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Does an ovarian cyst cause bleeding: Ovarian cysts: Overview – InformedHealth.org

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Ovarian cysts: Overview – InformedHealth.org

Introduction

Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs in the ovaries. Some have tissue inside them. The cysts are surrounded by a capsule and usually about the size of a cherry. Most ovarian cysts go away on their own.

These cysts often develop due to normal hormonal changes in puberty or during menopause. Sometimes ovarian cysts are already there at birth or are caused by something else, but that’s much less common.

It is estimated that about 10 out of 100 women have ovarian cysts. They are usually non-cancerous (benign) and rarely cause problems, so they generally don’t need to be treated. Surgery is only very rarely needed.

Symptoms

Most women who have ovarian cysts don’t know that they have them. But some cysts cause dull pain in the lower abdomen (pelvic pain).

Ovarian cysts can also lead to problems with the menstrual cycle, such as heavy or irregular periods, or spotting (abnormal vaginal bleeding between periods). Menstrual cycle problems occur if the cyst produces sex hormones that cause the lining of the womb to grow more.

Very large cysts may push against the bowel or bladder. This can lead to a swollen tummy, a feeling of fullness and pressure, pain when urinating, or constipation.

If a cyst ruptures (bursts), it can be felt as a sudden pain – but usually doesn’t cause any other problems. The weight of the cyst can sometimes pull on the ovary and cause it to become twisted. This leads to sudden, severe, cramping pain on the affected side of the lower abdomen, as well as nausea, vomiting and a high pulse rate.

Causes

Most ovarian cysts develop during one part of the menstrual cycle (the growth and release of egg cells). Known as “functional cysts,” these mainly occur in puberty or during menopause. They may develop in one ovary or in both ovaries at the same time.

These are the most common types of functional ovarian cysts:

  • Follicular cysts: Each egg cell is surrounded by a capsule known as a follicle. If the follicle doesn’t open and release the egg cell (if ovulation doesn’t occur), the follicle might gradually become filled with a fluid and turn into a cyst.

  • Corpus luteum cysts: These occur when a corpus luteum fills with blood. The corpus luteum develops from the follicle that released the egg cell during ovulation. It secretes the sex hormones known as progesterone and estrogen.

  • Theca lutein cysts: These mainly occur in women who have infertility treatment with hormones. The hormones stimulate the growth of egg cells in the ovaries. Cysts may develop as a side effect.

There is also a special type of cyst known as chocolate cysts (endometriomas). These are filled with dark, thick blood. They can develop as a result of endometriosis, for example.

Dermoid cysts (which are not functional cysts) are less common. They may develop if a non-cancerous tumor grows and it contains things like skin cells and sebaceous glands. Sebaceous glands produce an oily substance (sebum) that usually keeps skin moisturized. Because the sebum in this kind of tumor can’t “escape,” it builds up inside the cyst. Dermoid cysts might be there at birth. In rare cases they can turn into cancer (become malignant).

In another illness known as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO), there are a lot of small cysts in the ovaries. Women who have PCO produce too many male sex hormones (androgens), which prevent the egg cells from maturing properly.

Effects

Most ovarian cysts are only 1 to 3 centimeters in size and go away on their own within a few months. They only rarely grow large enough to cause severe symptoms. In very rare cases they grow as big as 15 to 30 centimeters.

Complications are also rare. They may occur if the wall of the cyst ruptures (bursts) and the fluid leaks out into the space around it. Although ruptures can be painful, they are usually harmless. Only rarely do they lead to bleeding that needs to be stopped through surgery.

A more serious complication may occur if the ovary becomes twisted around the tissue that supports it. Known as ovarian torsion, this mainly happens in women who have larger cysts – often after jerky movements, for instance when playing tennis. Ovarian torsion is very painful. It may also cut off the blood supply to the ovary. If that happens, surgery is needed as soon as possible to prevent the ovary from dying.

Diagnosis

Ovarian cysts can be seen on an ultrasound. They are often discovered by chance, for instance when doing an ultrasound scan of the ovaries. Some cysts can be felt too.

If it is thought that you might have an ovarian cyst, the doctor will ask you about symptoms such as menstrual (period) problems and pain, and you may have a blood test.

Other examinations, such as a CT scan or laparoscopy (keyhole procedure to look inside your tummy), are only rarely needed. Diagnostic examinations are usually done to find out whether the changes in ovary tissue could be cancer. Although cysts are usually non-cancerous (benign), it’s not always easy to tell whether it’s a cyst or a tumor.

Treatment

If a cyst causes no symptoms, or only mild symptoms, it’s usually okay to wait and see what happens. Most cysts go away on their own. Depending on the results of diagnostic examinations, it’s sometimes a good idea to go for regular check-ups (every month or every few months) so the doctor can keep an eye on the cyst. If the cyst is painful, painkillers such as ibuprofen or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help.

If the cysts change over time or don’t get smaller and if the symptoms don’t go away, laparoscopy is an option. This procedure involves inserting thin instruments into the abdomen (tummy) through small cuts in the tummy wall. Doctors can then take a closer look at the cysts and remove them if necessary. But new cysts may develop after others have been removed.

In rare cases doctors suggest removing an ovary, or even both ovaries – for instance, if they think it could be cancer or that it will be difficult to cut the cysts out of the ovary tissue. Removing both ovaries can have a great impact on women’s lives, particularly women of childbearing age, because the operation immediately leads to menopause. The sudden drop in hormones can cause symptoms such as hot flashes, dizziness, headaches and nausea. And women can no longer become pregnant after menopause. Because of this, at least one ovary is kept, if possible – especially in women who wish to have (more) children.

Some doctors recommend treating ovarian cysts with the birth control pill. But the pill doesn’t help in the treatment of functional cysts. Although it reduces the amount of hormones produced in the ovaries and prevents ovulation, studies have shown that this doesn’t make the cysts go away any faster.

Further information

When people are ill or need medical advice, they usually go to see their family doctor first. Read about how to find the right doctor, how to prepare for the appointment and what to remember.

Ovarian cysts: Overview – InformedHealth.org

Introduction

Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs in the ovaries. Some have tissue inside them. The cysts are surrounded by a capsule and usually about the size of a cherry. Most ovarian cysts go away on their own.

These cysts often develop due to normal hormonal changes in puberty or during menopause. Sometimes ovarian cysts are already there at birth or are caused by something else, but that’s much less common.

It is estimated that about 10 out of 100 women have ovarian cysts. They are usually non-cancerous (benign) and rarely cause problems, so they generally don’t need to be treated. Surgery is only very rarely needed.

Symptoms

Most women who have ovarian cysts don’t know that they have them. But some cysts cause dull pain in the lower abdomen (pelvic pain).

Ovarian cysts can also lead to problems with the menstrual cycle, such as heavy or irregular periods, or spotting (abnormal vaginal bleeding between periods). Menstrual cycle problems occur if the cyst produces sex hormones that cause the lining of the womb to grow more.

Very large cysts may push against the bowel or bladder. This can lead to a swollen tummy, a feeling of fullness and pressure, pain when urinating, or constipation.

If a cyst ruptures (bursts), it can be felt as a sudden pain – but usually doesn’t cause any other problems. The weight of the cyst can sometimes pull on the ovary and cause it to become twisted. This leads to sudden, severe, cramping pain on the affected side of the lower abdomen, as well as nausea, vomiting and a high pulse rate.

Causes

Most ovarian cysts develop during one part of the menstrual cycle (the growth and release of egg cells). Known as “functional cysts,” these mainly occur in puberty or during menopause. They may develop in one ovary or in both ovaries at the same time.

These are the most common types of functional ovarian cysts:

  • Follicular cysts: Each egg cell is surrounded by a capsule known as a follicle. If the follicle doesn’t open and release the egg cell (if ovulation doesn’t occur), the follicle might gradually become filled with a fluid and turn into a cyst.

  • Corpus luteum cysts: These occur when a corpus luteum fills with blood. The corpus luteum develops from the follicle that released the egg cell during ovulation. It secretes the sex hormones known as progesterone and estrogen.

  • Theca lutein cysts: These mainly occur in women who have infertility treatment with hormones. The hormones stimulate the growth of egg cells in the ovaries. Cysts may develop as a side effect.

There is also a special type of cyst known as chocolate cysts (endometriomas). These are filled with dark, thick blood. They can develop as a result of endometriosis, for example.

Dermoid cysts (which are not functional cysts) are less common. They may develop if a non-cancerous tumor grows and it contains things like skin cells and sebaceous glands. Sebaceous glands produce an oily substance (sebum) that usually keeps skin moisturized. Because the sebum in this kind of tumor can’t “escape,” it builds up inside the cyst. Dermoid cysts might be there at birth. In rare cases they can turn into cancer (become malignant).

In another illness known as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO), there are a lot of small cysts in the ovaries. Women who have PCO produce too many male sex hormones (androgens), which prevent the egg cells from maturing properly.

Effects

Most ovarian cysts are only 1 to 3 centimeters in size and go away on their own within a few months. They only rarely grow large enough to cause severe symptoms. In very rare cases they grow as big as 15 to 30 centimeters.

Complications are also rare. They may occur if the wall of the cyst ruptures (bursts) and the fluid leaks out into the space around it. Although ruptures can be painful, they are usually harmless. Only rarely do they lead to bleeding that needs to be stopped through surgery.

A more serious complication may occur if the ovary becomes twisted around the tissue that supports it. Known as ovarian torsion, this mainly happens in women who have larger cysts – often after jerky movements, for instance when playing tennis. Ovarian torsion is very painful. It may also cut off the blood supply to the ovary. If that happens, surgery is needed as soon as possible to prevent the ovary from dying.

Diagnosis

Ovarian cysts can be seen on an ultrasound. They are often discovered by chance, for instance when doing an ultrasound scan of the ovaries. Some cysts can be felt too.

If it is thought that you might have an ovarian cyst, the doctor will ask you about symptoms such as menstrual (period) problems and pain, and you may have a blood test.

Other examinations, such as a CT scan or laparoscopy (keyhole procedure to look inside your tummy), are only rarely needed. Diagnostic examinations are usually done to find out whether the changes in ovary tissue could be cancer. Although cysts are usually non-cancerous (benign), it’s not always easy to tell whether it’s a cyst or a tumor.

Treatment

If a cyst causes no symptoms, or only mild symptoms, it’s usually okay to wait and see what happens. Most cysts go away on their own. Depending on the results of diagnostic examinations, it’s sometimes a good idea to go for regular check-ups (every month or every few months) so the doctor can keep an eye on the cyst. If the cyst is painful, painkillers such as ibuprofen or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help.

If the cysts change over time or don’t get smaller and if the symptoms don’t go away, laparoscopy is an option. This procedure involves inserting thin instruments into the abdomen (tummy) through small cuts in the tummy wall. Doctors can then take a closer look at the cysts and remove them if necessary. But new cysts may develop after others have been removed.

In rare cases doctors suggest removing an ovary, or even both ovaries – for instance, if they think it could be cancer or that it will be difficult to cut the cysts out of the ovary tissue. Removing both ovaries can have a great impact on women’s lives, particularly women of childbearing age, because the operation immediately leads to menopause. The sudden drop in hormones can cause symptoms such as hot flashes, dizziness, headaches and nausea. And women can no longer become pregnant after menopause. Because of this, at least one ovary is kept, if possible – especially in women who wish to have (more) children.

Some doctors recommend treating ovarian cysts with the birth control pill. But the pill doesn’t help in the treatment of functional cysts. Although it reduces the amount of hormones produced in the ovaries and prevents ovulation, studies have shown that this doesn’t make the cysts go away any faster.

Further information

When people are ill or need medical advice, they usually go to see their family doctor first. Read about how to find the right doctor, how to prepare for the appointment and what to remember.

Ovarian cysts: Overview – InformedHealth.org

Introduction

Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs in the ovaries. Some have tissue inside them. The cysts are surrounded by a capsule and usually about the size of a cherry. Most ovarian cysts go away on their own.

These cysts often develop due to normal hormonal changes in puberty or during menopause. Sometimes ovarian cysts are already there at birth or are caused by something else, but that’s much less common.

It is estimated that about 10 out of 100 women have ovarian cysts. They are usually non-cancerous (benign) and rarely cause problems, so they generally don’t need to be treated. Surgery is only very rarely needed.

Symptoms

Most women who have ovarian cysts don’t know that they have them. But some cysts cause dull pain in the lower abdomen (pelvic pain).

Ovarian cysts can also lead to problems with the menstrual cycle, such as heavy or irregular periods, or spotting (abnormal vaginal bleeding between periods). Menstrual cycle problems occur if the cyst produces sex hormones that cause the lining of the womb to grow more.

Very large cysts may push against the bowel or bladder. This can lead to a swollen tummy, a feeling of fullness and pressure, pain when urinating, or constipation.

If a cyst ruptures (bursts), it can be felt as a sudden pain – but usually doesn’t cause any other problems. The weight of the cyst can sometimes pull on the ovary and cause it to become twisted. This leads to sudden, severe, cramping pain on the affected side of the lower abdomen, as well as nausea, vomiting and a high pulse rate.

Causes

Most ovarian cysts develop during one part of the menstrual cycle (the growth and release of egg cells). Known as “functional cysts,” these mainly occur in puberty or during menopause. They may develop in one ovary or in both ovaries at the same time.

These are the most common types of functional ovarian cysts:

  • Follicular cysts: Each egg cell is surrounded by a capsule known as a follicle. If the follicle doesn’t open and release the egg cell (if ovulation doesn’t occur), the follicle might gradually become filled with a fluid and turn into a cyst.

  • Corpus luteum cysts: These occur when a corpus luteum fills with blood. The corpus luteum develops from the follicle that released the egg cell during ovulation. It secretes the sex hormones known as progesterone and estrogen.

  • Theca lutein cysts: These mainly occur in women who have infertility treatment with hormones. The hormones stimulate the growth of egg cells in the ovaries. Cysts may develop as a side effect.

There is also a special type of cyst known as chocolate cysts (endometriomas). These are filled with dark, thick blood. They can develop as a result of endometriosis, for example.

Dermoid cysts (which are not functional cysts) are less common. They may develop if a non-cancerous tumor grows and it contains things like skin cells and sebaceous glands. Sebaceous glands produce an oily substance (sebum) that usually keeps skin moisturized. Because the sebum in this kind of tumor can’t “escape,” it builds up inside the cyst. Dermoid cysts might be there at birth. In rare cases they can turn into cancer (become malignant).

In another illness known as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO), there are a lot of small cysts in the ovaries. Women who have PCO produce too many male sex hormones (androgens), which prevent the egg cells from maturing properly.

Effects

Most ovarian cysts are only 1 to 3 centimeters in size and go away on their own within a few months. They only rarely grow large enough to cause severe symptoms. In very rare cases they grow as big as 15 to 30 centimeters.

Complications are also rare. They may occur if the wall of the cyst ruptures (bursts) and the fluid leaks out into the space around it. Although ruptures can be painful, they are usually harmless. Only rarely do they lead to bleeding that needs to be stopped through surgery.

A more serious complication may occur if the ovary becomes twisted around the tissue that supports it. Known as ovarian torsion, this mainly happens in women who have larger cysts – often after jerky movements, for instance when playing tennis. Ovarian torsion is very painful. It may also cut off the blood supply to the ovary. If that happens, surgery is needed as soon as possible to prevent the ovary from dying.

Diagnosis

Ovarian cysts can be seen on an ultrasound. They are often discovered by chance, for instance when doing an ultrasound scan of the ovaries. Some cysts can be felt too.

If it is thought that you might have an ovarian cyst, the doctor will ask you about symptoms such as menstrual (period) problems and pain, and you may have a blood test.

Other examinations, such as a CT scan or laparoscopy (keyhole procedure to look inside your tummy), are only rarely needed. Diagnostic examinations are usually done to find out whether the changes in ovary tissue could be cancer. Although cysts are usually non-cancerous (benign), it’s not always easy to tell whether it’s a cyst or a tumor.

Treatment

If a cyst causes no symptoms, or only mild symptoms, it’s usually okay to wait and see what happens. Most cysts go away on their own. Depending on the results of diagnostic examinations, it’s sometimes a good idea to go for regular check-ups (every month or every few months) so the doctor can keep an eye on the cyst. If the cyst is painful, painkillers such as ibuprofen or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help.

If the cysts change over time or don’t get smaller and if the symptoms don’t go away, laparoscopy is an option. This procedure involves inserting thin instruments into the abdomen (tummy) through small cuts in the tummy wall. Doctors can then take a closer look at the cysts and remove them if necessary. But new cysts may develop after others have been removed.

In rare cases doctors suggest removing an ovary, or even both ovaries – for instance, if they think it could be cancer or that it will be difficult to cut the cysts out of the ovary tissue. Removing both ovaries can have a great impact on women’s lives, particularly women of childbearing age, because the operation immediately leads to menopause. The sudden drop in hormones can cause symptoms such as hot flashes, dizziness, headaches and nausea. And women can no longer become pregnant after menopause. Because of this, at least one ovary is kept, if possible – especially in women who wish to have (more) children.

Some doctors recommend treating ovarian cysts with the birth control pill. But the pill doesn’t help in the treatment of functional cysts. Although it reduces the amount of hormones produced in the ovaries and prevents ovulation, studies have shown that this doesn’t make the cysts go away any faster.

Further information

When people are ill or need medical advice, they usually go to see their family doctor first. Read about how to find the right doctor, how to prepare for the appointment and what to remember.

What Risks Are Associated with a Ruptured Ovarian Cyst?

Having a cyst (a fluid-filled bump) on the ovaries is common and often is
without symptoms. Ovarian cysts are typically harmless, says

Dana Baras, M.D., M.P.H., an obstetrician/gynecologist at

Howard County General Hospital. But in some cases, an

ovarian cyst

can rupture (break open).

“A ruptured ovarian cyst isn’t automatically a life-threatening condition,”
says Baras. “In the majority of cases, the cyst fluid will dissipate and
it’ll heal without any intervention. However, there are some instances in
which a ruptured ovarian cyst becomes an emergency.”

When might an ovarian cyst need medical attention?

Multiple factors can influence whether a ruptured ovarian cyst becomes
problematic. Those include:

Infected Ovarian Cyst

Cysts can develop in response to a pelvic infection (called an abscess). If
an infected cyst ruptures, it can trigger

sepsis, a life-threatening immune response to harmful bacteria. Women with
infected cysts are treated with antibiotics and sometimes require
hospitalization for surgical drainage of the cyst.

Women with

pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

— an infection of the pelvic area generally resulting from gonorrhea or
chlamydia — are more likely to develop infected ovarian cysts. The bacteria
from these

sexually transmitted diseases

travel from the cervix into the uterus and may cause cysts to form. These
cysts are filled with bacteria that can lead to sepsis if they rupture.

Ovarian Torsion

Blood flow to the ovary is reduced or cut off when the weight of a cyst
causes the ovary to turn over on itself one or more times (called ovarian
torsion). If this happens, surgery is necessary to restore blood flow.

Pregnancy and Ovarian Cysts

It’s normal to have an ovarian cyst during your first trimester of
pregnancy. This type of cyst, called a corpus luteum, produces hormones
that initially help sustain the pregnancy. The cyst usually goes away by
the second trimester.

Ectopic pregnancy

is when a fertilized egg implants in an area outside of the uterus. Usually
this happens in the fallopian tubes, but on rare occasions, it implants on
an ovary. Medication or surgery is necessary to remove a cyst caused by
ectopic pregnancy — the cyst gets worse as the pregnancy grows in an area
that can’t sustain it.

Endometriosis and Ovarian Cysts

Endometriosis is a condition in which tissue that lines the uterus grows
outside of it. When endometrial tissue forms on the ovaries, it can produce
a type of cyst called an endometrioma. This cyst can fill with blood and
grow large. Endometriosis can affect fertility, increase

ovarian cancer

risk and cause internal bleeding if a cyst ruptures. Cysts caused by

endometriosis

may require surgery.

How can you tell if an ovarian cyst has burst?

“Not all women feel a ruptured ovarian cyst,” says Baras. “Most do feel
pain at the time of rupture and then some discomfort for a few days
afterward. Usually, the symptoms can be relieved with over-the-counter
medications.”

Symptoms you may experience if you have a ruptured ovarian cyst include:

  • Sudden, sharp pain in the lower belly or back
  • Vaginal spotting or bleeding
  • Abdominal bloating

Seek emergency medical attention if you also have abdominal pain with:

  • Severe nausea and vomiting (may indicate ovarian torsion)
  • Fever (may indicate infection)
  • Heavy vaginal bleeding
  • Faintness or dizziness

Treatments for ruptured ovarian cysts include watchful waiting, medications
and surgery. “When someone comes in with pain caused by an ovarian cyst, we
first assess if it’s pregnancy-related or infected,” says Baras. “An
ultrasound helps us evaluate the quality of the cyst and whether it’s
ruptured. Treatment depends on the specific diagnosis.”

Spotting the Warning Signs of Ovarian Cysts: Ulas Bozdogan, MD: Endometriosis Specialist

An ovarian cyst is a pouch that develops on your ovary, usually filled with fluid. Most ovarian cysts are benign, but they can cause problems if they grow too large or break open. 

Here at the Advanced Endometriosis Center, we provide personalized care to each of our patients. Led by Dr. Ulas Bozdogan and our teams in New York City and Hackensack, New Jersey, we’re here to help you find relief and treatment for ovarian cysts, along with all your other gynecological and obstetrical needs.

Many women develop ovarian cysts during ovulation as part of their normal menstrual period. Sometimes these growths, called functional cysts, can cause pain, but most disappear in a few weeks. Other types of ovarian cysts can develop if you have endometriosis, while yet another type is congenital — something you’re born with. 

Treatment differs depending on your individual situation.  

Do all ovarian cysts cause symptoms? 

Sometimes you have no symptoms when you have an ovarian cyst. That’s an important reason to keep your regularly scheduled OB/GYN appointment – your doctor may discover a cyst during the exam. 

Common symptoms of ovarian cysts 

The following are some of the most common symptoms of ovarian cysts:

Bloating 

Do you constantly have a full feeling, even when you haven’t eaten much? If your abdomen feels consistently heavy and bloated, you could have a cyst on your ovary. 

Pain during intercourse

Pain during sexual intercourse can be a sign of a few different medical conditions. Don’t let painful intercourse affect your relationship. Dr. Bozdogan determines if your pain is due to an ovarian cyst or another cause. 

Pelvic pain during menstruation 

Many women have cramps during their periods, which is normal. However, you want to rule out an ovarian cyst if you’re having an unusual amount of pain when you’re menstruating. 

Pain on the side of your abdomen

Pain on one side of the abdomen can be a sign of appendicitis or another condition, in addition to an ovarian cyst. When a cyst grows very large, it can become painful. 

Changes in elimination 

Changes in urinary or bowel habits can signal an ovarian cyst but can also signal serious medical issues, so be sure to get this symptom checked out. 

Symptoms signaling an ovarian cyst emergency 

Opting for regular gynecological treatment at the Advanced Endometriosis Center can help avoid an emergency caused by an undiagnosed ovarian cyst. 

Sometimes ovarian cysts may break open.  The cyst may twist the ovary, which can stop blood flow and lead to the rupture — in that case, you need emergency treatment. Dr. Bozdogan makes sure to leave time in his schedule for walk-in emergencies. 

The following are common symptoms of a ruptured ovarian cyst: 

 

  • Fever, vomiting, and pelvic pain 

 

  • Sudden, sharp pelvic pain 
  • Feeling lightheaded, dizzy, or weakness
  • Heavy bleeding
  • Rapid breathing

Some of the symptoms of ovarian cysts are similar to those you might have with other medical conditions. Receiving a correct diagnosis is critical for receiving the proper treatment in a timely manner. Dr. Bozdogan has treated hundreds of patients with ovarian cysts. 

Not all cases are the same, and treatment depends on the type of cyst, whether it’s growing, and other factors. You’re in safe hands — if Dr. Bozdogan finds a cyst, he knows whether it’s a ‘watch and wait’ or a ‘treat right now’ situation. 

If you’re in the New York City or Hackensack, New Jersey, area, call the Advanced Endometriosis Center or request an appointment online to receive the expert, specialized gynecological care you deserve today.

Functional Ovarian Cysts | Michigan Medicine

Topic Overview

What is a functional ovarian cyst?

A functional ovarian cyst is a sac that forms on the surface of a woman’s ovary during or after ovulation. It holds a maturing egg. Usually the sac goes away after the egg is released. If an egg is not released, or if the sac closes up after the egg is released, the sac can swell up with fluid.

Functional ovarian cysts are different from ovarian growths caused by other problems, such as cancer. Most of these cysts are harmless. They do not cause symptoms, and they go away without treatment. But if a cyst becomes large, it can twist, rupture, or bleed and can be very painful.

What causes functional ovarian cysts?

A functional ovarian cyst forms because of slight changes in the way the ovary makes or releases an egg. There are two types of these cysts:

  • A follicular cyst occurs when a sac on the ovary does not release an egg, and the sac swells up with fluid.
  • A luteal cyst occurs when the sac releases an egg and then reseals and fills with fluid.

What are the symptoms?

Most functional ovarian cysts do not cause symptoms. The larger the cyst is, the more likely it is to cause symptoms. Symptoms can include:

  • Pain or aching in your lower belly, usually when you are in the middle of your menstrual cycle.
  • A delay in the start of your menstrual period.
  • Vaginal bleeding when you are not having your period.

Some functional ovarian cysts can twist or break open (rupture) and bleed. Symptoms include:

  • Sudden, severe pain, often with nausea and vomiting.
  • Pain during or after sex.

If you have these symptoms, call your doctor right away. Some ruptured cysts bleed enough that treatment is needed to prevent heavy blood loss.

How are functional ovarian cysts diagnosed?

Your doctor may find an ovarian cyst during a pelvic exam. He or she may then use a pelvic ultrasound to make sure that the cyst is filled with fluid.

If you see your doctor for pelvic pain or bleeding, you’ll be checked for problems that may be causing your symptoms. Your doctor will ask you about your symptoms and menstrual periods. He or she will do a pelvic exam and may do a pelvic ultrasound.

How are they treated?

Most functional ovarian cysts go away without treatment. Your doctor may suggest using heat and medicine to relieve minor pain.

If a large cyst bleeds or causes severe pain, you can have surgery to remove it.

Your doctor may suggest that you take birth control pills, which stop ovulation. This may prevent new cysts from forming.

Cause

A functional ovarian cyst is caused by one or more slight changes in the way the ovary produces or releases an egg. During the normal monthly menstrual cycle, one of two types of functional cysts may develop:

  • A follicular, or simple, cyst occurs when the small egg sac (follicle) on the ovary does not release an egg, and it swells with fluid either inside the ovary or on its surface.
  • A luteal, or corpus luteum, cyst occurs when the remains of the egg follicle do not dissolve and continue to swell with fluid. This is the most common type of ovarian cyst.

The development of functional cysts is also common during treatment with clomiphene (such as Clomid or Serophene) for infertility. These cysts go away after treatment is completed, though this can take several months. They do not appear to endanger pregnancy.

Other ovarian growths

There are other types of ovarian cysts and growths caused by other conditions. An ovarian growth can be a noncancerous (benign) cystic tumor or related to endometriosis or cancer. In some cases, what seems to be an ovarian mass is actually growing on nearby pelvic tissue. This is why it’s important for you to have pelvic exams and for your doctor to carefully diagnose any cysts or growths felt on your ovaries.

Symptoms

Functional ovarian cysts usually are harmless, do not cause symptoms, and go away without treatment. Ovarian cysts are often discovered during a pelvic exam.

The larger the ovarian cyst is, the more likely it is to cause symptoms. When symptoms occur, they may include:

  • Frequent urination, if a large cyst is pressing against your bladder.
  • Abdominal (belly) pain.
  • Menstrual period changes.
  • Weight gain.

More severe symptoms may develop if the cyst has twisted (torsion), is bleeding, or has ruptured. See your doctor immediately if you have any of the following pain, shock, or bleeding symptoms:

  • Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Sudden faintness, dizziness, and weakness
  • Vaginal bleeding or symptoms of shock from heavy bleeding (hemorrhage)

There are many other conditions that cause signs or symptoms of a functional ovarian cyst. This is why it’s important to have any unusual pelvic symptoms checked and to have a pelvic exam.

What Happens

Most functional ovarian cysts cause no symptoms and go away without treatment in 1 to 2 months or after 1 to 2 menstrual periods. Some cysts grow as large as 4 in. (10.2 cm) in diameter before they shrink or rupture. A rupturing functional cyst can cause some temporary discomfort or pain.

What to think about

Functional ovarian cysts do not cause ovarian cancer. But your doctor must rule out other possible types of ovarian cysts or growths before diagnosing a functional cyst. This may involve another pelvic exam, a pelvic ultrasound, or possibly a laparoscopy procedure to closely examine the cyst and its ovary.

Cysts after menopause. After menopause, ovarian cancer risk increases. This is why all postmenopausal ovarian growths are carefully checked for signs of cancer. Some doctors will recommend removing the ovaries (oophorectomy) when any kind of cyst develops on an ovary after menopause. But the trend in medicine seems to be moving away from surgery for small and simple cysts in postmenopausal women. In the 5 years after menopause, some women will still have functional ovarian cysts now and then. Some postmenopausal ovarian cysts, called unilocular cysts, which have thin walls and one compartment, are rarely linked to cancer.

What Increases Your Risk

A functional ovarian cyst sometimes develops near the end of the menstrual cycle, when an egg follicle fills up with fluid. Factors that may increase your risk for developing a functional ovarian cyst include:

  • A history of a previous functional ovarian cyst.
  • Current use of clomiphene, such as Clomid or Serophene, to start ovulation.
  • Use of low-dose progestin-only contraception (such as some implants, pills, and IUDs).

When should you call your doctor?

Call your doctor immediately if you have:

  • Sudden, severe pelvic pain with nausea or vomiting.
  • Severe vaginal bleeding.
  • Sudden faintness or weakness.
  • Sudden dizziness with abdominal discomfort that persists for 2 hours or longer.

Call your doctor for an appointment if:

  • Pain interferes with your daily activities.
  • Your periods have changed from relatively pain-free to painful during the past 3 to 6 months.
  • Your periods have changed from regular to infrequent during the past 3 to 6 months and you are not nearing menopause.
  • You have pain during sexual intercourse.

For more information about other symptoms that concern you, see:

Watchful waiting

Most functional ovarian cysts are harmless, do not cause symptoms, and go away without treatment. Watchful waiting is usually an appropriate option if you are diagnosed with a functional ovarian cyst.

Who to see

Ovarian cysts can be diagnosed and treated by any of the following health professionals:

You may need to see a gynecologist for further testing or treatment.

Exams and Tests

If you see your doctor for pelvic pain or bleeding, you’ll be checked for a number of conditions, including an ovarian cyst, that may be causing your symptoms. Your evaluation will include a pelvic exam, a history of your symptoms and menstrual periods, a family history, and a transvaginal ultrasound (which uses a narrow wand placed in the vagina). See an image of ovarian cysts.

If your doctor discovers an ovarian cyst during a pelvic exam, a transvaginal or abdominal ultrasound can help show what kind of cyst it is.

When is further testing needed?

If an ultrasound shows that you have a fluid-filled functional ovarian cyst, and it isn’t causing you severe pain, your doctor will probably suggest a watchful waiting period. You can then have the cyst checked 1 to 2 months later to see whether it is changing in size. Most cysts go away in 1 to 2 months without treatment or after 1 or 2 menstrual periods.

Your doctor will recommend further testing or treatment if:

  • Initial ultrasound doesn’t clearly show what kind of cyst or growth is present, or both ovaries are affected.
  • You are not ovulating during your initial examination (because you are either a postmenopausal woman or a girl not yet menstruating). Without ovulation, a new functional cyst would be highly unlikely, so other possible conditions are explored.
  • You have moderate to severe pain or vaginal bleeding.
  • A diagnosed functional ovarian cyst does not get smaller or go away as expected.
  • You have risk factors for ovarian cancer, such as a strong family history of the disease or gene changes. The higher your risk of ovarian cancer, the more likely aggressive testing will be recommended to find out the cause of an ovarian mass.

Further testing

  • Laparoscopy allows a surgeon to look at the ovary through a lighted viewing instrument and take a sample of the growth (biopsy). After testing the sample, the surgeon can decide whether to surgically remove the cyst (cystectomy) or the entire ovary (oophorectomy). If there is concern about ovarian cancer, a laparotomy (instead of a laparoscopy) may be done. Then, if cancer is found, the surgeon can safely remove the ovaries.
  • CA-125 (cancer antigen) test is only recommended for women with a very high risk for ovarian cancer. These are women with a significant family history of the disease. This blood test result is combined with ultrasound results, because it doesn’t give a highly dependable diagnosis on its own.

Treatment Overview

Most functional ovarian cysts are harmless, do not cause symptoms, and go away without treatment. When treatment is needed, treatment goals include:

  • Relieving symptoms of pelvic pain or pressure.
  • Preventing more cysts from developing by preventing ovulation (if recurrence is a problem). Treatment with birth control pills prevents ovulation.

Initial treatment

Because functional ovarian cysts typically go away without treatment, your doctor may recommend a period of observation without treatment (watchful waiting) to see whether your ovarian cyst gets better or goes away on its own. Your doctor will do another pelvic exam in 1 to 2 months to see whether the cyst has changed in size.

If an ovarian cyst doesn’t go away, your doctor may want to do more tests to be sure that your symptoms are not caused by another type of ovarian growth. Home treatment with heat and pain-relieving medicine can often provide relief of bothersome symptoms during this time.

Ongoing treatment

A functional ovarian cyst that doesn’t go away, has an unusual appearance on ultrasound, or causes symptoms may require treatment with either medicines or surgery.

  • Your doctor may suggest that you try birth control pills for several months to stop more cysts from forming.
  • Surgical removal of the cyst (cystectomy) through a small incision (laparoscopy) may be needed if a painful functional ovarian cyst does not go away despite medical treatment. If a cyst has an unusual appearance on ultrasound or if you have other risk factors for ovarian cancer, your doctor may recommend surgical removal through a larger abdominal incision (laparotomy) instead of by using laparoscopy.

What to think about

Cysts after menopause. After menopause, ovarian cancer risk increases. This is why all postmenopausal ovarian growths are carefully checked for signs of cancer. Some doctors will recommend removing the ovaries (oophorectomy) when any kind of cyst develops on an ovary after menopause. But the trend in medicine seems to be moving away from surgery for small and simple cysts in postmenopausal women. In the 5 years after menopause, some women will still have functional ovarian cysts now and then. Some postmenopausal ovarian cysts, called unilocular cysts, which have thin walls and one compartment, are rarely linked to cancer.

Prevention

Functional ovarian cysts cannot be prevented if you are ovulating. Anything that makes ovulation less frequent reduces your chance of developing an ovarian cyst. Birth control pills, pregnancy, and breastfeeding in the first 6 months following birth prevent ovulation. Ovulation ceases when menopause is complete.

Home Treatment

Home treatment can help relieve the discomfort of functional ovarian cysts.

  • Use heat, such as a hot water bottle, heating pad, or warm bath, to relax tense muscles and relieve cramping. Be careful not to burn yourself.
  • Use pain relievers you can get over-the-counter. Acetaminophen (such as Tylenol), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (such as Advil or Aleve), and aspirin (such as Bayer) are all pain medicines you can buy without a prescription.
  • Herbal teas, such as chamomile, mint, raspberry, and blackberry, may help soothe tense muscles and anxious moods.
  • Empty your bladder as soon as you have the urge to urinate.
  • Avoid constipation. Constipation does not cause or treat ovarian cysts but may further increase your pelvic discomfort. For more information, see the topic Constipation, Age 12 and Older.

Medications

Treatment with medicine may be useful if you have recurrent, painful functional ovarian cysts.

Birth control pills (oral contraceptives) are used to prevent ovulation. Without ovulation, the chance that ovarian cysts will form is reduced and your symptoms may be relieved. Although birth control pills do not make ovarian cysts go away any faster, their use may prevent new cysts from forming.

What to think about

Birth control pills have not been shown to get rid of or shrink ovarian cysts that have already formed. Some studies show that the cysts shrink at the same rate with or without birth control pill use.footnote 1

Surgery

Surgery may be needed to confirm the diagnosis of an ovarian cyst or to evaluate ovarian growths when ovarian cancer is possible. Surgery does not prevent ovarian cysts from coming back unless the ovaries are removed (oophorectomy).

Surgery may be needed in the following situations:

  • An ovary and cyst have twisted (torsion) or ruptured.
  • You have severe pain or bleeding.
  • A cyst has not gone away after a period of observation (watchful waiting).
  • Ovarian cancer is suspected based on your risk factors for ovarian cancer or an unusual appearance of the cyst on ultrasound.

Goals of surgical treatment for an ovarian cyst are to:

  • Confirm a diagnosis of an ovarian cyst.
  • Rule out the diagnosis of ovarian cancer.
  • Remove cysts that are causing pain.
  • Relieve the pressure that cysts may cause on the bladder and other pelvic organs.

Surgery choices

Surgery for an ovarian cyst or growth can be done through a small incision using laparoscopy or through a larger incision (laparotomy). The cut is made in your stomach area.

Laparoscopy may be used to confirm the diagnosis of an ovarian cyst in a woman of childbearing age. Persistent, large, or painful ovarian cysts that have no signs of cancer risk can be removed during laparoscopy, leaving the ovary intact.

Laparotomy is used when an ovarian cyst is very large, ovarian cancer is suspected, or other problems with the abdominal or pelvic organs are present. If cancer is found, the larger incision lets the surgeon closely examine the entire area and more safely remove all cancerous growth.

What to think about

For the most part, functional ovarian cysts stop forming when menopause occurs (in rare cases, a functional ovarian cyst will occur or persist within 5 years of menopause). Relieving symptoms with medicine until menopause is complete may be an option.

Some women prefer the risks of surgery to symptoms that reduce their quality of life. If your doctor recommends surgery, ask whether laparoscopic surgery or laparotomy would be the best choice for you.

Unless the ovaries are removed, surgery does not prevent the formation of new functional ovarian cysts.

Other Treatment

No other treatment for functional ovarian cysts is available at this time.

References

Citations

  1. Grimes DA, et al. (2011). Oral contraceptives for functional ovarian cysts. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (9).

Credits

Current as of:
July 17, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
Sarah Marshall MD – Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD – Family Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD – Family Medicine
Kirtly Jones MD – Obstetrics and Gynecology

Ovarian Cysts | HemAware

Few medical conditions mirror the pain of a burst appendix. But women with a ruptured ovarian cyst say it comes close. “I couldn’t walk or put pressure on my right leg because the pain was so excruciating,” says Sarah Fey, 38, who has type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD). “I thought maybe I was having appendicitis,” says the project coordinator from Gilbert, Arizona.

Therein lies the problem—confusion about ovarian cysts and their complications. Women with bleeding disorders need to know if they’re susceptible to ovarian cysts and how to manage them.

Ovulation obstacles

Every month, the body prepares for pregnancy by forming a follicle, a fluid-filled sac, around the egg. Normally, the follicle breaks open, releases the egg, then dissolves. However, if the follicle fails to open or dissolve, a cyst forms. As fluid builds up in it, this follicular, or functional, cyst grows. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), ovarian cysts are common during the childbearing years. Most go away on their own without issue.

But the situation is different for women with bleeding disorders, says Andra H. James, MD, ob/gyn at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville. That’s because these women can bleed even during normal ovulation, when the egg is released from the follicular sac. And the bleeding can be sig­nificant. “They’re at risk for hemorrhagic ovarian cysts,” James says. “They can bleed into the sac itself and into the abdomen.”

An emergency room visit six years ago led to the discovery that Brooke Connell, 31, was prone to ovarian cysts. “I had a hemorrhagic ovarian cyst that ruptured,” says the PR/marketing specialist from Kansas City, Missouri. “When they did the ultrasound, they could see the blood around it.”

Connell, who has type III VWD, was then diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome, the inability to produce mature follicles. To get pregnant, she’s undergone treatments for infertility. “During several cycles we’ve had to stop the medication that stimulates the ovaries to produce more eggs because I’ve had large cysts on one or both ovaries,” says Connell.

Ovarian cysts also occur in women with other bleeding disorders, such as hemophilia, rare factor deficiencies and platelet defects.

Subtle and serious symptoms

Mild ovarian cyst symptoms can be easily dismissed. For instance, stomach pain, bloating and a dull ache in the back can be mistaken for premenstrual syndrome. Fey experienced a cluster of such symptoms in 2013. Pressure in her abdomen was one sign. “I felt full even at times when I was hungry,” she says. Needing to urinate at night was chalked up to aging. But heavier menstrual bleeding sent her to her doctor. “An ultrasound last fall revealed cysts on both sides,” she says.

The larger the cyst, the more pain a woman will feel, says James. When they’re about 5–10 cm (2–4 inches), they can begin to cause problems. Connell’s was 6 cm (2 1/3 inches) when it ruptured. Ruptured cysts can cause internal bleeding, sometimes with severe pain. “Very large cysts can cause the ovary to twist on itself, but that’s in extreme cases,” James says. This torsion of the ovary can cut off blood supply, resulting in permanent infertility.

Treatment factors

Treatment for ovarian cysts depends on several factors. If they’re small and asymptomatic, they may resolve on their own within three months or so. Although Fey currently has cysts on both ovaries, she’s not anxious. “They’re non-fluid-filled, so they are not a concern at this time,” she says.

Sometimes conservative measures are called for when a woman has hemorrhagic ovarian cysts. “We’ll try to correct the underlying bleeding problem and watch the woman very carefully in the hospital until the symptoms improve,” says James. But other times surgery is needed to remove a cyst or damaged ovary, especially if there’s acute pain and severe bleeding.

Preventive measures

Contraceptives can prevent ovarian cyst formation by inhibiting ovulation. The progesterone-estrogen combination pills that contain the same daily dose (monophasic), Depo-Provera injections and subdermal implants containing the hormone etonogestrel are all effective. “Only these methods are going to protect a woman from hemorrhagic ovarian cysts,” says James. Progestin-only pills and the levonorgestrel-containing IUD, often prescribed for women with bleeding disorders who have menorrhagia (heavy menstrual bleeding), however, do not work, she adds.

Expanding education

Chances are, most women are not familiar with ovarian cysts. “My mom has mild VWD, but she never had cysts,” Connell says. Much of her information and support have come from her hemophilia treatment center (HTC). “I am in contact with my nurse at the HTC a lot, so if I ever have trouble, I just call her,” she says. “She’s been a blessing when it comes to communicating with my other doctors about the plan for me or when I should dose.”

Healthcare providers also need education about the risk of hemorrhagic ovarian cysts in women with bleeding disorders. “We’ve educated around this over the last decade, so more of them know about it,” James says. Patients can take the lead, too. “Even as a teenager, women need to begin this discussion.”

90,000 I have an ovarian cyst – should I worry?

Many women develop ovarian cysts at some point in their lives. Most of these cysts are detected at the consultation of a gynecologist during periodic check-ups, since they do not cause symptoms and usually go away without the need for treatment. But not all ovarian cysts are created equal, and in some cases they can cause complications.

An ovarian cyst is a pocket or “sac” of liquid material that develops inside or on the surface of the ovary.Most disappear spontaneously within a few months.

But not all ovarian cysts are the same and not all have the same evolution. Therefore, it is important to find them, analyze them, make an accurate diagnosis and, if necessary, switch to the most appropriate treatment in order to avoid complications in the future.

Some cysts, especially larger ones, can cause complications. ALSO Cysts may rupture (causing internal bleeding and severe pain) or produce ovarian torsion (disruption of blood supply and causing damage or death to ovarian tissue).In some cases, it is necessary to undergo a gynecological operation to allow laparoscopic removal of the ovarian cyst.

MOST COMMON SYMPTOMS

To avoid complications, it is convenient not to postpone periodic gynecological examinations and to make an appointment with a doctor if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • Irregular menstrual cycles
  • Feeling of pressure in the pelvis
  • Feeling of bloating in the abdomen
  • Need to urinate frequently
  • Pain during menstruation
  • Pain during sex

HOW IS OVARIAN CYST DIAGNOSED?

At the consultation, during a gynecological examination, we can suspect and detect the presence of cysts in the ovaries.

If we find them in the review, regardless of whether you have symptoms, we will conduct additional tests that will allow us to clarify the diagnosis, estimate the size, type of cyst and the most convenient treatment.

  • With a gynecological ultrasound, Preferably transvaginally, we will confirm the presence of a cyst, its size, location and composition.
  • With blood test Depending on the characteristics of the cyst and the patient, we will analyze, only if necessary, the levels of certain tumor markers.
  • With MRI , if necessary, we will solve diagnostic doubts.

Although most ovarian cysts are benign and the diagnosis is straightforward, we must not trust ourselves.

En Women’s CD We have the necessary experience and specialization to make a very accurate diagnosis, which allows us to choose the best treatment and rule out or confirm ovarian cancer, because early diagnosis is important in this case.

Clinical Hospital | Cyst

Cyst – retention formation, which is formed as a result of the accumulation of secretions inside this formation (that is, not due to true growth).Cysts mainly arise against the background of hormonal changes and against the background of a chronic inflammatory process in the pelvic area.

  1. In the first place in terms of frequency there are follicular cysts , which are formed against the background of inflammation. These are, as a rule, unilateral formations that arise at the site of a cystic-atretic follicle, single-chamber, thin-walled. This cyst accumulates fluid containing estrogens, which are produced by the inner lining of the capsule.The liquid is yellow, transparent. Small cysts are asymptomatic and are detected by chance during gynecological examination, ultrasound examination, or when complications arise. Sometimes a slight dull pain in the lower abdomen may bother you. Often, the only manifestation of a follicular ovarian cyst is a violation of the menstrual cycle: hyperpolymenorrhea (profuse and prolonged periods) or uterine bleeding. In some cases, complications such as torsion of the cyst leg, rupture of the cyst capsule are possible, and then a picture of an “acute abdomen” develops.
  2. In second place – corpus luteum cysts . Their structure is similar to the structure of the corpus luteum, which is formed in the second phase of the menstrual cycle: they are one-sided, the capsule is thicker, formed at reproductive age (16-40 years). The cysts of the corpus luteum often have a rupture, hemorrhage, and often they undergo a reverse development. Therefore, women with corpus luteum cysts can also be observed for 2 months and viewed bimanually. Patients usually do not present complaints, and the cyst is discovered by chance during a gynecological examination.With a concomitant inflammatory process in the uterine appendages, pain in the lower abdomen may disturb. The development of complications is possible – hemorrhages in the cyst cavity. The corpus luteum cyst is palpable on the side of the uterus, has a smooth surface and elastic consistency. Often occurs during pregnancy, and after its interruption, it dissolves on its own.
  3. Paraovarian cyst – is formed between the leaves of the broad ligaments that extend from the lateral surface of the uterus. That is, such a cyst is located not in the ovary, but nearby.As a rule, they are formed against the background of chronic adnexitis. Such cysts produce a secret and the capsule is stretched, hormones are not produced. They have a very thin wall, so it is difficult to peel it off.

Tactics of reference

If after 2 months the cyst does not disappear, then surgical intervention is necessary, which is explained primarily by cancer vigilance. When formed on the ovary, it is much higher than with other tumor processes of the female genital area, for example, uterine myoma.

The task of general gynecologists is to prevent the development of the oncological process at any cost, and this task has been greatly facilitated today by the advent of ultrasound and laparoscopy. If a cyst is clearly detected, and not a tumor, then the operation is limited to cystectomy – removal of the cyst with a capsule (to prevent recurrence). Laparoscopy makes it possible to remove the cyst without damaging the healthy tissue of the ovary, with minimal intervention to remove the paraovarian cyst. With the development of complications, surgery is also indicated.

Follicular cyst of the left ovary: PHOTOS and successful TREATMENT

Authors of the article, Candidate of Medical Sciences O.Yu. Ermolaev
Experienced gynecologist, physiotherapist-balneologist E.K. Ermolaeva

Here we are cured of a follicular ovarian cyst, and not trying one drug after another!

90,098 From reviews of Patients 90,100

The follicular cyst of the left ovary is a benign ovarian cyst formed from the dominant (largest) follicle when it reaches 3.0 cm in diameter or more, in the absence of ovulation (rupture of the follicle and release of the egg).

Photo of a follicular cyst of the left ovary 8 cm in diameter on 3D ultrasound before treatment in our Clinic

Follicular cyst of the left ovary makes up 44% of all follicular ovarian cysts.

Follicular ovarian cyst occurs mainly in women of childbearing age, but can occur during the first 5 years of menopause.

Sometimes follicular cyst is detected in fetuses and newborns.

Follicular ovarian cyst never malignant (“does not turn into cancer”).

With regularly occurring follicular ovarian cysts, it is IMPORTANT to choose the RIGHT direction in treatment!

Everything you need to know about the right direction in the successful treatment of follicular cyst WITHOUT HORMONES, see HERE:

Treatment of follicular cysts by appointment by multichannel phone 8 (800) 500-52-74 (free call within Russia), or +7 (928) 022-05-32 (for foreign calls).

Treatment reviews

M.Kh., Nalchik

Follicular cyst developed every month. I was treated with duphaston, morning, twice sent for surgery, but I was getting worse and worse. And only you cured her for me with herbs and procedures.

A.I., Pyatigorsk

Gentle treatment without hormones, without escalating the situation with a detailed explanation. You are such a bright clinic. You want to be consulted and observed.

Causes of the follicular cyst of the left ovary

FOLLICULAR CYST of the left ovary arises from hormonal disturbances in the cerebral cortex, pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland and ovaries.

In some cases, the cause of the formation of a follicular ovarian cyst is dysfunction of the thyroid gland and adrenal glands.

PRIMARY in the genesis (development) of disorders, as a rule, is the DISORDER of the functions of the cerebral cortex – the highest center for the regulation of all body functions.

OBSERVATIONS OF PSYCHIATORS show that the appearance in a girl or a young woman of some important thought or feeling for her causes the activity of a certain part of the brain.

This dominant thought, often a heavy thought, to which the girl constantly returns, gnaws at her and disrupts the correct functioning of the hormonal centers of the brain.

Thus, the DOMINANT THOUGHT or feeling suppress the activity of other nerve centers, which leads to DISORDERS OF SLEEP, HORMONAL BACKGROUND, the occurrence of inadequate psychoemotional reactions and the FORMATION of follicular cyst of the ovary.In other words,

Observations of psychiatrists indicate the leading role of the psycho-emotional component in the development of the follicular cyst of the left ovary …

A period of emotional loading is needed at any age to zero out emotions: the accumulated excess of feelings is removed, and you can (must!) Enjoy the joy of existence …

It is important to complete on time, “close” this period of life and beautifully, for the benefit of the soul, brain and body, get out of it.

The reason for the formation of a follicular ovarian cyst in fetuses and newborns is believed to be intrauterine stimulation of the fetal ovaries by maternal estrogens (female sex hormones) and placental chorionic gonadotropin (hCG).

A number of authors believe that the reason for the formation of a follicular ovarian cyst in newborns and infants is a hormonal surge in the birth period.

The frequency of occurrence in the population of the follicular cyst, according to E.A. Bogdanova, 2000, averages 1: 2500 newborns.

Follicular ovarian cyst in the fetus, as a rule, is detected by ultrasound examination after the 26th week of pregnancy, more often at 34-38th weeks.

It is impossible to identify a follicular cyst by any other screening method, for example, when examining the blood of a pregnant woman in order to determine the risk of fetal malformations.

Photo of a follicular ovarian cyst in a fetus of 30 weeks (own observation)

The size of the ovarian follicular cyst varies (fluctuates) from 1 to 12 cm in diameter.

Follicular ovarian cyst in fetuses and newborns does not require surgical and therapeutic treatment in the absence of complications (ovarian torsion, ovarian apoplexy, hemorrhage into the cavity or cyst wall, cyst necrosis (death)), since it spontaneously (spontaneously) regresses (“disappears”) in 25 —50% of newborns within 1-1.5 months after birth.

The follicular cyst of the left ovary is a retention (DISAPPEARING) CYSTAL, i.e. a cyst that can resolve on its own, disappear with the normalization of the hormonal background.

Recurrent (REPEATING) follicular cyst of the left ovary is both a consequence and a cause of hormonal imbalance.

LONG-LASTING (more than two months) follicular cyst is called persistent.

Photo of persistent follicular ovarian cyst on 3D ultrasound before treatment in our Clinic

See all photos of ovarian follicular cyst

Look out for the superb photo quality that testifies to the expert class of ultrasound machines at the Spa Women’s Health Clinic.

You can find photos of the follicular ovarian cyst taken by our experienced doctors on many Russian and foreign websites and in textbooks.

Symptoms of the follicular cyst of the left ovary

  • A symptom of a follicular cyst of the left ovary is a FEELING OF HEAVY or bloating in the right groin.
  • A symptom of a follicular cyst of the left ovary is PAIN in the right INGUINE REGION, aggravated by fast walking, intercourse, physical exertion, a sharp change in body position (turns, somersaults, bends).
  • Discomfort, as a rule, occurs in the second phase of the menstrual cycle (AFTER DAY 14 from the onset of menstruation).
  • A symptom of a follicular cyst of the left ovary is LOW (below 36.8 ° C) BASAL temperature in the second phase of the menstrual cycle (after 14 days from the onset of menstruation). About the correct measurement of basal temperature in detail …
  • A symptom of a follicular ovarian cyst may be a scanty intermenstrual bleeding (“BLOOD”) in the period from 14 to 18 days from the onset of menstruation.In some cases, intermenstrual bleeding resembles menstruation, continues for 3-12 days and turns into menstruation according to the expected “planned” date.
  • A symptom of a follicular ovarian cyst is a delay in menstruation. DELAYED MENSTRUATION is associated with the predominant influence of estrogens (female sex hormones) against the background of relative or absolute progesterone deficiency. The duration of the delay in menstruation is unpredictable and depends on the severity of the hormonal imbalance.

Complications of the follicular cyst of the left ovary

  • OVARY TURNING. With a sharp change in body position (for example, when falling, during training sessions, sexual intercourse, etc.), regardless of the size of the follicular cyst, PARTIAL OVERTISING (180 °) and complete torsion (360 °, 720 °) of the ovary are possible. In this case, compression or torsion of the vessels and nerve fibers that feed and innervate the ovary occurs. Ovarian torsion is manifested by sudden, acute colicky pain in the corresponding groin or lower abdomen, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, weakness, cold sweat, a drop in blood pressure, and a feeling of fear.Often there is a slight increase in body temperature, paresis (cessation of activity) of the intestine in the form of stool retention. Pain when in a forced position on the side and at rest does not stop (does not subside).
    Twisting (partial torsion) of the ovary and COMPLETE Ovarian twisting with a follicular cyst, as a rule, occur with a medium-sized cyst (5-9 cm in diameter).
    When the ovary is twisted, they resort to emergency surgical treatment.

    The literature describes cases of intrauterine twisting of follicular ovarian cysts 4,5-6.0 cm in diameter and a case of ovarian apoplexy in a fetus of 33 weeks.

  • Rupture of cysts. The rupture of the follicular cyst of the left ovary is accompanied by a piercing (dagger) pain in the lower right abdomen, forcing to instantly assume a bent position. Nausea, vomiting, dizziness, weakness, cold sweat, and fainting are common. Body temperature, as a rule, remains normal.
  • INTERNAL BLEEDING.When the rupture of the follicular cyst of the left ovary is localized in the region of the vessel, sudden hemorrhage into the pelvic cavity is possible.
    A sudden hemorrhage in the ovary, accompanied by a violation of the integrity of its tissue and bleeding into the abdominal cavity and / or the pelvic cavity, is called ovarian APOPLEXIA.

    Depending on the amount of blood lost, the severity of bleeding symptoms can range from a feeling of lethargy, weakness to drowsiness, lethargy and shock.

    Intra-abdominal bleeding is manifested by pallor of the skin and mucous membranes, tachycardia (palpitations), hypotension (lowering blood pressure). Depending on the intensity of bleeding, the degree of blood loss, the state of the blood coagulation system and the subjective state (well-being) of the woman, conservative or surgical treatment is possible.

  • OVARIAN APOPLEXIA, as a rule, occurs with the rapid growth of the follicle / follicular cyst against the background of a provoking factor.A factor provoking ovarian apoplexy may be an unexpected change in the position of the body in space (fall, somersault, jump, etc.), sudden movement or shaking of the body, straining, intense sexual intercourse, etc.
    The risk of ovarian apoplexy is not directly related to the size of the follicle / follicular cyst.

    In these cases, very important factors were the confidence in the doctor against the background of the patients’ full awareness of the situation and strict adherence to all prescriptions (prescriptions).

  • DISRUPTION OF MENSTRUAL FUNCTION. Follicular cyst of the left ovary is a consequence and at the same time the cause of hormonal disorders.
    The cells of the follicular cyst membrane in excess for the body produce estrogens (female sex hormones). Estrogens promote proliferation (cell division), indirectly preventing the onset of secretion and desquamation phases (rejection of the mucous membrane of the uterine cavity, menstruation).
    The duration of the delay in menstruation in the presence of a follicular cyst of the left ovary is not predictable, but, as a rule, does not exceed 1 month.Delayed menstruation is painful (dysmenorrhea), profuse, with clots, often longer than usual (menorrhagia), in some cases turning into uterine bleeding (menometrorrhagia).

Treatment of follicular cyst of the left ovary

A follicular cyst of the left ovary of small size (up to 5-6 cm in diameter), based on our experience, usually resolves (disappears) on its own by the onset of menstruation, or during menstruation, or within 3 menstrual cycles (3 months).

CLEAR adherence to the principles of Evidence-Based Medicine.

A FEATURE of our Clinic is the analysis of each Patient at the CONSILIUM.

We ALWAYS, every day, offer the BEST examination and TREATMENT.

HELP even in the MOST difficult cases. Special PROCEDURE.

For women experiencing PHOBIA in relation to doctors. EMOTIONAL medicine.

Our Patients from the FIRST DAY of contacting us are already beginning to recover.

These facts attract the attention of hundreds of interested eyes to the treatment of follicular cysts in Pyatigorsk, and the treatment itself in our Clinic has become widely KNOWN in the Stavropol Territory and beyond.

Follicular cyst of the left ovary does not require treatment in the absence of complaints.

But in order to prevent relapses (reoccurrence), we consider it WISE to take vitamin and herbal medicines, selected individually, in order to regulate the function of the ovaries.

Follicular cyst up to 6 cm in diameter should be treated if there are complaints.

Follicular ovarian cyst more than 6 cm in diameter should be treated to avoid complications.

PERSISTENT follicular cyst that persists for more than two months and a RECURRENT follicular cyst (arising two or more times) are successfully cured by us WITHOUT HORMONES.

The Spa Clinic for Women’s Health uses a time-tested combination of natural medicines and physiotherapy.

There is EXPERIENCE, there are RESULTS, there are ways of ACHIEVING.

When treating a follicular cyst, we attach great importance to the formation of the correct way of thinking, emotions and the restoration of the harmony of brain activity.

Modulation of brain rhythms NORMALIZES the processes of excitation-inhibition in the cerebral cortex and subcortical structures (pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland), ELIMINATES ASYNCHRONOSIS (“biorhythm disease”) and has a general healing effect.

Exogenous (introduced from the outside) alpha rhythm RESTORES the correct alpha rhythm of the human brain, which calms the “nerves” and NORMALIZES the function of the ovaries, thyroid gland, adrenal glands.

OXYGEN with a concentration of 30% saturates the brain, organs and tissues of the body.Saturation of the body with oxygen is like a two-hour walk in the forest.

Oxygen therapy RELEASES psychological TENSION, normalizes hormones and metabolic processes in organs and tissues.

Modern physiotherapy procedures (electrophoresis and magnetophoresis by a running magnetic field of drugs, sonophoresis, SMT-phoresis, elective regulation of the menstrual cycle) carry out a PURPOSE delivery of drugs to the tissues of the ovaries, adrenal glands, pituitary gland (subcortical center of regulation of the functions of the ovaries and adrenal glands) and normalize hormones in them …

All physiotherapy procedures in the Spa Women’s Health Clinic are performed WITHOUT PAIN by professionally trained midwives of the Clinic.

CONTRAINDICATIONS to physiotherapy are general contraindications to physiotherapy: hypertension of the 3rd degree, oncological processes in the body, severe somatic (therapeutic) diseases in the stage of decompensation.

About each physiotherapy and contraindications to it in detail on our website in the corresponding paragraph of the article “Physiotherapy”.

Medicines from mineral and herbal raw materials according to the prescriptions of the doctors of the Resort Clinic of Women’s Health CLEAN the body, NORMALIZE the metabolism, STIMULATE the function of the ovaries and RESTORE the hormonal background, REGULAR and timely OVULATION, significantly the thickness and structure of the endometrial window during the period of “ovulation” …

The use of rectal suppositories (“suppositories”) and specialized physiotherapy allows the delivery of drugs through the lymphatic pathways targeted to the ovaries and fallopian tubes.About homeopathy in detail …

Our long-term experience of spa treatment shows that the use of medicines based on natural raw materials is an important physiological (corresponding to human physiology) component of SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT of follicular cyst of the left ovary.

Treatment of a follicular cyst without recurrence is quite possible.

THE COURSE OF TREATMENT OF Ovarian follicular cyst is 12 DAYS.

Treatment of a large follicular ovarian cyst (more than 6.0 cm) in order to avoid complications should be started from the MOMENT OF DETECTION, regardless of the day of the menstrual cycle.

TREATMENT of recurrent follicular cysts and persistent (existing more than two menstrual cycles) follicular cysts is preferable to start IMMEDIATELY AFTER the end of menstruation, i.e. from the first “dry” day.

EXAMINATION and treatment procedures are performed from the FIRST DAY of contacting our Clinic.

During the treatment of ovarian follicular cyst, sexual intercourse is NOT CONTRAINDICATED, however, the INTERCEPTANCE should not be intense in order to avoid soreness and torsion of the cyst.

There are no peculiarities and restrictions on nutrition with a follicular cyst.

Follicular ovarian cyst IS NOT A CONTRAINDICATION to the introduction of an intrauterine device (IUD, “spiral”).

During the treatment period and before the resolution (“disappearance”) of the ovarian follicular cyst, it is advisable to COMPLETELY EXCLUDE physical activity associated with training the abdominal muscles, hanging upside down, bending, squatting, jumping, somersaults and other exercises and actions accompanied by straining, abrupt or gradual a change in body position with raising the pelvis above shoulder level, etc.etc.

The Spa Women’s Health Clinic assists in the accommodation and accommodation of women, women with children and married couples during the examination and treatment.

For more information about living conditions and transfers from Mineralnye Vody airport or Pyatigorsk railway station, see the article “Accommodation”.

If you need to book accommodation, please agree on the date of arrival no later than 7 days.

Leading specialists in the treatment of follicular cysts in the North Caucasus

Ermolaeva Elvira Kadirovna
A well-known and recognized specialist in the North Caucasus in the field of non-surgical treatment of large, persistent and recurrent follicular ovarian cysts in girls, girls and women Good gynecologist, physiotherapist-balneologist, ultrasound doctor They turn to her for the treatment of follicular cysts WITHOUT OPERATION and without hormones

Ermolaev Oleg Yurievich
PhD, gynecologist-endocrinologist with 25 years of experience and successful experience in non-surgical treatment of retention and functional ovarian cysts, restoration of ovarian function and regular ovulation Able to see the relationships that elude others


THE INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION of the reputation and achievements of the Resort Women’s Health Clinic in the development and implementation of effective and safe treatment methods and the quality of the provided medical services IS AWARDING the Resort Women’s Health Clinic in Pyatigorsk with the International SIQS QUALITY CERTIFICATE in the field of medicine and healthcare.International Socratic Committee, Oxford, UK and Swiss Institute for Quality Standards, Zurich, SWITZERLAND.

The spa clinic of women’s health operates on paid services and in the voluntary health insurance system.

Each doctor of the Clinic has a long work experience, several specializations and is able to comprehensively assess the situation.

The spa clinic of women’s health works WITHOUT WEEKENDS and holidays:

Monday – Friday from 8.00 to 20.00,
Saturday, Sunday, holidays from 8.00 to 17.00.

Treatment of follicular ovarian cyst in Pyatigorsk by appointment by multi-channel phone 8 (800) 500-52-74 (free call within Russia), or +7 (928) 022-05-32, or [email protected]

We are at FULL ORDER for you if you have any doubts or wishes.

90,000 Gynecology: Ovarian apoplexy – diagnosis and treatment in St. Petersburg, price

Apoplexy is a spontaneous rupture of the ovary (follicle wall), most often occurring in the middle or in the second phase of the menstrual cycle (i.e.i.e. at the time of ovulation or at the stage of vascularization of the corpus luteum), with involvement in the rupture of the vessel.

This may be accompanied by bleeding into the abdominal cavity (a hematoma forms in the ovary, which causes sharp pains due to an increase in intraovarial pressure, then tissue rupture occurs), which is dangerous for a woman’s life.

Types of apoplexy

  • Painful form, which is characterized by pain syndrome, nausea, fever.

  • Anemic form, in which the leading symptom is internal bleeding.

Causes of ovarian apoplexy

  • neuroendocrine disorders,
  • inflammatory diseases of the uterine appendages,
  • genital anomalies,
  • abdominal injury,
  • physical stress,
  • intercourse,
  • neuropsychic stress,
  • ovarian cystic changes,
  • persistence of the corpus luteum (long-term existence).

Clinical symptoms

  • sudden pain in the lower abdomen and lower back, mainly on one side, which radiates to the anus,

  • tension of the abdominal muscles in the lower sections,

  • weakness, nausea, vomiting, cold sweat,

  • signs of growing anemia (anemia): heart palpitations, pallor,

  • symptoms of hemorrhagic (due to intra-abdominal bleeding) shock.

The leading symptom is acute pain, aggravating in the lower abdomen, and increasing symptoms of intra-abdominal bleeding with an undisturbed menstrual cycle.

Diagnosis of ovarian apoplexy

The diagnosis is made on the basis of complaints, history and examination.

  • On examination, the following are determined: pallor of the skin, tachycardia

  • Pelvic ultrasound is the method of choice in the diagnosis of apoplexy.The presence of a liquid inclusion, a heterogeneous structure (corpus luteum) is characteristic. The fluid in the small pelvis is determined.

The diagnosis can be difficult, since similar phenomena are observed in a disturbed ectopic pregnancy., Acute appendicitis, torsion of the ovarian cyst leg, acute pancreatitis, renal colic

Treatment of ovarian apoplexy

Urgent hospitalization. In the absence of severe bleeding and suspicion of an ectopic pregnancy, conservative tactics are possible (rest, cold on the lower abdomen, medications).With the growing phenomena of internal bleeding, if it is impossible to exclude an ectopic pregnancy, surgery is indicated. Currently, laparoscopy is used to coagulate the vessel and suture the ovary.
90,000 What causes ovarian cyst bleeding?

The causes of a bleeding ovarian cyst depend on the type of cyst that develops on the ovary of a woman of childbearing age. Cysts are small fluid-filled sacs that can form in many areas of the body.Some ovarian cysts grow in size and may rupture, causing vaginal bleeding. Pelvic pain and bleeding between periods are abnormal signs suggesting an ovarian cyst and should be seen by a doctor.

Symptoms of an abnormal ovarian cyst include pain on one or both sides of the abdomen. When an ovarian cyst forms, most women experience severe pain and cramps in the pelvic area. Difficulty or pain when urinating and during intercourse is also a sign of an ovarian cyst.The menstrual cycle may become irregular, or the woman may experience spotty bleeding between periods. A bleeding ovarian cyst will cause heavier blood flow than a normal menstrual cycle.

Normal ovarian cysts form every month as part of a woman’s menstrual cycle. The egg develops inside the follicle that protects the egg while the uterus prepares to receive the egg. After the egg is removed from the follicle, the follicle will dissolve normally.In some cases, the egg is not released, but the follicle remains, forming a cyst on the ovary. These cysts are usually not painful and are called functional ovarian cysts.

Follicular cysts can sometimes grow to a large size, causing the cyst to rupture and bleed. A bleeding ovarian cyst is diagnosed with an ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scan. Some ovarian cysts don’t require any treatment other than over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen, or even just a warm compress on your stomach.Sometimes, a large ovarian cyst may need to be removed. To shorten the healing time, the surgeon will remove the cyst by performing a minimally invasive procedure called laparoscopic surgery.

A bleeding ovarian cyst can be caused by polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). It is a disease that affects many small cysts on the ovaries. An explosion of an ovarian cyst can cause pain on one side of the abdomen as well as vaginal bleeding. PCOS has also been linked to other metabolic problems such as diabetes.

Women with a bleeding ovarian cyst may become anemic due to rapid blood loss due to a hemorrhagic ovarian cyst. Removing a ruptured ovarian cyst may be enough to restore blood hemoglobin levels to normal levels. Some doctors prescribe oral contraceptives because these pills prevent ovulation and can prevent ovarian cysts from developing.

OTHER LANGUAGES

Effective treatment of ovarian cysts | Clinic of Chinese medicine TAO

Ovarian cyst is a very common disease.It can affect the female body up to the age of 50, that is, in fact, it affects the entire reproductive age of a woman. This diagnosis can be made as a mother of five children, and a young 16-year-old girl. This disease is a benign neoplasm (tumor) of the ovary. In fact, this is a cavity that is filled with liquid. Ovarian cysts are referred to as “insidious” diseases that do not manifest themselves in any way. Often, the presence of a cyst can only be detected during examination.That is why an annual (at least!) Preventive visit to a gynecologist is an axiom for a good quality of life for a modern girl.

Medicine classifies several types of cysts:

  • Cyst of the corpus luteum.
  • Follicular cyst.
  • Endometrioid cyst.
  • Mucinous cyst.
  • Dermoid cyst.
  • Paraovarian cyst.

The first two types of neoplasms are usually referred to as functional cysts.The appearance of the first is possible due to the fact that in the ovaries in the process of maturation of the follicle a kind of “cystic substance” is formed, which does not “dissolve” in due time. The second cyst occurs when an already mature follicle fills with fluid instead of being filled with corpus luteum cells.

The first two types of cysts usually go away on their own, the subsequent ones require immediate treatment.

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Ovarian cyst

Treatment of ovarian cysts in the TAO clinic

Traditional medicine suggests only a radical way to treat this disease.This means a surgical way to resolve the issue – removal of the cyst by laparoscopy or laparotomy.

There are times when a doctor stops on hormone therapy, but this is possible only if neoplasms of a physiological nature are detected, and this is not always the case.

In view of the fact that the human hormonal system is an extremely delicate structure that can be compared to a nuclear reactor: the slightest intervention is enough for an “energy release” to occur.For a woman, this can be fraught with:

  • Increasing body weight.
  • A sharp increase in the amount of hair in places atypical for a woman’s body.
  • Low tone of voice.
  • Disappearance of libido.
  • Impossibility of conception.
  • Other, invisible to the eye, but difficult and long-term eliminated consequences.

But the psychology of a woman (as well as physiology) is so fragile and vulnerable that for her only one “prickly” word “operation” turns into fear of expecting unpleasant consequences, pain, unwillingness and inability to feel the same and even obvious self-hatred.After all, surgical intervention concerns the reproductive organs, which every woman identifies with the concept of love and being loved, with the opportunity to give the world new individuals, with the need to realize herself as a mother and the second charming half of humanity.

In addition, the fear of ceasing to be liked lies in the unwillingness to resolve the issue promptly. No matter what “heights of emancipation” the female sex has now reached, but the desire to please men, to cause delight by its mere presence, in a word, any aesthetic component is the unshakable prerogative of the female sex, its main weapon.The fear that with “penetration into the holy of holies”, a woman will lose her “former prowess” is inherent in every girl.

Traditional Chinese medicine does its best to rid the fair sex of surgery. The purpose of BMT is to “return the body to its usual” course, to neutralize hormonal disruption, namely, it is the main cause of this disease.

Initially, what the specialists of the TAO clinic try to do is to reassure the woman, because a calm emotional state is the first step towards the normalization of hormonal levels.This is a well-known, indisputable fact.

When a smile more and more often appears on a woman’s face, which takes on a calm, serene expression, it is time to move on to the second stage. It is associated with the elimination of imbalance in the work of the “kidney meridian”, which is responsible for all energy processes in the pelvic area. The main method of dealing with this phenomenon is the impact on special points by means of acupuncture.

Already at this stage, there is an impact on the “right points”, which can lead to the normalization of the cycle, “start” the process of treating ovarian cysts.

Specialists monitor the slightest changes in the patient’s body. Traditional Chinese medicine is good in that it does not involve the use of strict treatment regimens: we can adjust the treatment regimen in each individual case, since each person is different.

One of the main methods of treating cysts in our clinic is acupressure. It is difficult to overestimate the positive effect of influencing acupuncture points. As a rule, already in the middle of the course, a woman feels much better, depression and pain go away.

And the final stage of treatment of ovarian cysts by the specialists of the TAO clinic will be phytotherapy. Unique herbal teas, herbal teas will allow not only to consolidate the effect obtained, but also to exclude the appearance of a second disease.

The percentage of patients who, after undergoing treatment with us, completely got rid of the diseases that tormented them for years – ovarian cysts, is very high. TCM is also good in that it practically excludes the recurrence of a second disease, since we completely eliminate its cause, not the effect.In the case of the diagnosis “Ovarian cyst” – we normalize the natural hormonal cycle, which is extremely important for the reproductive sphere.

Our experts strive to do everything so that you could avoid such a frightening surgical intervention.

Causes of the disease

Traditional Chinese medicine sees the “coldness of the genital area” of a woman as the main cause of ovarian cysts of any nature.As a result – stagnation of blood in the pelvic area, which leads to a “decrease in energy”, which is why the body cannot function normally. This is not necessarily an irregular sex life.

The second reason for the occurrence of this disease is the inflammatory process in the woman’s body. One of these processes can be called endometriosis – a pathological change in the epithelial tissue lining the inner surface of the uterus. As a rule, a woman’s reproductive system is so vulnerable that a change in one of its components necessarily entails a pathological change in another.There are a lot of factors that can cause such changes. These are stress, hypothermia, ecology, unhealthy diet, and difficult pregnancy, and many more similar reasons.

Improper functioning of the ovaries can cause not only functional cysts, but also other types of cysts, which are commonly called abnormal. Infertility and cancer are the worst things that await a woman if everything is left to chance and this disease is not treated.

Disease symptoms

As mentioned earlier, ovarian cysts are usually asymptomatic.But sometimes this disease can be accompanied by the following symptoms:

  • Dull pain in the lower abdomen in the right or left ovary. It can occur both when moving and in a calm state, both during physical exertion and even in a dream. The pain is usually not so pronounced, so a woman, more often than not, is in no hurry to see a doctor, which can last not only months, but also years and lead to the negative consequences we have mentioned above.
  • Squeezing sensation in the lower abdomen.This symptom is also not so pronounced. Most often, patients tend to see in him, for example, “heaviness” when overeating and also do not rush to get medical help.
  • Irregular menstruation. Now a “special calendar” is maintained by almost every woman, and this symptom is most often cause for concern.
  • Soreness of menstruation. Oddly enough, but pain during critical days is considered “normal” by the overwhelming majority of women, so it is unlikely that most of them will see some kind of disease in this symptom.
  • Bloating. This symptom will definitely not force any of the girls to seek help from a “female doctor”, insofar as they attribute it to a disease of the stomach or intestines, but not to the pathology of the ovaries.
  • Soreness during sexual intercourse. With this question, a woman will soon turn to a sexologist or will solve it with her family, although not always.

Functional ovarian cyst

A functional ovarian cyst includes a corpus luteum cyst and a follicular cyst.These two types of cysts are considered “easy to treat” and most often go away “on their own” in a few “natural” cycles.

The mechanism of occurrence of a follicular cyst is as follows: the follicle in “waiting” for ovulation continues to form and grow, ovulation occurs, but fertilization does not occur, and instead of “dying”, the follicle grows further, turning over time into a benign neoplasm – a follicular cyst. To eliminate it, the collection of medicinal herbs practiced by doctors of Chinese medicine is very helpful.Usually one or two cycles are enough for the cyst to “disappear”.

The second type of functional ovarian cyst is the corpus luteum cyst, or luteal cyst. It occurs due to excess fluid in the corpus luteum itself after ovulation.

Luteal cysts are also quite easily eliminated by individually selected herbal medicine.

Functional cysts usually “do not hurt”, which only negatively affects the diagnosis and treatment, as the woman usually does not rush to the doctor.

Removal of ovarian cyst

A radical method of treating an ovarian cyst is to remove it. This is the very last path a woman can take. Usually, even surgical intervention cannot solve the problem, since it removes its consequence, and not the root cause. Within six months, the cyst may reappear, and it will behave more aggressively.

The root cause lies in the correct functioning of the woman’s reproductive system, which is what the specialists of Chinese medicine are trying to normalize.Sometimes, after the surgery, polycystic disease may occur, that is, the occurrence of multiple cysts, which is usually fraught with infertility.

It is especially dangerous if the cyst is “on the leg”. That is, it is attached to the ovary with a special “bridge” made of tissue – a “leg”. The leg can twist at any time and the contents of the cyst will enter the peritoneum. As a result, peritonitis will occur, which is fatal.

Now usually they do not resort to abdominal surgery, but remove the ovarian cyst by laparoscopic methods, making only a few small incisions.The experience of the surgeon and the availability of modern technology are extremely important here.

Diagnosis and prevention of ovarian cysts

The main method for diagnosing this disease (if you can call it that) is to regularly undergo preventive examinations. Usually, already in the process of palpation, a competent doctor can determine the presence of neoplasms. And to confirm or deny his diagnosis, as well as to establish the type of cyst, you can use ultrasound diagnostics.Transvaginal ultrasound is usually more accurate.

Prevention of the occurrence of a cyst of any nature serves, oddly enough, a calm psychological attitude of a woman. Unfortunately, in our time, it is impossible to completely eliminate stress, but it is possible for any person to reduce them to nothing or learn how to competently “let off steam”. It is very important not to dwell on negative emotions, to try to get rid of them during the time. Only in this case can one expect that the reproductive system – this delicate “mechanism” of any woman will work like a clock.

Ovarian cysts – interview with reproductive specialist Yuriy Gerevich in Kiev

We interviewed an obstetrician-gynecologist, reproductologist, candidate of medical sciences – Gerevich Yuri Iosifovich.

Today we will talk about ovarian cysts in relation to reproductive medicine.

Why is a cyst dangerous in women?

Cysts in women are dangerous because sometimes they can lead and cause serious illness.First of all, oncological diseases. An ovarian cyst can be cancer, which is why it is very dangerous. The second reason. The fact is that ovarian cysts can be precancerous conditions. That is, in this cyst, cancer can develop after a while. It is natural and obvious that this is also very dangerous. It is better to know about this as early as possible in order to prevent this serious illness. In general, there are many different types of cysts. The next type, for example, endometrioid cysts. They are dangerous because they worsen the quality of life, cause pain, and can lead to a decrease in fertility.That is, to the development of infertility in some women. There are also congenital so-called dermoid cysts, which are the result of a violation of the laying of organs in the prenatal period, and those tissues that should not be there appear in the ovary. The most common are adipose tissue, hair follicle tissue, tooth tissue, and so on. These hands grow slowly with age and can also cause pain over time, can occasionally become sad, and disrupt the quality of life. Well, the most common cysts are the so-called functional cysts, which appear temporarily and then disappear on their own.They can be harmful when it comes to reproductive medicine. They can also cause pain and rupture of the ovary. Anything that can lead to bleeding is subject to reagent surgery. Therefore, cysts can lead to a lot of trouble.

Why is it important to remove the cyst before puncture?

So why is it important to remove cysts? We discussed in the previous question what dangers a cyst has. Obviously, if God forbid there is cancer, then it needs to be treated.Of course, even if it is a precancerous condition, this must be resolved before the start of reproductive technologies – before the puncture. If they result in pregnancy, we will not be able to intervene for a long time. This can lead to sad consequences, especially since during pregnancy, oncological, pre-oncological processes, as a rule, accelerate their development.

Also, when it comes to the endometrioid cyst, the question is complex and debatable. But still, if it is possible to remove the cyst without violating, without significantly reducing the real reserve, if the real reserve is good enough initially, then, in principle, yes, it makes sense to remove the cyst, to reduce the negative effect of the endometrioid cyst.And this is a chronic inflammation that affects all the links that are important for the onset of pregnancy, then this operation will also be useful and will improve the results of reproductive technologies. If initially the ovarian reserve is very low, there may have already been operations or endometriosis develops for a long time, and the development of endometriosis and endometrioid cysts leads to a decrease in the ovarian reserve, then, for example, then I recommend that you first make stimulation, get eggs, freeze embryos, and then operate and prepare for the transfer.That is, to make such a segmented treatment cycle. Because if we go for an operation, we need to be aware that we will nevertheless reduce the emergency reserve by removing this endometrioid cyst. If we are talking about functional cysts, then they can interfere purely mechanically at the beginning of stimulation. That is, the ovary is already enlarged due to the cyst, there is an increased risk of complications during stimulation: rupture of the ovary, torsion of the ovary. Therefore, it is better to get rid of such a cyst before stimulation. If this cyst is still hormonally active during this period, then of course this will interfere with normal stimulation and adequate follicular growth.In general, it is believed that stimulation should be started when there are no cystic formations in the ovaries more than 9 mm in diameter.

Does the cyst affect the quality of the follicles?

If we are talking about endometrioid cysts, then yes. It has been established as a result of research that with endometriosis, the quality of cells obtained and their number deteriorates. In all other cases, there is no such direct connection. But if we start stimulation against the background of a hormonally active functional cyst, our stimulation may not be very successful.We can get fewer and poorer quality cells than we could get from the same woman in the absence of a cyst.

What causes cysts to form?

This is a difficult question, as there are so many types of cysts. If we are talking about endometriosis, then this is the ingress of tissue similar to the endometrium and their development outside the body, in this case in the ovary. If we are talking about terato dermoid, I have already said that this is a hit during the laying of tissue that should go to another place, getting into the ovary, and then tissues develop there that should not be there.If we are talking about a huge number of varieties of other cysts, then this is a violation of processes in the epithelium. That is, a cyst is a cavity. The inner surface of the cyst is expelled by epithelial tissue. Epithelial tissue is a rapidly dividing tissue, and certain developmental disorders of the division of these cells, their specialization, often occur in these tissues. These processes, if they are violated, can lead to various disorders, to the development of permanent cysts, not temporary ones, the development of precancerous and cancerous diseases.Therefore, the reasons here are complex, this is a genetic predisposition, impaired immunity, possibly the impact of the external environment. Until the end, no one will tell you for sure.

How to treat a cyst?

Cysts are treated, if we are talking about permanent cysts, then the only method is the surgical method. If we are talking about functional cysts, then they should go away on their own. This can be facilitated by creating a favorable environment with the help of drug support, the use of oral contraceptives in order to stop the development and growth of the dominant follicle selection.It is also believed that the addition of progesterone devices promotes changes in the vessels in the walls of the cysts, which facilitate their opening. And so the cyst can go away. But of course, the only method of treatment is surgery.

Do cysts translate to infertility?

If we are talking about endometrioid, then I have already said that endometriosis is associated with a decrease in fertility. There is no direct connection for other cysts. But cysts can lead to disorders that force them to undergo surgical treatment – for example, torsion of the ovary and a woman can lose an ovary as a result of surgery, and various other operations that are performed in the presence of cysts also reduce ovarian reserve and affect fertility.So endometrioid cysts directly affect, the rest can consistently have a negative effect.

What recommendations can you give to our clients? Should I go to the clinic right away? Or can you just go to the pharmacy and buy some medicine and treat it like that?

Of course, you need to be careful with cysts. First of all, you and your doctor must decide which cyst are you talking about: permanent or functional? What is the type of cyst? What is its danger in terms of potential cancer risk.