About all

Consequences of removing gallbladder: The request could not be satisfied

Содержание

Gallbladder removal – NHS

Gallbladder removal surgery, also known as a cholecystectomy, is a very common procedure.

The gallbladder is a small, pouch-like organ in the upper right part of your tummy.

It stores bile, a fluid produced by the liver that helps break down fatty foods.

You don’t need a gallbladder, so surgery to take it out is often recommended if you develop any problems with it.

Why does my gallbladder need to be removed?

Surgery to remove the gallbladder is usually carried out if you have painful gallstones.

These are small stones that can form in the gallbladder as a result of an imbalance in the substances that make up bile.

Gallstones often cause no symptoms and you may not realise you have them, but occasionally they can block the flow of bile and irritate the gallbladder (acute cholecystitis) or pancreas (acute pancreatitis).

This can cause symptoms such as:

  • sudden and intense tummy pain
  • feeling and being sick
  • yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes (jaundice)

Very occasionally it may be possible to take tablets to dissolve gallstones, but surgery to remove the gallbladder is the most effective treatment in the vast majority of cases.

What happens during gallbladder removal surgery

There are 2 main ways of removing a gallbladder:

  • laparoscopic (keyhole) cholecystectomy – several small cuts (incisions) are made in your tummy (abdomen) and fine surgical instruments are used to access and remove your gallbladder
  • open cholecystectomy – a single larger incision is made in your tummy to access and remove your gallbladder

Keyhole surgery is used most often because you can leave hospital sooner, recover faster and are left with smaller scars than with an open procedure.

Both techniques are performed under general anaesthetic, which means you’ll be asleep during the operation and won’t feel any pain while it’s carried out.

Find out more about how gallbladder removal surgery is performed

Recovering from gallbladder removal surgery

It doesn’t usually take long to recover from keyhole surgery to remove your gallbladder.

Most people can leave hospital the same day or the next morning.

You’ll probably be able to return to most of your normal activities within 2 weeks.

It takes longer to recover from open surgery. You may need to stay in hospital for 3 to 5 days and it could be 6 to 8 weeks before you’re feeling back to normal.

Find out more about recovering from gallbladder removal surgery

Living without a gallbladder

You can lead a perfectly normal life without a gallbladder.

Your liver will still make enough bile to digest your food, but instead of being stored in the gallbladder, it drips continuously into your digestive system.

You may have been advised to eat a special diet before surgery, but this doesn’t need to be continued afterwards.

Instead, you should aim to have a generally healthy, balanced diet.

Some people experience problems such as bloating or diarrhoea after surgery, although this usually improves within a few weeks. 

If you notice certain foods or drinks trigger these symptoms, you may wish to avoid them in the future.

Find out more about diet after gallbladder surgery

Risks of gallbladder removal surgery

Gallbladder removal surgery is considered to be a safe procedure, but, like any type of surgery, there’s a risk of complications.

Possible complications include:

  • wound infection
  • bile leaking into the tummy
  • damage to one of the openings (ducts) carrying bile out of the liver
  • blood clots

Speak to your surgeon about the benefits and risks of surgery before your operation.

Find out more about the complications of gallbladder removal surgery

Page last reviewed: 03 December 2018
Next review due: 03 December 2021

Gallbladder Surgery- Side Effects & Recovery

The gallbladder is a small pouch-like organ present on the right side of the abdomen. The job associated with gall-bladder is to store the bile juice produced by the liver, the digestive juice that helps in the digestion of fats.  

Too much cholesterol or bilirubin gives rise to some frequent gallbladder diseases such as:

  • gallstones
  • acute or chronic inflammation caused by gallstones
  • bile duct stones

In case the problem becomes more complicated or the pain becomes unbearable for the patient, doctors might suggest you undergo a Gallbladder removal surgery

After Surgery

Post-surgery
life of a patient is healthy as the surgical procedure for removing gall
bladder surgery is a relatively simple type of surgery. The bile juice after
the gall bladder removal can easily be transferred to your intestines by the
liver to aid the digestion of fats. 

But as it
goes for every surgery there is few complication and side-effects that are
associated with the gall bladder removal surgery that needs to be
discussed. 

Gallbladder surgery side
effects

After the
removal of the gall bladder, the body of the patient will take its time to
adjust with the new method of digesting fats. Although, the situation is
temporary in rare can become permanent and the condition is commonly known
as Bile leakage after gallbladder surgery. In which the bile leaks
into other organs or gall stones that are left behind in the bile ducts. 

Bile leakage
after gallbladder surgery 
may lead to
improper digestion of fats, which further leads to diarrhea. 

Anesthesia
and surgical procedure can result in short-term constipation, although the
removal of the gall bladder reduces constipation. Dehydration is another factor
that can cause constipation. 

Any
intestinal damage may occur during the surgical removal of gall bladder. The
chances of intestine damage are very less but still, it is possible, hence
discuss all complications associated with your surgery previously with the
doctor or a surgeon. In case the pain after surgery continues for a long time,
immediately check for medical help. It may be possible you may develop Incisional
hernia after gallbladder surgery.

Remaining
stones after gall bladder surgery can cause the bile duct blockages that cause
severe pain or jaundice. 

Gallbladder surgery
recovery

Post-surgery
recovery is quite smooth, there will be certain instruction that you may need
to follow during your recovery time. In case you have gone for a minimally
invasive surgical process popularly known as laparoscopy you may go home on the
same day your surgery. Patient may feel Post gallbladder surgery
nausea 
which can be result of anesthesia used for surgery.

Try not to
indulge in any physically stressful activity including lifting heavyweight for
at least two weeks. You need to clean and take proper care of the Scar
tissue after gallbladder surgery 
to avoid any risk of infection. You
can also use the help of a family member for cleaning the Scar tissue
after gallbladder surgery
.

Diet after surgery

Diet after gallbladder surgery is another important part that you must follow for a speedy recovery. It is advisable to include fibrous food in the diet that is easy to digest. You may include the following in your diet:

  • nuts
  • seeds
  • whole grains
  • brussels sprouts
  • broccoli
  • cauliflower
  • cabbage
  • high-fiber cereals

Gallstones: Should I Have Gallbladder Surgery?

You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor’s recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them.

Gallstones: Should I Have Gallbladder Surgery?

Get the facts

Your options

  • Have surgery to remove your gallbladder.
  • Don’t have surgery. Wait and see if you have another attack.

Key points to remember

  • If you feel comfortable managing mild and infrequent gallstone attacks, and if your doctor thinks that you aren’t likely to have serious complications, it’s okay not to have surgery.
  • Most doctors recommend surgery if you have had repeated attacks. If you have had one attack of gallstone pain, you may want to wait to see whether you have more.
  • Surgery is the best way to prevent gallstone attacks. The surgery is very common, so doctors have a lot of experience with it.
  • Your body will work fine without a gallbladder. There may be small changes in how you digest food, but you probably won’t notice them.

FAQs

Gallstones are stones made of cholesterol and other things found in bile. They form in the gallbladder or bile duct. They may be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball.

Most people with gallstones have no symptoms and don’t need treatment. Those who do have symptoms often have surgery to remove the gallbladder.

In people who do have symptoms, the most common one is pain in the upper right area of your belly. Other symptoms include nausea and vomiting.

Symptoms usually don’t come back after the gallbladder has been removed.

If gallstones block a duct, you may get jaundice. Jaundice makes your skin and the whites of your eyes yellow. It can also cause dark urine and light-colored stools.

Laparoscopic gallbladder surgery is the most common surgery done to remove the gallbladder. The doctor inserts a lighted viewing instrument called a laparoscope and surgical tools into your belly through several small cuts. This type of surgery is very safe. People who have it usually recover enough in 7 to 10 days to go back to work or to their normal routine.

Open gallbladder surgery involves taking the gallbladder out through one larger incision in your belly. Open surgery may be done if laparoscopic surgery is not an option or when problems are found during laparoscopic surgery. The hospital stay is longer with open surgery.

Stones in the bile duct

If gallstones are found in the common bile duct before or during surgery to remove the gallbladder, a doctor may do a procedure called an ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram). This involves putting a tube called an endoscope down your throat to your small intestine. The doctor uses the scope to look for stones in the duct and remove them.

The overall risk from laparoscopic gallbladder surgery is very low. The most serious risks include:

  • Infection.
  • Bleeding.
  • Injury to the common bile duct.
  • Injury to the small intestine by one of the tools used during surgery.

Risks from open gallbladder surgery include:

  • Injury to the common bile duct.
  • Bleeding.
  • Infection.
  • Injuries to the liver, intestines, or major blood vessels in the belly.
  • Blood clots or pneumonia related to the longer recovery period after open surgery.

Both surgeries have the risks of general anesthesia.

Postcholecystectomy syndrome

After gallbladder surgery (cholecystectomy), a few people have ongoing symptoms, such as belly pain, bloating, gas, or diarrhea. This is called postcholecystectomy syndrome. These symptoms can be treated with medicines.

There is little risk in not having surgery if you have only one mild attack. But if you have more than one painful attack, you’re likely to have more in the future.

The risks of not treating gallstones may include:

  • Unpredictable attacks of gallstone pain.
  • Episodes of inflammation or serious infection of the gallbladder, bile ducts, or pancreas.
  • Jaundice and other symptoms caused by blockage of the common bile duct. Jaundice makes your skin and the whites of your eyes yellow. It can also cause dark urine and light-colored stools.

About 1 out of 3 people with gallstones who have a single attack of pain or other symptoms do not have symptoms again.footnote 1 That means that 2 out of 3 people do have another attack.

You may be able to prevent gallstone attacks if you:

  • Stay close to a healthy weight by eating a balanced diet and getting regular exercise.
  • Avoid rapid weight loss. When you lose weight by dieting and then you gain weight back again, you increase your risk of gallstones, especially if you are a woman. If you need to lose weight, do it slowly and sensibly.

Your doctor may recommend surgery if:

  • You have repeated gallstone attacks.
  • The pain from the attacks is severe.
  • You have complications, such as inflammation of the gallbladder or the pancreas.
  • You have an impaired immune system.

Compare your options

Compare Option 1Have gallbladder surgeryDon’t have surgery

Compare Option 2Have gallbladder surgeryDon’t have surgery

What is usually involved?

What are the benefits?

What are the risks and side effects?

Have gallbladder surgery Have gallbladder surgery

  • You are asleep during surgery.
  • You may go home the same day, or you may stay in the hospital for a day or two. If you have open surgery, your hospital stay will be longer.
  • You can return to your normal activities within a week to 10 days. If you have open surgery, it will take 4 to 6 weeks.
  • Surgery gets rid of the gallstones and usually keeps them from coming back.
  • The surgery is safe and is very common.
  • All surgery has risks, including bleeding and infection. Your age and your health also can affect your risk.
  • Risk from laparoscopic surgery is very low. Possible problems include injury to the common bile duct or the small intestine.
  • After surgery, a few people have ongoing symptoms, called postcholecystectomy syndrome.

Don’t have surgery Don’t have surgery

  • You try to prevent another attack by eating a balanced diet and getting regular exercise to stay close to a healthy weight.
  • You avoid losing weight too quickly.
  • You avoid any costs and risks of surgery.
  • You may have more gallstone attacks.
  • You may have episodes of inflammation or infection of the gallbladder, bile ducts, or pancreas.
  • You may have jaundice and other symptoms caused by blockage of the common bile duct.

I have had a couple of gallbladder attacks over the past few years. They weren’t too bad, but I did take a sick day or two each time. Because I travel several times a month for work, I have decided to have my gallbladder removed. That way I won’t have to worry about having an attack while I am away on business, possibly even out of the country.

When I was pregnant, my doctor discovered that I have gallstones. We talked it over, and it turns out that it’s possible that the stomach pain I had a couple of years ago might have been related to my gallstones. I haven’t had any problems since then, so we agreed to wait and see if I have another attack. If I do, we can do some tests and find out if the pain is caused by the gallstones. I don’t want to have surgery if there is no need.

My first gallstone attack was pretty painful. I know I could handle another attack if it happens, but I would just as soon have surgery and know that I won’t have another one.

My gallbladder attacks have been pretty mild so far, and I’ve only had two in the past 5 years. I’m not too concerned about it. My doctor told me the signs of a more serious problem, so I feel well-prepared for another one, if it happens. We agree that I don’t need surgery now.

What matters most to you?

Your personal feelings are just as important as the medical facts. Think about what matters most to you in this decision, and show how you feel about the following statements.

Reasons to have gallbladder surgery

Reasons not to have gallbladder surgery

The pain from my gallstone attacks is very bad.

I have had one or more gallstone attacks, but they don’t hurt much.

More important

Equally important

More important

The thought of having more attacks is worse than the thought of having surgery.

I want to avoid surgery if I possibly can.

More important

Equally important

More important

I do a lot of traveling to places where I may not be able to get help if I have a serious attack.

I’m never too far away from medical treatment.

More important

Equally important

More important

Cost is not an issue for me.

I’m not sure I can afford to have surgery.

More important

Equally important

More important

My other important reasons:

My other important reasons:

More important

Equally important

More important

Where are you leaning now?

Now that you’ve thought about the facts and your feelings, you may have a general idea of where you stand on this decision. Show which way you are leaning right now.

Having gallbladder surgery

NOT having gallbladder surgery

Leaning toward

Undecided

Leaning toward

What else do you need to make your decision?

1. 1, It’s all right not to choose surgery if I’ve only had one mild gallstone attack. 2.2, Having surgery is the best way to get rid of my gallstones. 3.3, I could be putting my future health in danger if I have my gallbladder removed. 1.1,Do you understand the options available to you?2.2,Are you clear about which benefits and side effects matter most to you?3.3,Do you have enough support and advice from others to make a choice?

1.
How sure do you feel right now about your decision?

Not sure at all

Somewhat sure

Very sure

2.2, Check what you need to do before you make this decision.

Use the following space to list questions, concerns, and next steps.

Your Summary

Here’s a record of your answers. You can use it to talk with your doctor or loved ones about your decision.

Next steps

Which way you’re leaning

How sure you are

Your comments

Key concepts that you understood

Key concepts that may need review

Credits

Author Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer E. Gregory Thompson MD – Internal Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Adam Husney MD – Family Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Kenneth Bark MD – General Surgery, Colon and Rectal Surgery

References

Citations

  1. Wang DQH, Afdhal NH (2010). Gallstone disease. In M Feldman et al., eds., Sleisenger and Fordtran’s Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease, 9th ed., vol. 1 , pp. 1089–1120. Philadelphia: Saunders.

You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor’s recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them.

Gallstones: Should I Have Gallbladder Surgery?

Here’s a record of your answers. You can use it to talk with your doctor or loved ones about your decision.

  1. Get the facts
  2. Compare your options
  3. What matters most to you?
  4. Where are you leaning now?
  5. What else do you need to make your decision?

1. Get the Facts

Your options

  • Have surgery to remove your gallbladder.
  • Don’t have surgery. Wait and see if you have another attack.

Key points to remember

  • If you feel comfortable managing mild and infrequent gallstone attacks, and if your doctor thinks that you aren’t likely to have serious complications, it’s okay not to have surgery.
  • Most doctors recommend surgery if you have had repeated attacks. If you have had one attack of gallstone pain, you may want to wait to see whether you have more.
  • Surgery is the best way to prevent gallstone attacks. The surgery is very common, so doctors have a lot of experience with it.
  • Your body will work fine without a gallbladder. There may be small changes in how you digest food, but you probably won’t notice them.

FAQs

What are gallstones?

Gallstones are stones made of cholesterol and other things found in bile. They form in the gallbladder or bile duct. They may be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball.

Most people with gallstones have no symptoms and don’t need treatment. Those who do have symptoms often have surgery to remove the gallbladder.

In people who do have symptoms, the most common one is pain in the upper right area of your belly. Other symptoms include nausea and vomiting.

Symptoms usually don’t come back after the gallbladder has been removed.

If gallstones block a duct, you may get jaundice. Jaundice makes your skin and the whites of your eyes yellow. It can also cause dark urine and light-colored stools.

What is the surgery to remove the gallbladder?

Laparoscopic gallbladder surgery is the most common surgery done to remove the gallbladder. The doctor inserts a lighted viewing instrument called a laparoscope and surgical tools into your belly through several small cuts. This type of surgery is very safe. People who have it usually recover enough in 7 to 10 days to go back to work or to their normal routine.

Open gallbladder surgery involves taking the gallbladder out through one larger incision in your belly. Open surgery may be done if laparoscopic surgery is not an option or when problems are found during laparoscopic surgery. The hospital stay is longer with open surgery.

Stones in the bile duct

If gallstones are found in the common bile duct before or during surgery to remove the gallbladder, a doctor may do a procedure called an ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram). This involves putting a tube called an endoscope down your throat to your small intestine. The doctor uses the scope to look for stones in the duct and remove them.

What are the risks of gallbladder surgery?

The overall risk from laparoscopic gallbladder surgery is very low. The most serious risks include:

  • Infection.
  • Bleeding.
  • Injury to the common bile duct.
  • Injury to the small intestine by one of the tools used during surgery.

Risks from open gallbladder surgery include:

  • Injury to the common bile duct.
  • Bleeding.
  • Infection.
  • Injuries to the liver, intestines, or major blood vessels in the belly.
  • Blood clots or pneumonia related to the longer recovery period after open surgery.

Both surgeries have the risks of general anesthesia.

Postcholecystectomy syndrome

After gallbladder surgery (cholecystectomy), a few people have ongoing symptoms, such as belly pain, bloating, gas, or diarrhea. This is called postcholecystectomy syndrome. These symptoms can be treated with medicines.

What are the risks of NOT having the gallbladder removed?

There is little risk in not having surgery if you have only one mild attack. But if you have more than one painful attack, you’re likely to have more in the future.

The risks of not treating gallstones may include:

  • Unpredictable attacks of gallstone pain.
  • Episodes of inflammation or serious infection of the gallbladder, bile ducts, or pancreas.
  • Jaundice and other symptoms caused by blockage of the common bile duct. Jaundice makes your skin and the whites of your eyes yellow. It can also cause dark urine and light-colored stools.

About 1 out of 3 people with gallstones who have a single attack of pain or other symptoms do not have symptoms again.1 That means that 2 out of 3 people do have another attack.

If you decide against surgery, what can you do to prevent another attack?

You may be able to prevent gallstone attacks if you:

  • Stay close to a healthy weight by eating a balanced diet and getting regular exercise.
  • Avoid rapid weight loss. When you lose weight by dieting and then you gain weight back again, you increase your risk of gallstones, especially if you are a woman. If you need to lose weight, do it slowly and sensibly.

Why might your doctor recommend gallbladder surgery?

Your doctor may recommend surgery if:

  • You have repeated gallstone attacks.
  • The pain from the attacks is severe.
  • You have complications, such as inflammation of the gallbladder or the pancreas.
  • You have an impaired immune system.

2. Compare your options

  Have gallbladder surgery Don’t have surgery
What is usually involved?
  • You are asleep during surgery.
  • You may go home the same day, or you may stay in the hospital for a day or two. If you have open surgery, your hospital stay will be longer.
  • You can return to your normal activities within a week to 10 days. If you have open surgery, it will take 4 to 6 weeks.
  • You try to prevent another attack by eating a balanced diet and getting regular exercise to stay close to a healthy weight.
  • You avoid losing weight too quickly.
What are the benefits?
  • Surgery gets rid of the gallstones and usually keeps them from coming back.
  • The surgery is safe and is very common.
  • You avoid any costs and risks of surgery.
What are the risks and side effects?
  • All surgery has risks, including bleeding and infection. Your age and your health also can affect your risk.
  • Risk from laparoscopic surgery is very low. Possible problems include injury to the common bile duct or the small intestine.
  • After surgery, a few people have ongoing symptoms, called postcholecystectomy syndrome.
  • You may have more gallstone attacks.
  • You may have episodes of inflammation or infection of the gallbladder, bile ducts, or pancreas.
  • You may have jaundice and other symptoms caused by blockage of the common bile duct.

Personal stories

Personal stories about gallbladder surgery for gallstones

These stories are based on information gathered from health professionals and consumers. They may be helpful as you make important health decisions.

“I have had a couple of gallbladder attacks over the past few years. They weren’t too bad, but I did take a sick day or two each time. Because I travel several times a month for work, I have decided to have my gallbladder removed. That way I won’t have to worry about having an attack while I am away on business, possibly even out of the country.”

“When I was pregnant, my doctor discovered that I have gallstones. We talked it over, and it turns out that it’s possible that the stomach pain I had a couple of years ago might have been related to my gallstones. I haven’t had any problems since then, so we agreed to wait and see if I have another attack. If I do, we can do some tests and find out if the pain is caused by the gallstones. I don’t want to have surgery if there is no need.”

“My first gallstone attack was pretty painful. I know I could handle another attack if it happens, but I would just as soon have surgery and know that I won’t have another one.”

“My gallbladder attacks have been pretty mild so far, and I’ve only had two in the past 5 years. I’m not too concerned about it. My doctor told me the signs of a more serious problem, so I feel well-prepared for another one, if it happens. We agree that I don’t need surgery now.”

3. What matters most to you?

Your personal feelings are just as important as the medical facts. Think about what matters most to you in this decision, and show how you feel about the following statements.

Reasons to have gallbladder surgery

Reasons not to have gallbladder surgery

The pain from my gallstone attacks is very bad.

I have had one or more gallstone attacks, but they don’t hurt much.

More important

Equally important

More important

The thought of having more attacks is worse than the thought of having surgery.

I want to avoid surgery if I possibly can.

More important

Equally important

More important

I do a lot of traveling to places where I may not be able to get help if I have a serious attack.

I’m never too far away from medical treatment.

More important

Equally important

More important

Cost is not an issue for me.

I’m not sure I can afford to have surgery.

More important

Equally important

More important

My other important reasons:

My other important reasons:

More important

Equally important

More important

4. Where are you leaning now?

Now that you’ve thought about the facts and your feelings, you may have a general idea of where you stand on this decision. Show which way you are leaning right now.

Having gallbladder surgery

NOT having gallbladder surgery

Leaning toward

Undecided

Leaning toward

5. What else do you need to make your decision?

Check the facts

1.
It’s all right not to choose surgery if I’ve only had one mild gallstone attack.

You’re right. It’s okay not to have surgery if you feel you can manage mild and infrequent attacks and if your doctor thinks you’re not likely to have serious problems.

2.
Having surgery is the best way to get rid of my gallstones.

That’s right. Surgery gets rid of the gallstones and usually keeps them from coming back. The surgery is safe and widely done.

3.
I could be putting my future health in danger if I have my gallbladder removed.

Correct. Your body will work fine without a gallbladder. There may be small changes in how you digest food, but you probably won’t notice them.

Decide what’s next

1.
Do you understand the options available to you?

2.
Are you clear about which benefits and side effects matter most to you?

3.
Do you have enough support and advice from others to make a choice?

Certainty

1.
How sure do you feel right now about your decision?

Not sure at all

Somewhat sure

Very sure

2.
Check what you need to do before you make this decision.

Use the following space to list questions, concerns, and next steps.

Credits

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer E. Gregory Thompson MD – Internal Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Adam Husney MD – Family Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Kenneth Bark MD – General Surgery, Colon and Rectal Surgery

References

Citations

  1. Wang DQH, Afdhal NH (2010). Gallstone disease. In M Feldman et al., eds., Sleisenger and Fordtran’s Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease, 9th ed., vol. 1 , pp. 1089–1120. Philadelphia: Saunders.

Note: The “printer friendly” document will not contain all the information available in the online document some Information (e.g. cross-references to other topics, definitions or medical illustrations) is only available in the online version.

Current as of: April 15, 2020

Author:
Healthwise Staff

Medical Review:E. Gregory Thompson MD – Internal Medicine & Adam Husney MD – Family Medicine & Kenneth Bark MD – General Surgery, Colon and Rectal Surgery

Wang DQH, Afdhal NH (2010). Gallstone disease. In M Feldman et al., eds., Sleisenger and Fordtran’s Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease, 9th ed., vol. 1 , pp. 1089-1120. Philadelphia: Saunders.

Life After Gall Bladder Removal

If you experience persistent and severe abdominal pain from gallstones, your doctor may recommend to have your gall bladder removed. Speak to your doctor to discuss your surgery options, or make an appointment with a specialist.

Here, we look at some burning questions you may have about gall bladder removal and life after surgery:

What does my gall bladder do?

Your gall bladder is a small organ connected to the liver. It stores bile from the liver before it is released into the small intestine. Bile helps your body break down food and digest fat.

Why is gall bladder removal necessary?

Your doctor may recommend gall bladder removal, known as a cholecystectomy. It is generally for symptomatic gallstones. Gallstones may cause pain, infection or obstruction.

Can I function normally without a gall bladder?

Yes, you can. Without your gall bladder, bile flows directly into the small intestine. This may stimulate the intestine and 50% of patients may experience loose motion. This symptom will usually last for only 3 – 6 months. If it happens, stay on a low-fat diet to help with the loose motion. After 3 – 6 months patients will return to their normal status.

Is my life expectancy affected?

Gall bladder removal doesn’t shorten your life expectancy. In fact, it may even increase it as your post-surgery habits ‘force’ you to make healthier dietary choices. By eating smaller amounts of fats, oils, dairy products, and processed foods, you lose weight and reduce your risk of developing conditions such as high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes. As you are also taking in fewer calories per day, your body will digest your food and use energy more efficiently.

Will I have to make any dietary changes?

Your body will have to adjust to having no gall bladder, so, in the months after your operation, you can test your limits to work out what kind of food work best for you. The good news is that the changes you make will encourage you to lead a healthier lifestyle.

Here are some tips:

Limit your fat intake

Fat is going to be an issue so you need to know what you are putting into your body and how much of it is hidden fat. Read food labels and avoid processed food when you can. Eating whole foods eliminates the guesswork from your meal plans. Choose boiled or grilled food over fried and opt for low-fat choices when it comes to milk and cheese. Fat should make up only 30% of your diet.

Take frequent but smaller portions throughout the day

Your digestive system works slightly differently now so overwhelming it with too much food in one sitting puts too much strain on your liver and it can’t produce the amount of bile needed to help your body digest the food. Divide your meals into smaller dishes every day that include lean meat or other non-processed protein sources and fruit and vegetables.

Reduce the amount of fibre you take in

In the initial months after your surgery, you may find that eating foods high in fibre causes bloating, pain and diarrhoea. Limit your intake of offending foods like cauliflower, cabbage, beans, nuts, cereals and bread and introduce them slowly back into your diet one at a time until you can work out your limits.

Reduce your caffeine intake

Caffeine increases the production of stomach acid, which makes your stomach contents empty faster. Without the normal amount of bile in your stomach that used to be produced by your gall bladder, you will experience more gas, bloating and pain as the food is digested. Start to introduce coffee and tea back into your diet gradually to see how much you can handle.

Record what you eat

Being more aware and mindful of what you are eating is going to help you recover faster and return to life as normal. Record your food intake, breaking down each ingredient and how much you eat, and note the side effects that come up. Look for patterns so you can moderate your diet accordingly. This will help you to avoid or limit foods that you now know cause problems.

In summary, your body can still function well without your gall bladder. Be mindful, though, to control your diet to avoid or limit food that will cause digestive issues – introducing these healthy dietary habits into your lifestyle post-surgery will also benefit your overall health in the long run!

If you’re worried about the cost of surgery, Gleneagles Hospital offers price guarantee for your gall bladder removal surgery so you can budget for the procedure without any bill shock afterwards. This will give you the peace of mind you need to go ahead without any unwanted surprise fees. Learn more about Price Guarantee Procedures.

The improvement on your quality of life can be dramatic, so it’s important to prioritise treatment if you need it.

 

Article reviewed by Dr Winston Woon, general surgeon at Gleneagles Hospital

References

Jewell, T. Can you live without a gallbladder. 17 April 2018. Retrieved 11 April 2019 from https://www.healthline.com/health/can-you-live-without-a-gallbladder#life-expectancy

5 ways to avoid discomfort after your gallbladder removal. 29 July 2015. Retreived 11 April 2019 from https://health.clevelandclinic.org/5-ways-to-avoid-discomfort-after-your-gallbladder-removal/

Short and long term outcome after laparoscopic cholecystectomy


Background:

As an audit of patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy this study not only reports the short term results, but attempted to assess the long term effect of the operation on the symptom profiles of the patients.


Methods:

Three hundred unselected consecutive patients underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy from January 1991 to July 1994. Short term outcome was analysed by reviewing patient files for operation details, postoperative morbidity, complications, and gallbladder histology. Long term (median 2 years) outcome was evaluated by a detailed postal questionnaire. Symptomatic benefit ratios (BR) accruing from the laparoscopic removal of the gallbladder were calculated.


Results:

Twelve operations (4.0%) were converted to open surgery and were excluded from long term outcome analyses. Median operation time was 93 (range 40-245) minutes. There were no deaths. Overall morbidity was 13 %. Median postoperative hospital stay was 2 days (range 1-18 days) and median time-off work 15 days (range 2-49 days). The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 87%. Only one of the 261 patients (0.4%) suffered from recurrent common bile duct stones so far. As shown by the benefit ratios the symptoms most effectively relieved by laparoscopic cholecystectomy were biliary pain (0.97), nausea (0.95), vomiting (0.96) and jaundice (0.94). Most patients with diarrhoea (0.70) and heartburn (0.66) felt relief. Constipation (0.39) and food intolerance (0.57) were unaffected. Most patients (90%) felt that the operation-initiating symptom had disappeared and 98 percent of the patients considered that they had obtained overall symptomatic improvement by the operation.


Conclusions:

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy appears to be a safe and effective way of treating the most common symptoms related to gallstone disease.

Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: Gallbladder Removal

Overview

What is a laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

A laparoscopic cholecystectomy is surgery to remove your gallbladder.

The surgeon makes a few small incisions on the right side of your abdomen (belly). The surgeon uses one incision to insert a laparoscope, a thin tube with a camera on the end. This shows your gallbladder on a screen. The gallbladder then gets removed through another small incision.

A laparoscopic cholecystectomy is less invasive than an open cholecystectomy. This other form of gallbladder removal involves a larger incision.

What is the gallbladder?

The gallbladder is an organ the shape and size of a small pear. It stores a substance called bile made by the liver. It keeps the bile until the body needs it to digest fatty foods.

Who needs to have gallbladder removal?

A laparoscopic cholecystectomy helps people with gallstones that are causing pain and infection.

Gallstones are crystals that form in the gallbladder. They can block the flow of bile out of the gallbladder into your digestive system. This roadblock causes cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder). Gallstones can also move to other parts of the body and cause problems.

Symptoms of gallstones include:

  • Feeling bloated.
  • Fever.
  • Jaundice (yellow-looking skin).
  • Nausea.
  • Pain in the right side of the abdomen, which may reach the back or the shoulder.

Procedure Details

How should I prepare for gallbladder removal?

Before the procedure, your healthcare team will perform certain tests, such as:

They will also talk to you about:

  • Any medications you are taking.
  • Your options for controlling pain during and after surgery.
  • Your surgeon may ask you to avoid food and liquid for a few hours before the procedure.

What happens right before laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

You will receive general anesthesia so that you sleep and have no pain during the procedure. Once you’re out, your healthcare providers will place a tube down your throat to help you breathe. They’ll place another tube — an IV line — in your arm to deliver fluids and medications.

What happens during laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy takes about an hour or two. A surgeon will make a few small incisions in your abdomen. The surgeon will insert thin, hollow tubes into those incisions. The surgical team will then place a laparoscope and other surgical tools into the tubes.

Your team may pump carbon dioxide into your abdomen. This step inflates the surgical area and makes it easier to see inside. Using the special tools, the surgeon will detach the gallbladder from the rest of the body and remove it. The team will then close the incisions with stitches, surgical clips or surgical glue.

If any complications occur during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the surgeon may decide to use an open cholecystectomy instead. That procedure involves a larger incision.

What happens after laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

Your team will watch you for a few hours after surgery. They want to make sure you wake up from the anesthesia without complications. They will check your heart, breathing, blood pressure and ability to urinate (pee).

Risks / Benefits

What are the benefits of gallbladder removal?

Removing the gallbladder will stop the pain and treat the infection caused by gallstones. It can also stop gallstones from coming back.

If gallstones are not treated, pain and infection can get worse. The gallbladder may burst, which can be life-threatening.

What are the benefits of laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

Your healthcare provider or surgeon will determine whether open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy is right for you. The laparoscopic procedure has several benefits:

  • Less pain.
  • Lower risk of complications.
  • Quicker recovery and return to regular activities.
  • Smaller wounds and scars.

What are the risks or possible complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

Like any surgery, laparoscopic cholecystectomy has some risks, but they are rare:

  • Bile leaking in the body.
  • Bleeding.
  • Complications from anesthesia.
  • Hernia.
  • Injury to the bile ducts, liver or intestines.
  • Numbness in the surgical area.
  • Peritonitis (inflammation and infection in the abdomen).
  • Small scars from the incisions.
  • Urinary tract infection.

Recovery and Outlook

What is the recovery time after laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

If you don’t have any complications, you can usually go home the same day as your laparoscopic cholecystectomy. With an open cholecystectomy, you may have to stay in the hospital for a day or two.

What should I do to take care of myself after gallbladder removal?

After surgery, do the following to help yourself recover:

  • Avoid lifting heavy things.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Eat foods high in fiber to help your bowel movements (pooping).
  • Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions about taking care of your wounds and taking medications.
  • Slowly increase your activity.
  • Walk a little bit every day to prevent blood clots.

When can I go back to normal activities after laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

Without complications, you should be able to drive and eat normally in a day or two. You usually can return to work and other daily activities in about a week, as long as they don’t involve lifting. You may need a week or two before you are physically or sexually active.

When to Call the Doctor

When should I seek medical attention after gallbladder removal?

After you go home, call your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of the following:

  • Chills.
  • Cramps in your abdomen or severe pain.
  • High fever (over 101 degrees Fahrenheit).
  • Incision problems, like bleeding, swelling, redness or a funny smell.
  • No bowel movement for three days.
  • Vomiting.
  • Yellow skin.

A note from Cleveland Clinic

Gallstones can be very painful and dangerous. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy removes the gallbladder and prevents gallstones from coming back. Most people fully recover from the minimally invasive procedure in just a few weeks. But call your healthcare provider if you experience any problems after surgery.

Gallbladder Surgery & Removal for Gallstones: What to Expect

Your gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ that stores bile, the fluid that helps digest food. If it’s not working the way it should (or your bile gets out of balance), hard fragments start to form. These can be as small as a grain of rice or as big as a golf ball.

Gallstones don’t go away on their own. If they start to hurt or cause other symptoms, your doctor may decide to remove your gallbladder. This type of surgery is called a cholecystectomy. It’s one of the most common surgeries doctors perform.

About 80% of people who have gallstones will need surgery.

Types of Gallbladder Surgery

Doctors can remove your gallbladder in one of two ways:

Open surgery: During this procedure, your surgeon will make a 5- to 7-inch incision (cut) on your belly to take out your gallbladder. You’ll need open surgery if you have a bleeding disorder. You may also need it if you have severe gallbladder disease, are very overweight, or are in your last trimester of pregnancy.

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Doctors also call this “keyhole surgery.” Your surgeon doesn’t make a big opening in your belly. Instead, they make four small cuts. They insert a very thin, flexible tube that contains a light and a tiny video camera into your belly. These help your surgeon see your gallbladder better. Next, they’ll insert special tools to remove the diseased organ.

For both types of surgery, you’ll be given general anesthesia. This means you’ll sleep through the procedure and won’t feel any pain while it’s being done.

Do I Need Surgery?

If your gallstones aren’t causing symptoms, there’s usually no need for you to have surgery. You’ll only need it if a stone goes into, or blocks, one of your bile ducts. This causes what doctors call a “gallbladder attack.” It’s an intense, knife-like pain in your belly that can last several hours.

If you have sickle cell or another blood disorder, your doctor may consider doing a cholecystectomyas a precaution, even it you don’t have symptoms. 

If left untreated, gallstones can also lead to more serious problems, like:

  • Cholecystitis — an inflamed gallbladder
  • Pancreatitis — an inflamed pancreas
  • Cholangitis — inflamed bile ducts

Before your doctor opts for surgery, they’ll run several tests to see the effect your gallstones are having on your health. Tests might include:

  • Blood test
  • Ultrasound
  • MRI HIDA (hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid) scan — a radioactive chemical is put into your body to create images of any blocked ducts
  • Endoscopic ultrasonography — an imaging device is put into your mouth and down through your digestive tract so sound waves can create a detailed picture of your small intestine

Can I Try Other Treatments First?

You may be able to manage your symptoms for a short time by making changes to your diet. This includes cutting back on fatty foods. But dietary changes don’t always help prevent gallbladder attacks.

If surgery isn’t an option for you, your doctor can prescribe a medication to dissolve your gallstones. But this can take months or even years to work. And even if your gallstones do go away, there’s a chance they’ll return.

Gallbladder Surgery Risks

You can live without your gallbladder. Your liver can make enough bile on its own. This will naturally find its way into your small intestine even if your gallbladder is removed.

Doctors believe gallbladder surgery is safe, but some problems can still arise. These may include:

  • Problems with anesthesia
  • Infection
  • Bleeding
  • Swelling
  • Bile leakage
  • Damage to a bile duct
  • Damage to your intestine, bowel, or blood vessels
  • Deep vein thrombosis (blood clots)
  • Heart problems
  • Pneumonia

You also run the risk of a problem doctors call “post-cholecystectomy syndrome” (PCS). It can happen if any gallstones are left in your bile ducts or bile happens to leak into your stomach. The symptoms of PCS are similar to those of gallstones. They include belly pain, heartburn, and diarrhea.

Recovery

The length of time it takes you to heal depends on the type of surgery you have.

If you have your gallbladder removed during open surgery, you’ll need to stay in the hospital for a few days afterward. It may take between 6 to 8 weeks for your body to heal fully.

Laparoscopy is less involved, so you’ll have less pain and heal faster than if you have open surgery. Most people who have it are able to go home from the hospital the same day. You’ll likely be back to your normal routine within 2 weeks.

Operation to remove the gallbladder by laparoscopy: removal of stones from the gallbladder

About the service

Benefits of laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  • minimal damage to the anterior abdominal wall: 3-4 incisions measuring 5-10 mm,
  • precise operation thanks to the video endoscopic system,
  • excellent cosmetic result: incision marks become almost invisible after a few months,
  • there is practically no pain syndrome in the postoperative period,
  • Fast recovery after surgery, discharged from the hospital in 1-2 days.

When laparoscopic cholecystectomy is performed – indications

  • In chronic inflammation of the gallbladder due to the presence of gallstones in it – calculous cholecystitis.
  • In case of chronic inflammation of the gallbladder without stones, difficult to treat with drugs – non-calculous cholecystitis.
  • In the presence of polyps in the gallbladder.
  • In the presence of large and small stones in the gallbladder without symptoms of inflammation – asymptomatic cholelithiasis.

If you do not perform the operation

If the removal of the gallbladder is not performed in time, the consequences for the body are unfavorable. The disease can be complicated by purulent inflammation of the gallbladder, inflammation of the pancreas or obstructive jaundice. The complexity of operations for these diseases increases many times and often requires long-term inpatient treatment. Some of the symptoms of these diseases persist even after surgery. Therefore, it is important to have a timely operation to remove the gallbladder, not to postpone it.

Preparation for laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  1. Consultation with a surgeon, you can sign up for it online on our website at any time of the day.
  2. Examination by a therapist (1 month).
  3. Examination by a gynecologist (
  4. Radiography of the OGK or fluorography (no later than 12 months).
  5. Electrocardiogram (10 days).
  6. FGDS (1 month).
  7. List of studies:
  • General blood test with leukocyte formula (10 days).
  • General urine analysis (10 days).
  • Biochemical blood test (protein, AST, ALT, creatinine, urea, glucose, bilirubin, K, Na, Cl) (10 days).
  • Coagulogram (10 days).
  • Analysis for blood group and Rh factor (3 months).
  • Analysis for HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, RW (3 months).

On the day of the operation, the patient arrives at the surgical hospital located at ul. Bekhtereva, 7. Be sure to be on an empty stomach.

With you – changeable shoes, passport.

How is the operation to remove the gallbladder performed

The operation is performed under general anesthesia.

On the eve of laparoscopic gallbladder removal, the patient is consulted by an anesthesiologist.

After the patient is anesthetized, laparoscopic surgery begins to remove the gallbladder. A needle is inserted into the abdominal cavity, through which gas is injected. In the resulting environment, surgeons can clearly examine the abdominal organs, blood vessels, and bile ducts.Four small incisions with a diameter of 5 to 10 mm are made on the anterior abdominal wall. Through the formed holes, a laparoscope and instruments are inserted to perform the operation.

A laparoscope is a metal tube with a light source and a video camera. Doctors control the entire course of the operation using a screen located in the operating room. The applied laparoscopic equipment allows obtaining a stable image with a clear and distinct pattern, saturated color shades.

During the operation, surgeons separate the gallbladder from nearby organs, blood vessels, ducts and remove it through one of the holes in the abdominal wall.Postoperative wounds are sutured.

How long does it take to remove the gallbladder? The duration of laparoscopic cholecystectomy is 40 minutes to an hour.

Why our patients prefer laparoscopic cholecystectomy

1. After laparoscopic cholecystectomy, no traces of the operation remain on the skin – four small scars ranging in size from 5 to 10 millimeters completely disappear over time.

A scar from a scar in an abdominal operation passes under the right costal arch or from the navel to the sternum, and remains for life.

2. Postoperative wounds formed after the introduction of laparoscopic instruments into the abdominal cavity do not hurt, their size is minimal.

During abdominal surgery, an incision with a length of 15 to 25 centimeters passes through the skin, subcutaneous adipose tissue, and underlying tissues. Each layer of tissue is sutured separately. Therefore, tissue healing after surgery is long and painful.

3. The small size of the surgical incisions practically excludes blood loss during the operation, so the general condition of the operated patient does not suffer.

Recovery after laparoscopic surgery takes two to three days, and after abdominal surgery – weeks.

4. The risk of postoperative complications is minimal; hernias of the anterior abdominal wall are not formed in the area of ​​the postoperative wound.

After traditional cholecystectomy, purulent complications and hernial protrusions of the anterior abdominal wall often occur.

What to do after removing the gallbladder

  • 4-6 hours after the operation, the patient is allowed to sit in bed, get up.
  • The first meal is recommended the next day after the operation; before that, small amounts of clean, non-carbonated water are allowed.
  • Surgeon’s observation is obligatory for 1-2 days, after which the patient is discharged from the Nordin surgical hospital. After discharge, patients should follow a diet and adhere to all doctor’s recommendations.

When the patient is examined after removal of the gallbladder

  • Upon discharge from the Nordin surgical hospital, the patient is issued a sick leave.
  • Examination of the patient by the surgeon after removal of the gallbladder is carried out on the day of discharge from the hospital.
  • Follow-up visit is carried out 10 days after surgery to remove stitches.

Recovery and physical activity after removal of the gallbladder

  • Recovery from laparoscopic cholecystectomy takes one to two weeks.
  • 2-3 days after the operation, the patient can get behind the wheel, lift weights up to 3 kilograms, go down and go up the stairs.
  • It is allowed to resume training in the gym 2 weeks after the operation.

Diet after removal of the gallbladder

The day after the operation, liquid food is allowed – kefir, oatmeal, diet soup. In the future, the patient is recommended to fermented milk products, porridge on the water, boiled lean meat, baked apples.

During the week after the operation, you must not eat chocolate, fried food, drink coffee, strong tea and alcoholic beverages.

Dietary restrictions for a month after surgery:

  • exclude alcohol,
  • exclude easily digestible carbohydrates,
  • exclude spicy, fatty foods,
  • eat regularly 4 to 6 times a day.

Operation to remove the gallbladder (cholecystectomy)

Cholecystectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the gallbladder, which is a pear-shaped organ located directly under the liver on the right side of the abdomen.Bile accumulates in the gallbladder – a liquid formed in the liver, which takes part in the digestion process.

Distinguish between emergency cholecystectomy and cholecystectomy performed routinely (during remission, in the absence of symptoms).

Indications for removal of the gallbladder

Cholecystectomy is performed for cholecystitis and gallstone disease to remove gallstones and combat the complications they cause.The attending physician may recommend surgery in the following cases:

– Chronic calculous cholecystitis (stones in the gallbladder, cholelithiasis)

– Polyps and cholesterosis of the gallbladder;

– Stones in the bile duct (choledocholithiasis)

– Inflammation of the gallbladder (acalculous cholecystitis)

– Asymptomatic cholecystolithiasis (no symptoms in the presence of gallstones)

Cholecystectomy performed routinely is a fairly simple operation that rarely entails complications.In most cases, the patient can go home 1-2 days after the surgery.

Removal of the gallbladder on an emergency basis is carried out with an immediate threat to the patient’s life, when the complications of cholecystitis that have arisen make attempts to achieve stable stabilization of the patient’s general condition unpromising:

– with peritonitis;

– gangrenous cholecystitis;

– perforation of the gallbladder wall

Methods for removing the gallbladder

Currently, there are 3 main technologies for performing cholecystectomy:

1.Laparoscopic cholecystectomy

2. Open cholecystectomy from mini-access

3. Traditional open cholecystectomy

The principal difference in all these methods is only access to the gallbladder.

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is performed most often, performed under general anesthesia with tracheal intubation (insertion of a thin elastic tube into the trachea during anesthesia, which the patient does not feel), which minimizes the risk of regurgitation (reflux of gastric contents into the oropharynx) and aspiration (ingestion of gastric contents into the lungs) during surgery.

After the onset of anesthesia, the surgeon will inject carbon dioxide into the abdominal cavity through a special thin needle. The purpose of the injection of carbon dioxide is to raise the abdominal wall and at the same time tighten the internal organs, figuratively speaking “to inflate the abdomen.” Carbon dioxide is absolutely harmless to the body and its injection makes it possible to create space in the abdominal cavity for the surgeon to work. After that, a puncture is made in the navel, through which a laparoscope equipped with a video camera is inserted to examine the abdominal organs, as well as to visually monitor the further course of the operation.The image from the video camera of the laparoscope is transmitted to the monitor in the operating room and allows surgeons to control their actions.

At the next stage, punctures of the abdominal wall (from 1 to 3) are performed for the introduction of instruments – manipulators necessary to remove the gallbladder. After diagnostic manipulations, if required, proceed to the isolation of the cystic artery and cystic duct. After applying special metal brackets on them, they are crossed. The gallbladder, separated from the liver, is removed from the abdominal cavity (through one of the punctures).

After removing the gallbladder, cholangiography is performed – a special X-ray examination of the bile duct for abnormalities. If the surgeon detects stones or other pathologies in the bile duct, medical intervention may also be carried out to eliminate them.

At the end of the operation, carbon dioxide is removed from the abdominal cavity, sutures and a sterile dressing are applied. After full awakening, the patient is transferred to the postoperative department.Laparoscopic cholecystectomy lasts from 30 minutes to 2 hours, with an average of 40 minutes.

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not indicated for all patients. In some cases, the surgeon may begin laparoscopic cholecystectomy and decide to make a wider incision due to scar tissue from previous surgery or complications.

As a rule, the patient can stand up within 2-3 hours after the laparoscopy. Discharge from hospital usually takes place the day after surgery, but some may need to stay in the hospital longer.The patient will be able to go home after being able to eat, drink and move independently without pain. It takes about a week to fully recover.

Advantages of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

– Absence of incisions in the anterior abdominal wall and, as a result, less pain, less likelihood of infection, lower risks of incisional hernia, quick recovery period;

– Patient can get up already 2-3 hours after laparoscopy.Usually, by the evening or morning of the next day, the state already allows you to return to normal physical activity, and after a few days return to work. Puncture marks on the skin heal quickly enough, after a few months they can hardly be detected;

– Great information content. The technology of laparoscopy, in which the image from the abdominal cavity is displayed on the monitor screen, allows you to identify the smallest pathology that is not visible during a classical operation.This is possible due to the fact that the monitor can magnify the image of organs up to 10 times.

– Sparing operational impact. Taking into account the multiple magnification and special surgical instruments, the lesions of pathology are removed without affecting healthy tissues

Mini-access open cholecystectomy

Not all patients can have laparoscopic gallbladder removal. Anatomical abnormalities, a pronounced inflammatory or adhesive process in the abdominal cavity, concomitant diseases that prevent the imposition of pneumoperitoneum (injection of the abdominal cavity with carbon dioxide) are the reason for an open minimally invasive cholecystectomy.

In this method, the gallbladder is accessed through an incision (3 to 7 cm) in the right hypochondrium. Muscles and tissues are lifted to free the liver and gallbladder. Next, proceed to the isolation of the cystic artery and cystic duct. After applying special metal brackets on them, they are crossed. The gallbladder, separated from the liver, is removed from the abdominal cavity.

Control cholangiography is then performed. Stitches and a sterile dressing are applied.After full awakening, the patient is transferred to the postoperative department. Open cholecystectomy from a mini-access lasts 30 minutes to 2 hours, on average – 40 minutes.

The duration of hospital stay is slightly longer than with laparoscopy, and is 1 – 3 days. The postoperative rehabilitation period is also longer.

Traditional open cholecystectomy

Currently, this method of cholecystectomy is used either in emergency cases, for example, in acute cholecystitis complicated by diffuse peritonitis, or in complex forms of pathology of the bile ducts.

Traditional open cholecystectomy is performed through large incisions of the abdominal wall, which is accompanied by significant trauma and, as a consequence, the development of frequent postoperative complications, for example, postoperative ventral hernias or infectious complications. In addition, in the early postoperative period, intestinal paresis and dysfunctions of external respiration may develop.

Of course, the early postoperative activity of the patient is limited, the period of rehabilitation and disability is longer.To recover, you will need to spend 3 to 7 days in the hospital. After that, it takes four to six weeks for full recovery.

Complications of cholecystectomy

The following complications are very unlikely to occur:

– Leakage of bile

– Bleeding

– Blood clots

– Death

– Air embolism

– Occurrence of heart problems

– Postoperative wound infection

– Damage to nearby organs: bile duct, liver and small intestine

– Pancreatitis

– Pneumonia

The risk of complications depends on the general state of health and the causes of cholecystitis.The risk of complications with urgent cholecystectomy is higher than when the operation is performed routinely.

After cholecystectomy

Prepare in advance for postoperative recovery. Most people go home the day after having a cholecystectomy, but complications can lengthen the hospital stay. In some cases, the surgeon has to make an incision in the abdominal wall to remove the gallbladder.The patient in this case will have to stay in the hospital for a longer period. It is not always possible to say exactly how the operation will proceed. If you have to stay in the hospital longer, you should immediately take your personal belongings with you, for example, a toothbrush, comfortable clothes, books or magazines, so that you don’t get bored.

Arrange for someone to drive you home after you are discharged and look after you. Ask a friend or family member to drive you home and stay with you the first night after surgery.

Thanks to cholecystectomy, pain and discomfort caused by gallstones will disappear. Conservative treatment such as dietary changes does not prevent gallstones. Cholecystectomy is the only way to prevent gallstones from forming.

After cholecystectomy, some patients have mild diarrhea that then goes away. Most patients do not experience digestive problems after cholecystectomy.The gallbladder is not an organ necessary for healthy digestion.

How quickly a patient can return to their normal activities after cholecystectomy depends on the method of surgery and overall health. Patients who have undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy can return to work after a few days. Patients who have undergone open cholecystectomy take several weeks to recover and return to work.

Preparation for cholecystectomy

Before a planned operation, a number of studies are carried out to assess the state of internal organs and identify concomitant diseases:

General analysis of blood and urine

Biochemical blood test (ALT, AST, albumin, amylase, glucose, bilirubin, creatinine, electrolytes, etc.)

Coagulogram (prothrombin, INR, fibrinogen, APTT, VSC)

Determination of blood group, Rh factor

Microprecipitation reaction with cardiolipin antigen

Determination of antibodies to HIV 1/2 immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV)

Determination of antibodies to hepatitis C virus (Anti-HCV-total)

Determination of hepatitis B virus antigen (HBsAg)

Electrocardiogram

Chest X-ray

Videoesophagogastroduodenoscopy (FGS)

MR – cholangiography

Examination of the therapist

Anesthesiologist’s examination

This list can be expanded, if necessary

Before performing a planned cholecystectomy, the surgeon may recommend:

– Drink a special medicine (as prescribed by a doctor, for example, Fortrans) in order to flush the intestines.A few hours before the operation, the patient may be prescribed a solution that will remove feces from the intestines.

– Refrain from eating the night before surgery. You can take the medicine with a little water, but you should refrain from eating and drinking four hours before the operation.

– Stop taking certain medications and supplements. You must tell your doctor the names of all medications and supplements you are taking and continue to take only those that your doctor tells you. Your doctor may prohibit certain medications and supplements because they can increase the likelihood of bleeding.

– Take a shower or bath using special soap. Your doctor may recommend a special antibacterial soap.

More detailed information about cholecystectomy can be obtained from the surgeon of the Zdorovye 365 clinic in Yekaterinburg.

Related Articles:

Abdominal pain

Lower abdominal pain

Appendicitis

Ultrasound of the abdominal cavity

Videoesophagogastroduodenoscopy (FGS)

MR – cholangiography (see.MRI of the abdominal cavity)

Gallbladder

Stomach ulcer

Gastritis

Pancreatitis

Pancreas

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

Ulcerative colitis

Crohn’s disease.

Gastroenteritis

Cholecystectomy (surgery to remove the gallbladder)

Cholelithiasis takes the 1st place among all surgical diseases, even overtaking appendicitis.Every year in the world, up to 1 million patients with cholelithiasis are diagnosed; from 10 to 35% of the adult population suffer from it. Alas, the older we get, the greater the risk of becoming the owner of a “miniature geological museum” – after forty years, 20% of women and 8% of men have gallstones. In a significant part of patients, the presence of stones does not manifest itself in anything. But the more time passes, the more often the asymptomatic “stone carrying” is replaced by their movement, blockade of bile outflow, which causes bouts of “biliary colic”, and subsequently leads to the development of inflammation and numerous formidable complications that require surgical treatment.

  • What is the most gentle operation for LC?

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the gold standard for treating gallstones. Simple, fast and gentle gallbladder removal surgery is especially recommended for elderly patients with severe concomitant diseases. And for young patients, especially women, an important argument is that in a short time, puncture marks become almost invisible.In addition, laparoscopic cholecystectomy practically eliminates the risk of incisional hernias, so there is no need to purchase and wear a postoperative bandage for a long time.

  • What are the benefits of laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

Minimal trauma to the abdominal wall, virtually no pain syndrome, fast recovery period after surgery, short hospital stay (1-2 days), quick recovery and return to daily activities and work.

  • Is it possible to remove stones and leave the gallbladder?

Technically, it is not difficult to do this, and at the dawn of the development of gallbladder surgery, this was exactly what was done, but, unfortunately, stones in the gallbladder are formed again. That is why, at present, the gallbladder as a source of stone formation is removed in case of gallstones in all cases. The fact is that with gallstones, after a certain time, irreversible changes occur in the bladder, as a result of which it ceases to fulfill its role, but becomes only a source of stone formation, inflammation and even the development of a malignant tumor.By this time, the function of the gallbladder is taken over by the bile ducts and the liver, therefore, the operation does not disrupt the function of digestion, but at the same time reliably relieves of numerous possible complications.

  • What is the preparation for the operation?

Before the operation, it is necessary to undergo a set of examinations that will assess the body’s readiness for intervention and identify possible complicated forms of cholelithiasis and concomitant diseases.

Before the operation, the surgeon may recommend:

– take a special medicine to cleanse the intestines;

– refrain from eating and drinking a few hours before the operation;

– Stop taking certain medications and supplements;

– take a shower using a special antibacterial soap.

  • What kind of anesthesia is used during the operation?

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is performed under endotracheal anesthesia (general). This is necessary in order to relax the abdominal wall well. The patient falls asleep before the start of the intervention and wakes up after it ends. The duration of laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be from 20 minutes to 1.5-2 hours, depending on the complexity of the intervention, the features of the anatomy and the pathological process.On average, the operation takes about 40 minutes.

  • How is the operation going?

It is performed using special instruments through 3-4 punctures in the abdominal wall with a diameter of 5-10 mm. Special tubes (trocars) are inserted into these punctures. Carbon dioxide is injected into the abdominal cavity using a special pump to create space for the instruments to work. Through trocars using a video camera, special clips and electrodes, the anatomical elements of the gallbladder are isolated – the cystic artery and the cystic duct, special metal brackets (clips) are placed on them and crossed.The gallbladder is separated from the liver and removed through one of the punctures of the abdominal wall. Modern video systems provide excellent image quality and visualization of structures, far superior to those of open surgery.

  • What are the possible complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

Any operation can be accompanied by undesirable effects and complications. However, in the case of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, they are extremely rare – no more than 0.24% of the total number of interventions.In most cases, they are associated with damage, obstruction or incompetence of the bile ducts and respond well to treatment such as stenting of the bile ducts or choledochoenterostomy surgery. Important: the risk of complications with an urgent cholecystectomy is higher than when the operation is performed routinely!

  • How is the postoperative period going?

After laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the patient is admitted from the operating room to the intensive care unit, where he spends the next 2 hours of the postoperative period to monitor adequate recovery from the state of anesthesia.Then the patient is transferred to the ward, where he receives the prescribed postoperative treatment. 4-6 hours after the operation, the patient can get up, the next day – take liquid food. Young patients can be discharged home the next day after the operation, the rest of the patients are usually in the hospital for 2 days. Upon discharge, a sick leave and an extract from the inpatient’s card are issued, which describes the diagnosis and features of the operation, as well as recommendations on diet, physical activity and drug treatment.

Most patients after cholecystectomy are completely cured of the symptoms that worried them, and in 1-6 months after the operation they return to normal life. If the cholecystectomy is performed on time, before the onset of concomitant pathology from other organs of the digestive system, the patient can eat without significant restrictions, not restrain himself in physical activity, and not take special medications. If the patient has already developed concomitant pathology from the digestive system (gastritis, chronic pancreatitis, dyskinesia), he should be under the supervision of a gastroenterologist in order to correct this pathology.

Removal of the gallbladder (laparoscopic cholecystectomy)

Laparoscopic gallbladder removal (laparoscopic cholecystectomy) is a modern way to remove the gallbladder without wide incisions through several small punctures of the anterior abdominal wall. The operation is carried out with the help of special manipulator instruments and an endoscope – a high-tech device with a video camera that transmits the image to the monitor screen.
Note: Laparoscopy for gallbladder removal is today the gold standard in the treatment of gallstone disease. “Open” operations with a large incision are currently performed only with the development of complications of gallstone disease, including perforation of the gallbladder, peritonitis, anatomical anomalies.

When is the gallbladder removed?

Your doctor may refer you to surgery to remove your gallbladder if you have:

  • Choledocholithiasis – a form of gallstone disease, in which stones are formed in the lumen of the common bile duct
  • Blockage of the biliary tract
  • Acute cholecystitis – if the disease has arisen against the background of an existing gallstone disease, the doctor may decide on an urgent operation
  • Cholelithiasis (cholelithiasis) with attacks of biliary colic or with the manifestation of “small” symptoms of the disease: bitterness in the mouth, aching painful sensations in the hypochondrium on the right and a feeling of heaviness after eating in the same area
  • Asymptomatic cholelithiasis
  • Calcification of the gallbladder
  • Polyps of the gallbladder with cholelithiasis or at risk of developing a tumor
  • Perforation of the gallbladder – malignant tumors, severe abdominal trauma and a number of systemic diseases can lead to this disease
  • Cholesterosis – the deposition of cholesterol on the walls of the bladder against the background of cholelithiasis
  • Development of secondary pancreatitis

These are the main problems in which the gallbladder is removed.How much removal is necessary in your case, the attending physician will determine based on the results of a thorough preliminary diagnosis and your general condition.
It is important to know: if the operation is not done on time, sooner or later there will be serious complications that could cost you your life.
Therefore, do not delay your visit to the doctor. Make an appointment and undergo preliminary diagnostics.

Is it necessary to remove the gallbladder?

Why is the gallbladder necessarily removed? Can’t you just remove stones or polyps?

These questions are of concern to most patients.Alas, it is impossible to leave the gallbladder, because:

    1. . Bile will interfere with the normal healing of the gallbladder wall after surgery.
    2. . Bile can enter the abdominal cavity and cause peritonitis.
    3. . Simply removing stones does not mean getting rid of gallstone disease, since they are formed again.
    4. . Even with successful healing of the gallbladder wall, a scar will remain, in which bile particles will crystallize and stones will form.
    5. . After the operation, adhesions are often formed that interfere with the normal flow of bile, as a result of which it will stagnate, and this will sooner or later cause cholestasis.

Operations to remove the gallbladder

In traditional cholecystectomy, a rather large incision of about 15-20 cm is made on the anterior abdominal wall, through which the gallbladder is removed.

Laparoscopy of the gallbladder has a number of advantages over traditional cholecystectomy:
  • The gallbladder is removed through small, neat punctures instead of a large incision: after surgery, you leave almost invisible specks instead of an extensive scar
  • You recover quickly: up to 2-3 days in a hospital and up to 7 days on an outpatient basis
  • Laparoscopy of the gallbladder takes place practically without blood loss
  • The risk of complications after surgery (suppuration, formation of adhesions, etc.) is practically zero
  • After the operation, you will need much less pain relievers or not at all.

Preparation for operation

Preparation for the operation is the most important stage on which the success of the future operation largely depends.Preliminary diagnostics helps to assess the general condition of your body, to exclude infections, allergic reactions and other pathologies for which the operation is contraindicated.

These are the key tests and examinations that you undergo before removing the gallbladder:

    1. . General and biochemical blood and urine tests.
    2. . Tests for syphilis, hepatitis B and C.
    3. . Coagulogram.
    4. . Determination of blood group and Rh factor.
    5. . Ultrasound of the gallbladder, biliary tract and abdominal organs.
    6. . ECG.
    7. . Radiography of the lungs.
    8. . Fibrogastroscopy or colonoscopy – if necessary.

If necessary, other specialists are involved for comprehensive diagnostics – gastroenterologist, cardiologist, endocrinologist, allergist. This approach helps to understand your condition in detail, choose anesthesia and correctly control the body’s work during the operation.

How to prepare the intestines?

3 days before laparoscopy of the gallbladder, exclude bread, vegetables, fruits. To cleanse the intestines, on the eve of the operation, it is necessary to put an enema (about 1.5 liters of liquid) or take the drug “Microlax”.
In the evening before the operation, you can eat a light dinner, for example, porridge or dairy products – cottage cheese, yogurt or kefir.
Important: Do not eat or drink within 8 hours prior to surgery.

How is the gallbladder removed?

Laparoscopy of the gallbladder is performed under general anesthesia and takes from 20 minutes to 1.5 hours:

  • The doctor makes several small punctures of the abdominal wall and inserts instruments through them – trocars, endoscope and special manipulators
  • Gas is pumped into the abdomen, which improves visibility
  • The doctor clamps the cystic duct and artery with a special instrument and cuts them off
  • After that, the doctor removes the gallbladder from the abdominal cavity, removes the instruments and sutures the holes

Sometimes a drain (a thin tube to drain fluid) is inserted into the wound, which is removed the next day if there is no discharge.
After removal of the gallbladder, you are transferred to the recovery room, where you are under the supervision of specialists for 1 to 3 days.

Possible complications after surgery

In most cases, there are no complications after laparoscopy of the gallbladder, since there are no large incisions, sutures, and blood loss during the operation is minimal. But, like any surgical intervention in our body, this operation can cause a number of rare complications, including:

  • Suppuration of sutures
  • Bleeding in the abdomen
  • Bile flow
  • Adhesion formation
  • Injury of the bile ducts during surgery
  • Allergic reactions
  • Thromboembolic consequences
  • Exacerbation of another chronic disease

These complications are extremely rare.As a rule, this occurs in elderly people, or when there is a severe concomitant pathology or severe damage to the biliary tract.
If you feel unwell after the surgery, notify your doctor immediately, who will prevent further complications from developing.

Do stones form after gallbladder removal?

The operation to remove the gallbladder does not change the composition of the bile. Hepatocytes continue to create abnormal bile, which can cause stones to form again.That is why, even after surgery to remove the gallbladder, you need to regularly undergo a study of the composition of bile.

Rehabilitation after removal of the gallbladder

4-6 hours after removal of the gallbladder, you can already eat light food, drink water, get out of bed and walk. The main thing is to do it carefully, as after anesthesia you may be weak and dizzy.
Pain after surgery is minimal and does not require a lot of analgesics.And many people do not need pain relievers at all.
You will be discharged in 1-4 days. And in 15-20 days you will be able to return to work.
Limit physical activity: do not lift more than 2-3 kg and do not do exercises that use the abdominal muscles.
Please note that proper nutrition after removal of the gallbladder is one of the most important factors in recovery.

Nutrition after removal of the gallbladder

Without the gallbladder, bile constantly enters the intestines from the liver.Proper nutrition will reduce its toxicity and help preserve the intestinal mucosa.
For the first month after surgery, eat 5-6 times a day, but not much, and drink up to 1.5 liters of water a day. Of the products during this period, you can eat white bread, boiled meat and fish, cereals, jelly, dairy products, stewed or steamed vegetables.
Take your time and chew food thoroughly: this will help activate the necessary enzymes and “turn on” the liver.
Six months after the operation, you can gradually expand the diet.Eat berries, fruits, and vegetables other than onions, garlic, radishes, and lemons. You can eat honey and dried fruits.
Alcohol, sweets, pickles, fatty and fried foods will have to be limited forever.
Fermented milk products with live bifidobacteria, which improve the intestinal microflora, will also be useful for you.
If necessary, your doctor will prescribe choleretic herbs and preparations with the desired enzymes.

Drug treatment and gymnastics

After the removal of the gallbladder, it is vital to restore the normal functioning of the body and adapt all systems.To do this, the doctor will select an individual drug therapy for you, consisting of choleretic and enzyme preparations, as well as drugs that restore the intestinal microflora.
Physical activity is necessary a few months after the operation.
Physical activity is necessary a few months after the operation.
Take half an hour walks every day, and do gymnastics in the morning. This will help oxygenate the body and activate the abdominal organs.

Removal of the gallbladder in the Stolitsa network of clinics is:

High-tech

To effectively carry out low-traumatic operations to remove the gallbladder, we use modern premium video equipment “PENTAX”.Thanks to its powerful optical system, it allows the doctor to examine in detail the state of the gallbladder and safely remove it.

Professionally

The experience and professionalism of a doctor is the key to a successful operation. Indeed, without a highly qualified specialist, even the most premium equipment is just apparatus. Only an experienced doctor can perform laparoscopic surgery professionally and safely for your health.
Over the years of successful practice, our specialists have performed a huge number of laparoscopic operations to remove the gallbladder and have returned health to hundreds of people.
Turning to us, you can be sure that our specialists will thoroughly understand your situation: they will carry out detailed preliminary diagnostics and determine exactly how necessary the removal of the gallbladder is.
Before the operation, we conclude a formal contract with you. You will receive all the necessary documents.
The contract price includes the payment for the operation itself, the cost of anesthesia and postoperative observation in the clinic.
After the operation, you will receive a sick leave from the first day of hospitalization, which can be extended, if necessary, either at our clinic or at your local clinic.
After you are discharged, you will receive a discharge summary with the protocol of the operation and detailed doctor’s recommendations for treatment during the rehabilitation period.

Comfort

In our cozy rooms you will feel comfortable, because they have everything you need: a button to call a nurse at any time of the day, a separate bathroom, air conditioning, refrigerator, TV, microwave oven and Wi-Fi.
After the operation, our specialists will continuously monitor your condition.
Adequate nutrition and rehabilitation treatments will help you quickly recuperate after surgery and return to a fulfilling life.
Get your health back. Make an appointment now.

90,000 ▶ Removal of the gallbladder Kiev ⭐ Operation laparoscopic cholecystectomy

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a minimally invasive method to remove the gallbladder. It is used for cholelithiasis, expressed by the presence of stones in the gallbladder and bile ducts. The pathologically altered organ cannot perform its function, but is a focus of infection, disrupts the work of the biliary system and the pancreas.In addition, it often provokes severe pain in the patient. According to medical data, after cholecystectomy, the existing symptoms completely disappeared in 90-95% of patients, while the body quickly adapts to changes in the biliary and digestive systems.

Laparoscopy of the gallbladder is a frequently performed operation that requires appropriate equipment and special training. ADONIS doctors have extensive experience in carrying out such low-traumatic organ-preserving interventions.This ensures minimal blood loss, reduces pain and shortens the recovery period. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in Kiev is performed through several small punctures in the abdominal cavity. Due to the high precision of such operations, the patient can be discharged from the surgical department for a maximum of 3 days.

Symptoms of gallbladder diseases

Many diseases of the gallbladder, including gallstone disease, can develop asymptomatically for a long time.If the patient does not undergo preventive examinations, he can find out about the onset of the disease already with the development of complications. This greatly complicates the process of removing the gallbladder and increases the price of this service.

If you experience the following symptoms, seek immediate medical attention:

  • Pain aching, cutting character in the area of ​​the right hypochondrium
  • Pain with irradiation to the right shoulder blade, right shoulder, neck
  • Increased pain on the background of the intake of fatty, smoked food
  • Elevated body temperature
  • Bloating
  • Metallic or bitter taste in the mouth
  • Nausea, vomiting.

A combination of several symptoms may indicate the development of a disease that requires immediate surgery to remove the bile.

Indications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy are:

  • Cholelithiasis (if stones are detected during ultrasound and there is no pain syndrome)
  • Acute or chronic calculous cholecystitis (in the presence of pain, nausea, fever against the background of stone formation)
  • Acute non-calculous cholecystitis (in the presence of pain and dyspeptic syndrome against the background of bacterial inflammation of the gallbladder wall in the absence of stones)
  • Inflammation and blockage of the bile ducts with small stones (cholangitis with choledocholithiasis)
  • Cholesterosis of the gallbladder wall (breaking through the wall of the gallbladder with cholesterol crystals)
  • Polyposis of the gallbladder (multiple adenomatous polyps more than 10 mm)
  • Neoplasms
  • Spasm of the sphincter of Oddi, leading to a violation of the contractile function of the gallbladder (around the world is about 25% of all operations – the presence of pain and dyspeptic syndrome in the absence of stones, a decrease in the excretion of bile volume by 40%, revealed by ultrasound with choleretic breakfast).

These are the main indications for removal of the gallbladder. It is carried out both in acute cholecystitis, which develops against the background of gallstone disease, and in the chronic non-calculous form of the disease. Before making a decision on the appointment of cholecystectomy, the doctor directs the patient to laboratory and instrumental studies, which allow him to assess his condition as accurately as possible and choose the optimal method of treatment. In some cases, patients have contraindications to the removal of the gallbladder and there is a need for a different type of therapy.

Contraindications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy are:

  • Heart failure
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Diseases of the lungs with the development of pulmonary insufficiency
  • Renal failure.

Diagnostics and preoperative preparation

For the diagnosis of diseases of the gallbladder, laboratory tests, ultrasound examinations, fibrogastroduodenoscopy and other techniques are used.The scope of examinations is determined by the attending physician, taking into account the patient’s medical history and his state of health.

Upon detection of indications for routine cholecystectomy, the patient is prescribed additional tests and studies necessary for thorough preparation for the operation to remove the gallbladder.

Before the operation appoint:

The results of these studies help to exclude possible contraindications for biliary removal and to prepare the patient for it.

How the transaction is carried out

In ADONIS surgery in Kiev, two types of cholecystectomy are used to remove the gallbladder: laparotomic and laparoscopic. Today, most of our surgeons prefer the laparoscopic method, which is minimally invasive. When performing the operation in this way, there are no large incisions, which reduces its invasiveness and shortens the recovery period.

The essence of gallbladder laparoscopy is that special surgical instruments, trocars, are inserted into the patient’s abdominal cavity through 4 incisions with a diameter of 3-10 mm.Through one of them, carbon dioxide is injected into the abdominal cavity. The gas lifts the abdominal wall and creates an operating space. After that, a trocar with a camera and laparoscopic instruments are inserted through other incisions, with the help of which the doctor removes the gallbladder. The operation takes up to 2 hours and is performed under general anesthesia.

Postoperative period and consequences of gallbladder removal

After the laparoscopy, the patient is transferred to the individual ward of the day hospital at the ADONIS MC.After laparoscopic cholecystectomy, depending on individual cases, it is recommended to remain under the supervision of the attending physician for 1-3 days.

During the first two days (until gas begins to pass) after removal of the gallbladder, food is usually excluded. Then a strict diet is prescribed, which is gradually expanded.

After cholecystectomy, you can live an absolutely fulfilling life. Since only the gallbladder is removed, the ducts are preserved through which bile continues to flow into the duodenum.After adaptation of the organism and the formation of a conditioned reflex for processing food chyme, the same volume of bile begins to be supplied from the liver as before.

To avoid complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, medical recommendations should be followed for 3-7 weeks. They may differ for each patient, depending on his individual characteristics. Basically, after removal of the gallbladder, patients are advised:

  • Adhere to diet number 5 to adapt the digestive system (the first month is strict, followed by expansion under the supervision of a gastroenterologist)
  • Do not lift heavy objects weighing more than 4 kg
  • Avoid overvoltage and stress
  • Walking regularly
  • A month later, undergo an ultrasound of the abdominal cavity.

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in ADONIS: prices

In the department of surgery ADONIS in Kiev, cholecystectomy is performed mainly by the laparoscopic method. High-precision endoscopic equipment from the USA and Germany allows performing operations of any complexity with minimal trauma and blood loss, which ensures a reduction in the postoperative period, allowing the patient to return to his normal life in a few days.

Cholecystectomy is performed by doctors of the highest category with more than 10 years of experience. They thoroughly master the method of laparoscopic operations using modern equipment and regularly improve their skills at field master classes.

Also one of the advantages of gallbladder laparoscopy

in ADONIS, there is an affordable price for this service compared to other private clinics in Kiev.

We have created all the conditions for accurate diagnosis, effective and safe surgical treatment, as well as a comfortable hospital stay.

How to make an appointment

To make an appointment for a consultation with a surgeon or planned intervention, leave a request through the feedback form on the website, or call

044 299 7 999

067 220 36 03

The contact center operators will enter your data and schedule an examination, consultation or intervention at a convenient time.

Road Clinical Hospital

Gallstone disease (GSD) is a disease characterized by the formation of stones in the gallbladder and bile ducts due to metabolic disorders (cholesterol, fatty acids, etc.)). The bile of a healthy person contains bile acids and cholesterol. When the balance between the content of cholesterol and bile acids is disturbed, an excess of cholesterol in bile or a lack of bile acids, stones are formed from the excess cholesterol on the inner lining of the gallbladder. The oversaturation of bile with cholesterol occurs with obesity, a high-calorie diet, an increase in animal fats, sugar, sweets in food. Female hormones stimulate the flow of cholesterol into the gallbladder. This leads to the fact that women form stones 2-3 times more often than men.If the motor function of the gallbladder decreases (dyskinesia of the gallbladder), then it cannot completely empty itself several times a day, getting rid of mucus and bile, bile stagnates, fluid is absorbed from it. The bile becomes thick, viscous and stones are easily formed from it.

Symptoms.

Gallstones are asymptomatic in 60-80% of people. But sometimes stones can block the flow of bile from the gallbladder, “getting stuck” in the neck of the bladder or bile ducts, cause severe inflammation of the walls of the bladder (calculous cholecystitis).This is accompanied by such symptoms as a sharp pain in the right hypochondrium, sometimes with an echo in the right shoulder or shoulder blade, nausea, vomiting that does not bring relief, dry and bitter taste in the mouth, fever, sometimes with chills, jaundice. As a rule, such attacks of acute cholecystitis occur after eating spicy, fatty foods, alcohol and last for several hours. In addition, the bile ducts in the area of ​​confluence with the duodenum are connected to the ducts of the pancreas.If the stone “gets stuck” not in the initial sections of the bile ducts, but in the area of ​​their connection with the pancreatic ducts, then this can lead to blocking the outflow of pancreatic juice from the pancreas and, in turn, to acute pancreatitis.

Treatment.

Diagnostics. If sometimes after a meal you have discomfort and heaviness in the right hypochondrium, a feeling of bitterness in the mouth, then it is enough to routinely perform an ultrasound of the abdominal organs.Considering that the formation of stones in the gallbladder is associated with metabolic disorders, the removal of stones from the gallbladder or their crushing is absolutely futile, since they will form again. The only radical treatment for calculous cholecystitis is the removal of the gallbladder (cholecystectomy). Removal of the gallbladder does not lead to a deterioration in digestion, since in the absence of a gallbladder, bile enters the duodenum directly from the liver! Currently, the department uses low-traumatic surgical methods of treatment – laparoscopic cholecystectomy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy using the SILS technique (through one incision).

LCE Advantages:

• With LCE, 4 incisions are made from 0.5 to 2 cm, in contrast to open surgery, when the incision length reaches 15-20 cm.

Postoperative pain after LCE is significantly less in contrast to open surgery. The need for a patient to stay in the hospital after LCE is also significantly less than after open surgery. When making small incisions (up to 2 cm), the likelihood of incisional hernias is extremely low. Laparoscopic surgery has contraindications – this is the presence of operations on the abdominal organs, especially on the stomach and duodenum of the liver and spleen, as well as on the intestines.After the above operations, it is possible to “fusion” the internal organs and the anterior abdominal wall. This complicates the operation. Another contraindication to laparoscopic cholecystectomy is lung disease accompanied by respiratory failure. In laparoscopic surgery, a large amount of gas is injected into the abdominal cavity. This causes the diaphragm, the muscle that separates the abdominal organs from the chest organs, to shift upward. Such a displacement of the diaphragm can aggravate the condition of patients with respiratory failure, as it limits the expansion of the lungs during inhalation.

Treatment is carried out by: Surgical Department

90,000 Gallbladder: Remove or Not? | | Infopro54

So what if there are stones in the gallbladder? According to the European approach, you do not need to touch if the disease does not bother you. Removal (cholecystectomy) is indicated only when the organ periodically makes itself felt, there are uncomfortable sensations, and sometimes attacks with pronounced symptoms.

The gallbladder is the supplier of bile to the small intestine, so you should not unnecessarily disrupt its functioning, injuring it.

It is logical that if the function of the gallbladder is close to normal, then it does not need to be removed. Since the operation gives its negative consequences. However, there are two opinions on this matter. According to one of them, since when stones are less than half a centimeter in diameter, their dissolution is possible, it makes no sense to remove the organ, and according to the other, in the presence of stones, the gallbladder must be removed in any case.

But it is also necessary to take into account the peculiarities of the disease, the presence of complications and other diseases. With pain on the right in the hypochondrium, there is a reason for cholecystectomy, but a number of other features must be taken into account, therefore, each specific case should be carefully evaluated by a doctor.

It should be borne in mind that the operation will not relieve cholelithiasis. Small stones come out on their own, while those with a larger diameter can be removed using minimally invasive methods. But in any case, dietary adherence and drug therapy are required.

Cholelithiasis can be accompanied by benign and malignant formations. And here, especially in the second case, removal is imperative, as with calculous cholecystitis.

Surgery is indicated for inflammation of the gallbladder or bile ducts, as well as for calculus obstruction of the biliary tract with calculus.

And yet, in the presence of stones in the gallbladder, not accompanied by complications, in most cases, resort to expectant tactics.

How is the removal procedure going?

Therapy is possible with several methods of surgical intervention. Minimally invasive (laparoscopic) is used as a planned operation, and assumes the absence of contraindications and complications. Abdominal surgery is mainly used in emergency and / or complicated cases. If necessary, laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be transferred to open abdominal surgery.

In any case, the purpose of this or that depends on the size of the stones, the state of the body, the presence of pathological processes in the tissues of the organ, complications.

There are non-surgical methods for getting rid of calculi by dissolving with drugs or destroying it with UVL, but this also does not cure the disease and after a while new calculi may form, and they have a number of contraindications.

Prophylaxis is indicated for those who have had cases of cholelithiasis in your family and those who have the disease in remission. In this case, it is recommended to take tests and do an ultrasound of the abdominal cavity once a year.

Also, the onset of the disease provokes malnutrition, obesity, dramatic weight loss, the presence of chronic diseases. Prevention in this case will reduce the chance of cholelithiasis.

.