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Dry eczema scalp: Scalp eczema: Symptoms, treatment, and remedies

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Scalp eczema: Symptoms, treatment, and remedies

The shedding of white skin flakes is often the most noticeable symptom of scalp eczema.

Eczema that affects the scalp may sometimes be seborrheic dermatitis, which people also refer to as dandruff. This form of eczema is the type that most often affects the scalp. In babies, it is known as cradle cap.

There may be itchy, red, and sometimes inflamed skin that is typical of different kinds of eczema.

Scalp eczema can be a stubborn condition that persists for years. It can come and go without warning, and it can disappear on its own. Symptoms of scalp eczema can be effectively managed, but the condition cannot be cured completely.

In this article, we will examine the risk factors linked to scalp eczema, how to help prevent it, and what to do about it when it occurs.

Scalp eczema may be triggered by stress, hormones, and illness.

No one really knows what causes scalp eczema, but it affects up to 5 percent of the general population. Slightly more men are affected than women.

Genes, hormones, illness, and stress have all been known to trigger scalp eczema in some people.

Other medical conditions can make people more prone to scalp eczema. These include:

Other risk factors linked to scalp eczema include the following:

  • stress
  • lack of sleep
  • cold, dry weather
  • sweating
  • irritants
  • dry skin
  • greasy hair

Once triggered, scalp eczema can be made worse by a combination of otherwise normal skin properties.

Naturally occurring oil called sebum, yeast that lives on the skin, and a skin fungus called Malassezia, all play a role.

Sebum is a waxy, fatty substance that is expelled by the sebaceous glands. Too much of this can cause greasy scales to develop on the scalp. This can then cause the overgrowth of an otherwise normal skin fungus called Malassezia.

Dandruff occurs when the Malassezia fungus irritates the sebaceous glands of the scalp. This triggers the body’s immune response and causes the distinctive scaly rash.

In short, dandruff is just one symptom of scalp eczema.

Scalp eczema causes patches of skin to become red, flaky, and itchy. It can also affect other oily areas of the body, such as the face, nose, eyebrows, and eyelids.

This form of eczema can also affect the ear canal. When it does, it may result in the discharge of fluid from the ear.

Scalp eczema can cause the skin to become greasy, waxy, or even blistered. These patches of skin can become infected and will release clear fluid.

The color of the skin can change in the affected area, even after it has healed.

Shampoos may be the most effective treatment against scalp eczema.

Although scalp eczema cannot be cured, medical treatment can bring relief by removing the scaly buildup and reducing itchiness.

Treatments for scalp eczema usually come in the form of a shampoo or a cream or gel to apply to the scalp.

Shampoos that are most effective against scalp eczema include those that contain one or more of the following ingredients:

  • zinc pyrithione
  • salicylic acid
  • selenium sulfide
  • ketoconazole
  • coal tar

In mild cases of scalp eczema, antifungal creams, ointments, or sprays can be effective. Typically, these contain coal tar or corticosteroids that help calm the irritation and stop the flaking.

In more severe cases, a mild corticosteroid can calm the inflammation. Doctors may prescribe topical corticosteroids to treat an active flare-up marked by redness, itching, and flaking. Corticosteroids are not suitable for use over long periods.

Doctors may also prescribe non-corticosteroid medicine, such as topical drugs that suppress the immune system called calcineurin inhibitors. People can use these for a more extended period than corticosteroids.

In very severe cases, a doctor may prescribe an oral antifungal medication.

Anecdotally, natural remedies have helped relieve the symptoms of scalp eczema in some people. These include the following topical treatments:

  • tea tree oil
  • olive oil
  • aloe vera

The following dietary supplements have been beneficial in some cases:

A physical examination is usually necessary for a doctor to diagnose scalp eczema.

Scalp eczema can cause extreme discomfort, anxiety, and infected skin. When any of these things happen, or if scalp eczema persists despite home treatment, it is usually time to see a doctor.

There is no single test for decisively diagnosing scalp eczema. This is because the yeasts and fungus that play a role in scalp eczema occur naturally on the scalp of everyone.

A doctor will aim to rule out other similar skin conditions, such as psoriasis and allergic reactions. They will usually diagnose seborrheic dermatitis after a physical examination of the affected skin.

Some doctors may refer people to a dermatologist, a doctor who specializes in skin conditions.

The doctor may take a skin scraping to determine whether a fungal infection is also present. Rarely, a small sample may be required to rule out the other conditions that resemble scalp eczema.

Flare-ups can be prevented by reducing stress and by avoiding exposure to suspected irritants. Irritants affect people differently, but they can include hair dye, harsh soap, and very hot water.

It can help to keep the scalp clean with a gentle shampoo and warm water. It is a good idea to do this after heavy work or exercise, as sweat can be a trigger in some cases.

Scalp eczema tends to affect babies under the age of 3 months. It usually clears up completely between the ages of 6 months and 1 year, but it can return during puberty.

In adults, scalp eczema tends to start during late adolescence. It most often affects adults between the ages of 30 and 60.

In some cases, scalp eczema can clear up without treatment. More often, it lasts for years, and comes and goes without warning. Treatment is often necessary to control the itchy and scaly symptoms.

Read the article in Spanish.

Scalp eczema: Symptoms, treatment, and remedies

The shedding of white skin flakes is often the most noticeable symptom of scalp eczema.

Eczema that affects the scalp may sometimes be seborrheic dermatitis, which people also refer to as dandruff. This form of eczema is the type that most often affects the scalp. In babies, it is known as cradle cap.

There may be itchy, red, and sometimes inflamed skin that is typical of different kinds of eczema.

Scalp eczema can be a stubborn condition that persists for years. It can come and go without warning, and it can disappear on its own. Symptoms of scalp eczema can be effectively managed, but the condition cannot be cured completely.

In this article, we will examine the risk factors linked to scalp eczema, how to help prevent it, and what to do about it when it occurs.

Scalp eczema may be triggered by stress, hormones, and illness.

No one really knows what causes scalp eczema, but it affects up to 5 percent of the general population. Slightly more men are affected than women.

Genes, hormones, illness, and stress have all been known to trigger scalp eczema in some people.

Other medical conditions can make people more prone to scalp eczema. These include:

Other risk factors linked to scalp eczema include the following:

  • stress
  • lack of sleep
  • cold, dry weather
  • sweating
  • irritants
  • dry skin
  • greasy hair

Once triggered, scalp eczema can be made worse by a combination of otherwise normal skin properties.

Naturally occurring oil called sebum, yeast that lives on the skin, and a skin fungus called Malassezia, all play a role.

Sebum is a waxy, fatty substance that is expelled by the sebaceous glands. Too much of this can cause greasy scales to develop on the scalp. This can then cause the overgrowth of an otherwise normal skin fungus called Malassezia.

Dandruff occurs when the Malassezia fungus irritates the sebaceous glands of the scalp. This triggers the body’s immune response and causes the distinctive scaly rash.

In short, dandruff is just one symptom of scalp eczema.

Scalp eczema causes patches of skin to become red, flaky, and itchy. It can also affect other oily areas of the body, such as the face, nose, eyebrows, and eyelids.

This form of eczema can also affect the ear canal. When it does, it may result in the discharge of fluid from the ear.

Scalp eczema can cause the skin to become greasy, waxy, or even blistered. These patches of skin can become infected and will release clear fluid.

The color of the skin can change in the affected area, even after it has healed.

Shampoos may be the most effective treatment against scalp eczema.

Although scalp eczema cannot be cured, medical treatment can bring relief by removing the scaly buildup and reducing itchiness.

Treatments for scalp eczema usually come in the form of a shampoo or a cream or gel to apply to the scalp.

Shampoos that are most effective against scalp eczema include those that contain one or more of the following ingredients:

  • zinc pyrithione
  • salicylic acid
  • selenium sulfide
  • ketoconazole
  • coal tar

In mild cases of scalp eczema, antifungal creams, ointments, or sprays can be effective. Typically, these contain coal tar or corticosteroids that help calm the irritation and stop the flaking.

In more severe cases, a mild corticosteroid can calm the inflammation. Doctors may prescribe topical corticosteroids to treat an active flare-up marked by redness, itching, and flaking. Corticosteroids are not suitable for use over long periods.

Doctors may also prescribe non-corticosteroid medicine, such as topical drugs that suppress the immune system called calcineurin inhibitors. People can use these for a more extended period than corticosteroids.

In very severe cases, a doctor may prescribe an oral antifungal medication.

Anecdotally, natural remedies have helped relieve the symptoms of scalp eczema in some people. These include the following topical treatments:

  • tea tree oil
  • olive oil
  • aloe vera

The following dietary supplements have been beneficial in some cases:

A physical examination is usually necessary for a doctor to diagnose scalp eczema.

Scalp eczema can cause extreme discomfort, anxiety, and infected skin. When any of these things happen, or if scalp eczema persists despite home treatment, it is usually time to see a doctor.

There is no single test for decisively diagnosing scalp eczema. This is because the yeasts and fungus that play a role in scalp eczema occur naturally on the scalp of everyone.

A doctor will aim to rule out other similar skin conditions, such as psoriasis and allergic reactions. They will usually diagnose seborrheic dermatitis after a physical examination of the affected skin.

Some doctors may refer people to a dermatologist, a doctor who specializes in skin conditions.

The doctor may take a skin scraping to determine whether a fungal infection is also present. Rarely, a small sample may be required to rule out the other conditions that resemble scalp eczema.

Flare-ups can be prevented by reducing stress and by avoiding exposure to suspected irritants. Irritants affect people differently, but they can include hair dye, harsh soap, and very hot water.

It can help to keep the scalp clean with a gentle shampoo and warm water. It is a good idea to do this after heavy work or exercise, as sweat can be a trigger in some cases.

Scalp eczema tends to affect babies under the age of 3 months. It usually clears up completely between the ages of 6 months and 1 year, but it can return during puberty.

In adults, scalp eczema tends to start during late adolescence. It most often affects adults between the ages of 30 and 60.

In some cases, scalp eczema can clear up without treatment. More often, it lasts for years, and comes and goes without warning. Treatment is often necessary to control the itchy and scaly symptoms.

Read the article in Spanish.

Scalp eczema: Symptoms, treatment, and remedies

The shedding of white skin flakes is often the most noticeable symptom of scalp eczema.

Eczema that affects the scalp may sometimes be seborrheic dermatitis, which people also refer to as dandruff. This form of eczema is the type that most often affects the scalp. In babies, it is known as cradle cap.

There may be itchy, red, and sometimes inflamed skin that is typical of different kinds of eczema.

Scalp eczema can be a stubborn condition that persists for years. It can come and go without warning, and it can disappear on its own. Symptoms of scalp eczema can be effectively managed, but the condition cannot be cured completely.

In this article, we will examine the risk factors linked to scalp eczema, how to help prevent it, and what to do about it when it occurs.

Scalp eczema may be triggered by stress, hormones, and illness.

No one really knows what causes scalp eczema, but it affects up to 5 percent of the general population. Slightly more men are affected than women.

Genes, hormones, illness, and stress have all been known to trigger scalp eczema in some people.

Other medical conditions can make people more prone to scalp eczema. These include:

Other risk factors linked to scalp eczema include the following:

  • stress
  • lack of sleep
  • cold, dry weather
  • sweating
  • irritants
  • dry skin
  • greasy hair

Once triggered, scalp eczema can be made worse by a combination of otherwise normal skin properties.

Naturally occurring oil called sebum, yeast that lives on the skin, and a skin fungus called Malassezia, all play a role.

Sebum is a waxy, fatty substance that is expelled by the sebaceous glands. Too much of this can cause greasy scales to develop on the scalp. This can then cause the overgrowth of an otherwise normal skin fungus called Malassezia.

Dandruff occurs when the Malassezia fungus irritates the sebaceous glands of the scalp. This triggers the body’s immune response and causes the distinctive scaly rash.

In short, dandruff is just one symptom of scalp eczema.

Scalp eczema causes patches of skin to become red, flaky, and itchy. It can also affect other oily areas of the body, such as the face, nose, eyebrows, and eyelids.

This form of eczema can also affect the ear canal. When it does, it may result in the discharge of fluid from the ear.

Scalp eczema can cause the skin to become greasy, waxy, or even blistered. These patches of skin can become infected and will release clear fluid.

The color of the skin can change in the affected area, even after it has healed.

Shampoos may be the most effective treatment against scalp eczema.

Although scalp eczema cannot be cured, medical treatment can bring relief by removing the scaly buildup and reducing itchiness.

Treatments for scalp eczema usually come in the form of a shampoo or a cream or gel to apply to the scalp.

Shampoos that are most effective against scalp eczema include those that contain one or more of the following ingredients:

  • zinc pyrithione
  • salicylic acid
  • selenium sulfide
  • ketoconazole
  • coal tar

In mild cases of scalp eczema, antifungal creams, ointments, or sprays can be effective. Typically, these contain coal tar or corticosteroids that help calm the irritation and stop the flaking.

In more severe cases, a mild corticosteroid can calm the inflammation. Doctors may prescribe topical corticosteroids to treat an active flare-up marked by redness, itching, and flaking. Corticosteroids are not suitable for use over long periods.

Doctors may also prescribe non-corticosteroid medicine, such as topical drugs that suppress the immune system called calcineurin inhibitors. People can use these for a more extended period than corticosteroids.

In very severe cases, a doctor may prescribe an oral antifungal medication.

Anecdotally, natural remedies have helped relieve the symptoms of scalp eczema in some people. These include the following topical treatments:

  • tea tree oil
  • olive oil
  • aloe vera

The following dietary supplements have been beneficial in some cases:

A physical examination is usually necessary for a doctor to diagnose scalp eczema.

Scalp eczema can cause extreme discomfort, anxiety, and infected skin. When any of these things happen, or if scalp eczema persists despite home treatment, it is usually time to see a doctor.

There is no single test for decisively diagnosing scalp eczema. This is because the yeasts and fungus that play a role in scalp eczema occur naturally on the scalp of everyone.

A doctor will aim to rule out other similar skin conditions, such as psoriasis and allergic reactions. They will usually diagnose seborrheic dermatitis after a physical examination of the affected skin.

Some doctors may refer people to a dermatologist, a doctor who specializes in skin conditions.

The doctor may take a skin scraping to determine whether a fungal infection is also present. Rarely, a small sample may be required to rule out the other conditions that resemble scalp eczema.

Flare-ups can be prevented by reducing stress and by avoiding exposure to suspected irritants. Irritants affect people differently, but they can include hair dye, harsh soap, and very hot water.

It can help to keep the scalp clean with a gentle shampoo and warm water. It is a good idea to do this after heavy work or exercise, as sweat can be a trigger in some cases.

Scalp eczema tends to affect babies under the age of 3 months. It usually clears up completely between the ages of 6 months and 1 year, but it can return during puberty.

In adults, scalp eczema tends to start during late adolescence. It most often affects adults between the ages of 30 and 60.

In some cases, scalp eczema can clear up without treatment. More often, it lasts for years, and comes and goes without warning. Treatment is often necessary to control the itchy and scaly symptoms.

Read the article in Spanish.

Scalp Eczema | About and Treatments

Scalp eczema

Jump to:

Introduction

Types of eczema that affect the scalp

How is scalp eczema treated?

Washing the hair

Introduction

The scalp is an area of the body that can be affected by several types of eczema. The scalp may be dry, itchy and scaly in a chronic phase and inflamed (red), weepy and painful in an acute (eczema flare) phase.

Aside from eczema, there are a number of reasons why the scalp can become dry and itchy (e.g. psoriasis, fungal infection, ringworm, head lice etc.), so it is wise to get a firm diagnosis if there is uncertainty.

Types of eczema that affect the scalp

Seborrhoeic eczema (dermatitis) is one of the most common types of eczema seen on the scalp and hairline. It can affect babies (cradle cap), children and adults. The skin appears red and scaly and there is often dandruff as well, which can vary in severity. There may also be a rash on other parts of the face, such as around the eyebrows, eyelids and sides of the nose. Seborrhoeic eczema can become infected. See the National Eczema Society factsheets on Adult seborrhoeic dermatitis and Infantile seborrhoeic dermatitis and cradle cap for more details.

Atopic eczema is another common type of eczema that can affect the scalp at all ages. The skin is red, dry and itchy and can easily become infected, especially if scratched and when there is broken skin.

Allergic contact dermatitis can develop as a result of your body reacting to a particular substance to which you are allergic. Everyday items that can cause allergic contact dermatitis on the scalp include the following:

  • Hair shampoos, conditioners, gels, sprays and other hair products
  • Hair dyes, perm solutions
  • Bathing caps, hair nets – especially those containing rubber
  • Hair clips and headgear – especially those containing rubber or nickel.

See the National Eczema Society booklet on Contact dermatitis for more details.

Irritant contact dermatitis is a type of eczema that occurs when the skin’s surface is irritated by a substance that causes the skin to become dry, red and itchy. For example, shampoos, mousses, hair gels, hair spray, perm solution and fragrance can all cause irritant contact dermatitis. See the National Eczema Society booklet on Contact dermatitis for more details.

How is scalp eczema treated?

Treatment of scalp eczema will depend on the type diagnosed by your doctor. Below are possible treatments that may be prescribed:

Moisturising the scalp

The skin on the scalp requires moisturising just like the body, but it can be difficult to get beyond the hair to the scalp. Moisturising creams or spray-on oils can be applied to the scalp by parting the hair and massaging them into the skin (ointments are not suitable as they are grease-based and difficult to wash out). Medical emollients in lotion, gel and spray-on oil forms, for example, Diprobase® lotion, Doublebase® gel, and the spray-on oil Emollin®, may be suitable. Coconut oil is another option, which, like emollient creams, can be bought in pharmacies. It comes as a solid form that melts at skin temperature. Olive oil is no longer recommended as it has been found to damage the skin barrier; as an alternative, non-fragranced mineral oil (baby oil) is recommended.

People often prefer to moisturise the scalp in the evening, using a cotton turban or shower cap to keep the moisturising cream or oil in overnight, and then rinse the product out (see section below on washing hair) in the morning. If the scalp is very scaly, a salicylic acid and tar preparation (for example, Cocois® or Sebco®) can also be applied in the same way and left in place for at least 4 hours, but an overnight application is more effective. These scalp treatments are messy, so make sure you use an old pillowcase! In the morning, simply shampoo out the treatment.

Treating flares

In the acute phase of scalp eczema (i.e. when the eczema flares) the treatment is similar to treatment for other body areas. Try to treat the scalp and not the hair – part the hair and massage treatments onto the scalp.

Topical steroids designed for use on the scalp can be prescribed. Some have an alcohol base, which can cause stinging, so a lotion, mousse or gel preparation may be a more comfortable option – for example, Elocon lotion® or Bettamousse® or Synalar® gel (although these might be too potent for a young child, in which case a mild topical steroid cream, such as 1% Hydrocortisone, would be prescribed. For older children, a moderate topical steroid such as Eumovate, may be prescribed for a short treatment burst). It is important to use topical steroids for a prescribed treatment course – usually 2 weeks. For more information, see the National Eczema Society factsheet on Topical steroids.

If scalp eczema extends onto the hairline and face, different strengths of topical steroids will be required, as less potent topical steroids are advised for the face.

If the scalp is scaly and inflamed, topical steroids combined with salicylic acid can be helpful (for example, Diprosalic® scalp application). If scalp eczema is infected, oral antibiotics may need to be prescribed.

Please note: we are not recommending particular prescription-only topical steroids but rather giving examples.

Washing the hair

If you have dry, itchy skin and scalp eczema, normal shampoos containing detergents and fragrance are likely to irritate your scalp. Therefore, it is important that you either find a less irritant shampoo (e.g. E45 Dry Scalp Shampoo or Eucerin® DermoCapillaire Calming Urea Shampoo) or simply use water with the optional addition of bicarbonate of soda mixed into a thin paste or an emollient bath oil. Conditioners can also irritate the scalp, so are best avoided. Avoid all shampoos and hair products that are fragranced, as these will cause irritation and possibly allergy. Use hair dryers on cool settings; hot air will increase dryness and itching.

There are several medicated shampoos available for treating scalp problems, which may help in managing scalp eczema. However, these need to be selected carefully, and washed off thoroughly to avoid irritation. The following are examples: Dermax® Therapeutic Shampoo contains a mild antiseptic, benzalkonium chloride, and helps to reduce scale; T-Gel® is a gentle tar shampoo; Capasal® contains salicylic acid, coconut oil and tar, which may help a very scaly scalp.

Seborrhoeic dermatitis should be managed with shampoos especially designed to reduce the yeast element and flaking in seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp (for example, Ketoconazole® shampoo and shampoos containing selenium sulphide or zinc pyrithione). Anti-yeast shampoos should be used once a week as an ongoing preventative measure for adult seborrhoeic dermatitis. It is neither necessary nor advisable to use anti-yeast shampoos for other types of eczema.

To obtain the information on this page in a PDF format, please download our Scalp eczema factsheet, below.

Related Documents

What the Causes May Be and How to Treat It Today

Itching, flaking, and irritation are signs that you have dry skin — too little of the oil that keeps your skin moisturized. Your scalp can also dry out and cause the same symptoms.

It can happen for many reasons. Here are some of the causes, and how to treat them.

Too Much Washing

Washing your hair every day can strip your scalp of the natural oils it needs to stay hydrated. Over time, you can dry out your hair to the point where it becomes brittle and breaks.

How often you should wash depends on your hair type. People with coarser hair may only need once-weekly washings. Those with fine hair may need to wash a few times a week. Ask your stylist or dermatologist how often to wash based on your hair type.

Hair Products

A scalp that turns red, itches, and flakes after you wash it could be contact dermatitis. This allergic reaction happens when you use certain shampoos, soaps, or other products in your hair. If you dye your hair black, dermatitis may be a reaction to the chemical PPD in the hair dye.

Continued

The first step to treating contact dermatitis is to figure out which product caused the reaction. Cut out one thing at a time to see if your symptoms clear up. After 2-4 weeks off the product, your dry scalp should improve.

While you figure out the cause, try not to scratch your scalp. Scratching irritates the skin and can make your symptoms worse. Place a cool, wet washcloth on your scalp for 15 to 30 minutes a few times a day to soothe the itch. You can also apply a cortisone anti-itch cream.

Weather Changes

During the winter months in cold climates, the humidity in the air drops. Cold weather dries out the skin all over your body, including on your scalp. Blasting the heat can also be drying.

Use warm water instead of hot water in your shower and bath to keep your skin and scalp moist. Don’t stay under the water for longer than 5 or 10 minutes at a time. Spending too much time under hot water can strip your skin of its natural oils.

Turn on a humidifier in your home to add moisture to the air. And use a gentle moisturizing shampoo to wash your hair.

Dandruff vs. Dry Scalp

Dandruff might seem like the result of dry scalp, but it can happen for many reasons, including a yeast-like fungus that feeds on the oils in your skin. Dandruff is a symptom of the skin condition seborrheic dermatitis, which is a type of eczema. It causes redness, itching, and flakes on areas of skin where there are lots of oil-producing glands, like around your nose and scalp.

To get rid of those little white flakes, use a dandruff shampoo once or twice a week. Look for ingredients like these:

Follow the instructions on the bottle carefully. Some dandruff shampoos need to stay on your scalp for several minutes. Others rinse off right away.

If a dandruff shampoo doesn’t relieve your flakes, see a dermatologist. You might have a skin condition that needs treatment.

Eczema

Eczema is a common skin condition that leaves your scalp dry, red, itchy, and cracked.

Continued

Atopic eczema is the type of eczema that affects people who have allergies. It often runs in families, so if one or both of your parents had eczema, you may get it too.

Soap, detergent, stress, and changes in the weather can cause dry eczema patches to form on your scalp. You may also have dryness on your hands, elbows, face, and on the backs of your knees.

Avoid harsh shampoos or other products that trigger your symptoms. Ask your doctor about using an emollient or cream to add moisture back into your skin.

Scalp Psoriasis

In psoriasis, your immune system misfires and makes your skin cells multiply much faster than usual. Those extra cells build up on the surface of your skin and create itchy, scaly patches called plaques.

Psoriasis can pop up on your face, inside your ears, hands and feet, back, and nails. It can also leave itchy patches on your scalp, forehead, and on the back of your neck.

Continued

For mild scalp psoriasis, you can try a medicated shampoo that contains coal tar. It should help relieve the itch. Treatments for more severe scalp psoriasis include creams like these that you rub on your scalp:

Psoriasis that’s on many parts of your body may need treatment with drugs that you take by mouth, like methotrexate or cyclosporine, or shots like adalimumab or ixekizumab.

Eczema on Scalp: Symptoms, Causes & Treatments

If you have a scalp, it’s going to itch at some point. But if the top of your head is severely itchy, you might actually have eczema on your scalp. Yup, it happens.

Eczema is a condition that can cause flare-ups of a red, scaly, itchy rash to appear on different parts of your body, according to the Mayo Clinic. The most common form of eczema is atopic dermatitis, which generally shows up on areas of your body like your hands, feet, ankles, wrists, neck, upper chest, eyelids, elbows, and knees, but it can be anywhere—including under your hair.

You might not think you can have eczema if you’re having issues only with your scalp, but it’s possible. While it’s likely that having scalp eczema also means that you have it elsewhere, it’s not a requirement. “Sometimes eczema can be seen only on the scalp,” Gary Goldenberg, M.D., assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, tells SELF.

Translation: If you’re dealing with intense scalp irritation, don’t assume you can combat it on your own—get to a dermatologist as soon as you can.

You would think you couldn’t miss having eczema on your scalp, but people with this condition often mistake it for something else. “Many times, patients just assume it is a consequence they have to live with from their hair products, or that they have a dry scalp,” Cynthia Bailey, M.D., a diplomate of the American Board of Dermatology and founder of Dr. Bailey Skin Care, tells SELF.

Here’s how to tell whether or not eczema is what’s really behind your irritated scalp.

What causes scalp eczema?

Eczema is a term that’s used to describe several different conditions, one of which is atopic dermatitis. All of these conditions are caused by a disruption in the skin barrier that usually keeps irritants out and hydration in. But if that barrier isn’t working properly, the skin can become dry, red, irritated, and sensitive to irritants and allergens. That barrier disruption may be driven by a gene variation, the Mayo Clinic says.

There are some triggers that your scalp is especially likely to come in contact with, like ingredients in your shampoo, conditioner, and hair styling products. If you brush your hair aggressively, wash your hair too frequently, or heat-style your hair often, those could also aggravate dry skin on your scalp or trigger eczema symptoms.

What are the symptoms of eczema on your scalp?

When your skin’s barrier is unable to function properly, that makes it difficult for the skin to keep moisture in. It also makes the skin more sensitive to potential irritants. So, according to the Mayo Clinic, the symptoms of eczema often include:

  • very dry skin
  • patches of reddish or brownish skin
  • intense itching that gets especially bad at night
  • sensitive or swollen skin after scratching
  • flakes on your clothes or shoulders after scratching
  • small bumps that might leak fluid
  • thickened or cracked skin

What’s the difference between scalp eczema and scalp psoriasis?

There are a surprising amount of conditions that can cause an itchy scalp, so it’s important to be sure you know what you’re really dealing with. Seborrheic dermatitis, for example, is a major cause of dandruff and has an entirely different treatment plan than eczema.

Scalp Eczema – Signs, Causes, Prevention And Treatments – SkinKraft

When you think of eczema, the first thing that comes to mind is the skin condition. But, did you know that eczema can also affect the scalp?

The most common symptoms of scalp eczema are dryness, itchiness, chronic irritation, swelling, burning, and redness. However, itchiness and dryness in the scalp may also occur due to other reasons such as a fungal infection, lice, or psoriasis.

Read on to find out more about scalp eczema and the best ways to treat and manage it.

Highlights:

What Is Scalp Eczema?

Scalp eczema is a condition that causes itchy, inflamed, and dry skin to form on your scalp. One of the most common forms of scalp eczema is seborrheic dermatitis, and usually, its most prevalent symptom is dandruff. Since it typically develops on oily areas of your skin, it may also affect your face and back.

Note:

Remember, scalp eczema is not contagious.

Scalp Eczema Symptoms

The common symptoms of scalp eczema include:

  • Dryness
  • Itchiness
  • Flaky scalp
  • Burning
  • Scaly patches
  • Dandruff
  • Redness and inflammation

What Causes Scalp Eczema?

The exact cause of scalp eczema is unknown, but different factors are often associated with triggering scalp eczema. These include hormonal changes, genetics, stress, and chronic illnesses.

How Can I Get Rid Of Eczema On My Scalp?

Your doctor may propose different treatments for you, depending on your condition. This may include a combination of medicated shampoos, moisturizers, medicines, and light therapies.

1. Medicated Shampoos, Lotions, and Creams

Just like your skin requires regular moisturizing, your scalp needs it too. You can use medicated products such as shampoo, lotion, or cream to massage your scalp regularly.

Since it can be tricky to work the moisture through your hair so it reaches the scalp, it is essential to part your hair into sections before application. With this step, the medicine is absorbed effectively into the affected areas.

Medicated emollients lotions [1] and spray-on oil can also be used to keep the scalp moisturized and hydrated.

If your scalp is too scaly, you can use a combination of salicylic acid and tar preparation [2]. Apply the formula and leave it on overnight, or at least for four hours and shampoo your hair in the morning.

Don’t forget to cover your hair with a shower cap or a cotton turban if you leave the medicine on overnight as the process may get messy.

2. Light Therapy For Scalp Eczema

About 70% [3] of people get treated for eczema with light therapy or phototherapy. The most common type of light therapy used for scalp eczema treatment is a narrowband ultraviolet B light, which is present in natural sunlight in small amounts.

Broadband UVB phototherapy, PUVA, and UVA1 are other forms of light therapy used to treat some cases of scalp eczema.

Phototherapy helps reduce the itch, controls inflammation, and boosts vitamin D production in the body.

3. OTC Medicines

Over-the-counter medicines that contain zinc pyrithione, salicylic acid, ketoconazole, and selenium sulfide are used to treat scalp eczema.

Additionally, your doctor may prescribe medicines such as desonide, clobetasol, fluocinolone, and hydrocortisone to reduce inflammation. [4]

Word Of Caution:

While these medications work, you should refrain from using them for more than a week to avoid side effects. Skin thinning is a common side-effect.

4. Home Remedies

Some people have benefitted from topical application of essential oils like tea tree oil, olive oil, and aloe vera gel, along with dietary supplements like vitamins A, D, and B, Zinc, omega-3, probiotics, and water. [5]

5. Eczema Diet

Foods To Eat:

You can control your eczema symptoms by eating certain foods such as fatty fish with fish oil, a rich source of omega-3. Since omega-3 is anti-inflammatory, it helps provide relief from the pain.

Foods like apples, berries, broccoli, and spinach are rich sources of quercetin, a plant-based flavonoid. Quercetin has antioxidant and antihistamine properties, which help reduce inflammation and offer considerable relief from eczema.

Foods To Avoid:

While no particular food causes eczema, certain foods may flare up or trigger eczema. In many people, eczema has some connection with food allergies. However, this varies from patient to patient.

Remember, it is important to consult your physician to identify foods to avoid. Common food allergies usually associated with eczema include:

  • Cow’s milk
  • Gluten
  • Eggs
  • Soy products
  • Fish and shellfish
  • Nuts

Preventive Tips & Risks

If you are prone to scalp eczema, here are some preventive measures for you:

1. Reduce your stress levels.

2. Reduce your exposure to irritants.

3. Avoid washing your hair with hot water as this can dry out your scalp further.

4. Keep your scalp clean by using a mild shampoo to wash off dirt and sweat especially after workouts.

People Who Are At Risk:

People who have pre-existing skin conditions like psoriasis, rosacea, acne, or diseases that weaken the immune or nervous systems such as Parkinson’s disease and HIV are at risk of developing scalp eczema.

Allergic conditions like hay fever and asthma can also trigger scalp eczema.

How Do I Know If I Have Scalp Eczema?

Don’t confuse scalp eczema with dandruff. Scalp eczema is characterized by flaky and greasy or a waxy scalp. Additionally, it may also have weeping lesions and some oozing. However, your doctor would be the right person to diagnose scalp eczema.

Can I Dye My Hair If I Have Scalp Eczema?

Many hair dyes contain ingredients that may irritate the scalp or cause an allergic reaction. If you want to dye your hair, choose a product that is free of phenylenediamines, ammonia, and hydrogen peroxide. If you already have a flare-up, wait for a few days for it to subside.

Remember to do a patch test before you begin the hair-dyeing process. Deep conditioning your scalp with a hydrating conditioner at least two days before dyeing your hair ensures that the scalp does not become dry and flaky.

Note:

Hair does not react to dye, but sensitive scalps do. Consult with your doctor if you want to dye your hair.

How Long Does Scalp Eczema Last?

In babies, scalp eczema usually clears up between six months and a year. However, in adults, it may last for years, as it comes and goes intermittently. Treatment can help control your symptoms significantly. In some people, it may clear up without any treatment.

Does Scalp Eczema Cause Hair Loss?

Although scalp eczema or seborrheic dermatitis is not a direct cause of hair loss, itching and scratching can injure the scalp while damaging hair follicles. This, in turn, leads to brittle hair, resulting in some amount of hair fall and hair loss.

Wrapping Up

Scalp eczema is chronic and may last for years, but it is possible to manage your symptoms effectively. While home remedies are a boon for some, it is strongly advisable to consult your doctor to identify the nature of your scalp eczema and follow a suitable course of action.

Begin By Knowing Your Skin

90,000 symptoms and treatments in EMC

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What is eczema?

Eczema is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with itching, redness and rashes in the form of small vesicles of fluid. The rash resembles air bubbles that form when water boils. Hence the name of the disease (from the Greek.eczeo – boil).

Eczema is not spread from person to person. This is a genetically determined disease. Eczema occurs quite often, it is diagnosed in about 30-40% of patients who visit a dermatologist.

What does eczema look like and on which parts of the body it appears

Wet and itchy skin on face and hands

Rash on the skin in the form of blisters and bumps, accompanied by redness, can be manifestations of true eczema.Subsequently, the bubbles open with the release of serous fluid, in their place are formed shallow point erosion (ulcers). The released liquid dries up to form a soft crust.

The appearance of repeated rashes in the area of ​​the pathological focus leads to the simultaneous localization of vesicles, ulcers, and crusts on the skin. All rashes are accompanied by severe itching, which causes significant discomfort to the patient and reduces the quality of life. Sometimes itching at night causes insomnia.

Symmetry is characteristic of the rashes, the absence of clear boundaries at the affected area.

The rash tends to spread to the chest, trunk, abdomen and back.

Scaly layer at the border of the scalp

Seborrheic eczema often develops on the scalp. In the initial stages, it manifests itself as single yellowish nodules, the number of which is rapidly increasing. The nodules turn into spots with the formation of whitish scales on the surface.

As a result of the fusion of lesions on the border of the hair, a “seborrheic crown” is often formed – a scaly ring, along the edges of which areas of hyperemic skin are located. If left untreated, this form of eczema spreads from the scalp to the folds behind the ear and the neck.

Some doctors consider seborrheic eczema only a kind of true seborrhea with minor differences in the course of the pathological process.

Rounded eruptions on the skin of the hands

Itchy rashes on the hands can indicate many different diseases.Eczema is one of them; in 80% of cases, true eczema is localized on the hands.

Rashes at the initial stage have rounded outlines, with the development of the disease, the contours lose their correctness. A similar nature of rashes on the hands is also characteristic of mycotic eczema.

Microbial eczema on the hands is rare and is characterized by the formation of purulent crusts on the surface.

Rash with clear edges on the legs

Due to the increased frequency of skin trauma and chronic venous insufficiency, post-traumatic and microbial eczema appears most often on the legs.In 75% of cases, they are observed in women. Rashes are more often located next to varicose veins, have a rounded shape and clear boundaries.

Often, microbial eczema manifests itself in many separate rounded foci up to 3 cm in size. Due to the similarity with a scattering of coins, this form of eczema is called coin-like.

Symmetrical scaly eruptions on the body

Symmetry of the lesions is characteristic of true eczema. In most cases, it initially appears on the limbs, but sometimes foci are initially formed on the trunk.

In the early stages, the lesions look typical and consist of vesicles filled with liquid. With a prolonged course, in place of weeping foci, areas of thickened skin appear with an increase in the skin pattern. In chronic eczema, the lesions become covered with flaky skin during healing, eczema becomes dry.

Fine-grained eruptions on palms and soles

Eczema can affect the skin of the hands and feet. In these cases, due to the peculiarities of the structure of the skin, foci of eczema appear in the form of small whitish tubercles.The bumps coalesce to form blisters that can burst open. After opening, large ulcers remain on the palms and feet, secreting serous fluid.

Callous eruptions on the palms

A rash on the palms in the form of corns, appearing in places uncharacteristic for corns, may indicate tylotic eczema. Bubbles are formed, but may not open due to the peculiarities of the structure of the skin.

Tylotic eczema usually accompanies true eczema, therefore, when a callus-like rash appears, it is recommended to pay attention to the rest of the body.

Multiple vesicles in the axillary region with a hair in the center

Rashes, in the center of which the hair is located, are a sign of sycosis – a special lesion of the hair follicles. This type of rash outside the scalp is called sycosiform eczema. Eczema is also indicated by the presence of itching, which is accompanied by a rash. In addition to the axillary region, this type of eczema can be localized on the chin, upper lip and pubic area.

Seals on the skin of the hands and on the body

Thickening of the skin may be evidence of the transition of eczema to a chronic form. In addition, the chronization of the disease is indicated by a decrease in wetting and the appearance of large areas of compacted, flaky skin.

Areas of depigmentation after peeling on the skin

Usually appear during the recovery phase. At the site of the rash, the skin is lighter. Most often, such light spots disappear on their own within a month.

Areas of depigmentation appear after most types of eczema, but more often after true and microbial.

Multiple tubercles on the face and hands without wetness and crusts

Sometimes, with true eczema, the vesicles do not open, but appear only as multiple tubercles and papules. This is how pruriginous eczema manifests itself – one of the varieties of true eczema. Pruriginous eczema is localized on the extensor surfaces of the arms and on the face.

Itchy areas of redness on the skin of the legs and arms

A hyperemic and itchy area of ​​skin with many rashes indicates true or microbial eczema.The most pronounced pruritus with eczema is manifested at the stages of active formation of fresh papules and vesicles. Itching increases with the addition of bacterial flora.

With varicose and post-traumatic eczema, these symptoms are observed in most cases on the legs. In occupational eczema, itching and flushing are typical symptoms. The severity of symptoms increases after repeated contact with a provoking agent. After elimination of the provoking factor, the symptoms disappear.

Suppuration and itching around wounds on the legs and arms

Hyperemia of the skin and the formation of purulent crusts indicate microbial eczema. Most often, they appear on the areas of the skin that are most susceptible to injury.

When the pus dries, coarse crusts are formed, which fall off, exposing the skin that continues to wet.

Types of eczema

Understanding the types of eczema is essential for proper treatment.

True or idiopathic eczema.

Differs in the classic course, the rash passes through all six stages.

Stages of true eczema:

First stage . It is characterized by wide foci of hyperemia with a red-blue tint and with blurred edges without clear boundaries.

The second stage – papule formation. Soft nodular joints appear, merging into small foci. Puffiness and plaques appear in places.

The third stage is vasecular.The nodules gradually turn into bubbles.

Fourth stage . The accumulation of subcutaneous exudate causes the papules to open and the release of serous fluid. Point foci of maceration with depressions (wells) appear on the skin. At this stage, the development of the disease reaches its peak.

The fifth stage is a tough one. The released serous fluid begins to dry out, the forming crusts are layered on top of each other.

Sixth stage – squamous.Dried whitish scales separate on their own, the skin is restored. Pink or whitish spots may remain where the rash is.

Serous wells are the main distinguishing feature of true eczema. The foci of inflammation are more often located in a symmetrical order. The first symptoms appear on the face and hands, then the disease spreads to other parts of the body. There is severe itching and soreness at the sites of ulceration.

Without treatment, the process quickly flows into the chronic stage, when, even during the period of remission, the foci of the rash become excessively thickened, a pronounced linear pattern appears on the skin.

Chronic eczema

The acute stage of true eczema can quickly turn into a chronic one. It is characterized by thickening and coarsening of endogenous foci. New rashes appear actively, followed by infiltration and the formation of serous wells. Itching intensifies many times over and does not stop even at night, so patients with chronic eczema often suffer from insomnia. After getting rid of the symptoms in the affected areas, pigmentation is disturbed, and dry skin appears.

Exacerbations often occur in the winter period.

Microbial eczema

Caused by infectious or fungal agents. It occurs at the stage of opening papules with true eczema or with chronic ulcerative vegetative pyoderma, in places of fistulas, wounds, etc.

Pathogenic foci have clear pink borders. In addition to papules and weeping erosions, from which fluid is released, layering of purulent crusts occurs. The size of the affected areas increases rapidly.Often, separate pustules with scaly areas form next to the lesions.

Depending on the source of the disease, microbial eczema is divided into coin-like and varicose.

Coin eczema

The name is due to the appearance of red spots, shaped like coins. Formations may not take place for a long time (from a month to several years). In most cases, symptoms begin to appear on the inner thigh and the outer side of the hands.

In addition to bubbles of a red-pink, sometimes bluish tint, severe itching and burning appear, weeping is noted after opening the rash.

Varicose eczema

Primarily develops on the legs. It is accompanied by moderate itching, increased dry skin, scaly formations in the localization of dilated venous vessels. The disease greatly affects the condition of the skin – edematous, hyperemic lesions with a burgundy-purple tint appear.Specific dark spots appear on the skin.

Also, small bubbles form on the skin, which break open with the release of fluid and the formation of ulcers. The soaking stage turns into a drying stage after about two weeks. Crusts are formed. Pathological foci thicken and darken, up to brown. When pressed, soreness appears.

The inflammatory process is accompanied by severe itching. The patient combs the foci of inflammation, as a result of which abrasions and cracks form on the skin, there is a risk of a secondary infection.

Seborrheic eczema

The trigger of this type of eczema is a weakening of local immunity, dysfunction of the sebaceous glands, and malnutrition of the scalp. Most patients have a history of congenital allergic reactions.

Each person has the fungus Pityrosporum ovale in the hair epithelial layer. In case of failures in the protective function, it can penetrate deeper, in response, the local immunity reacts in the form of an allergic reaction.The inflammatory process begins in the form of local edema. Normally, it stops after treatment of the fungus, but with seborrheic eczema, the inflammatory process is more pronounced and lasts a long time.

A feature of seborrheic eczema is the excessive activity of the sebaceous glands in the lesions. The thinned skin scales stick together and yellow fatty flakes are formed.

Localization of eruptions:

  • trunk: navel area, chest, around the halo of the mammary glands, in the folds of the axillary and inguinal zones;

  • head: nasolabial fold, ears and behind the ears, eyebrows, chin, eyelashes, scalp.

Dry eczema

At the initial stages, spots with blurred pink edges are formed, subsequently the contours acquire a red tint. Acute papules appear, merging into large plaques.

Bubbles are not formed, but there is a violation of the integrity of the skin. The top thin and dry layer peels off, forming small and deep cracks. Without treatment, the disease progresses and turns into an acute form with weeping, the formation of dense crusts and severe redness.In this case, the patient may not experience painful sensations.

The disease worsens during dry and cold seasons.

Allergic eczema

Is a consequence of the body’s hypersensitivity to external or internal stimuli. It develops more often in patients with a weak immune response.

The main factor is contact with foreign compounds that cause excessive production of histamine.

Any manifestations of the disease cause excitation of the nervous system, so the patient experiences irritation, may suffer from insomnia and severe headaches.

Symptoms:

  • rashes accompanied by itching,

  • dryness and flaking of the skin,

  • crusts are formed in place of bursting bubbles,

  • redness of the skin, burning sensation,

  • thickening of the skin in the eyes of the lesion.

Allergic eczema is divided into dry and weeping.The first type is characterized by dry, flaking skin. The trigger can be direct contact with an allergen or the presence of internal diseases.

The second type is more often localized on the hands and arises from direct contact with a chemical. In this case, the skin swells greatly, red foci with small papules appear, which, after opening, turn into painful ulcers.

Rashes with this type of eczema can appear on any part of the body.

Dyshidrotic eczema

Dyshidrosis affects the sweat glands of the feet (in 20% of cases) and hands (80%), has a chronic course with seasonal exacerbations.Serous vesicles form on the affected areas.

A hallmark of dyshidrosis is the development of vesicles. The rashes are covered with a dense membrane. Purulent discharge appears only when a secondary infection is attached. Under normal conditions, the formations contain a clear liquid.

All stages are accompanied by gradually increasing itching. The lesions are swollen and scaly. The vesicles break open on their own, or in the process of scratching or damage, small wounds and cracks appear in their place.The skin pattern becomes more distinct.

In this type of eczema, itching appears before the skin symptoms, rashes form later, first on the lateral parts of the fingers, then on the palms and feet.

Moist eczema

This species has several phases. The first phase: pink spots of various shapes and sizes appear on the skin, swelling, as well as papules or vesicles. Due to the constant release of subcutaneous exudate, weeping zones are formed.

When opened, the formations are covered with crusts with active exfoliation. The peculiarity of this type is that the rash is at different stages of development. In one zone, new and already opened rashes can be located, and rejection of dead cells is also observed. Severe itching causes insomnia and neuroses.

With the chronicity of the process, the skin in the affected areas thickens and scarred, a blue-red tint appears. During the period of remission, the skin in the lesions constantly peels off.

Symptoms

Symptoms of eczema can vary depending on the type of disease, but there are general symptoms:

  • regular increase in body temperature in case of occupational eczema;

  • the appearance of a focus of inflammation and redness, thickening of the skin;

  • appearance of a rash;

  • increased sensitivity of the skin, the appearance of itching, which reduces the patient’s quality of life;

  • the appearance of painful cracks, wounds, erosion at the site of the rash, the formation of serous or hemorrhagic crusts;

  • increased skin dryness, loss of elasticity during remission.

Eczema has very specific manifestations, even with a small area of ​​the rash. In adults, it usually affects large areas of the body, more often on the arms, shoulders, face, feet and lower leg. Eczema can also occur with swelling and redness of the skin.

Eczema is difficult to treat, frequent relapses are possible, but thanks to modern protocols, doctors are increasingly able to achieve stable remissions. It is important to see a doctor promptly.

Eczema on the face

City air, climate features, improper care can have a negative effect on the skin.If you notice itchy, edematous, reddish spots on your face with rashes in the form of bubbles that burst, forming crusts, and the crusts then merge into a large weeping spot, urgently make an appointment with a dermatologist. This is especially true given that eczema is accompanied by intense burning and itching.

Symmetry is characteristic of the disease, if rashes appear on one side of the face, they will appear on the other. Eczema can affect the mouth and eyes. The skin on the eyelids thickens and coarsens, itching and flaking appears.Lamellar scales form on the lips, which then turn into bleeding painful cracks.

True, seborrheic and professional eczema appears on the face. The symptoms are very similar. Separate areas on the face swell and redden, then small itchy blisters appear, filled with a clear or cloudy liquid. Cracks form on the skin, it begins to peel off.

True eczema is characterized by symmetrical eruptions, seborrheic occurs on the scalp, and professional eczema occurs in places of direct contact with an irritant.

Eczema on legs

Often, eczema on the legs appears as a result of an allergic reaction and the presence of vascular pathology of the lower extremities (varicose eczema). Also triggers can be a psychoemotional state and reduced immunity.

Microbial eczema appears most often on the legs. It is localized in places of burns, postoperative sutures, fungal infections, varicose veins. Eczema occurs against the background of an already existing inflammatory process.

Main symptoms of eczema on the feet:

  • swelling of the legs;

  • appearance of a characteristic crust;

  • painful appearance and dry skin;

  • the appearance of bubbles, cracks and pigmentation at localization sites.

Possible sleep disturbances and headache.

Self-medication of eczema is unacceptable.It can lead to the development of complications and complicate the treatment process.

Eczema on hands

According to the intensity of the development of the disease on the hands, acute and chronic eczema can be distinguished.

Depending on triggers, the following are allocated:

  • microbial (affects the area around wounds, abrasions, boils),

  • professional,

  • dyshidrotic (affects palms, nails), horny (may appear in the form of corns).

There is eczema of children, which manifests itself as a severe rash on the hands and can go away with age.

There are 4 stages of the disease:

  • Erythematous – swelling and redness of the lesion.

  • Papulovesicular – the appearance of rashes.

  • Wet – opening bubbles.

  • Crustal – crust formation.

When the disease progresses to the chronic stage, the skin becomes rough, pigmentation, peeling, dryness appear.

Causes of the disease

Hereditary factor is the main cause of eczema . If there are cases of eczema in close relatives, the patient is at times more likely to develop this disease.

One of the provoking factors is immunity disorders. Immunity begins to produce immunoglobulins to its own skin cells, which leads to the appearance of areas of inflammation.Violation of intercellular immunity is confirmed by an imbalance of glycoproteins: laboratory values ​​of IgG and IgE are above normal, IgM is in deficit.

There is a connection between exacerbations of eczema and stress.

It has been scientifically proven that eating habits and gastrointestinal disturbances can also affect the development of eczema.

How to treat eczema

Moist eczema

Moist eczema of character for all types of eczema. After the diagnosis, the dermatologist will draw up a personalized treatment plan, including:

  • Medication:

a) general;

b) local.

The goal of treatment is to diagnose and eliminate the cause of the disease.

Dry eczema

Dry eczema is manifested by excessive dryness of the skin. Distinctive features are:

  • chronic course;

  • seasonal exacerbations;

  • localization on any part of the skin, but most often on the limbs.

Dry eczema on the hands is often a sign of liver or gastrointestinal disease.It can also appear due to frequent stress. But the main factor is genetic predisposition.

In treatment, adherence to therapy is extremely important, all measures prescribed in the treatment plan must be fully implemented. Treatment should not be interrupted at the first sign of improvement.

A good effect in the early stages of the development of eczema is shown by corticosteroids in the form of an ointment. But they are not recommended for long-term use. To eliminate symptoms in the future, emollients are used.

The treating dermatologist can recommend consultations from specialized specialists: endocrinologist, gastroenterologist, etc. A multidisciplinary approach allows you to improve the results of therapy.

Treatment of eczema with medicines

The development of eczema is associated with increased sensitivity of the body to a number of irritants. Therefore, treatment should be systemic with the appointment of hormonal ointments, antihistamines, antibiotics. The doctor’s task is to select the most effective drugs in each case.

Sorbents and antihistamines

Antihistamines can relieve itching and inflammation.

Antibacterial therapy

Antibiotics with tetracycline are prescribed with caution in children under 10 years of age. Laboratory diagnostics helps the doctor determine the safest drug.

Preparations that relieve itching and sedatives

  • moisturizers;

  • oral substances;

  • intravenous corticosteroids.

Among sedatives, “Novopassit”, “Persen”, “Valemidin” are more often prescribed.

Hormonal preparations

Therapeutic regimens include hydrocortisone. Hormonal preparations are recommended in the form of ointments, tablets, lotions. It is not recommended to use these drugs for more than 2 weeks due to possible complications.

Corticosteroid-based creams are effective for weeping eczema because they dry out the skin.Ointments have a healing effect and remove rough crusts. For localization in the scalp, emulsions and lotions with a light texture are used.

Antiseptic and anti-inflammatory drugs

To exclude additional complications and disorders, antiseptic preparations are used:

  • Betadine;

  • Miramistin;

  • “Dekasan”;

  • “Dimexide”;

  • Clotrimazole and Polyphepan;

  • Radevit;

  • “Chlorhexidine”.

The choice of the drug depends on the type of eczema and on concomitant diseases, therefore it should be carried out only by the attending physician.

Features of the treatment of eczema on the hands

For local treatment of eczema, ointments (pastes and creams) with corticosteroids, hormones with a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect, are used. They help to reduce the inflammatory response and speed up the skin regeneration process.

Corticosteroid ointments have side effects: skin thinning, increased risk of bacterial and fungal infections, etc.Therefore, they should only be prescribed by the attending physician.

There are non-hormonal drugs that are also effective in treating eczema. These are topical calcineurin inhibitors – tacrolimus ointment (protopic) and pimecrolimus cream. They reduce inflammation and itching. The dosage and duration of admission should also be determined only by the attending physician.

In severe eczema, extensive foci of inflammation and the lack of effect from local therapy, systemic treatment is prescribed in the form of immunosuppressants – drugs that suppress immunity.

In severe disease, as well as in erythroderma, cytostatics are prescribed.

Antibiotics and antifungal agents are used in the treatment of microbial and fungal eczema.

Features of the treatment of eczema on the legs

Eczema on the legs often develops as a result of an allergic reaction or severe vascular pathology (varicose eczema). Additional provoking factors can be a weakened immune system and prolonged psycho-emotional stress.& nbsh3;

Microbial eczema most often develops on the legs. The main localization is in the places of burns, postoperative sutures, fungal infections, varicose veins. Eczema develops against the background of an already existing inflammatory process.

Main symptoms of eczema on the feet:

  • edema;

  • formation of a characteristic crust on the skin;

  • the appearance of bubbles, cracks and pigmentation in the lesions.

Sleep disturbances and headache may occur.

With a timely visit to a doctor, the prognosis for the treatment of eczema on the legs is favorable.

What does eczema treatment consist of

The essence of eczema treatment is:

  • exclusion of contact with irritants,

  • proper nutrition,

  • elimination of itching,

  • local treatment with ointments and creams,

  • general treatment with tablets and injections.

Treating eczema in children is no different from treating adults. Physiotherapeutic methods are often included in the treatment plan, which allow you to act directly on the damaged areas.

Dermatologists, through a combination of different methods, develop the best treatment for each patient.

Treatment of eczema in children

To determine the tactics of treatment, it is necessary to establish the type of eczema, the cause of its appearance and differentiate with other dermatological diseases (herpes rash, diathesis, allergic reactions, urticaria, shingles, etc.).).

Diagnostics include:

  • general blood test;

  • scraping from the skin for examination under a microscope;

  • allergy tests for atopic eczema to identify the source of the allergy;

  • histological examination – for the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases.

Treatment is selected taking into account the results of examinations, age and health characteristics of the little patient.

Complex therapeutic treatment includes:

  • Individual diet

  • Sedatives (for sleep regulation)

  • Antihistamines (to relieve itching and burning)

  • Anti-inflammatory drugs (to relieve skin puffiness and improve general condition)

  • Multivitamins

  • Antibiotics or antiviral drugs

Physiotherapy may be prescribed to speed up the recovery process and as an alternative to certain medications.

Mandatory antiseptic treatment of wounds and abrasions to exclude secondary infections.

It is especially important to properly care for the child’s skin and follow all the recommendations of a dermatologist, who will select individual care products.

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Good to know about ECZEM (eksem)

Good to know about ECZEM ( eksem)

Useful information on eczema – Fact sheet of the Norwegian Asthmatics and Allergy Association

What is eczema?

Eczema is the generic term for various itchy skin conditions.The most common forms of eczema are atopic, occupational (contact), seborrheic, and childhood. Atopy means difference. In this case, it refers to differences in skin properties and describes hereditary allergic eczema.

Eczema may be chronic , i.e. with a prolonged, or acute, form of the course of the disease and in most cases is characterized by an improvement in the condition in the summer and a worsening in the winter. For the chronic form, the appearance of an itchy rash is characteristic.Scratching often results in thickened areas of the skin that crack easily. Acute eczema is characterized by itching, redness, and swelling of the skin, with the possible formation of watery blisters.

With eczema, there is a deterioration in the body’s defenses against infections, which easily leads to the occurrence of infectious inflammations, which can lead to a worsening of the condition of eczema.

Symptoms of eczema

Atopic eczema results in itchy, dry skin.

New or recurrent contact eczema is characterized by itching, redness and swelling of the skin with the formation of small and large blisters, as well as wet wounds in places of direct exposure to the allergen. With prolonged contact eczema, the skin becomes increasingly dry and cracked. Severe itching is common. In the initial stage, eczema occurs only on the area of ​​the skin that was exposed to the allergen, but then the rash can spread to other areas.

With seborrheic eczema in infants, there is the formation of areas with oily, red skin covered with fat crusts on the forehead, head, face, as well as in the folds of the skin on the neck and in the perineum. In adults, it appears as flaky, red, oily skin on the central areas of the face, on the head, behind the ears, and on the chest.

Children’s eczema is accompanied by the formation of red, smooth, sometimes wet areas of the skin in places where diapers are worn.

Who can get eczema?

Young children are especially prone to atopic eczema. It is estimated that around 15% of Norwegian children suffer from eczema. Often the disease occurs in children in the first months of life, in 60% of them it disappears after reaching the age of four. However, relapse may occur during adolescence or adulthood.

Contact eczema in young children is rare, but cases of its occurrence are noted more and more often, starting from school age.Ear piercing, piercings and skin contact with base metals are responsible for a significant increase in nickel contact allergies. Getting a tattoo can lead to allergic contact eczema, which can occur weeks or even months after getting a tattoo. Hair coloring is also an increasingly common cause of eczema, especially as more young people are dyeing their hair.

Seborrheic eczema is relatively common.Eczema can appear as early as the first months of life, but usually occurs in adults.

Causes of eczema

The cause of atopic eczema is unknown. Allergies can play a role, but only in conjunction with other factors. The disease has a relationship with heredity and the environment. It is common for other family members to have atopic diseases (asthma, eczema, or allergic rhinitis). Allergies can be found in 20-30% of patients, which for some of them may be the cause of eczema.Food allergies are never the only cause of eczema.

The cause of seborrheic eczema is not hypersensitivity, but a painful reaction in the sebaceous glands, which is possibly caused by a particular yeast fungus usually found on the surface of the skin. This form of eczema is especially susceptible to persons with oily skin and increased sebaceous gland productivity.

Contact eczema occurs when the skin reacts to contact with certain substances.The reaction can be allergic or non-allergic. A non-allergic reaction occurs through direct contact with substances that irritate the skin, such as detergents or disinfectants. An allergic reaction is caused by allergenic substances such as nickel, chromium, rubber, formaldehyde and perfumes. Paraphenylenediamine (PPD) is one of the substances commonly associated with allergic contact eczema. PPD is found in many types of hair dye.

Infant eczema is caused by irritants in urine and feces.

Treatment of eczema

In the treatment of eczema, the most important is hygiene, the systematic use of creams and ointments to prevent dry skin, refraining from scratching, reducing exposure to irritants and abstaining from eating foods known to be allergic. Sunlight and salt baths are good for mild to moderate eczema. Regular baths with calcium permanganates have a good prophylactic effect.

However, in most cases a cortisone ointment is necessary. This treatment will give the desired result, provided that the correct drug is applied to the appropriate area of ​​the body at the prescribed frequency. Once the eczema is under control, it is important to reduce the concentration of the cortisone ointment and, if necessary, lengthen the time between ointment applications. The correct use of cortisone ointment does not lead to negative effects. The attending physician will give you the necessary recommendations for the use and reduction of the drug concentration.

In general terms, it can be said that it is necessary to use potent drugs for a sufficiently long period of time. By opting for weaker drugs, you will not be able to bring eczema under control. In this case, the entire cortisone treatment process may be in vain. This often leads to increased eczema. It is important to remember that the bad effect of cortisone ointment is associated with an infection in the eczema itself, which must be treated with antibiotics, both locally and in general.

In case of a new outbreak of eczema in a child who previously suffered from this disease, treatment can be started with the use of group 2 or 3 cortisone. After the condition has stabilized, the drug can be applied less often (with an interval of 2-3 days). With further improvement of the condition, you can switch to a weaker ointment, in order to eventually switch to applying the drug with an interval of 2-3 days.

After eczema has healed, it is recommended to continue applying the drug 1-2 times a week for at least 2-4 weeks in order to achieve the best result.It is also recommended to apply a moisturizer in the morning and evening, as well as every time after taking a bath or shower, even when there is no eczema.

Children suffering from eczema, which regularly intensifies and worsens, benefit from calcium permanganate baths, even during good periods. During periods of eczema activity, calcium permanganate baths can be performed every day or every other day.

Cortisone-free anti-eczema ointments (Elidel®, Protopic®) are good alternatives to try for chronic eczema.These ointments are applied daily, twice a day. The advantage of these ointments is that they do not affect the thickness of the skin even with prolonged use, and also that they can be used in cases where treatment with cortisin ointments does not lead to the desired result and control over eczema is not established with treatment with cortisone ointments without risk side effects.

In case of skin infections, it is first necessary to treat the infection itself, and only then apply the above means.

Medical light or climatic treatment for eczema may have an effect. However, some patients may experience a temporary increase in eczema, which is probably due to sweat irritation. In addition, such treatment is costly and time-consuming, which makes it unacceptable for school-age children. This treatment is carried out exclusively by a specialist in skin diseases.

Achieving positive results depends on how well the patient is informed about the treatment.Eczema can be a very painful disease, but early treatment allows you to establish control over it in most cases. Fortunately, the disease will give up on its own over time, and 80% of patients recover by the age of 18. There is reason to believe that good treatment for eczema leads to an improved prognosis.

Factors worsening the condition 90,730

Rough, tight clothing, coarse wool, polyester, heavily dyed fabrics, moisture, stress, infections, food, chlorinated water, tobacco smoke, perfumes, allergies, alkaloid soaps, grease removers and heat.

The child himself knows what kind of clothes are itchy!

Prevention of eczema

Prevention of eczema by controlling the nutrition of the expectant mother during pregnancy, or after the birth of the child, has no effect on the development of atopic eczema in the child. Research shows that symptoms of atopic eczema may be delayed in some cases in babies who are breastfed for the first four to six months of life.

Where to get help

For mild sporadic eczema in children, advice from a nurse may be sufficient.In more difficult cases, you should contact your doctor who, if necessary, will write out a referral to a specialist. The free hospital choice system in Norway gives you a choice based on the information you receive. On the Internet at www.frittsykehusvalg.no and by calling toll-free 800 41 004, you can get information about the available places for eczema treatment and your rights regarding the choice of hospital.

People suffering from eczema and other skin diseases, as well as people who work with this group of patients, can communicate with specialists at the Polyclinic for Skin Diseases, Villa Derma, Oslo University Hospital, by calling the “skin phone” 23075803 , open to calls three hours a week according to the following schedule: Tuesday and Friday from 8:00 to 9:00 am, Thursday from 12:00 to 13:00 (check the correctness of this schedule!).

Facts about eczema developed in collaboration with the Medical Council of the Norwegian Asthmatics and Allergy Association.

Eczema: what is it, symptoms, causes, types, treatment and diet

Table of Contents

Eczema is a chronic inflammatory skin disease of an allergic nature. The causes of the onset and development of pathology have not yet been studied, but it is believed that the provoking factors are allergic diseases and genetic prerequisites.Treatment for eczema is successful today. You just need to contact experienced specialists.

What is eczema?

This is a disease characterized by inflammatory processes and is characterized by:

  • A large number of provoking factors of development
  • Many types of rashes
  • A tendency to relapse
  • Highly resistant to treatment

Usually, eczema rashes concentrate on areas such as:

  • Neck
  • Knee bends
  • Elbows
  • Ankle

Symptoms of pathology may periodically increase.Such attacks last from a couple of hours to several days.

Classification

In accordance with the characteristics of the course of the pathological condition, the following are distinguished:

  • Acute eczema. Her symptoms usually persist for 1 to 2 months
  • Subacute . The symptoms of this pathology are less pronounced. In this case, the pathology can accompany the patient up to 6 months
  • Chronic. In this case, the disease can continue for several years.Relapse periods are followed by remissions

There are several types of pathology:

  • True . This eczema is characterized by a chronic course. Exacerbations occur frequently and are accompanied by the appearance of symmetrical foci of inflammation. First, areas of the skin become red and swollen. After that, small bubbles form on them. Over time, they open up with the release of exudate (a small amount of liquid)
  • Microbial .This form of pathology is characterized by the formation of deep ulcers and fistulas. Pathology is accompanied by severe itching. In the microbial form, the foci of inflammation spread mainly to the legs
  • Seborrheic . This form is characterized by rashes on the face (on the forehead, near the eyebrows, behind the ears) and scalp. Complete restoration of the skin is possible only with correct therapy
  • Children . This form is characterized by a large amount of exudate
  • Professional .This form of pathology is characterized by striking manifestations. The rash can appear on various areas of the skin (usually those in contact with irritants). Irritants for occupational eczema can be chemical, physical, or mechanical. Usually pathology is provoked by constant exposure to cosmetics, active chemicals, various plants, resins, metals (mainly nickel and chromium)

Causes

Eczema, which should only be treated by professionals, is common.

Its reasons include a number of internal and external factors.

Internal factors for the development of eczema:

  • Disorders of the nervous system
  • Pathology of internal organs
  • Genetic factors (heredity)

External factors provoking pathology:

  • Temperature increase or decrease
  • Exposure to aggressive chemicals
  • Influence of extracts of various plants, etc.

Often, the pathology is provoked by a combination of internal and external factors.

Eczema can be the body’s response to:

  • Contact with pollen
  • Excessive sweating
  • Immune system disorders
  • Stress
  • Taking medications
  • Taking certain products

Before starting treatment for eczema, it is very important to identify the causes that triggered the onset of the pathology.Only in this case, the therapy will be as effective as possible and will not drag on for a long time.

Symptoms

All types of eczema are characterized by the following symptoms:

  • The appearance of separate inflamed areas on the skin
  • Onset of rash
  • Itching
  • Bubble opening
  • Wounds and cracks that cause permanent discomfort
  • Increased body temperature during exacerbations
  • General malaise and weakness
  • Cracking of the skin, its pronounced dryness and loss of elasticity

Symptoms of the pathological condition largely depend on the stage of development of eczema.

At erythematous stage , the disease manifests itself in the form of inflamed areas. Gradually, the spots can merge into a separate affected area, characterized by an impressive area.

At papular stage , the affected skin becomes unpleasant to the touch. Small nodules with clear boundaries and bright red color are formed on it.

At vesicular stage nodules turn into vesicles.

At the stage of soaking, bubbles gradually open, and liquid is released from them.

At crusty stage the inflamed areas dry up. Yellowish crusts form on the skin.

At stage of dry eczema , the skin begins to peel off. The crusts formed gradually disappear. You shouldn’t try to rip them off yourself! This can provoke a resumption of pathology.

Diagnostics

Treatment of eczema in adults is possible only after a careful assessment of its symptoms and causes.That is why it is very important for a doctor to conduct a high-quality diagnosis.

It begins with the collection of anamnesis.

The doctor finds out:

  • The first cases of manifestation of signs of a pathological process
  • Presence of intolerance to certain products and drugs
  • Cases of allergic reactions

At the first appointment, the dermatologist performs dermatoscopy. This study is aimed at studying the condition of the skin, mucous membranes and scalp.

Then laboratory tests are carried out.

To diagnose eczema, the following are prescribed:

  • Urinalysis
  • Blood tests
  • Study of the level of immunoglobulin in blood serum

During the examination, the specialist determines the general state of health of the patient, evaluates individual vital signs. If necessary, a consultation with a nutritionist and immunologist-allergist is carried out.

In advanced situations, a comprehensive immunological and allergological examination with sampling is also prescribed. As part of such a diagnosis, doctors are able to identify irritating factors that can provoke symptoms of eczema and allow you to quickly start treating the pathology.

Treatment

The main task of the doctor after making a diagnosis such as eczema is to reduce or completely eliminate the factors that provoke the onset of symptoms.

Treatment of pathology is conventionally divided into several stages:

  • Taking general medications
  • Diet correction
  • Use of local remedies in the form of ointments, emulsions, creams, etc.
  • Physiotherapy

The following groups of drugs are used for therapy:

  • Antihistamines . These remedies are prescribed for acute eczema
  • Glucocorticosteroids .These hormonal preparations relieve inflammation and prevent the development of allergic reactions
  • Diuretics . These remedies are recommended for severe edema
  • Tranquilizers . These drugs allow to eliminate itching, ensure a sound and healthy sleep of the patient, his full rest, even with severe discomfort in the acute stage of eczema
  • Enterosorbents . These funds allow you to quickly remove all products of intoxication from the intestines
  • Vitamins of group B , aimed at normalizing the functioning of the nervous system
  • Antibiotics .These funds are prescribed if, as a result of diagnostics, it turned out that eczema was provoked by the action of aggressive microorganisms

Locally, applications with pastes and ointments are usually prescribed, which have:

  • Antipruritic effect
  • Anti-inflammatory effect
  • Antiseptic properties

Formulations of preparations for external use are often selected individually.In some cases, “talkers” are prescribed, which are prepared in pharmacies on the basis of a doctor’s prescription.

Important! It is strictly forbidden to use folk remedies, various oils, plant extracts, etc. for the treatment of eczema. They are able not to suspend the development of the pathological process, but to provoke it.

With regard to physical therapy, patients are usually prescribed:

  • UV irradiation
  • Magnetotherapy
  • Electrophoresis

Treatment of weeping eczema is carried out with the obligatory use of drugs that allow you to dry the skin and ensure the elimination of external signs of pathology.The therapy of other forms of the disease has an individual specificity. Your doctor will tell you about all the intricacies.

There are general guidelines that should be followed by all patients suffering from the disease.

  • Avoiding skin contact with exacerbating substances (if identified by tests and sampling)
  • Compliance with a diet. Cocoa, citrus fruits and chocolate should be completely excluded from the diet
  • Skin care only with products recommended by your doctor
  • Elimination of nervous overload and stressful situations

Diet

A well-chosen diet is often the basis for the recovery of patients with eczema.When choosing the products you need, the doctor takes into account both the general state of health and the stage and form of pathology, as well as the presence of concomitant diseases.

There are general recommendations regarding nutrition.

All patients during an exacerbation should:

  • Exclude spicy, salty and smoked foods
  • Give up sweets
  • Remove citrus fruits, eggs, alcoholic beverages, dairy products and convenience foods from the diet

The diet must include:

  • Greens
  • Lean porridge
  • Vegetables

During periods of remission, it is advisable to use zucchini and pumpkin, watermelons, gooseberries, lingonberries, currants and cranberries, nuts.Patients who adhere to a strict diet usually improve rapidly. After a month, the diet can be expanded.

With eczema, the following foods and drinks are strictly prohibited:

  • Coffee and cocoa
  • Sweets
  • Fatty meat
  • Tomatoes
  • Garlic
  • Buns and other pastries
  • Melon
  • Grenades
  • Beet
  • Strawberry
  • Honey

It is advisable to consume only those foods that are hypoallergenic.Your doctor will give you a complete list.

Benefits of treatment at MEDSI

  • Complex diagnostics of eczema . The examination includes laboratory tests, dermatoscopy and video dermatoscopy. Diagnostics is carried out on modern equipment. We have our own laboratory, which allows us to provide patients with the results of analyzes in CITO mode (urgent)
  • Individual selection of treatment methods for eczema in adults and children.Therapy is prescribed taking into account the stage of the pathological process and the characteristics of its course
  • Use of modern drugs at . Patients are prescribed anti-inflammatory, disinfectant and other agents that have been developed recently, but already have proven efficacy
  • Carrying out modern physiotherapy procedures . Our clinics offer UVA therapy, ozone therapy, magnetotherapy. The combination of modern techniques allows you to achieve pronounced treatment results in the shortest possible time
  • Treatment of eczema with laser devices .Our clinic has the Excilite µ system. It belongs to the latest generation of excimer lasers. The procedures are painless and do not cause discomfort in patients. At the same time, the treatment of signs of eczema with such a system takes a minimum of time

To make an appointment with a doctor, just call +7 (495) 7-800-500. Reception is possible at a convenient time for you in a comfortable environment.

Eczema. Symptoms – News

Eczema, also called atopic dermatitis, is a common allergic skin disorder that usually begins in early childhood.It can be due to an infection (bacteria, fungi, yeast, and viruses) of the skin.

The main symptom is itchy skin. The skin is also often dry. Scratching makes the skin red, frayed and thick.

It is now believed that eczema is caused by a leaky skin barrier. This allows the water to flow out, leaving the skin dry. Skin leakage can be caused by genes inherited from parents or environmental factors:

  • Disorders in the Filaggrin gene cause moderate to severe eczema in nearly a third of people of North European and East Asian descent.
  • Exposure to soaps, detergents, house dust mites, pollen, animal dander, and certain bacteria that contain proteins called “proteases” can cause an eczema outbreak. Proteases break down the bonds between skin cells and make the skin barrier leaky.

Symptoms and Diagnosis

  • In infants and children, rash usually occurs on the scalp, knees, elbows and cheeks
  • In adults, rash may occur on the folds of the wrists, elbows, knees, ankles, face and neck

The rash is usually itchy, red and scaly.Scratching is often due to the itchy nature of the rash. If you have a rash for an extended period of time, the affected skin may become thicker. Dry skin can worsen itching and rashes. “Scratch-cycle” can occur when the skin is rubbed or scratched, causing more irritation and therefore additional itching.

The rash may get worse after eating certain foods. In the case of eczema, this is usually a delayed reaction. However, other reactions to food can occur more quickly, including hives (itchy sores) and swelling.Allergy testing may be done with a blood draw or skin allergy injection by an allergist or immunologist to determine if an immediate food allergy may be present. Allergy tests are often positive even in patients who tolerate food in their diet, so foods should not be excluded from their diet based solely on the results of these tests.

Half of patients with moderate to severe eczema also suffer from asthma, hay fever and food allergies.Other types of rashes, such as psoriasis and contact dermatitis (poison ivy), can look like an eczema rash. In addition, people with various other immune problems, such as immunodeficiency and vitamin deficiencies, may have a similar rash.

It is important to talk to an allergist or immunologist about your rash.

90,000 photos, treatment, causes and symptoms

Eczema on the head is a common ailment that is directly related to internal abnormalities and disorders of the body.The disease is characterized by extensive inflammation of the scalp, which is often predicted by copious amounts of dandruff in the form of large flakes. Eczema in this area most often occurs due to allergies and disorders of the psychoemotional state, which can be caused by frequent stress and traumatic care.

Contents of the article:

Varieties and atypical forms

Most often, it is a seborrheic type of skin disease that occurs on the head.Dry eczema is expressed as fused eczematous plaques that are covered with scales. The scales regularly flake off, forming large flakes. The scalp becomes very oily, as the work of the sebaceous glands is seriously impaired. The dry form has clear contours of inflammation, and also very often passes into the area of ​​the eyebrows and neck in case of improper treatment or neglect of the disease.

There is a weeping form of eczema of the head, but it is extremely rare. This type most often occurs as a result of damage to the skin of the body and, gradually, is localized in the head area.Weeping eczema can occur as a complication of the seborrheic form. The moist form of eczema is characterized by papules filled with fluid inside. Over time, the bubbles burst and form a kind of weeping surface. The moist form of eczema heals together with the main focus of the disease, which is usually localized on the face, hands and feet. But, if a weeping lesion is a complication of seborrheic eczema, treatment is carried out only in a part of the head.

Both forms of the disease are accompanied by severe and pronounced itching, which brings considerable discomfort.

Main article: Types of eczema

Causes of occurrence

Eczema most often occurs due to neuro-allergic factors. The causes of the disease can be both internal and external.

The most common causes of eczematous lesions on the surface of the head include:

  • allergic agents;
  • excessive obesity;
  • chronic foci of intoxication;
  • Disorders of endocrine processes;
  • chemicals in care products;
  • genetic factor;
  • malfunctions of the gastrointestinal tract, chronic diseases;
  • overactive sebaceous glands;
  • chronic liver diseases and liver failure;
  • medicines;
  • nervous and immune failures, vulnerability of immunity due to frequent colds and viral infections;
  • food products;
  • prolonged stress, disorders of the psychoemotional state;
  • deep vitamin deficiency;
  • hormonal disruptions;
  • renal failure;
  • diabetes mellitus.

Only the attending physician can determine the true cause of the occurrence, most often this type of eczema is caused not by one, but by several factors at once.

Symptoms

The seborrheic form of the disease develops rather quickly, especially under the direct influence of factors of its occurrence – allergens, chronic diseases or improper care.

The disease constantly progresses and develops in the following order:

  1. There is a significant reddening of the scalp – hyperemia.It is accompanied by dryness and tightness of the skin.
  2. The next manifestation is the appearance of yellowish-pink nodules. Nodules can occur not only on the scalp, but also in the neck and behind the ears.
  3. Over time, the inflamed lesions merge into one flat plaque, which has clear boundaries and outlines.
  4. Scales are formed on the surface of the lesion, which are covered with a thick layer of sebum and acquire an off-yellow color.
  5. The flakes peel off and leave moist erosion.If the areas are accompanied by suppuration, the dry one smoothly turns into a weeping form.
  6. During the healing of plaques, the skin swells, cracks and crusts form.
  7. After the cracks have healed and the crust has peeled off, a healthy skin area is formed, which, without proper treatment, can be affected by the disease again and then the eczema can become chronic.

Eczema on the head is accompanied by severe itching. But you cannot damage the inflammation, because when combing there is a risk of damage by bacterial and fungal organisms.

Photo of eczema on the head: what it looks like

Seborrheic eczema.

Main article: What eczema looks like

Diagnostics

Very often, the first manifestations of eczema on the head are confused with dandruff and do not go to a dermatologist. It is very important to consult a specialist at the first changes in the scalp. With analyzes of skin scrapings, dermoscopy and hair condition, the doctor will be able to determine the cause of the disease and prescribe treatment.The specialist must not only identify the disease, but also distinguish seborrheic eczema from microsporia, psoriasis or trichophytosis.

Often, such an ailment is associated with disorders of internal organs, therefore, consultation of related doctors is mandatory – an endocrinologist, allergist, neurologist and gastroenterologist.

Treatment of eczema on the head

The key to a good and productive treatment is a comprehensive approach to eliminate eczema. The complex includes the use of special care products, ointments and tablets, some physiotherapy methods, as well as adherence to a specialized diet for people with skin diseases.It is recommended to include folk remedies in the treatment system and to carry out timely prevention of eczema.

Physiotherapy

This method of treatment will help not only cope with eczema, but also restore the condition of the affected skin and hair. Treatment will help restore the sebaceous glands and reanimate hair follicles.

Effective directions in the treatment of eczematous foci of inflammation of the scalp are:

  • cryotherapy,
  • laser techniques,
  • darsonvalization,
  • mesotherapy,
  • magnetotherapy,
  • cryomassage.

The procedures will help to cope with the chronic stage of the disease and bring the skin back to normal.

Shampoos

In addition to physiotherapy and medications, it is worth paying due attention to the care of the affected skin and hair. The best treatment option would be a medicated shampoo aimed at getting rid of eczema. Funds may contain antifungal as well as anti-inflammatory components. It is recommended to clean the head with a special shampoo based on ketoconazole, with the addition of salicylic acid, tar, cyclopirox or zinc.The easily penetrating formula of shampoos with this composition accelerates the healing of the skin, helps to relieve inflammation and suppress the reproduction of harmful organisms and the development of infections.

Effective shampoos against eczema include:

  • Zinccon,
  • Sulsen,
  • Nizoral,
  • Keto Plus,
  • Dermazole
  • ,
  • tar “,

  • ” Sebozol “,
  • ” Friederm zinc “,
  • ” Cynovit “.

Ointments

An integral part of the treatment for eczema on the head is the use of topical preparations, namely ointments. Gels, creams and ointments for seborrheic eczema are aimed at healing the skin, restoring it, preventing disease, relieving itching.

Such care may include mummies and flake exfoliation creams, non-hormonal ointments, antiseptics and hormonal creams.

Treatment with ointments can be divided into the following categories:

  1. Antimycotic ointments – Eplan, Zalain, Flucinar and Triderm.
  2. Antifungal agents (in the presence of infection) – “Clotrimazole”, “Miconazole” and “Fungoerbin”.
  3. Non-hormonal ointments such as resorcinol ointment, naphthalan ointment, zinc ointment and salicylic ointment.
  4. Hormonal drugs, in particular glucocorticosteroid drugs – Lokoid, prednisolone ointment, Celestoderm, hydrocortisone ointment and Elokom. Hormonal agents are used only for severe forms of the disease.

Main article: Ointments and creams for eczema

Tablets

The use of tablets in the treatment of eczema is quite common.In particular, tablets can eliminate the allergic cause of the disease, help with diseases of the nervous system and strengthen the immune system.

For scalp lesions, the following are most often used:

  1. Antihistamines – Suprastin, Zyrtec, Loratadin, Citrine, Erius, Tavegil and Claritin. It is this class of funds that will help eliminate the allergic cause of the disease.
  2. In severe forms of the disease, antifungal tablets are used to eliminate the fungal infection – “Ketoconazole”, “Itraconazole” and “Fluconazole”.
  3. To strengthen the immune system – “Likopid” and “Mielopid”. With eczema, it is very important to strengthen the immune system, since the state of the immune system is not directly affected by the treatment and its timing.
  4. Sedatives to eliminate the somatic cause of the disease – “Glycine”, “Tenoten”, Phenibut “.

Main article: Tablets for eczema

Lotions

Compresses and lotions will also contribute to the fight against eczema.

The most effective remedies include:

  • Burov’s fluid,
  • menthol solution,
  • phenol solution,
  • silver nitrate solution,
  • lead water,
  • furacilin solution,
  • .

Diet

Nutrition is an important unit of treatment. In some cases, food can be the cause of inflammatory foci. Unwanted foods can interfere with treatment, slowing down the results.

In case of eczematous lesion of the head, the following nutritional components should be discarded:

  • seasonings,
  • chocolate,
  • smoked meats,
  • alcohol,
  • citrus,
  • fatty dishes,
  • coffee,
  • coffee
  • spicy dishes,
  • honey,
  • eggs,
  • fried dishes,
  • whole milk.

Main article: Diet and nutrition for eczema

Treatment with folk remedies at home

A combination of natural remedies and medication often brings good and very high quality results. Treatment with traditional medicine is less expensive but no less effective. Therapy can include both homemade ointments and decoctions, lotions, tinctures, masks and hair rinses after washing. There are many effective ways to treat this ailment using folk recipes.

These include the following kaleidoscope of funds:

  • Herbal oils, including essential oils – soften the scalp and resist inflammation and flaking. These include: tea tree oil, cedar, rosemary, thyme, rose, bergamot, fennel, geranium, clove, chamomile, lavender, eucalyptus, fir. To use as follows: apply oil to a cotton pad and moisten the skin. Do not rinse and carry out the procedure a couple of times during the day.
  • Oak broth. The broth must be thoroughly rubbed into the scalp at least twice a week and left for active exposure for an hour. To prepare the product, you need to brew oak bark in a thermos in a ratio with boiling water 1: 5. After 12 hours, add a tablespoon of honey, leave for a couple of minutes and then the mixture is ready to use.
  • Sage lotions. To prepare sage infusion, pour a tablespoon of medicinal herb with 300 milliliters of water and boil. Allow to cool, and then apply to the foci of eczema, moistening with gauze infusion.
  • Rinsers. For effective therapy, rinsing with herbal decoctions is also applicable. To prepare the broth, pour and insist two tablespoons of herbs per 500 ml of water. You can rinse your hair with decoctions of sage, oak, chamomile, eucalyptus, calendula, thyme, nettle or celandine.
  • Saline solution. Rinse your head with a solution after each shampooing. To prepare it, dilute 1 tablespoon of salt, food or sea, in a liter of boiled water.
  • Spicy tincture.Mix in equal proportions ginger, nutmeg and galangal root. Pour alcohol and leave for at least two days. Then wipe the scalp with the resulting tincture twice during the day.
  • Harvesting string and hop cones. Pour 150 ml of water over a teaspoon of each herb and leave for an hour. Drink the broth three times a day.
  • Grated radish compresses. Grate black radish and apply gruel to inflamed areas for 20 minutes once a day.
  • Cucumber.Cut the vegetable into slices and apply to the eczematous plaques for half an hour three times a day.
  • Pumpkin. Apply grated pumpkin gruel to the foci of inflammation for 20 minutes. Repeat twice during the day.
  • Orange peel compress. Grind the orange peel, apply to the skin and leave under a scarf overnight.
  • Tar. Mix 100 g of birch tar with 50 grams of heavy cream and two fresh eggs. Rub the ointment into eczematous areas.
  • Zhivitsa. It is recommended to sprinkle the lesions with resin powder twice a day.
  • Copper sulfate. Dilute the liquid to a light blue color in water and wipe the skin after shampooing.

Main article: Treatment of eczema with folk remedies

Recommendations

  • In the period of exacerbation, stop washing with soap and other aggressive means for washing. It is recommended to use natural organic products such as hydrophilic oil or oatmeal.
  • Normalize sleep and activity, pay attention to the psycho-emotional state.
  • Stop using cosmetics, hair dyes and masks.
  • Frequently washing your hair and combing your skin is contraindicated.
  • Monitor the humidity in the room.
  • Avoid contact with chemicals.
  • Avoid prolonged exposure to the sun.
  • Protect skin from frost and wind.
  • Strengthen immunity and provide vitamin therapy.

Main article: Treatment of eczema

Prevention

To prevent the chronic course of eczema, you must adhere to the rules of prevention of this disease.

In particular:

  • adhere to proper nutrition;
  • Wear hats made from natural fabrics only;
  • Refuse to perm, dye and dry hair with a hairdryer;
  • Use gentle natural shampoos during remission;
  • monitor the state of internal organs;
  • Periodically soften the scalp with burdock and coconut oil.

Complications and consequences

Complications and neglect of eczematous foci on the scalp include suppuration of plaques, deep erosion, as well as concomitant infections, in particular fungal infections.

The effects of eczema on the scalp most often appear as spots and minor scars, but these can be removed with the right skin care. Also, hair is severely affected, which needs to be restored with the help of medicinal products and oils.

Is it contagious and how is it transmitted

This type of eczema is not contagious and in no case can be transmitted to another person. The only exception to the rule is heredity.

Main article: Is eczema contagious

Features in children

After diagnosing the disease, choose care and treatment according to the age of the child.It is undesirable to use hormonal drugs and self-medicate. The most effective remedies for getting rid of the disease are medicated shampoos and oil lotions. Tea tree oil has a good effect.

Main article: Eczema in children

During pregnancy

Seborrheic eczema is most often exacerbated during pregnancy. The foci of inflammation can spread to the skin of the neck, face and shoulder blades. It is necessary to carefully select drugs, as well as folk remedies, so that they do not harm the fetus.

It is undesirable to use ointments containing hormones. In order to get rid of the itching in a quality manner, it is imperative to check for concomitant infections, because they can cause great harm to both the baby and the mother.

Video about eczema

A detailed description of the nuances of the treatment and prevention of eczema in children and pregnant women.

Forecast

Eczema with inflammation on the head is a completely curable disease.Adhering to the recommendations and rules for skin care, proper nutrition, treatment system, as well as prevention, you can permanently get rid of this problem and protect yourself from its reappearance.

7 types of eczema – causes, symptoms, treatment

Eczema usually manifests itself in the fact that areas of a person’s skin begin to become inflamed, itchy and redden. There are several different types of eczema, including atopic and discoid eczema and contact dermatitis.

World statistics indicate that the prevalence of eczema is about 1-2% among the adult population of the planet.The disease affects all races and age categories, women and men. It has been found that women suffer from eczema more often than men. In 70% of cases, eczema is the reason for going to a doctor, in 20% – the cause of temporary disability, in 10% of cases – the reason for changing jobs or profession.

In general, eczema can affect the skin, causing:

  • dark spots;
  • rough scaly or leathery patches;
  • swelling;
  • crusting and wetting.

Eczema is not contagious, which means that a person cannot get it himself and / or infect another person.

This article examines seven different types of eczema and their causes and symptoms. The article also discusses methods of diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the disease.

1. Atopic dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis, or atopic eczema, is the most common type of eczema.

Often onset during childhood and can range from mild to severe.A child often develops atopic dermatitis if one of the parents has had it.

Children with atopic dermatitis are at high risk for food sensitivities. Also, these children are prone to diseases such as asthma and hay fever. In some children, atopic dermatitis can go away with age.

Atopic dermatitis tends to present with patches of dry skin that can become itchy, red, and inflamed. These areas often appear in the folds of the elbows and knees, as well as on the face, neck, and wrists.Scratching these areas can worsen itching and cause clear fluid to ooze out of the skin. Repeated scratching or constant friction can cause the skin layer to thicken. This condition is known as Lichen Simplex Chronicus (LSC).

People with atopic dermatitis usually experience flare-ups for a time in which the eczema worsens. The reasons for the manifestations of such outbreaks can be:

  • low humidity, cold weather and extreme temperature changes;
  • Certain irritants such as detergents, soaps, perfumes and fragrances;
  • dust mites;
  • animal hair and saliva;
  • skin infections;
  • Certain fabrics such as wool and synthetics;
  • hormonal changes, eg during pregnancy;
  • food allergies.

2. Contact dermatitis

In some people, a skin reaction is caused by contact with certain substances. This condition is known as contact dermatitis.

Symptoms of contact dermatitis may include:

  • dry, red and itchy skin, the person feels like the skin is on fire;
  • bubbles;
  • rash that looks like small red bumps;

A person with atopic dermatitis is at increased risk of developing contact dermatitis.

There are two types of contact dermatitis:

Irritant contact dermatitis

Irritant contact dermatitis can result from repeated exposure to a substance that irritates the skin, for example:

  • acids and bases;
  • fabric softeners;
  • strong detergents;
  • solvents;
  • hair dyes;
  • weed control chemicals
  • cement:
  • some shampoos.

People who regularly use or work with these substances have a higher risk of developing contact dermatitis.

Allergic contact dermatitis

Allergic contact dermatitis occurs when a person’s immune system reacts to a specific substance known as an allergen.

A person may not react to an allergen upon first contact with it. However, once they develop an allergy, it remains for life.

Potential allergens include:

  • glues and adhesives:
  • latex and rubber:
  • Certain medications such as topical and oral antibiotics;
  • fabrics and dyes for clothing;
  • some plants;
  • Ingredients in make-up, nail polish, creams, hair dyes and other cosmetics;
  • some metals such as nickel and cobalt.

3. Dyshidrotic eczema

Dyshidrotic eczema usually occurs in adults under the age of 40.It usually manifests itself on the hands and feet and has characteristic symptoms, including severe itching and the appearance of small blisters filled with fluid (vesicles). In some cases, the blisters may become large and watery. The vesicles can also become infected, which can lead to pain and swelling. They may also ooze pus.

Vesicles usually burst within a few weeks. After this, the skin often becomes dry and eroded, which can lead to painful cracks in the skin.

It is unclear what causes dyshidrotic eczema. However, the disease is more common in humans:

  • suffering from hay fever;
  • 90,225 have atopic dermatitis or have a family history of atopic dermatitis;

    90,225 with fungal skin infections.

People who work with certain chemicals or work with their hands immersed in water during the day are also at greater risk of developing dyshidrotic eczema.

Emotional stress and changes in the weather are factors that contribute to the development of dyshidrotic eczema.

Dyshidrotic eczema can be a form of contact dermatitis. People with dyshidrotic eczema also tend to experience flare-ups periodically.

4. Discoid eczema

Discoid eczema or nummular eczema, recognizable by the disc-like patches of itchy, red, cracked and swollen skin it causes.

Disks usually appear on the lower limbs, trunk and forearms.Sometimes the center of the disc is clear, surrounded by a ring of red skin.

Discoid eczema can occur in people of any age, including children.

As with other types of eczema, the causes of discoid eczema are not entirely clear. However, known causes and risk factors include:

  • dry skin;
  • Injuries to the skin such as friction or burns;
  • insect bites;
  • poor blood flow;
  • cold climate;
  • bacterial skin infections;
  • Certain medicines;
  • Sensitivity to metals and formaldehyde;
  • atopic dermatitis.

5. Seborrheic dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is a condition that causes a red, itchy and scaly rash. The rash may appear swollen or raised, and may develop a yellowish or white crust on its surface.

Seborrheic dermatitis develops in areas with oily skin, for example:

  • skull skin;
  • ears;
  • eyebrows;
  • eyelids;
  • face;
  • upper chest and back;
  • armpits;
  • genitals.

Seborrheic dermatitis can affect people of any age. For example, a type of seborrheic dermatitis may develop on the scalp of babies, but this usually disappears after a few months.

There is no cure for seborrheic dermatitis in adults, so the person will periodically experience outbreaks of the disease. This course of the disease is typical for people aged 30 to 60 years.

Certain medical conditions and medical conditions can increase the risk of seborrheic dermatitis.These include:

  • Parkinson’s disease;
  • HIV;
  • acne, rosacea and psoriasis;
  • epilepsy;
  • Alcohol Use Disorders;
  • recovering from a stroke or heart attack;
  • depression;
  • Eating Disorders.

Certain medications, including interferon, lithium, and psoralen, may also increase your risk of seborrheic dermatitis.

6.Varicose eczema

Varicose eczema is also known as venous, gravitational or static eczema. It is common in older people with varicose veins.

Aging, decreased motor activity can weaken the veins in a person’s legs. This condition can lead to both varicose veins and varicose eczema.

Varicose eczema usually affects the lower legs, symptoms may include:

  • itchy spots or blisters;
  • dry, scaly seals;
  • oozing, hard stains;
  • cracked leather.

The skin on the leg can become fragile, so it is important to avoid scratching and scratching spots and blisters.

7. Asteatous eczema

Asteatous eczema, also called xerotic or craquelure eczema, usually only affects people over the age of 60. The disease may be due to the fact that as a person ages, his skin becomes drier.

Asteatous eczema usually occurs on the lower extremities, but it can also appear on other parts of the body.Symptoms include:

  • cracked, dry skin with a characteristic appearance;
  • pink or red cracks or depressions;
  • itching and soreness.

As with other types of eczema, the causes of asteatous eczema are unknown, but the causes may be:

  • dry, cold weather:
  • hot tubs:
  • soap and other detergents:
  • excessive cleaning of the skin;
  • Towel Dry.

When to see a doctor and diagnostics

People who develop eczema should see a dermatologist. Eczema can indicate an allergy, so it is important to determine what is causing the reaction. Eczema also increases the likelihood of infection with staphylococci and has a serious impact on a person’s mental health. Your doctor may recommend a treatment plan for outbreaks.

There is no specific test for diagnosing most types of eczema.The doctor may need information about the patient’s personal and family medical history. He may also inquire about recent exposure to potential allergens and irritants. It is important that patients inform their doctor if they have hay fever or asthma.

The doctor can also ask the patient about:

  • the nature of the sleep period;
  • stress factors:
  • any previous skin treatments;
  • any steroid use.

A physical examination of the rash will help the doctor determine the type of eczema.

A doctor may also perform a test that involves tingling a person’s skin with a needle that contains potential irritants and allergens. Such a test can determine if a patient has contact dermatitis.

Treatment

There is no cure for eczema, so treatment includes managing symptoms and trying to prevent further manifestations of the disease.

Some treatment options for eczema include:

  • applying moisturizers or emollients to the skin to reduce itching and cracking;
  • Using steroid creams and ointments to reduce swelling, redness and soreness;
  • use of antihistamines to relieve itching, especially at night;
  • use of calcineurin inhibitors to help reduce inflammation;
  • phototherapy, which uses ultraviolet light to fight inflammation
  • The use of antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial skin infections.

Prevention of disease manifestations.

A list of tips that can help prevent flare-ups of eczema include:

  • Use of mild soaps and detergents;
  • The need to avoid aromatic fragrances or perfumes;
  • using cool water for showers and baths;
  • Gentle drying and skin care after washing;
  • the need to avoid scratching or rubbing areas of eczema, as damage to the skin can worsen and increase the likelihood of infection;
  • thorough and regular moisturizing of the skin using light, oil-rich products;
  • Application of non-cosmetic moisturizers after showers and baths to maintain skin moisture
  • Wearing clothing made from natural fabrics, refusing tight clothing.

Patients with eczema should be in constant contact with a dermatologist to determine what is causing or worsening the symptoms of the disease. Knowing the causes of eczema or allergens can help prevent or minimize the manifestations of the disease.

Original article on Medical News Today – What are the different types of eczema?

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90,000 Causes, Symptoms and Treatment of Eczema. Types of eczema, diet for dermatitis

Causes, symptoms and treatment of eczema in children and adults

Eczema (dermatitis) is a group of chronic recurrent skin diseases resulting in inflammation of the skin.What the initial stage of eczema looks like depends on the form of the disease, but redness and rashes on an area of ​​the skin or all over the body are common signs. The symptoms of dermatitis range from small rashes to blisters. Characterized by redness of the skin, swelling, itching.

Eczema is a widespread disease that accounts for 30-40% of all skin pathologies. In developed countries, it affects 10–20% of the population.

Eczema is caused by serous inflammation of the epidermis and dermis. Due to the different genesis, the disease is characterized by the variability of the clinical course and the polymorphism of the elements of the rash.The causes, symptoms and treatment of eczema will be discussed below.

Types of eczema

According to the classification based on the clinical characteristics of the disease, the true, microbial, seborrheic, children’s and professional varieties of eczema are distinguished.

Main types of eczema:

  1. Seborrheic. As a rule, it develops gradually and begins with dry or oily seborrhea – flaking of the scalp (dandruff). If left untreated, it can lead to hair loss.In severe cases, rashes appear along the hairline, behind the ears, on the eyebrows, on the back and around the nose, on the chest, on the upper back, in the axillary and groin folds.
  2. Atopic (sometimes called nervous) eczema is a common allergic disease. It is believed that a hereditary component prevails in the onset of atopic eczema. Common in families with asthma. An itchy rash is especially noticeable on the face, scalp, neck, elbows, buttocks.Irritant contact dermatitis is sometimes misdiagnosed as atopic.
  3. Microbial (exudative) or coin-like eczema. This form is characterized by rounded weeping spots or dry rashes with clear, uneven boundaries. Most often affects the upper and lower extremities. As a rule, it is exacerbated in the winter.
  4. Varicose eczema occurs in people with circulatory disorders, varicose veins, edema, especially in the ankle joint.This type of eczema predisposes to ulcers. Read about how to treat varicose veins on our website Dobrobut.com.
  5. Xerotic eczema is manifested by dryness and cracking of the skin. The disorder is common among the elderly.
  6. Dyshidrotic or vesicular eczema (dyshidrosis). A characteristic manifestation is small opaque tubercles (vesicles), cracks on the palms and soles. The disease is accompanied by itching, which is worse at night. Aggravation is observed in the warm season.
  7. Hormonal eczema develops as a result of the haphazard use of hormonal drugs.

How to get rid of eczema on nails, elbows, palms, hands and fingers

Considering the polyetiology of the disease, eczema therapy is carried out in a complex manner. The doctor develops a personalized treatment algorithm, taking into account the localization of the pathological process, the patient’s age, concomitant diseases, and the effectiveness of previous therapy.

An obligatory component of complex treatment is adequate external therapy. Cream for eczema on the body in adults helps relieve itching, eliminates dry skin, relieves allergic inflammatory reactions, and prevents secondary infection.

Systemic therapy is usually connected with exacerbation of pathology. How to treat eczema on the face and head depends on the form of the disease and the nature of the skin lesions.

Drugs are usually prescribed:

  • antihistamines;
  • Desensitizing;
  • sedatives (tranquilizers).

Correction of concomitant pathologies is carried out if necessary.

How to get rid of eczema on nails, elbows, palms, hands and fingers? You should regularly moisturize the skin and apply hormonal creams strictly according to the scheme prescribed by the doctor. Eczema is considered a steroid-sensitive disease, so a high therapeutic effect is observed with topical glucocorticosteroid therapy. However, hormone creams should not be used for more than two weeks.For signs of skin infection, antibiotic ointments are prescribed.

Treatment of eczema in children

Diet for eczema on hands and feet in children allows you to improve the condition of the skin without the use of potent hormonal ointments. Parents should track which foods the child has an allergic reaction to and exclude them from the diet.

How to treat skin eczema in babies? First of all, products should be excluded from the diet of a nursing mother, after the use of which the baby has an exacerbation of atopic dermatitis.A mother’s diet during pregnancy and breastfeeding has been shown to reduce the risk of eczema in her baby.

The second important point is moisturizing / softening the skin. Bathing once or twice a day and regular use of moisturizers are recommended. Hormonal ointments for children’s eczema on the feet or other localization are prescribed only during exacerbations and strictly dosed.