do:

    1. Wearing tight or damp clothesYeast infections thrive in warm, moist environments, and when your ladyparts don’t have room to breathe, your vagina is more likely to become such a place, says physician Lorraine Maita, M.D. Yoga pants and other tight clothes can make your more hospitable to yeast infections, especially in the summer, as can leaving your clothes on after working out or swimming.

    2. Consuming foods or drinks that contain yeast or sugarIt almost seems too obvious to be true, but it’s not a myth: when you eat foods with yeast, it can get into the blood stream and enter the vagina from there, says Dr. Maita. And yeast infections feed on sugar and starch. Since beer and wine both contain yeast and sugar (alcohol is sugar fermented by yeast), excessive drinking can definitely be a recipe for yeast infections. You should also go easy on sweets, along with foods like moldy cheese, mushrooms, and anything fermented if you’re prone to yeast infections.

    3. Over-using antibioticsWhile antibiotics may kill the bacteria causing an illness, the downside is that they also kill the healthy Lactobacillus bacteria, which keep the vagina’s pH levels low, explains ob-gyn Jamil Abdur-Rahman, M.D. When this bacteria is missing, the vagina becomes less acidic, making you more prone to yeast infections. Listen to your doctor, but keep an eye on the number of scripts you end up with.

    4. Taking certain forms of birth controlAn imbalance of estrogen and progesterone can bring on a yeast infection, and oftentimes progesterone-only contraceptives like the Depo Provera shot, the Mirena IUD, the Skyla IUD, and the Nexplanon implant can cause this problem. If you use one of these methods, a supplemental estrogen vaginal cream or vaginal probiotic can help combat this effect, says Dr. Abdur-Rahman, if you notice the infections popping up frequently.

    Eliminating these habits won’t prevent you from ever getting yeast infections ever. But the best way to decrease your chances is to wear loose, light clothes, change quickly after the gym, eat enough probiotics, stay hydrated, and maintain a healthy diet. If the infections keep coming anyway, Dr. Abdur-Rahman recommends trying a vaginal probiotic supplement. And, of course, whenever you have one, see your ob-gyn as soon as possible.

    Diflucan 150mg 1 pc. capsules pfizer inc.

    Inside, swallowing whole.

    Therapy can be started pending culture and other laboratory test results. However, anti-infective therapy needs to be modified accordingly when the results of these studies become known.

    Fluconazole can be taken orally or administered intravenously by infusion at a rate not exceeding 10 ml / min. The choice of the route of administration depends on the clinical condition of the patient.When transferring a patient from IV to oral administration of the drug, or vice versa, changes in the daily dose are not required. In a solution for intravenous administration, fluconazole is dissolved in 0.9% sodium chloride solution; each 200 mg (100 ml bottle) contains 15 mmol of Na + and Cl-. Therefore, in patients who require restriction of sodium or fluid intake, the rate of fluid administration must be considered.

    The daily dose of Diflucan® depends on the nature and severity of the fungal infection. With vaginal candidiasis, in most cases, a single dose of the drug is effective.For infections requiring repeated administration of the antifungal drug, treatment should be continued until the clinical or laboratory signs of an active fungal infection disappear. Patients with AIDS and cryptococcal meningitis or recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis usually require supportive care to prevent recurrence of infection.

    Adult use

    1. In case of cryptococcal meningitis and cryptococcal infections of other localization, 400 mg is usually prescribed on the 1st day, and then treatment is continued at a dose of 200–400 mg once a day.The duration of treatment for cryptococcal infections depends on the clinical and mycological effect; for cryptococcal meningitis, treatment is usually continued for at least 6–8 weeks.

    To prevent the recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis in AIDS patients, after the completion of the full course of primary treatment, therapy with Diflucan® at a dose of 200 mg / day can be continued for a very long period.

    2. For candidemia, disseminated candidiasis and other invasive candidal infections, the dose is usually 400 mg on the 1st day, then 200 mg / day.Depending on the severity of the clinical effect, the dose may be increased to 400 mg / day. The duration of therapy depends on the clinical effectiveness.

    3. In case of oropharyngeal candidiasis, the drug is usually prescribed at 50-100 mg 1 time per day for 7-14 days. If necessary, in patients with severe suppression of immune function, treatment can be continued for a longer time. In atrophic oral candidiasis associated with wearing dentures, the drug is usually prescribed at a dose of 50 mg once a day for 14 days in combination with local antiseptic agents for the treatment of the denture.

    For other candidal infections of the mucous membranes (with the exception of genital candidiasis, see below), for example, esophagitis, non-invasive bronchopulmonary infections, candiduria, candidiasis of the skin and mucous membranes, etc., the effective dose is usually 50-100 mg / day for a duration treatment for 14-30 days.

    For the prevention of relapses of oropharyngeal candidiasis in AIDS patients, after completion of the full course of primary therapy, Diflucan® can be prescribed 150 mg once a week.

    4. For vaginal candidiasis, Diflucan® is administered once orally at a dose of 150 mg.

    To reduce the frequency of relapses of vaginal candidiasis, the drug can be used at a dose of 150 mg once a month. The duration of therapy is determined individually; it varies from 4 to 12 months. Some patients may require more frequent use of the drug. The use of a single dose for children under 18 years of age and patients over 60 years of age without a doctor’s prescription is not recommended.

    For balanitis caused by Candida, Diflucan® is prescribed as a single oral dose of 150 mg.

    5. For the prevention of candidiasis, the recommended dose of Diflucan® is 50–400 mg once a day, depending on the degree of risk of developing a fungal infection. For patients with a high risk of generalized infection, for example, with severe or long-term neutropenia, the recommended dose is 400 mg once a day. Diflucan® is prescribed a few days before the expected development of neutropenia and after an increase in the number of neutrophils more than 1000 mm3, the treatment is continued for another 7 days.

    6. For skin infections, including mycoses of the feet, smooth skin, groin area and candidal infections, the recommended dose is 150 mg once a week or 50 mg once a day. The duration of therapy is usually 2-4 weeks, however, with mycoses of the feet, longer therapy (up to 6 weeks) may be required.

    With pityriasis versicolor, the recommended dose is 300 mg once a week for 2 weeks; some patients require a third dose of 300 mg / week, while for some patients a single dose of 300–400 mg is sufficient.An alternative treatment regimen is the use of the drug, 50 mg 1 time per day for 2-4 weeks.

    For tinea unguium (onychomycosis), the recommended dose is 150 mg once a week. Treatment should be continued until the infected nail is replaced (an uninfected nail grows out). Regrowth of nails on fingers and toes usually takes 3–6 and 6–12 months, respectively. However, the growth rate can vary widely from person to person, and also by age.After successful treatment of persistent chronic infections, nail shape changes are sometimes observed.

    7. With deep endemic mycoses, it may be necessary to use the drug at a dose of 200-400 mg / day for up to 2 years. The duration of therapy is determined individually; it is 11-24 months – with coccidioidomycosis; 2–17 months – with paracoccidioidomycosis; 1–16 months for sporotrichosis and 3–17 months for histoplasmosis.

    Application in children

    As with similar infections in adults, the duration of treatment depends on the clinical and mycological effect.For children, the daily dose of the drug should not exceed that for adults. Diflucan® is used daily, once a day.

    For candidiasis of the mucous membranes, the recommended dose of Diflucan® is 3 mg / kg / day. On the first day, in order to more quickly achieve constant Css, a loading dose of 6 mg / kg can be prescribed.

    For the treatment of generalized candidiasis and cryptococcal infections, the recommended dose is 6–12 mg / kg / day, depending on the severity of the disease.

    For the prevention of fungal infections in patients with suppressed immunity, in whom the risk of developing an infection is associated with neutropenia, which develops as a result of cytotoxic chemotherapy or radiation therapy, the drug is prescribed at 3-12 mg / kg / day, depending on the severity and duration of the persistence of induced neutropenia ( see dosage for adults; for children with renal impairment – see dosage for patients with renal impairment).

    Use in children aged 4 weeks or less

    In newborns, fluconazole is excreted slowly.In the first 2 weeks of life, the drug is prescribed in the same dose (in mg / kg) as for older children, but with an interval of 72 hours. For children aged 3 and 4 weeks, the same dose is administered with an interval of 48 hours.

    Use in the elderly

    In the absence of signs of renal failure, the drug is prescribed in the usual dose. Patients with renal insufficiency (Cl creatinine

    Use in patients with renal insufficiency

    Fluconazole is excreted mainly in the urine unchanged.With a single dose, dose changes are not required. In patients (including children) with impaired renal function with repeated use of the drug, a loading dose of 50 to 400 mg should be initially administered

    compatibility, consequences, is it possible to combine

    It’s not for nothing that they say that advertising is the engine of commerce. The popularity of certain drugs is so great that people indiscriminately prescribe treatment for themselves without consulting doctors. But some drugs must be taken strictly according to the doctor’s prescription and in no case should they be combined in certain foods or, more seriously, with alcohol.These types of drugs include Diflucan.

    Diflucan and alcohol

    As we all know from the popular commercial, Diflucan is a remedy for thrush. But is it only this unpleasant disease that is included in the list of indications for taking the medicine?

    In fact, Diflucan is a fairly serious antifungal agent, widely used by doctors for a variety of diseases:

    • any fungal lesions, including on the mucous membranes of the oral cavity, esophagus and pharynx;
    • vaginal fungal infections;
    • any organ damage caused by the multiplication of pathogenic fungi;
    • for the prevention and treatment of fungal infections in persons who are recipients of transplanted internal organs;
    • during therapy in people with HIV infection and after chemotherapy and radiation therapy;
    • fungal diseases of feet, nails, groin area and other similar lesions.

    The active ingredient of Diflucan is fluconazole, which, in combination with other auxiliary elements, gives a quick result in the fight against yeast-like. Fluconazole accumulates in the mucous membranes and on the surface of the skin, providing its therapeutic effect exactly where it is needed.

    Ideally, Diflucan should be taken as prescribed by a doctor or, with self-medication, strictly follow the attached instructions. The instructions also describe the interaction of the drug with a whole series of other drugs, so this factor must also be taken into account when using Diflucan.

    Typically, Diflucan is tolerated by patients, but there is evidence that fluconazole is toxic to the liver of patients. When taking the drug, there were cases of death due to the death of liver cells.

    In addition, it is worth noting such side effects as:

    • headaches, convulsions, dizziness;
    • nausea, abdominal pain, flatulence, hepatitis, liver dysfunction, jaundice;
    • allergic reactions;
    • heart disorders associated with a lack of potassium and many other phenomena.

    All side effects of the drug, including destruction of the liver, are usually reversible and disappear after the drug is discontinued. But can it be taken with alcohol?

    Compatible

    Doctors do not recommend taking a course of treatment with Diflucan and at the same time taking any dose of alcoholic beverages. This applies to both strong alcohol and low alcohol drinks – beer, cocktails, wine. It’s all about the hepatotoxicity of fluconazole. While undergoing a course of treatment, we cannot always predict how an unhealthy organism will react to a particular drug.In the case of Diflucan, which itself has many unpleasant side effects, the simultaneous intake of alcohol can provoke the development of serious pathologies that significantly impair the quality of life of an already not very healthy person.

    In addition, patients who are prescribed the use of Diflucan for the treatment of the underlying disease should not consume alcoholic beverages at all! This applies to both patients with severe illnesses (HIV, oncology, organ transplantation) and those with common mycoses.

    Potential consequences

    The probability of liver damage when taking Diflucan cannot be calculated. It is also impossible to calculate what effect the combined use of two substances potentially hazardous to the liver – alcohol and fluconazole – will have on this vital organ. It’s good if the liver can withstand this blow, but if not? Hepatitis, or worse, liver cell necrosis, will begin to develop.

    The manufacturer mentions probable nausea and vomiting as a side effect of this medication.Excessive alcohol consumption causes the same symptoms. Thus, the manifestation of the gag reflex after mixing Diflucan with alcohol is quite likely, which means that the drug will not be absorbed and, at least, the effectiveness of treatment will be reduced to zero, and in the worst case, a decrease in the concentration of the drug in the blood will entail the addiction of existing fungi to it … After some time, you will have to be treated again and with a different drug.

    How to distinguish these substances by time?

    It would be most correct not to start treatment during periods of long holidays, when it is not possible to refrain from taking alcoholic beverages.But if therapy has already begun, then it is necessary to undergo a course of treatment to the end, and then you can reward yourself by attending a party where you will be allowed to drink a little alcohol.

    Two weeks after taking the last pill of Diflucan is the best answer to the question of how long it will take to drink alcoholic beverages. This is due to the long half-life of the drug from the patient’s body.

    Conclusions

    In general, Diflucan is a fairly effective and safe drug, if you do not combine the course of treatment with it with the intake of any alcoholic beverage.Moreover, such serious illnesses, in which the doctor prescribes an antifungal drug, in themselves adversely affect the patient’s quality of life, so why additionally experience all the delights of side effects?

    “Diflucan” and alcohol: compatibility, consequences of joint administration

    At present, thrush is a very common disease. This ailment is unpleasant, during and after it, very negative sensations are observed.To combat it, doctors usually prescribe “Diflucan”, the course of therapy is sometimes supplemented with other drugs to achieve a greater effect. Therefore, the actual question is about the compatibility of “Diflucan” with alcohol.

    What is worth knowing about this medication?

    “Diflucan” is an antifungal drug, it is allocated into a separate pharmacological group. Most of the drug is dissolved by peritoneal and articular fluids, and, in addition, breast milk, along with saliva and even sputum, serves as a favorable environment for its resorption.The therapeutic period of action of the drug is from two to three days and directly depends on the state of the kidneys, through which it is excreted. The medication is used in the presence of the following ailments in the patient:

    • Mycosis of the skin and nails.
    • The defeat of the internal organs by the fungus.
    • Cancer patients in order to prevent fungal pathologies.

    Is Diflucan and alcohol compatible? How long can you drink alcohol and how is it combined with taking the drug? More on this below.

    The drug very well helps to get rid of unpleasant phenomena like cryptococcus, microspores, trichophyton, blastomycelium and histoplasm. It comes in a variety of forms and can be taken in powder form or in gelatin capsule format. There are also liquid suspensions. The method of application is distinguished depending on the type of drug, for example, pills and powders are used internally, and liquid ones are prescribed in the form of injections.

    Indications for use

    Reviews of people who have been treated with this drug indicate “Diflucan” as one of the most effective medicines.Through this medication, a violent suppression of all activity of pathogenic microflora can occur. Against the background of all this, as a rule, the death of fungal organisms occurs, and at the same time, a cure occurs. The medicine shows a fairly high performance in relation to: microspores, histoplasm, cryptococcus, trichophyton, blastomycelium, and so on.

    Women are often interested in whether or not Diflucan can be combined with alcohol. Let’s figure it out.

    Treatment with this medication is prescribed only by a doctor.It becomes appropriate to use it for vaginal fungus. An excellent tool is also suitable as part of complex therapy in patients with HIV infection. Among other things, it is often used as a prophylactic agent after radiation and chemotherapy.

    The product is especially effective for treating fungal infections of the skin and nails. It should be considered for use against the background of ongoing prophylaxis for persons who have undergone internal organ transplantation. “Diflucan” successfully treats fungal infections of various nature.In particular, those pathologies, the dislocation of which is observed on the mucous tissues of the intestine, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach and pharynx.

    Side-effects

    One should not forget about side-effects during treatment. When using Diflucan, they are usually the following:

    • Dizziness and nausea.
    • The appearance of allergic rashes.
    • Probably excessive intestinal gas along with severe headache.
    • Occurrence of abdominal pain with a simultaneous loss of appetite.
    • Excessive fatigue.

    Compatibility of “Diflucan” with alcohol

    The composition of the presented medicinal product includes a special substance called fluconazole. It is because of him that this drug is considered extremely incompatible with alcoholic beverages. Fluconazole has a strong effect on the liver, and alcohol has a similar effect. The use of these substances together has only a negative effect, not to mention the fact that most people have disorders that they do not even know about.

    Is it possible to take “Diflucan” with alcohol at the same time, not everyone knows.

    Liver dysfunction

    Mild abnormalities are difficult to diagnose. The liver is responsible for the processing of poisons and toxins in the body, namely, they are found in excess in alcohol. Hepatic dysfunction is manifested in a change in the level of bilirubin in the blood. In the event that it is increased, the activity of the liver enzyme will also increase. Signs of this process are expressed in a yellowish skin tone, the manifestation of hepatitis, and liver cell necrosis.Liver cells die off. From this it is worth concluding that after using this medicine, you should not drink in any way.

    It is important to find out in advance how long it takes to take Diflucan and alcohol.

    Alcoholic drinks can be consumed eighteen hours after the last medication intake. All this time, the concentration of the drug in the human body is sufficient for poisoning. So you should not drink before the specified time. Otherwise, the consequences can be very unpleasant.In the event that a person seriously values ​​health, the question of the compatibility of “Diflucan” with alcohol should not arise at all. It is better to play it safe once again and wait a day, since everyone’s metabolism is completely different. For example, in one person the medicine will be released in eighteen hours, while in another the body will be cleansed only after a day.

    Thus, alcohol can decrease or increase the effect of the drug, and this leads to very dangerous consequences. Recommendations in the instructions for use of “Diflucan” do not warn about its incompatibility with alcohol, but this, at least, nullifies the treatment.The person may even have to re-conduct the whole course of therapy. This will require extra costs, and will also increase the risk of the transition of fungal pathology to a new stage.

    After how much “Diflucan” with alcohol will cease to be dangerous, of course. And what are the consequences of using such a tandem?

    Consequences of combining

    When mixing the described drug with an alcoholic beverage, you can get all its side effects in an enhanced form. And the intense manifestation of allergies in combination with alcohol can lead to death.Alcohol abuse while taking Diflucan can threaten:

    • The emergence of various hallucinations in a person.
    • The appearance of severe depression along with increased excitability.
    • The presence of convulsive activity.
    • The onset of throbbing pain in the head.

    What does the reaction depend on?

    The reaction is individual and based on the characteristics of the organism. Among other things, it cannot be guaranteed that these symptoms will not become more acute.It is well known that mixing drugs with alcohol ends not only with physical, but also mental disorders in the body. This is due to the effect of ethyl on the brain neurons, and the combination of alcohol and medicine can increase the effect several times. After all, no one wants their brains to suffer.

    Features of mixing

    The doctor will tell you whether it is possible to take alcohol with Diflucan.

    Of the internal organs, more than one liver undergoes significant destruction from this combination.The fact is that the combination of an alcoholic drink with fluconazole can greatly harm the heart system. Under the influence of alcohol, the vessels expand, and then sharply narrow, which is manifested by a sharp jump in pressure. Among other things, the heart rhythm is disturbed, atrial fibrillation with ventricular flutter may occur.

    It is difficult to predict in advance what consequences such a combination will have on experimenters. Alcohol can affect cellular metabolism in the human body.This neutralizes the effect of any drugs.

    “Diflucan” itself is distinguished by many side effects, and even if it is combined with strong drinks, the negative effect does not clearly affect, the body will still experience severe consequences. Therefore, just before you combine the medication with this or that alcoholic beverage, you need to think twice. Is a fun evening worth a serious health break?

    How long can you take Diflucan and alcohol?

    It would be most correct not to start treatment at all during the long holidays, when it is simply not possible to refrain from taking alcoholic beverages.But if the treatment has already begun, then it is necessary to undergo a course of therapy until the very end, and after that it will be possible to reward yourself by attending some party, where it will be allowed to take a small amount of alcohol.

    Two weeks after taking the last pill of “Diflucan” is considered the most optimal period after which a person can drink alcohol. This is directly related to the long half-life of the drug from the patient’s body.

    So the answer to the question whether alcohol is possible while taking Diflucan is definitely negative.

    What should be done in case of violation of the prohibition?

    If this still happens, then the person must adhere to the following recommendations:

    • Stop drinking alcohol further.
    • Drink as much water as possible for the next four hours.
    • See your doctor for additional help and advice.

    In the annotation attached to the described medicine, you must carefully study the item on contraindications and take into account the information provided there.

    In the event that the medication was taken in a course, alcohol can be taken, having withstood a certain period after the end of treatment. It ranges from three days to one month, depending on the direct instructions of the attending specialist.

    It does not matter in what form Diflucan was taken. Pills, ointments, and suspensions have poor compatibility with alcohol.

    Of course, when the combination of this drug with alcohol occurs once, the risks of harm to health are minimal.But it is better not to allow such a “neighborhood”. Reviews about “Diflucan” and alcohol (their joint intake) are presented below.

    Reviews of narcologists and patients

    Many people write that they should not forget that the consumption of alcoholic beverages during treatment with this drug always provokes an increase in its side effects. When we are talking not just about a glass of wine or champagne for the company, but about serious alcohol abuse while taking Diflucan, then, as noted in the comments, it is quite possible that dangerous conditions develop in the form of hallucinations, severe depression, hyperexcitability, seizures and throbbing headache.

    Manifestation of allergy

    Particularly dangerous, as narcologists write, is the possible appearance of allergic reactions, which are only intensified by alcoholic beverages. In the event that the human body is weakened, a similar effect can take hypertrophied forms – Quincke’s edema or anaphylactic shock.

    No narcologist will be able to give an exact answer to the question of what the consequences may be after combining Diflucan with alcohol. After all, each human organism is very individual, and it is simply impossible to predict such a thing.As consumers note, the only thing that can be said for sure: the presented medicine is today an effective remedy, provided that a healthy lifestyle is observed.

    We found out if it is possible to take Diflucan with alcohol. What are the conclusions?

    Conclusions

    In general, the drug “Diflucan” is currently quite effective, and at the same time a safe drug if you do not combine the course of therapy with the intake of alcoholic beverages.Such serious illnesses, for which doctors prescribe antifungal drugs, in themselves have an extremely adverse effect on the quality of life of patients. This raises the question: why in addition to experience all the negative consequences of side effects on yourself?

    We have examined the compatibility of “Diflucan” with alcohol. Having received information about all possible consequences, everyone has the right to decide for himself whether to risk health or not.

    Thrush: get rid of or accept?

    Kuznetsova Irina Vsevolodovna, d.M.Sc., prof., department. of obstetrics and gynecology GBOU DPO RMAPO Ministry of Health and Social Development of the Russian Federation:

    Burning and itching in the external genital area, white cheesy discharge from the vagina, soreness during sexual intercourse, pain during urination – about three quarters of the female population of the planet at least once in their lives felt the result of excessive reproduction in the vagina of fungi of the genus Candida. It seems that thrush is not so terrible, it does not pose a serious threat to health, moreover, according to the assurances of commercials, it can be easily cured by itself – three days, and it “has not happened!” And a month later, again symptoms and again drugs… And then life turns into a bad dream, in which you become more and more immersed in the problem of discomfort in the most intimate sphere of the body, avoid sex, begin to hate your unlucky body, which cannot cope with such a trifle.

    To listen to the advice of friends or see a doctor? But how often the same recommendations are heard from the lips of a gynecologist, known to us from commercials, advice from friends, the Internet and other sources of medical and paramedical information.Is medicine really powerless even in solving such a simple problem?

    Of course, not all women with thrush, or, as they call it in medical circles, vulvovaginal candidiasis, go through the described circles of hell. But in 10-20% of cases, vulvovaginal candidiasis is complicated, and fungi of the genus Candida, which have the right to live in the normal microflora of the mouth, vagina and colon, multiply with enviable constancy, leading to the recurrence of symptoms of thrush.If there are at least four such acute symptomatic episodes of the disease per year, the doctor should diagnose “chronic vulvovaginal candidiasis.” But who will count the frequency of thrush episodes? You yourself, and no one else! Tell the gynecologist that he is dealing with mushrooms that are well seasoned in battles with other microorganisms and medicines, so that it will be impossible to cope with them in the usual way.

    Meanwhile, there is a way to get rid of chronic, recurrent four or more times a year, vulvovaginal candidiasis.It is described in the scientific literature, contained in international clinical guidelines, and has been proven to be effective in numerous studies. In uncomplicated thrush, effective agents are used that suppress the growth of fungi, which in most cases are effective with short courses of treatment or even a single dose of the well-known and widely prescribed fluconazole (original fluconazole — Diflucan ® ). Sometimes (with severe symptoms of thrush), more “heavy artillery” is required, namely, in order to enhance the therapeutic effect, it is recommended to increase the duration of treatment, for fluconazole (the drug Diflucan ® ) – this means taking the second capsule of 150 mg orally 3 days after the first …If we are dealing with chronic thrush caused by the fungi Candida albicans, then when symptoms return, it is recommended to “hit the enemy” even harder, and for the drug Diflucan ® , as a rule, it is effective to take 3 capsules of 150 mg orally with an interval of 3 days (1,4 and 7 days).

    However, the complete removal of fungi from the body cannot be achieved with any drug, and it is not necessary: ​​after all, they are an integral part of it. The suppression of their excessive growth when taking one or even two or three capsules of fluconazole is achieved for 1-2 weeks, followed by a gradual resumption of the mushroom population, ending with a relapse of thrush.But one can not wait for a new relapse, but maintain the suppression of the growth of fungi with a weekly intake of fluconazole in the hope that, in the end, they will not withstand a stronger and more patient opponent. The duration of such therapy was worked out by many years of research in order to recommend a course of weekly intake of fluconazole (Diflucan 150mg) for 6 months. The main result of such treatment is the absence of the recurrence of thrush for a year or more.

    The situation with the treatment of recurrent thrush caused by C.albicans, is insidious in that the symptoms of thrush in most cases begin to subside after taking the first capsule on the second day and go away for the majority after the third intake of Diflucan 150 mg on the 7th day of treatment. This stage can be called “Attack”. To prevent a relapse of thrush soon after such an “Attack”, it is important not to quit treatment, but to continue the so-called “suppressive therapy” (we will call this phase “Cruise”), because if you feel well, it is difficult to force yourself to drink medications for preventive purposes.Otherwise, all efforts may be in vain. This stage lasts 6 months, during which it is recommended to take Diflucan ® 150 mg once a week. In order not to forget about the timely administration of the drug, you can set yourself reminders in the form of e-mail or sms. By the way, there is a special notification service on the website www.diflucan.ru, where you can easily customize them for yourself.

    So, health is not a joke: therefore, tune in to a serious and long course of suppressive therapy in order to get rid of thrush and discomfort once and for all.

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    READ THE INSTRUCTIONS.

    Diflucan 150 mg – about the drug

    Diflucan 150 mg – about the drug

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    Single or multiple administration of fluconazole at a dose of 50 mg does not affect the metabolism of phenazone (antipyrine) when taken simultaneously.

    The simultaneous use of fluconazole with the following drugs is contraindicated

    Cisapride: with the simultaneous use of fluconazole and cisapride, adverse reactions from the heart are possible, incl. ventricular tachysystolic arrhythmia of the “pirouette” type. The use of fluconazole at a dose of 200 mg 1 time / day and cisapride at a dose of 20 mg 4 times / day leads to a pronounced increase in plasma concentrations of cisapride and an increase in the QT interval on the ECG. Concomitant use of cisapride and fluconazole is contraindicated.

    Terfenadine: with the simultaneous use of azole antifungals and terfenadine, serious arrhythmias may occur as a result of an increase in the QT interval. When taking fluconazole at a dose of 200 mg / day, an increase in the QT interval has not been established, however, the use of fluconazole at doses of 400 mg / day and above causes a significant increase in the concentration of terfenadine in blood plasma. Concomitant administration of fluconazole at doses of 400 mg / day or more with terfenadine is contraindicated. Treatment with fluconazole at doses less than 400 mg / day in combination with terfenadine should be closely monitored.

    Astemizole: the simultaneous use of fluconazole with astemizole or other drugs, the metabolism of which is carried out by isoenzymes of the cytochrome P450 system, may be accompanied by an increase in serum concentrations of these drugs. With an increase in the concentration of astemizole in blood plasma, it is possible to lengthen the QT interval and, in some cases, develop a ventricular tachysystolic arrhythmia “pirouette”. The simultaneous use of astemizole and fluconazole is contraindicated.

    Pimozide: despite the fact that there have been no relevant studies in vitro or in vivo, the simultaneous use of fluconazole and pimozide can lead to inhibition of the metabolism of pimozide.In turn, an increase in plasma concentrations of pimozide can lead to a prolongation of the QT interval and, in some cases, to the development of ventricular tachysystolic arrhythmias of the “pirouette” type. The simultaneous use of pimozide and fluconazole is contraindicated.

    Quinidine: despite the fact that there have been no relevant studies in vitro or in vivo, the simultaneous use of fluconazole and quinidine can also lead to inhibition of quinidine metabolism. The use of quinidine is associated with prolongation of the QT interval and, in some cases, with the development of ventricular tachysystolic arrhythmias of the “pirouette” type.
    Concomitant use of quinidine and fluconazole is contraindicated.

    Erythromycin: Concomitant use of fluconazole and erythromycin potentially leads to an increased risk of cardiotoxicity (prolonged QT interval, pirouette-type ventricular arrhythmias) and, as a result, sudden cardiac death. Concomitant use of fluconazole and erythromycin is contraindicated.

    Care should be taken and, possibly, dose adjustments should be made while using the following drugs and fluconazole

    Drugs affecting fluconazole

    Hydrochlorothiazide: repeated use of hydrochlorothiazide simultaneously with fluconazole leads to an increase in the concentration of fluconazole in blood plasma by 40%.The effect of this degree of severity does not require a change in the dosage regimen of fluconazole in patients receiving diuretics at the same time, however, the doctor should take this into account.

    Rifampicin: the simultaneous use of fluconazole and rifampicin leads to a decrease in AUC by 25% and a decrease in T 1/2 fluconazole by 20%. In patients taking rifampicin at the same time, it is necessary to consider the advisability of increasing the dose of fluconazole.

    Drugs affected by fluconazole

    Fluconazole is a potent inhibitor of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 isoenzymes and a moderate inhibitor of CYP3A4 isoenzyme.In addition, in addition to the effects listed below, there is a risk of an increase in plasma concentrations of
    and other drugs metabolized by isoenzymes CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 when taken simultaneously with fluconazole. In this regard, caution should be exercised with the simultaneous use of the listed drugs, and, if necessary, similar combinations. Patients should be under close medical supervision. It should be borne in mind that the inhibitory effect of fluconazole persists for 4-5 days after discontinuation of the drug due to prolonged T 1/2 .

    Alfentanil: there is a decrease in clearance and V d , an increase in T 1/2 alfentanil. Perhaps this is due to the inhibition of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme by fluconazole. Alfentanil dose adjustment may be required.

    Amitriptyline, nortriptyline: increased effect. The concentration of 5-nortriptyline and / or S-amitriptyline can be determined at the beginning of combination therapy with fluconazole and one week after the start. If necessary, the dose of amitriptyline / nortriptyline should be adjusted.

    Amphotericin B: in studies on mice (including those with immunosuppression), the following results were noted: a small additive antifungal effect in systemic infection caused by Sandida albicans, no interaction in intracranial infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans and antagonism in systemic infection, caused by A. fumigatus. The clinical significance of these results is not clear.

    Anticoagulants: like other antifungal agents – azole derivatives, fluconazole, when used simultaneously with warfarin, increases prothrombin time (by 12%), which may lead to the development of bleeding (hematomas, bleeding from the nose and gastrointestinal tract, hematuria, melena).In patients receiving coumarin anticoagulants, it is necessary to constantly monitor the prothrombin time. You should also evaluate the feasibility of adjusting the dose of warfarin.

    Azithromycin: with simultaneous oral administration of fluconazole in a single dose of 800 mg with azithromycin in a single dose of 1200 mg, no pronounced pharmacokinetic interaction has been established.

    Benzodiazepines (short-acting): after oral administration of midazolam, fluconazole significantly increases the concentration of midazolam and psychomotor effects, and this effect is more pronounced after taking fluconazole orally than when using it intravenously.If concomitant therapy with benzodiazepines is necessary, patients taking fluconazole should be monitored to assess the appropriateness of a corresponding reduction in the dose of benzodiazepine.

    With the simultaneous administration of triazolam in a single dose, fluconazole increases the AUC of triazolam by approximately 50%, C max – by 25-32% and T 1/2 by 25-50% due to inhibition of the metabolism of triazolam. Dose adjustment of triazolam may be necessary.

    Carbamazepine: fluconazole inhibits the metabolism of carbamazepine and increases the plasma concentration of carbamazepine by 30%.The risk of developing carbamazepine toxicity must be considered. The need to adjust the dose of carbamazepine depending on the concentration / effect should be assessed.

    Calcium channel blockers: Some calcium channel antagonists (nifedipine, isradipine, amlodipine, verapamil and felodipine) are metabolized by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. Fluconazole increases the systemic exposure of calcium channel antagonists. It is recommended to control the development of side effects.

    Cyclosporine: in patients with a transplanted kidney, the use of fluconazole at a dose of 200 mg / day leads to a slow increase in the concentration of cyclosporine.However, with repeated administration of fluconazole at a dose of 100 mg / day, changes in the concentration of cyclosporine were not observed in bone marrow recipients. With the simultaneous use of fluconazole and cyclosporine, it is recommended to control the concentration of cyclosporine in the blood.

    Cyclophosphamide: with the simultaneous use of cyclophosphamide and fluconazole, an increase in serum concentrations of bilirubin and creatinine is noted. This combination is acceptable given the risk of increased concentrations of bilirubin and creatinine.

    Fentanyl: There has been a report of one death, possibly associated with the simultaneous administration of fentanyl and fluconazole. The disturbances are thought to be related to fentanyl intoxication. It has been shown that fluconazole significantly prolongs the elimination time of fentanyl. It should be borne in mind that an increase in the concentration of fentanyl can lead to respiratory depression.

    Halofantrine: fluconazole may increase the plasma concentration of halofantrine due to inhibition of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme.

    Inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase: with the simultaneous use of fluconazole with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors metabolized by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme (such as atorvastatin and simvastatin) or by the CYP2D6 isoenzyme (such as rhabdomiopathy), the risk of developing myopathies increases. If simultaneous therapy with these drugs is necessary, patients should be observed in order to identify symptoms of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. It is necessary to control the concentration of creatinine kinase.In the case of a significant increase in the concentration of creatinine kinase or if myopathy or rhabdomyolysis is diagnosed or suspected, therapy with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors should be discontinued.

    Losartan: fluconazole inhibits the metabolism of losartan to its active metabolite (E-3174), which is responsible for most of the effects associated with angiotensin II receptor antagonism. Regular monitoring of blood pressure is required.

    Methadone: Fluconazole may increase the plasma methadone concentration.Dose adjustment of methadone may be necessary.

    NSAIDs: C max and AUC of flurbiprofen increase by 23% and 81%, respectively. Similarly, C max and AUC of the pharmacologically active isomer [S – (+) – ibuprofen] increased by 15% and 82%, respectively, with the simultaneous use of fluconazole with racemic ibuprofen (400 mg). With the simultaneous use of fluconazole at a dose of 200 mg / day and celecoxib at a dose of 200 mg C max and AUC of celecoxib increase by 68% and 134%, respectively.In this combination, it is possible to reduce the dose of celecoxib by half.

    Despite the lack of targeted studies, fluconazole may increase the systemic exposure of other NSAIDs metabolized by the CYP2C9 isoenzyme (eg, naproxen, lornoxicam, meloxicam, diclofenac). Dose adjustment of NSAIDs may be necessary.

    With the simultaneous use of NSAIDs and fluconazole, patients should be under close medical supervision in order to detect and control adverse reactions and toxicity associated with NSAIDs.

    Oral contraceptives: with the simultaneous use of a combined oral contraceptive with fluconazole at a dose of 50 mg, a significant effect on the level of hormones has not been established, while with a daily intake of 200 mg of fluconazole, the AUC of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel increases by 40% and 24%, respectively, and when taking 300 mg of fluconazole 1 time / week. AUC of ethinylestradiol and norethindrone increases by 24% and 13%, respectively. Thus, repeated use of fluconazole at the indicated doses is unlikely to affect the effectiveness of the combined oral contraceptive.

    Phenytoin: Concomitant use of fluconazole and phenytoin may be accompanied by a clinically significant increase in phenytoin concentration. If it is necessary to simultaneously use both drugs, the concentration of phenytoin should be monitored and its dose should be adjusted accordingly in order to ensure the therapeutic concentration in the blood plasma.

    Prednisone: there is a report on the development of acute adrenal cortex insufficiency in a patient after liver transplantation against the background of discontinuation of fluconazole after a 3-month course of therapy.Presumably, the cessation of fluconazole therapy caused an increase in the activity of the isoenzyme CYP3A4, which led to an increase in the metabolism of prednisone.
    Patients receiving combination therapy with prednisone and fluconazole should be under close medical supervision when discontinuing fluconazole in order to assess the state of the adrenal cortex.

    Rifabutin: the simultaneous use of fluconazole and rifabutin can lead to an increase in the plasma concentration of the latter up to 80%.With the simultaneous use of fluconazole and rifabutin, cases of uveitis have been described.
    Patients receiving concomitant rifabutin and fluconazole should be closely monitored.

    Saquinavir: AUC increases by approximately 50%, from max – by 55%, the clearance of saquinavir decreases by approximately 50% due to inhibition of hepatic metabolism of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme and inhibition of P-glycoprotein. Dose adjustment of saquinavir may be necessary.

    Sirolimus: an increase in the concentration of sirolimus in blood plasma, presumably due to inhibition of the metabolism of sirolimus through inhibition of the isoenzyme CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein.This combination can be used with appropriate dose adjustment of sirolimus depending on effect / concentration.

    Sulfonylurea preparations: fluconazole, when taken simultaneously, leads to an increase in T 1/2 oral sulfonylurea preparations (chlorpropamide, glibenclamide, glipizide and tolbutamide). Patients with diabetes mellitus can be simultaneously prescribed fluconazole and sulfonylureas for oral administration, but the possibility of hypoglycemia should be taken into account, in addition, regular monitoring of blood glucose is required and, if necessary, dose adjustment of sulfonylureas.

    Tacrolimus: the simultaneous use of fluconazole and tacrolimus (by mouth) leads to an increase in serum concentrations of the latter up to 5 times due to inhibition of the metabolism of tacrolimus, which occurs in the intestine through the isoenzyme CYP3A4. No significant changes in the pharmacokinetics of drugs were observed with the use of tacrolimus IV. Cases of nephrotoxicity have been reported. Patients receiving oral tacrolimus and fluconazole at the same time require careful monitoring. The dose of tacrolimus should be adjusted depending on the degree of increase in its concentration in the blood.

    Theophylline: when used simultaneously with fluconazole at a dose of 200 mg for 14 days, the average rate of plasma clearance of theophylline decreases by 18%. When prescribing fluconazole to patients taking high doses of theophylline, or patients with an increased risk of developing the toxic effect of theophylline, the symptoms of theophylline overdose should be monitored and, if necessary, the therapy should be adjusted accordingly.

    Tofacitinib: the exposure of tofacitinib is increased when it is used together with drugs that are both moderate inhibitors of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme and potent inhibitors of the CYP2C19 isoenzyme (for example, fluconazole).Dose adjustment of tofacitinib may be necessary.

    Vinca alkaloid: despite the lack of targeted studies, it is assumed that fluconazole may increase the concentration of vinca alkaloids (e.g. vincristine and vinblastine) in blood plasma and thus lead to neurotoxicity, which may possibly be associated with inhibition of the isoenzyme CYP3A4 …

    Vitamin A: there is a report of one case of development of undesirable reactions from the central nervous system in the form of pseudotumor of the brain with the simultaneous use of completely transretinoic acid and fluconazole, which disappeared after the discontinuation of fluconazole.The use of this combination is possible, but one should remember about the possibility of adverse reactions from the central nervous system.

    Zidovudine: with simultaneous use with fluconazole, there is an increase in C max and AUC of zidovudine by 84% and 74%, respectively. This effect is probably due to a decrease in the metabolism of the latter to its main metabolite. Before and after therapy with fluconazole at a dose of 200 mg / day for 15 days, patients with AIDS and ARC (AIDS-related complex) found a significant increase in the AUC of zidovudine (20%).

    Patients receiving this combination should be monitored for side effects of zidovudine.

    Voriconazole (inhibitor of isoenzymes CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4): simultaneous use of voriconazole (400 mg 2 times / day on the first day, then 200 mg 2 times / day for 2.5 days) and fluconazole (400 mg on the first day, then 200 mg / day for 4 days) leads to an increase in the concentration and AUC of voriconazole by 57% and 79%, respectively. It has been shown that this effect persists with decreasing dose and / or decreasing the frequency of administration of any of the drugs.Concomitant use of voriconazole and fluconazole is not recommended.

    Studies of the interaction of oral forms of fluconazole when taken simultaneously with food, cimetidine, antacids, as well as after total body irradiation to prepare for bone marrow transplantation have shown that these factors do not have a clinically significant effect on the absorption of fluconazole.

    The above interaction was established with repeated use of fluconazole; drug interactions resulting from a single dose of fluconazole are unknown.Doctors should be aware that interactions with other drugs have not been specifically studied, but they are possible.

    Pharmaceutical interaction

    Diflucan ® – solution for intravenous administration is compatible with the following solutions: 20% glucose solution, Ringer’s solution, Hartmann’s solution, potassium chloride solution in glucose, 4.2% sodium bicarbonate solution, aminofusine, isotonic saline … Diflucan ® can be administered to the infusion set together with one of the solutions listed above.Although cases of specific incompatibility of fluconazole with other drugs have not been described, nevertheless, it is not recommended to mix it with any other drugs before infusion.

    Diflucan, 150 mg, capsules, 4 pcs.

    Inside, swallowing whole.

    Therapy can be started pending culture and other laboratory test results. However, anti-infective therapy needs to be modified accordingly when the results of these studies become known.

    Fluconazole can be taken orally or administered intravenously by infusion at a rate not exceeding 10 ml / min. The choice of the route of administration depends on the clinical condition of the patient. When transferring a patient from IV to oral administration of the drug, or vice versa, changes in the daily dose are not required. In a solution for intravenous administration, fluconazole is dissolved in 0.9% sodium chloride solution; each 200 mg (100 ml bottle) contains 15 mmol of Na + and Cl-. Therefore, in patients who require restriction of sodium or fluid intake, the rate of fluid administration must be considered.

    The daily dose of Diflucan® depends on the nature and severity of the fungal infection. With vaginal candidiasis, in most cases, a single dose of the drug is effective. For infections requiring repeated administration of the antifungal drug, treatment should be continued until the clinical or laboratory signs of an active fungal infection disappear. Patients with AIDS and cryptococcal meningitis or recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis usually require supportive care to prevent recurrence of infection.

    Adult use

    1. In case of cryptococcal meningitis and cryptococcal infections of other localization, 400 mg is usually prescribed on the 1st day, and then treatment is continued at a dose of 200–400 mg once a day. The duration of treatment for cryptococcal infections depends on the clinical and mycological effect; for cryptococcal meningitis, treatment is usually continued for at least 6–8 weeks.

    To prevent the recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis in AIDS patients, after the completion of the full course of primary treatment, therapy with Diflucan® at a dose of 200 mg / day can be continued for a very long period.

    2. For candidemia, disseminated candidiasis and other invasive candidal infections, the dose is usually 400 mg on the 1st day, then 200 mg / day. Depending on the severity of the clinical effect, the dose may be increased to 400 mg / day. The duration of therapy depends on the clinical effectiveness.

    3. In case of oropharyngeal candidiasis, the drug is usually prescribed at 50-100 mg 1 time per day for 7-14 days. If necessary, in patients with severe suppression of immune function, treatment can be continued for a longer time.In atrophic oral candidiasis associated with wearing dentures, the drug is usually prescribed at a dose of 50 mg once a day for 14 days in combination with local antiseptic agents for the treatment of the denture.

    For other candidal infections of the mucous membranes (with the exception of genital candidiasis, see below), for example, esophagitis, non-invasive bronchopulmonary infections, candiduria, candidiasis of the skin and mucous membranes, etc., the effective dose is usually 50-100 mg / day for a duration treatment for 14-30 days.

    For the prevention of relapses of oropharyngeal candidiasis in AIDS patients, after completion of the full course of primary therapy, Diflucan® can be prescribed 150 mg once a week.

    4. For vaginal candidiasis, Diflucan® is administered once orally at a dose of 150 mg.

    To reduce the frequency of relapses of vaginal candidiasis, the drug can be used at a dose of 150 mg once a month. The duration of therapy is determined individually; it varies from 4 to 12 months. Some patients may require more frequent use of the drug.The use of a single dose for children under 18 years of age and patients over 60 years of age without a doctor’s prescription is not recommended.

    For balanitis caused by Candida, Diflucan® is prescribed as a single oral dose of 150 mg.

    5. For the prevention of candidiasis, the recommended dose of Diflucan® is 50–400 mg once a day, depending on the degree of risk of developing a fungal infection. For patients with a high risk of generalized infection, for example, with severe or long-term neutropenia, the recommended dose is 400 mg once a day.Diflucan® is prescribed a few days before the expected development of neutropenia and after an increase in the number of neutrophils more than 1000 mm3, the treatment is continued for another 7 days.

    6. For skin infections, including mycoses of the feet, smooth skin, groin area and candidal infections, the recommended dose is 150 mg once a week or 50 mg once a day. The duration of therapy is usually 2-4 weeks, however, with mycoses of the feet, longer therapy (up to 6 weeks) may be required.

    With pityriasis versicolor, the recommended dose is 300 mg once a week for 2 weeks; some patients require a third dose of 300 mg / week, while for some patients a single dose of 300–400 mg is sufficient.An alternative treatment regimen is the use of the drug, 50 mg 1 time per day for 2-4 weeks.

    For tinea unguium (onychomycosis), the recommended dose is 150 mg once a week. Treatment should be continued until the infected nail is replaced (an uninfected nail grows out). Regrowth of nails on fingers and toes usually takes 3–6 and 6–12 months, respectively. However, the growth rate can vary widely from person to person, and also by age.After successful treatment of persistent chronic infections, nail shape changes are sometimes observed.

    7. With deep endemic mycoses, it may be necessary to use the drug at a dose of 200-400 mg / day for up to 2 years. The duration of therapy is determined individually; it is 11-24 months – with coccidioidomycosis; 2–17 months – with paracoccidioidomycosis; 1–16 months for sporotrichosis and 3–17 months for histoplasmosis.

    Application in children

    As with similar infections in adults, the duration of treatment depends on the clinical and mycological effect.For children, the daily dose of the drug should not exceed that for adults. Diflucan® is used daily, once a day.

    For candidiasis of the mucous membranes, the recommended dose of Diflucan® is 3 mg / kg / day. On the first day, in order to more quickly achieve constant Css, a loading dose of 6 mg / kg can be prescribed.

    For the treatment of generalized candidiasis and cryptococcal infections, the recommended dose is 6–12 mg / kg / day, depending on the severity of the disease.