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Pleurisy – Diagnosis and treatment

Diagnosis

Your doctor will start by asking about your medical history and doing a physical exam, including examining your chest with a stethoscope.

To determine if you have pleurisy and identify the cause, your doctor might recommend:

  • Blood tests. A blood test might tell your doctor if you have an infection. Other blood tests also might detect an autoimmune disorder, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, in which the initial sign can be pleurisy.
  • Chest X-ray. A chest X-ray can show if your lungs are fully inflating or if there is air or fluid between the lungs and ribs.
  • Computerized tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan combines a series of X-ray images taken from different angles around your body and uses computer processing to create cross-sectional images that look like slices of your chest. These detailed images can show the condition of the pleura and if there are other causes of pain, such as a blood clot in the lung.
  • Ultrasound. This imaging method uses high-frequency sound waves to produce precise images of structures within your body. Your doctor might use ultrasound to determine whether you have a pleural effusion.
  • Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG). Your doctor might recommend this heart-monitoring test to rule out certain heart problems as a cause for your chest pain.

Diagnostic procedures

In some cases, your doctor might remove fluid and tissue from the pleural space for testing. Procedures might include:

  • Thoracentesis. In this procedure, your doctor injects a local anesthetic between your ribs to the area where fluid was seen on your imaging studies. Next your doctor inserts a needle through your chest wall between your ribs to remove fluid for lab analysis and to help you breathe better. Your doctor might insert the needle with the help of ultrasound guidance.
  • Thoracoscopy. If TB or cancer is a suspected cause of your condition, your doctor might perform a thoracoscopy — also called a pleuroscopy — in which a tiny camera (thoracoscope) is inserted through a small incision in your chest wall. This procedure allows for a direct view inside your chest to look for any abnormalities or to get a tissue sample (biopsy).

Treatment

Treatment for pleurisy focuses primarily on the underlying cause. For example, if bacterial pneumonia is the cause, an antibiotic will be prescribed to manage the infection. If the cause is viral, pleurisy may resolve on its own.

The pain and inflammation associated with pleurisy is usually treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others). Occasionally, your doctor may prescribe steroid medication.

The outcome of pleurisy treatment depends on the seriousness of the underlying disease. If the condition that caused pleurisy is diagnosed and treated early, a full recovery is typical.

Lifestyle and home remedies

The following steps might help relieve symptoms related to pleurisy:

  • Take medication. Take medication as recommended by your doctor to relieve pain and inflammation.
  • Get plenty of rest. Find the position that causes you the least discomfort when you rest. Even when you start to feel better, be careful not to overdo it.
  • Don’t smoke. Smoking can cause more irritation to your lungs. If you smoke and can’t quit on your own, ask your doctor for help.

Preparing for your appointment

You’re likely to start by seeing your family doctor. However, when you call to set up your appointment, you might be urged to seek immediate medical care if you are experiencing severe, unexplained chest pain.

You may want to bring a family member or friend along, if possible, to help you remember questions to ask and what your doctor said.

Here’s some information to help you get ready for your appointment, and what to expect from your doctor.

What you can do

You can prepare a list that includes:

  • Details of your symptoms, including where your chest pain starts and how far it spreads, as well as other signs and symptoms, such as fever, shortness of breath or weight loss.
  • Key medical information, including recent hospitalizations and any medical conditions you have. Also note whether family members — especially children — or close friends have recently been sick.
  • Medications you’re taking, including prescription and over-the-counter drugs, vitamins, herbs or other supplements, and the dosages.
  • Key personal information, including recent travel abroad and major life changes. Your doctor might also be interested in your work history, including possible environmental exposure to asbestos.
  • Questions for your doctor.

Questions to ask your doctor

Questions may include:

  • What do you think is the underlying cause of my symptoms?
  • What kinds of diagnostic tests or procedures do I need, if any?
  • What treatment approach do you recommend?
  • How soon after I begin treatment can I expect to feel better?
  • Are there self-care steps I can take to improve my discomfort?
  • Do you recommend that I stay home from work or school? For how long?
  • Will it help if I stop smoking?
  • Am I at risk of long-term complications from this condition?
  • I have other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?

Don’t hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Be ready to answer questions your doctor might ask:

  • How would you describe your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, seems to improve or worsen your symptoms?
  • Have you been diagnosed with or treated for any other health conditions?
  • Have you recently traveled?
  • Have you been involved in any work, projects or hobbies over the years that might have exposed you to asbestos?
  • Do or did you smoke? If so, how much and for how long?
  • Have you recently noticed swollen and tender joints or rashes?

Your doctor will ask additional questions based on your responses, symptoms and needs. Preparing and anticipating questions will help you make the most of your time with the doctor.


Jan. 03, 2020

Symptoms, Causes, Tests and Treatment

Overview

Normal pleura in lung compared to inflamed pleura in lung (pleurisy)

What is pleurisy?

The pleura is the thin membrane that lines the outside of the lungs and the inside of the chest cavity. Pleurisy is an inflammation (swelling or irritation) of these two layers of tissue.

The pleural space is a thin area between the chest lining and the membrane that lines the lungs. Fluid lubricates the layers of the pleura so they slide smoothly alongside each other when you breathe. When the membranes become inflamed, they rub painfully against each other instead.

Pleurisy can cause sharp or stabbing chest pain and shortness of breath. It is also called pleuritis.

Who is affected by pleurisy?

Pleurisy can affect people with certain underlying medical conditions, such as infections or autoimmune diseases. Pleurisy occurs in people of all ages, but it develops most often in people over age 65. These people are more likely to develop chest infections.

People of Mediterranean descent have a higher risk for pleurisy due to a hereditary condition called familial Mediterranean fever. With familial Mediterranean fever, a genetic mutation (change) causes inflammation in the chest and abdomen.

Symptoms and Causes

What causes pleurisy?

Doctors do not always know what causes pleurisy. Infections usually cause the disorder. These infections can be viral (caused by a virus), such as influenza, or bacterial (caused by bacteria), such as pneumonia. While infections can cause pleurisy, pleurisy itself is not contagious.

Other conditions that can cause pleurisy include:

  • Asbestosis (lung disease caused by the inhalation of asbestos).
  • Autoimmune disorders such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Blood clot in the lung (pulmonary embolism).
  • Chest surgery or trauma.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Reactions to medicines including hydralazine (treats high blood pressure), isoniazid (treats tuberculosis), and procainamide (treats abnormal heart rhythms).
  • Tumors caused by cancers of the respiratory system such as lung cancer.

What are the symptoms of pleurisy?

Most people with pleurisy experience sharp or stabbing chest pain, also known as pleuritic pain. This pain often worsens when you cough or breathe in deeply. Sometimes the pain can spread to the shoulder or back.

Pain similar to pleuritic pain can also be a symptom of emergency medical conditions such as a heart attack or pulmonary embolism (blood clot in the lung). If you experience sharp chest pain, it is important to seek immediate medical attention to rule out these life-threatening conditions.

Other signs and symptoms of pleurisy can include:

  • Cough.
  • Fatigue (extreme tiredness).
  • Fever.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Unexplained weight loss.

Can you get pleurisy more than once?

Yes. You do not become immune to pleurisy by having it and recovering. Also, some of the conditions that can cause pleurisy are chronic—you have them for a long time—so you may continue to be susceptible to inflammation of the pleura.

Diagnosis and Tests

How is pleurisy diagnosed?

Doctors use a medical history and several tests to evaluate for pleurisy. These tests include:

  • Biopsy: In some cases, a doctor will take a small sample of lung tissue to determine whether cancer or tuberculosis is present.
  • Blood test: Doctors use blood tests to look for signs of infection or autoimmune disorders such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG): This test uses small electrodes placed on the chest to measure the heart’s electrical activity. It helps doctors rule out problems or defects of the heart.
  • Imaging tests: Imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans and ultrasounds allow your doctor to see abnormalities in the pleural space, including air, gas or a blood clot.
  • Physical exam: Listening to your lungs with a stethoscope allows your doctor to hear a rubbing sound in your lungs that may be a sign of pleurisy.
  • Fluid extraction (thoracentesis): A doctor inserts a small needle into the pleural space and removes fluid to look for signs of infection or other causes of pleurisy.

Management and Treatment

What are the treatments for pleurisy?

Pleurisy treatment depends on the underlying condition causing it. In some cases, pleurisy goes away on its own without treatment.

Your treatment options might include:

  • Draining the pleural space: Doctors remove air, blood, or fluid from the pleural space. Depending on how much of the substance needs to be drained, doctors use a needle and syringe (thoracentesis) or a chest tube to suction fluid out of the area.
  • Medication: Your doctor might prescribe an antibiotic, an antifungal or an antiparasitic to treat an infection. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen can relieve the pain associated with pleurisy. Corticosteroids can reduce inflammation, but they can produce many side effects. Your doctor may prescribe bronchodilators to make it easier for you to breathe.
  • Radiation treatment or chemotherapy: In some cases, doctors use cancer treatments to shrink tumors that cause pleurisy.

What are the complications associated with pleurisy?

Some people with pleurisy experience complications. They include:

  • Hemothorax: Blood builds up in the pleural space.
  • Pleural effusion: Too much fluid collects in the pleural space. Pleural effusion can cause difficulty in breathing.
  • Severe illness from not treating the infection or condition that caused pleurisy in the first place.

Prevention

How can you prevent pleurisy?

You can’t prevent pleurisy, but you can reduce your risk by promptly treating conditions that may cause it. You should also quit smoking tobacco, using electronic cigarettes, and smoking marijuana. If you don’t smoke, don’t start.

Who is at risk of developing pleurisy?

People of Mediterranean descent have a higher risk for pleurisy due to a hereditary condition called familial Mediterranean fever. People with other underlying conditions that can lead to pleurisy are also at higher risk for the disorder. These conditions include:

  • Asbestosis (lung disease caused by inhaling asbestos).
  • Autoimmune disorders such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Cancers of the respiratory system such as lung cancer, asthma, and COPD.
  • Chest surgery or trauma.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Taking certain medications, including hydralazine, isoniazid, and procainamide.

Outlook / Prognosis

What is the prognosis (outlook) for people with pleurisy?

Doctors successfully treat most cases of pleurisy. Most people who receive prompt diagnosis and treatment for the condition causing pleurisy recover fully. People treated with antibiotics for an infection causing pleurisy usually feel better in about a week. Very rarely, people who are not treated may have life-threatening complications. The outlook also depends on the underlying condition that caused the pleurisy.

Living With

When should I see a healthcare provider about pleurisy?

Contact your healthcare provider if you experience unexplained severe chest pain or other symptoms of pleurisy.

What questions should I ask my doctor?

If you have pleurisy, you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Why did I develop pleurisy?
  • Should I consider genetic testing?
  • If medicine caused pleurisy, should I stop or change my medicine?
  • Am I at higher risk for other lung conditions?
  • What can I do at home to relieve pain?
  • What signs of complications should I look out for?
  • Am I more likely to get pleurisy again after having it once?

Symptoms, Causes, Tests and Treatment

Overview

Normal pleura in lung compared to inflamed pleura in lung (pleurisy)

What is pleurisy?

The pleura is the thin membrane that lines the outside of the lungs and the inside of the chest cavity. Pleurisy is an inflammation (swelling or irritation) of these two layers of tissue.

The pleural space is a thin area between the chest lining and the membrane that lines the lungs. Fluid lubricates the layers of the pleura so they slide smoothly alongside each other when you breathe. When the membranes become inflamed, they rub painfully against each other instead.

Pleurisy can cause sharp or stabbing chest pain and shortness of breath. It is also called pleuritis.

Who is affected by pleurisy?

Pleurisy can affect people with certain underlying medical conditions, such as infections or autoimmune diseases. Pleurisy occurs in people of all ages, but it develops most often in people over age 65. These people are more likely to develop chest infections.

People of Mediterranean descent have a higher risk for pleurisy due to a hereditary condition called familial Mediterranean fever. With familial Mediterranean fever, a genetic mutation (change) causes inflammation in the chest and abdomen.

Symptoms and Causes

What causes pleurisy?

Doctors do not always know what causes pleurisy. Infections usually cause the disorder. These infections can be viral (caused by a virus), such as influenza, or bacterial (caused by bacteria), such as pneumonia. While infections can cause pleurisy, pleurisy itself is not contagious.

Other conditions that can cause pleurisy include:

  • Asbestosis (lung disease caused by the inhalation of asbestos).
  • Autoimmune disorders such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Blood clot in the lung (pulmonary embolism).
  • Chest surgery or trauma.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Reactions to medicines including hydralazine (treats high blood pressure), isoniazid (treats tuberculosis), and procainamide (treats abnormal heart rhythms).
  • Tumors caused by cancers of the respiratory system such as lung cancer.

What are the symptoms of pleurisy?

Most people with pleurisy experience sharp or stabbing chest pain, also known as pleuritic pain. This pain often worsens when you cough or breathe in deeply. Sometimes the pain can spread to the shoulder or back.

Pain similar to pleuritic pain can also be a symptom of emergency medical conditions such as a heart attack or pulmonary embolism (blood clot in the lung). If you experience sharp chest pain, it is important to seek immediate medical attention to rule out these life-threatening conditions.

Other signs and symptoms of pleurisy can include:

  • Cough.
  • Fatigue (extreme tiredness).
  • Fever.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Unexplained weight loss.

Can you get pleurisy more than once?

Yes. You do not become immune to pleurisy by having it and recovering. Also, some of the conditions that can cause pleurisy are chronic—you have them for a long time—so you may continue to be susceptible to inflammation of the pleura.

Diagnosis and Tests

How is pleurisy diagnosed?

Doctors use a medical history and several tests to evaluate for pleurisy. These tests include:

  • Biopsy: In some cases, a doctor will take a small sample of lung tissue to determine whether cancer or tuberculosis is present.
  • Blood test: Doctors use blood tests to look for signs of infection or autoimmune disorders such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG): This test uses small electrodes placed on the chest to measure the heart’s electrical activity. It helps doctors rule out problems or defects of the heart.
  • Imaging tests: Imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans and ultrasounds allow your doctor to see abnormalities in the pleural space, including air, gas or a blood clot.
  • Physical exam: Listening to your lungs with a stethoscope allows your doctor to hear a rubbing sound in your lungs that may be a sign of pleurisy.
  • Fluid extraction (thoracentesis): A doctor inserts a small needle into the pleural space and removes fluid to look for signs of infection or other causes of pleurisy.

Management and Treatment

What are the treatments for pleurisy?

Pleurisy treatment depends on the underlying condition causing it. In some cases, pleurisy goes away on its own without treatment.

Your treatment options might include:

  • Draining the pleural space: Doctors remove air, blood, or fluid from the pleural space. Depending on how much of the substance needs to be drained, doctors use a needle and syringe (thoracentesis) or a chest tube to suction fluid out of the area.
  • Medication: Your doctor might prescribe an antibiotic, an antifungal or an antiparasitic to treat an infection. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen can relieve the pain associated with pleurisy. Corticosteroids can reduce inflammation, but they can produce many side effects. Your doctor may prescribe bronchodilators to make it easier for you to breathe.
  • Radiation treatment or chemotherapy: In some cases, doctors use cancer treatments to shrink tumors that cause pleurisy.

What are the complications associated with pleurisy?

Some people with pleurisy experience complications. They include:

  • Hemothorax: Blood builds up in the pleural space.
  • Pleural effusion: Too much fluid collects in the pleural space. Pleural effusion can cause difficulty in breathing.
  • Severe illness from not treating the infection or condition that caused pleurisy in the first place.

Prevention

How can you prevent pleurisy?

You can’t prevent pleurisy, but you can reduce your risk by promptly treating conditions that may cause it. You should also quit smoking tobacco, using electronic cigarettes, and smoking marijuana. If you don’t smoke, don’t start.

Who is at risk of developing pleurisy?

People of Mediterranean descent have a higher risk for pleurisy due to a hereditary condition called familial Mediterranean fever. People with other underlying conditions that can lead to pleurisy are also at higher risk for the disorder. These conditions include:

  • Asbestosis (lung disease caused by inhaling asbestos).
  • Autoimmune disorders such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Cancers of the respiratory system such as lung cancer, asthma, and COPD.
  • Chest surgery or trauma.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Taking certain medications, including hydralazine, isoniazid, and procainamide.

Outlook / Prognosis

What is the prognosis (outlook) for people with pleurisy?

Doctors successfully treat most cases of pleurisy. Most people who receive prompt diagnosis and treatment for the condition causing pleurisy recover fully. People treated with antibiotics for an infection causing pleurisy usually feel better in about a week. Very rarely, people who are not treated may have life-threatening complications. The outlook also depends on the underlying condition that caused the pleurisy.

Living With

When should I see a healthcare provider about pleurisy?

Contact your healthcare provider if you experience unexplained severe chest pain or other symptoms of pleurisy.

What questions should I ask my doctor?

If you have pleurisy, you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Why did I develop pleurisy?
  • Should I consider genetic testing?
  • If medicine caused pleurisy, should I stop or change my medicine?
  • Am I at higher risk for other lung conditions?
  • What can I do at home to relieve pain?
  • What signs of complications should I look out for?
  • Am I more likely to get pleurisy again after having it once?

Symptoms, Causes, Tests and Treatment

Overview

Normal pleura in lung compared to inflamed pleura in lung (pleurisy)

What is pleurisy?

The pleura is the thin membrane that lines the outside of the lungs and the inside of the chest cavity. Pleurisy is an inflammation (swelling or irritation) of these two layers of tissue.

The pleural space is a thin area between the chest lining and the membrane that lines the lungs. Fluid lubricates the layers of the pleura so they slide smoothly alongside each other when you breathe. When the membranes become inflamed, they rub painfully against each other instead.

Pleurisy can cause sharp or stabbing chest pain and shortness of breath. It is also called pleuritis.

Who is affected by pleurisy?

Pleurisy can affect people with certain underlying medical conditions, such as infections or autoimmune diseases. Pleurisy occurs in people of all ages, but it develops most often in people over age 65. These people are more likely to develop chest infections.

People of Mediterranean descent have a higher risk for pleurisy due to a hereditary condition called familial Mediterranean fever. With familial Mediterranean fever, a genetic mutation (change) causes inflammation in the chest and abdomen.

Symptoms and Causes

What causes pleurisy?

Doctors do not always know what causes pleurisy. Infections usually cause the disorder. These infections can be viral (caused by a virus), such as influenza, or bacterial (caused by bacteria), such as pneumonia. While infections can cause pleurisy, pleurisy itself is not contagious.

Other conditions that can cause pleurisy include:

  • Asbestosis (lung disease caused by the inhalation of asbestos).
  • Autoimmune disorders such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Blood clot in the lung (pulmonary embolism).
  • Chest surgery or trauma.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Reactions to medicines including hydralazine (treats high blood pressure), isoniazid (treats tuberculosis), and procainamide (treats abnormal heart rhythms).
  • Tumors caused by cancers of the respiratory system such as lung cancer.

What are the symptoms of pleurisy?

Most people with pleurisy experience sharp or stabbing chest pain, also known as pleuritic pain. This pain often worsens when you cough or breathe in deeply. Sometimes the pain can spread to the shoulder or back.

Pain similar to pleuritic pain can also be a symptom of emergency medical conditions such as a heart attack or pulmonary embolism (blood clot in the lung). If you experience sharp chest pain, it is important to seek immediate medical attention to rule out these life-threatening conditions.

Other signs and symptoms of pleurisy can include:

  • Cough.
  • Fatigue (extreme tiredness).
  • Fever.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Unexplained weight loss.

Can you get pleurisy more than once?

Yes. You do not become immune to pleurisy by having it and recovering. Also, some of the conditions that can cause pleurisy are chronic—you have them for a long time—so you may continue to be susceptible to inflammation of the pleura.

Diagnosis and Tests

How is pleurisy diagnosed?

Doctors use a medical history and several tests to evaluate for pleurisy. These tests include:

  • Biopsy: In some cases, a doctor will take a small sample of lung tissue to determine whether cancer or tuberculosis is present.
  • Blood test: Doctors use blood tests to look for signs of infection or autoimmune disorders such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG): This test uses small electrodes placed on the chest to measure the heart’s electrical activity. It helps doctors rule out problems or defects of the heart.
  • Imaging tests: Imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans and ultrasounds allow your doctor to see abnormalities in the pleural space, including air, gas or a blood clot.
  • Physical exam: Listening to your lungs with a stethoscope allows your doctor to hear a rubbing sound in your lungs that may be a sign of pleurisy.
  • Fluid extraction (thoracentesis): A doctor inserts a small needle into the pleural space and removes fluid to look for signs of infection or other causes of pleurisy.

Management and Treatment

What are the treatments for pleurisy?

Pleurisy treatment depends on the underlying condition causing it. In some cases, pleurisy goes away on its own without treatment.

Your treatment options might include:

  • Draining the pleural space: Doctors remove air, blood, or fluid from the pleural space. Depending on how much of the substance needs to be drained, doctors use a needle and syringe (thoracentesis) or a chest tube to suction fluid out of the area.
  • Medication: Your doctor might prescribe an antibiotic, an antifungal or an antiparasitic to treat an infection. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen can relieve the pain associated with pleurisy. Corticosteroids can reduce inflammation, but they can produce many side effects. Your doctor may prescribe bronchodilators to make it easier for you to breathe.
  • Radiation treatment or chemotherapy: In some cases, doctors use cancer treatments to shrink tumors that cause pleurisy.

What are the complications associated with pleurisy?

Some people with pleurisy experience complications. They include:

  • Hemothorax: Blood builds up in the pleural space.
  • Pleural effusion: Too much fluid collects in the pleural space. Pleural effusion can cause difficulty in breathing.
  • Severe illness from not treating the infection or condition that caused pleurisy in the first place.

Prevention

How can you prevent pleurisy?

You can’t prevent pleurisy, but you can reduce your risk by promptly treating conditions that may cause it. You should also quit smoking tobacco, using electronic cigarettes, and smoking marijuana. If you don’t smoke, don’t start.

Who is at risk of developing pleurisy?

People of Mediterranean descent have a higher risk for pleurisy due to a hereditary condition called familial Mediterranean fever. People with other underlying conditions that can lead to pleurisy are also at higher risk for the disorder. These conditions include:

  • Asbestosis (lung disease caused by inhaling asbestos).
  • Autoimmune disorders such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Cancers of the respiratory system such as lung cancer, asthma, and COPD.
  • Chest surgery or trauma.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Taking certain medications, including hydralazine, isoniazid, and procainamide.

Outlook / Prognosis

What is the prognosis (outlook) for people with pleurisy?

Doctors successfully treat most cases of pleurisy. Most people who receive prompt diagnosis and treatment for the condition causing pleurisy recover fully. People treated with antibiotics for an infection causing pleurisy usually feel better in about a week. Very rarely, people who are not treated may have life-threatening complications. The outlook also depends on the underlying condition that caused the pleurisy.

Living With

When should I see a healthcare provider about pleurisy?

Contact your healthcare provider if you experience unexplained severe chest pain or other symptoms of pleurisy.

What questions should I ask my doctor?

If you have pleurisy, you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Why did I develop pleurisy?
  • Should I consider genetic testing?
  • If medicine caused pleurisy, should I stop or change my medicine?
  • Am I at higher risk for other lung conditions?
  • What can I do at home to relieve pain?
  • What signs of complications should I look out for?
  • Am I more likely to get pleurisy again after having it once?

Pleurisy | Symptoms, Treatment and Recovery Time

Pleurisy is due to inflammation of the pleura next to the lung. It is most often caused by infection with a germ (a viral infection). In these cases the pain can be severe but soon goes. Various other lung disorders can also cause a ‘pleuritic pain’ similar to pleurisy. A pleuritic pain is a chest pain which is typically sharp and ‘stabbing’ in a part of the chest. The pain is usually made worse when you breathe in or cough.

What are pleurisy symptoms?

Pleurisy means inflammation of the pleura. Pleurisy, or other problems that affect the pleura, can cause a ‘pleuritic’ chest pain. This is usually a sharp stabbing pain.

You may feel a pleuritic chest pain anywhere in the chest, depending on the site of the inflammation, or problem with the pleura. The pain is made worse by breathing in or by coughing, as this causes the two parts of the inflamed pleura to rub over each other.

You may have other symptoms, depending on the cause of the pleurisy.

What is the pleura?

The pleura is a thin membrane with two layers. One layer lines the inside of the chest wall. The other layer covers the lungs.

Between the two layers of pleura (the pleural cavity) is a tiny amount of fluid. This helps the lungs and chest wall to move smoothly when you breathe.

What causes pleurisy?

Causes of pleurisy include:

If the inflammation of your pleura is caused by a more serious cause you are likely to have other symptoms. See a doctor if any of the following occur with a pleuritic chest pain:

Do I need any tests?

The most important thing when diagnosing the cause of a pleuritic pain is for a doctor to talk to you about your symptoms and to examine you. Most of the causes of the more serious causes of pleuritic pain will have other symptoms apart from the pain, as mentioned above. A doctor’s examination may also show up some signs which may point to the cause.

A doctor may arrange tests such as a chest X-ray if you develop pleuritic pain and the cause is not clear. A chest X-ray is normal in the common infection with a germ (a viral pleurisy) but may show up abnormalities when there are some other causes of the pain. Other tests are sometimes done if a serious cause is suspected.

What are pleurisy treatments?

If you have an infection with a germ (a viral pleurisy), take painkillers regularly until the pain eases. Your doctor may prescribe stronger painkillers if the pain is severe.

If you have other causes of pleuritic pain, such as a serious lung infection (pneumonia) or a blood clot in the lung (pulmonary embolism), the treatment depends on the cause.

Pleurisy | Michigan Medicine

Topic Overview

Is this topic for you?

This topic provides information about pleurisy, which usually results in chest pain. If you have chest pain that concerns you and that your doctor does not know about, see the topic Chest Problems.

What is pleurisy?

Pleurisy is swelling (inflammation) of the thin layers of tissue (pleura) covering the lungs and the chest wall.

The outer layer of the pleura lines the inside of the chest wall, and the inner layer covers the lungs. The tiny space between the two layers is called the pleural cavity. This cavity normally contains a small amount of lubricating fluid that allows the two layers to slide over each other when you breathe.

When the pleura becomes inflamed, the layers rub together, causing chest pain. This is known as pleuritic pain.

Pleurisy is sometimes called pleuritis.

What causes pleurisy?

In young, healthy people, an infection of the lower respiratory system by a virus or bacteria may cause pleurisy. Pleurisy usually lasts a few days to 2 weeks. In very rare cases, the virus or bacteria may spread and cause pleurisy in others.

Other causes of pleurisy include air leaking into the pleural cavity from a hole in a lung (pneumothorax), injury to the chest (such as a broken rib), tuberculosis or other infections, or a tumor in the pleura.

Other conditions may also cause pleurisy. These include rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, sickle cell crisis, pulmonary embolism, or pancreatitis. Pleurisy may also develop as a complication of heart surgery.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of pleurisy are chest pain and difficulty breathing. The chest pain usually starts suddenly. People often describe it as a stabbing pain, and it usually gets worse with breathing. The pain:

  • May always be present, but it usually gets worse when you breathe in. You may avoid breathing deeply to prevent the pain.
  • Usually is on only one side of the chest.
  • May extend to a shoulder or the belly.
  • Is usually worse when you cough, sneeze, or suddenly move.
  • May ease when you hold your breath or press on the painful area.

But this type of chest pain can be caused by conditions that do not affect the pleura, such as chest muscle strain and costochondritis.

If a viral infection is causing your pleurisy, you may or may not have common viral symptoms, such as fever, headache, and muscle aches.

The inflammation of the pleura sometimes causes fluid to build up in the pleural cavity (pleural effusion). You may have less pain after this happens, because the fluid prevents the two layers of the pleura from rubbing together. If there is a large amount of fluid, it may prevent the lung from expanding when you breathe in. This can make it hard to breathe. Other symptoms of pleural effusion include fever, chest pain, and a dry cough.

Pleural effusion
may occur without pleurisy in other conditions, such as heart failure or liver or kidney disease.

How is pleurisy diagnosed?

Many different health problems can lead to pleurisy, so your doctor will look for what is causing your inflammation. He or she will do a physical exam and tests such as a chest X-ray, blood tests, or a CT scan to look for the cause of your symptoms. The conditions that may cause pleuritic chest pain include:

If your doctor thinks your pleurisy may be caused by an autoimmune disease such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis, he or she may do blood tests.

If you have pleural effusion, your doctor may use a needle to remove some of the fluid from the pleura. This procedure is called thoracentesis. The fluid is then studied, to help your doctor find out the cause of the effusion.

See pictures of pleural effusion and thoracentesis.

How is pleurisy treated?

The treatment for pleurisy depends on the cause. For example, if a bacterial infection is the cause, you will probably need an antibiotic. If a pulmonary embolism is present, you may get medicine to dissolve the clot or to prevent future blood clots (anticoagulants).

For most cases of pain caused by pleurisy, your doctor will suggest that you use aspirin, ibuprofen, or another nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Do not give aspirin to anyone younger than 20 because of the risk of Reye syndrome. If you have severe pain, you may need prescription cough or pain medicine. You may also be able to relieve pain by lying on the painful side or pressing a pillow against it.

If you have pleural effusion, you may need to have the fluid drained through a tube that the doctor inserts in your chest.

In some cases of pleural effusion, you may need pleurodesis. During this procedure, a medicine is put into your chest cavity, which triggers an inflammatory reaction over the surface of the lung and inside the chest cavity. This causes the surface of the lung to stick to the surface of the chest cavity, which prevents more fluid from building up or reduces the amount of fluid.

Pleural Effusion | Michigan Medicine

Topic Overview

Pleural effusion (say “PLER-uhl eh-FYOO-zhun”) is the buildup of fluid in the space between tissues lining the lungs and chest wall (pleural space). Because of the fluid buildup, the lungs may not be able to expand completely, and that can make it hard for you to breathe. The lung, or part of it, may collapse.

How is pleural effusion diagnosed?

Pleural effusion is usually diagnosed with a physical exam and imaging tests, such as an X-ray or a CT scan. The doctor will also listen to the airflow in your lungs.

Blood tests or tests done on a sample of fluid taken from around the lungs may be used to help find out what caused the fluid to build up.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of pleural effusion may include:

  • Trouble breathing.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Chest pain.
  • A fever.
  • A cough.

A minor pleural effusion may not cause any symptoms.

What causes pleural effusion?

Pleural effusion has many causes. They include heart failure, pneumonia and other infections, cancer, pulmonary embolism, liver disease, and inflammation of the tissues around the lungs.

How is it treated?

A minor pleural effusion often goes away on its own without treatment.

In other cases, doctors may need to treat the condition that is causing the pleural effusion. For example, you may get antibiotics to treat pneumonia. Or you could get other medicines to treat heart failure.

Pleural effusion can also be treated by removing fluid from the pleural space. This may help relieve symptoms, such as shortness of breath and chest pain. It can also help the lungs to expand more fully.

Fluid can be removed by placing a needle into the pleural space. This treatment is called thoracentesis. A small sample of the fluid may be removed and sent to a lab to find out what is causing the buildup of fluid.

If pleural effusion is severe or doesn’t get better, a small catheter tube or a larger tube may be placed in the chest. This allows fluid to drain from the space surrounding the lungs. The tube stays in the chest until the fluid is drained or until the doctor removes it. Most people stay in the hospital while the chest tube is in.

With some conditions, such as lung cancer, fluid may keep building up over time. In these cases, a tube can be put in the chest for as long as the person needs it. It can be used to drain the fluid each time it builds up. Most people can go home with this type of chest tube and drain the fluid themselves.

Some people may get a treatment called pleurodesis to remove the fluid and then put a medicine into the chest cavity. This helps to prevent too much fluid from building up again.

90,000 Pleurisy – symptoms and methods of treating pleurisy in the CELT clinic

Pleurisy – an inflammatory process on the serous membrane of the lungs. The disease develops in several directions, when the pleural petals fall out on the fibril surface, or purulent discharge accumulates in the pleural cavity.

Tumor-type pleurisy is widespread among female patients. Tumors form in the organs of the reproductive system and the mammary gland. Men often fall ill with effusion pleurisy due to rheumatism and inflammation of the prostate gland.The disease is unilateral (one lung) or bilateral (both lungs).

Why does pleurisy occur?

Disease provocateurs – inflammatory processes in the body and infections. Inflammatory pleurisy Cause:

  • rheumatoid arthritis;
  • arteritis;
  • rheumatism;
  • Liebman-Sachs disease;
  • scleroderma;
  • pulmonary embolism;
  • pulmonary edema or infarction;
  • metastases in the pleural region;
  • mesothelioma;
  • lymphoma;
  • leukemia;
  • hemorrhagic diathesis;
  • 90,015 ovarian cancer;

    90,015 breast cancer;

  • acute pancreatitis.

Infectious sources of pleurisy:

  • syphilis;
  • tuberculosis;
  • 90,015 parasites;

  • typhoid fever and other dangerous infections;
  • 90,015 microbes;

  • staphylococcus, pneumococcus, Escherichia coli, etc.;
  • influenza, herpes and other viruses;
  • candidiasis and other fungal infections;
  • penetration of microbes into open wounds.

Types and symptoms

Doctors differentiate pleurisy by its symptoms.

  1. Fibrinous (dry)

The characteristic development is the onset of pleural lesions. There is no infection in the lungs. The pathological condition is due to the active participation of the lymphatic and blood vessels, as well as the appearance of allergies. The permeability of the vessels increases, as a result of which fluids penetrate into the pleural cavity, including fibrin, whose molecules are formed in the lesion and spread to the serous membrane of the lungs.

  1. Purulent

Exudative fluid accumulates in the serous membrane.The disease causes a severe form of body poisoning. Lack of medical therapy can be fatal. A purulent form is formed if the pleura itself is damaged, as well as in the case of an opening of a lung abscess. The pleural sheets become inflamed with exhaustion and reduced immune defenses.

  1. Exudative (exudative)

Next stage after dry type. The inflammation progresses, and the lesions increase. Enzymes less actively break down fibrin filaments, which contributes to the appearance of a pocket in the pleura, in which purulent fluid begins to accumulate.The outflow of lymph is deteriorating, intrapural effusion increases in volume. The effusion leads to compression of the lower portions of the lung, which significantly reduces its allowable volume for life. The exudate makes the friction of the pleural sheets less noticeable, and reduces the strength of the pain syndrome. Pulmonary insufficiency may develop, incompatible with the patient’s life.

  1. Tuberculous

A common form of the disease. It is characterized by a chronic course, as well as poisoning of the body and damage to the lungs (sometimes other organs).The effusion contains many lymphocytes. In some cases, the disease is accompanied by a fibrinous form. Pus of a characteristic thick structure enters the lesion.

The division is relative, since some types of pleurisy are often identified by specialists as a form of one inflammatory process. The initial stage is dry pleurisy, after which the further reaction of the body begins to progress.

Symptoms of the disease are differentiated by dry and exudative degrees.

  1. Exudative pleurisy
  • Weakness, rapid fatigue, slight fever;
  • Chest pain, shortness of breath; the temperature starts to rise.

The acute form is due to tuberculosis and is characterized by the following stages:

  1. The intercostal space is smoothed or, on the contrary, protrudes. The organs of the chest cavity are displaced to the other side due to the effect of pleural fluid.
  2. Acute signs such as pleural friction and body temperature decrease. Chest pain and shortness of breath disappear. A blood test shows a moderate white blood cell count.
  3. Accumulation of pleural fluid can be above the diaphragm or between the lobes and is not recorded on a vertical X-ray image.For this reason, the examination must be carried out in a lateral position. The liquid will move to free areas.

Dry pleurisy

  • chest pain or local pain;
  • general malaise;
  • dry cough;
  • slight fever;
  • pain increases with palpation and deep breathing.

The acute course of the disease is characterized by pleural noise, which is heard with a stethoscope or during coughing.Adequate treatment of dry pleurisy avoids complications.

Pneumothorax and pleural empyema are purulent forms that can develop in the acute stage of the disease due to tubercle bacillus and other infections. Pus enters the pleural cavity, where it begins to accumulate. If empyema is not caused by tuberculosis, then the outcome of treatment is usually positive, but incorrect treatment tactics can develop complications and cause respiratory arrest, infectious and purulent infection. Tuberculous pathology is difficult and can flow into a chronic stage.The patient is losing weight, suffers from suffocation, chills and bouts of severe coughing. Protein metabolism of internal organs is disturbed.

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Diagnostics and treatment

The main task of a specialist is to find out where the focus of inflammation or tumor is located, and the causes of its occurrence.To do this, the doctor analyzes the patient’s medical history and examines him.

Instrumental diagnostics of pleurisy includes:

  • blood test for infection and immunity;
  • chest x-ray;
  • computed tomography;
  • pleurocentesis to detect fluid and infection in it;
  • thoracoscopy to determine the lesion and take a sample for analysis;
  • biopsy;
  • ultrasound examination.

After receiving the results of the examination, the patient is prescribed treatment. If pleurisy is combined with pneumonia, antibiotics are needed. Glucorticoid drugs are indicated for arteritis, rheumatism and scleroderma.

Pleurisy, which is caused by a tubercle bacillus, is treated with isoniazid, rifampicin, and streptomycin. This therapy continues for several months. All stages of the disease involve the use of analgesics, diuretics and cardiovascular drugs, as well as antihistamines and antitussives.

If there are no contraindications, the patient is prescribed physiotherapy exercises and a physiotherapy course. In case of neoplastic pleurisy or malignant tumors of the lymph nodes of the intrathoracic region , chemotherapy is used. During the recovery period after illness, the patient must perform breathing exercises, as well as follow the prescriptions of physiotherapy therapy for general strengthening recommendations.

Prevention

Preventive measures can prevent the development of both the disease itself and possible undesirable consequences and complications.A few general guidelines:

  • timely and adequate treatment of colds and viral infections;
  • 90,015 smoking cessation;

  • climate change with regular infectious diseases of the respiratory system;
  • chest X-ray at the first suspicion of pneumonia;
  • strengthening the immune system;
  • performing breathing exercises.

90,000 ultrasound of the pleural cavity in the Dnieper.

Ultrasound of the pleural cavity in the Dnieper.

  • Ultrasound of the pleural cavity – diagnostic ultrasound examination of the contents and volume of the pleural cavity, its walls and other parameters.

Ultrasound of the pleural cavity for the diagnosis of various pathologies of the lungs and pleura, which include:

  • pneumonia
  • pleurisy
  • pleural epiemia
  • adhesions in the lungs
  • neoplastic lesions of the pleura
  • Metastatic lesions of the lungs and pleura.

Indications for ultrasound of the pleural cavity may be a penetrating wound of the chest cavity. Echography of the pleural cavity or echography is the second name for ultrasound diagnostics of the pleural cavity. An ultrasound of the pleural cavity can be performed in our diagnostic center “Dovira” in Dnipro.

This diagnostic method is very informative, it makes it possible to make the correct diagnosis with great accuracy, while absolutely harmless and safe, which makes it possible, if necessary, to repeat the ultrasound of the pleural cavity repeatedly.
Multiple repeated ultrasound of the pleural cavity is required in the case of monitoring the course of treatment, or when the patient is working in hazardous work.

Ultrasound examination of the pleural cavity does not require special long-term preparation, it is well tolerated by patients, which makes it possible to use this diagnosis in case of a serious condition in a patient. Thanks to the new modern premium equipment with high resolution (this is the equipment used by the ultrasound doctors of our clinic in St.Dnipro), the doctor can detect even a small accumulation of fluid, determine the nature of the pathology, inflammatory, tumor or other type.

Ultrasound of the pleural cavity can be performed by both children and adults, we emphasize once again that the method is absolutely harmless, but at the same time highly informative.

Malignant formations such as:

  • fibroma
  • angioma
  • lymphangioendothelioma
  • fibrous mesothelioma

Therefore, such pathologies are clinically manifested already having rather large dimensions.

The indications for undergoing an ultrasound scan of the pleural cavity are the following symptoms:

  • chest pain
  • long-term cough
  • shortness of breath
  • various kinds of coughing secretions, such as sputum, blood and other
  • high temperature

An ultrasound scan should be done to people who have had severe bronchial diseases, pneumonia, hematogenous embolic, also if the person is in constant contact with patients with tuberculosis.People working in hazardous industries should undergo ultrasound of the pleural cavity for prophylactic purposes, as well as people who are smokers for a long time.

How is the ultrasound of the pleural cavity going.

A special gel is applied to the lower part of the chest. Depending on the complexion and age of the patient (thin or overweight, child or adult), the ultrasound doctor chooses a sensor with an appropriate frequency. First of all, a suspicious area is scanned, then the area adjacent to this area.Sometimes it is required to change the position of the patient for a more detailed diagnosis. Comparison of the existing symptoms with the data of ultrasound diagnostics allows the doctor to make a correct and accurate diagnosis.

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PLEURIT

What is pleurisy?

Pleurisy refers to inflammation of the layers of tissue (pleura) that line the lungs and the inner wall of the chest.

Pleurisy is often associated with an accumulation of fluid between the two layers of the pleura, known as pleural effusion.

Pleurisy is characterized by sharp pain in the chest, which is aggravated by breathing.

Analysis of pleural fluid aspirated from the breast can help determine the cause of pleurisy. It is important to correctly determine the cause of the disease and eliminate it.

Causes of pleurisy

The cause of pleurisy can be chronic bronchitis, infection, tuberculosis, lung cancer.Sometimes pleurisy is accompanied by pneumonia, pneumothorax. Pleurisy may be accompanied by chronic heart failure, pulmonary embolism.

With pleurisy, the internal “lining” of the lungs becomes inflamed, and excess fluid accumulates in them.

There are two layers of the pleura: one covers the lung (called the visceral pleura) and the other covers the inner wall of the chest.

These two layers are lubricated with pleural fluid – it is located between the two layers. We can say that the lungs are “wrapped” in pleura – a thin layer of tissue.When a person is healthy, he never pays attention to how his pleura works.

In cancer patients, exudative pleurisy often occurs, accompanied by pneumothorax – the accumulation of a large amount of pleural fluid.

Symptoms of pleurisy

A symptom of pleurisy is acute chest pain, aggravated by breathing. The patient complains of shortness of breath. The pain may radiate to the back or shoulder.

Diagnosis of pleurisy

The diagnosis of pleurisy is determined based on the following data: chest pain, information obtained from auscultation – drying the lungs.To confirm the diagnosis, additional instrumental studies are required.

Pleural fluid accumulation (pleural effusion) can be seen in studies:

  • chest X-ray,
  • ultrasound
  • computed tomography.

Pleurisy treatment

An anti-inflammatory drug such as ibuprofen (Motrin), indomethacin (indocin), or naproxen (naprosyne), hydrocodone (vicodin) or oxycodone (Percocet) is prescribed.

If a lot of fluid accumulates in the lungs, it must be eliminated by pleural puncture and pumping out the exudate.

Pleurisy can cause severe discomfort.

If the patient is unable to breathe and cough properly, pneumonia develops. Dyspnea increases, a large amount of sputum is released with a cough, a person complains of chills. When the temperature rises to high numbers, you must call the doctor again.

If the pain worsens despite the prescribed medication or if there is no improvement within a week, you should consult your doctor again.

When should you call the doctor?

Talk to your doctor about any chest pain that concerns you. Many causes of chest pain are life-threatening.

If you have a high fever, shivering and chills, and cough up thick green phlegm, you may have pneumonia. An x-ray of the chest will need to be done.

The risk of pleurisy increases with age and the presence of other serious diseases such as heart disease, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, diabetes and collagen tissue diseases, and often with cancer.

If your leg or shoulder is swollen with pleurisy, you may have deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. If chest pain persists, shortness of breath and difficulty breathing, fever or dizziness, you need to see a doctor urgently.

If you are in serious condition, call an ambulance or emergency room immediately.

You can avoid severe pleural pain through early diagnosis and treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs.Most pleurisy is infectious in nature. The disease usually lasts 7-14 days if triggered by a virus.

Severe diseases such as pleurisy are treated by qualified pulmonologists of the therapeutic department of the Yusupov hospital.

Sign up at the Neurology Center:

  • by phone: +7 925 191 50 55
  • fill out the form: APPLICATION FOR TREATMENT
  • get a consultation by e-mail surgery @ rusmedserv.com
  • clinic address: Moscow, Nagornaya st., 17 k 6

Pleural ultrasound in Germany

Pleural ultrasound in Germany is performed to diagnose diseases of the lungs and pleura. Ultrasound of the pleural cavity also includes ultrasound of the pleura and ultrasound of the diaphragm. This study is non-invasive, but quite informative and can be used as an alternative to X-ray methods. With its help, a number of diseases are detected, such as pleurisy , hydrothorax , pleural empyema .

Indications for the appointment of ultrasound of the pleural cavity and ultrasound of the pleura may be wheezing, shortness of breath, blood in sputum, chest trauma, pain in the chest area and other pathological conditions.

How is pleural ultrasound performed in Germany?

The patient lies down or sits down, the doctor applies a special gel to the chest and applies an ultrasound probe. Moving the sensor along the chest, it receives an image of the pleural cavities, pleura and diaphragm on the screen.

Ultrasound of the pleural cavity allows you to quite accurately see the size of the pleural cavity, the state of the pleura, notice the accumulation of fluid or neoplasms, and detect even minor changes in the structure of the tissues of the pleura and lungs.

For the diagnosis of what diseases is an ultrasound of the pleural cavity prescribed in Germany?

Ultrasound of the pleural cavity helps to diagnose many diseases of the lungs and pleura, among which:

Other methods of lung diagnostics are also used in Germany, allowing the fastest and most accurate determination of the disease and its stage, for example, spiroergometry, endobronchial ultrasound, CT of the lungs.

It is better to diagnose complex and rare lung diseases in leading clinics such as the Asklepios Gauting Center for Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery.It is one of the best medical institutions dealing with respiratory diseases in Germany.

If you want to go to Germany for diagnostics and treatment to do the necessary examination and undergo a course of treatment, we are ready to help you. Specialists of the medical company EMEX Medical will advise you on all relevant issues and take care of organizing the trip.

Asklepios Gauting Pulmonology Clinic

You can see the cost of the most demanded diagnostic tests in Germany on our website.

You can find out the price for ultrasound of the pleural cavity by contacting us. If you have the results of other tests, you can also send them to the doctors for review.

How to get diagnosed in Germany? 90,000 Diagnostic thoracoscopy – another type of research began to be performed at the FEFU Medical Center

31 March 2017

Diagnostic thoracoscopy – another type of research began to be performed at the FEFU Medical Center

Making an accurate diagnosis is one of the main tasks of a doctor.The effectiveness of the prescribed treatment directly depends on how correctly it was delivered. Modern methods of laboratory, ultrasound and radiation diagnostics are not always able to provide sufficient information to establish a correct diagnosis. Then surgical methods of research come to the rescue. According to Alexey Shapovalov, a thoracic surgeon at the FEFU Medical Center (MC), minimally invasive diagnostic methods are most often used in thoracic surgery.

– This procedure is called “Diagnostic thoracoscopy”, – explains Alexey Sergeevich.- Through a small puncture made in the chest wall, a camera is introduced – a thoracoscope, which allows you to examine the pleural cavity, where the lungs, pleura, mediastinum and the lining of the heart – the pericardium are located. Thanks to the high-resolution camera, the surgeon can see the image at 4x magnification. This allows you to assess the color, structure, condition of the organs located in the pleural cavity. During the examination, a biopsy can be performed – obtaining tissue samples for the purpose of their histological examination.In some cases, thoracoscopy can help the patient by removing the pathological area of ​​the lung, pleura and mediastinum. In this case, diagnostic thoracoscopy turns into a therapeutic one. Another indication for its appointment is pleurisy of unknown origin.

“The intervention takes place under general anesthesia and lasts about 30 minutes,” says Sergey Belov, a thoracic surgeon of the highest category of the FEFU MC. – It is important to note that surgical trauma and the risk of complications with thoracoscopy are significantly lower than with traditional diagnostic thoracotomy.The diagnostic thoracoscopy method meets all modern requirements for minimally invasive surgery. Has a minimum of complications, a short rehabilitation postoperative period, is less traumatic to tissues, does not require a large number of painkillers in the postoperative period (some patients even refuse to take them for 2-3 days after the operation), reduces the length of inpatient stay, does not leave large scars on the patient’s body.

In order to get a consultation from a thoracic surgeon at the FEFU MC, you need to make an appointment by phone 8 (423) 223 00 00 or through the online registration form on our website – https: // www.