About all

Ferrous fumarate side effects: ferrous fumarate | Michigan Medicine

Содержание

ferrous fumarate | Michigan Medicine

What is the most important information I should know about ferrous fumarate?

You should not use ferrous fumarate if you have iron overload syndrome, or other red blood cell disorders.

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 if a child has accidentally swallowed it. An overdose of ferrous fumarate can be fatal to a child younger than 6 years old.

What is ferrous fumarate?

Ferrous fumarate is a type of iron. You normally get iron from the foods you eat. In your body, iron becomes a part of your hemoglobin (HEEM o glo bin) and myoglobin (MY o glo bin). Hemoglobin carries oxygen through your blood to tissues and organs. Myoglobin helps your muscle cells store oxygen.

Ferrous fumarate is used to treat iron deficiency anemia (a lack of red blood cells caused by having too little iron in the body).

Ferrous fumarate may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking ferrous fumarate?

You should not use ferrous fumarate if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • iron overload syndrome; or
  • hemolytic anemia.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if this medicine is safe to use if you have ever had:

  • a stomach ulcer;
  • an intestinal disorder such as ulcerative colitis; or
  • blood transfusions.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Your dose needs may be different during pregnancy or while you are nursing.

Do not give ferrous fumarate to a child without the advice of a doctor.

How should I take ferrous fumarate?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor.

Take ferrous fumarate on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

Take with food if ferrous fumarate upsets your stomach.

You may need frequent medical tests.

You may need to follow a special diet while using ferrous fumarate. Follow all instructions of your doctor or dietitian. Learn about the foods to eat to make sure you get enough iron from both your diet and your medication.

Do not take this medicine for longer than 6 months without a doctor’s advice.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 if you think you have used too much of this medicine, or if a child has accidentally swallowed it. An overdose of ferrous fumarate can be fatal to a child younger than 6 years old.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, cold or clammy skin, blue lips, and loss of consciousness.

What should I avoid while taking ferrous fumarate?

Avoid eating foods that are high fiber at the same time you take your ferrous fumarate dose. High-fiber foods include whole grains, raw vegetables, and bran.

Avoid milk or other dairy products for at least 2 hours before or 2 hours after you take ferrous fumarate.

Do not take any vitamin or mineral supplements that your doctor has not prescribed or recommended.

What are the possible side effects of ferrous fumarate?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe stomach pain;
  • severe nausea or vomiting;
  • coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • blood or tarry stools; or
  • bright red blood in your stools.

Common side effects may include:

  • constipation, diarrhea;
  • stomach cramps;
  • loss of appetite; or
  • black or dark-colored stools or urine.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect ferrous fumarate?

Some drugs can affect your blood levels of other drugs you take, which may increase side effects or make the medications less effective. Ask your doctor how much time to allow between your ferrous fumarate dose and other medicines you use, especially:

  • an antacid or stomach acid reducer;
  • an antibiotic;
  • thyroid medication;
  • medicine to treat Parkinson’s disease;
  • osteoporosis medication; or
  • seizure medication.

Other drugs may affect ferrous fumarate, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about ferrous fumarate.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. (‘Multum’) is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum’s drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum’s drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2021 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.01. Revision date: 3/10/2020.

Ferrous Fumarate Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing

Follow all directions on the product package, or take as directed by your doctor. Do not take more than the recommended dosage. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Iron is best absorbed on an empty stomach (usually if taken 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals). If stomach upset occurs, you may take this medication with food. See the instructions below for the liquid drops for infants/children. Avoid taking antacids, dairy products, tea, or coffee within 2 hours before or after this medication because they will decrease its effectiveness.

Take tablets or capsules with a full glass of water (8 ounces or 240 milliliters) unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Do not lie down for at least 10 minutes after taking your tablet or capsule dose.

Swallow extended-release capsules whole. Do not crush or chew extended-release capsules or tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split extended-release tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing.

If you are taking chewable tablets, chew the medication thoroughly, then swallow.

If you are taking a liquid suspension form of this medication, shake the bottle well before each dose.

If you are taking the liquid form for adults, carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose. Mix the dose in a glass of water or juice, and drink the mixture through a straw to prevent staining the teeth.

If you are giving the liquid drops to an infant or child, use the dropper provided to carefully measure the dose. The dose may be placed directly into the mouth (towards the back of the tongue) or it may be mixed in formula (not milk), fruit juice, cereal, or other food as directed to increase your child’s acceptance. It is best to give this medication right after a meal. Follow the directions on the product package for the brand that you use.

Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time(s) each day.

Norethindrone, Ethinyl Estradiol, And Ferrous Fumarate (Oral Route) Side Effects

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common

  1. Breast tenderness

  2. heavy non-menstrual vaginal bleeding

  3. irregular menstrual periods

  4. longer or heavier menstrual periods

  5. normal menstrual bleeding occurring earlier, possibly lasting longer than expected
Incidence not known

  1. Chest pain

  2. chills

  3. clay-colored stools

  4. confusion

  5. dark urine

  6. diarrhea

  7. difficulty with speaking

  8. dizziness

  9. double vision

  10. fast or irregular heartbeat

  11. fever

  12. headache

  13. inability to move the arms, legs, or facial muscles

  14. inability to speak

  15. indigestion

  16. itching or rash

  17. loss of appetite

  18. nausea

  19. pain, redness, or swelling in the arm or leg

  20. pains in the chest, groin, or legs, especially in the calves

  21. severe headaches of sudden onset

  22. severe nausea or vomiting

  23. slurred speech

  24. stomach pain

  25. sudden loss of coordination

  26. sudden onset of slurred speech

  27. sudden vision changes

  28. tightness in the chest

  29. unpleasant breath odor

  30. unusual tiredness or weakness

  31. unusual warmth or flushing of the skin

  32. unusually heavy or unexpected menstrual bleeding

  33. vaginal bleeding or spotting

  34. vomiting of blood

  35. yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  1. Vomiting
Less common

  1. Anxiety

  2. blemishes on the skin

  3. cramps

  4. depression

  5. pain

  6. pimples

  7. weight changes

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Portions of this document last updated: Nov. 01, 2021

Copyright © 2021 IBM Watson Health. All rights reserved. Information is for End User’s use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes.


.

Iron supplements | Patient

About iron supplements

Type of medicine Oral iron
Used for Prevention and treatment of iron-deficiency anaemia
Also called Ferrous sulfate, ferrous fumarate, ferrous gluconate, sodium feredetate, polysaccharide-iron complex
Available as Tablets, capsules, oral liquid medicine, oral liquid sachets and oral drops

Iron-deficiency anaemia is caused by a lack of iron. Iron is needed to make haemoglobin which carries oxygen around in the bloodstream and is what makes red blood cells red.

If you have iron-deficiency anaemia, it means that there is a reduced amount of oxygen being carried around in your body. This can cause tiredness, breathlessness, dizziness, the sensation of having a ‘thumping heart’ (palpitations) and headache.

Iron is found naturally in certain foods, but in conditions where people do not get enough iron from their normal diet for their body’s needs, an iron supplement may be useful.

Before taking iron supplements

Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking an iron supplement it is important that your doctor or pharmacist knows:

  • If you have any difficulty swallowing.
  • If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines you are taking which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.
  • If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine.

How to take iron supplements

  • Before you start the treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside the pack. It will give you more information about the iron supplement and will provide you with a full list of the side-effects which you may experience from taking it.
  • Iron is absorbed into your bloodstream best if the supplement is taken about an hour before a meal. If, however, you feel queasy after taking iron, having some food in your stomach can help to reduce stomach irritation and feelings of queasiness. So in this case, it may be better for you to take your iron supplement just after a meal.
  • Take the iron preparation exactly as your doctor tells you to. You will be told how much to take and how often to take it. Your dose will also be on the label of the pack to remind you. It is usual to be prescribed between 1-3 doses a day. Taking your doses at the same times each day will help you to avoid missing any.
  • If you do forget to take a dose, don’t worry, just leave out the missed dose and take the next dose when it is due. Do not take two doses together to make up for a forgotten dose.

Getting the most from your treatment

  • The length of your course of treatment will depend upon how low your iron levels are. A blood test after a few weeks will show if the treatment is working and your doctor will tell you for how long you should continue to take the iron supplement.
  • If you buy any medicines, check with your pharmacist that they are suitable to take with iron supplements. Some medicines (particularly antacids) can interfere with the way iron is absorbed and so should not be taken at the same time.
  • Iron supplements can make your stools look darker in colour. This is completely harmless.
  • If you suspect that you have taken an overdose of iron, or that someone else (especially if it is a child) might have taken it accidentally, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital straightaway. This is very important because iron can cause serious problems when it is taken accidentally or in overdose. Take the container with you to show what has been taken, even if the pack is now empty.

Can iron supplements cause problems?

Along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side-effects although not everyone experiences them. The table below contains some of the most common ones associated with iron. You will find a full list in the manufacturer’s information leaflet supplied with your medicine. The unwanted effects often improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine, but speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome.

Common iron side-effects
What can I do if I experience this?
Feeling sick (nausea), stomach pain Stick to simple foods. If you are not already doing so, take your doses after meals
Constipation Try to eat a well-balanced diet and drink several glasses of water each day
Diarrhoea Drink plenty of water to replace lost fluids

If you experience any other symptoms which you think may be due to the medicine, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

How to store iron supplements

  • Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.
  • Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.

Important information about all medicines

Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else might have taken an overdose of this medicine, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Take the container with you, even if it is empty.

This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours.

If you are having an operation or any dental treatment, tell the person carrying out the treatment which medicines you are taking.

Do not keep out-of-date or unwanted medicines. Take them to your local pharmacy which will dispose of them for you.

If you have any questions about this medicine ask your pharmacist.

Uses, Side Effects, Interactions & Pill Images

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6 years of age. Keep this product out of reach of children. If overdose does occur, seek immediate medical attention or call a poison control center.

This medication is an iron supplement used to treat or prevent low blood levels of iron (such as those caused by anemia or during pregnancy). Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) improves the absorption of iron from the stomach.

Take this medication by mouth, usually once daily or as directed by your doctor.This medication is best taken on an empty stomach 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals. If stomach upset occurs, you may take this medication with food. Avoid taking antacids, dairy products, tea, or coffee within 2 hours before or after this medication because they will decrease its effectiveness.Swallow this medication with a full glass of water (8 ounces or 240 milliliters) unless your doctor directs you otherwise. Do not crush or chew this medication. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split the tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing. Do not lie down for at least 10 minutes after taking this medication.Use this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day.

Constipation, diarrhea, or upset stomach may occur. These effects are usually temporary and may disappear as your body adjusts to this medication.If any of these effects persist or worsen, contact your doctor or pharmacist promptly. Iron may cause your stools to turn black, which is not harmful.If your doctor has prescribed this medication, remember that your doctor has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.Before taking this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: certain metabolic disorders (e.g., hemochromatosis, hemosiderosis), use/abuse of alcohol, stomach/intestinal problems (e.g., ulcers, colitis).If your particular brand of iron supplement also contains folic acid, be sure to tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have vitamin B12 deficiency (pernicious anemia) before taking it.During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.This medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

See also How To Use section.

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.This product can decrease the absorption of other drugs such as bisphosphonates (for example, alendronate), levodopa, penicillamine, quinolone antibiotics (for example, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin), thyroid medications (for example, levothyroxine), and tetracycline antibiotics (for example, doxycycline, minocycline). Separate your doses of these medications as far as possible from your doses of this product. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about how long you should wait between doses and for help finding a dosing schedule that will work with all your medications.This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (tests for blood in the stools), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea.

Do not share this medication with others.Laboratory and/or medical tests (e.g., complete blood count) may be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.There are many iron supplement products available. Some can be purchased without a prescription. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details.This medication is not a substitute for a proper diet. It is important to maintain a well-balanced diet. Foods rich in iron include beans, nuts, asparagus, oatmeal, red meat, dried peaches, and pork liver.

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose. Take your next dose at the regular time. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

Information last revised August 2021. Copyright(c) 2021 First Databank, Inc.

Ferrous Fumarate: Pediatric Medication | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

This information from Lexicomp® explains what you need to know about this medication, including what it’s used for, how to take it, its side effects, and when to call your healthcare provider.

Brand Names: US

Ferretts [OTC]; Ferrimin 150 [OTC]; Hemocyte [OTC] [DSC]

What is this drug used for?

  • It is used to aid diet needs.
  • It is used to treat or prevent low iron in the body.
  • It may be given to your child for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

What do I need to tell the doctor BEFORE my child takes this drug?

  • If your child is allergic to this drug; any part of this drug; or any other drugs, foods, or substances. Tell the doctor about the allergy and what signs your child had.
  • If your child has any of these health problems: Too much iron in the body or anemia from a cause other than low iron.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this drug.

Tell the doctor and pharmacist about all of your child’s drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe to give this drug with all of your child’s other drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug your child takes without checking with the doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while my child takes this drug?

  • Tell all of your child’s health care providers that your child is taking this drug. This includes your child’s doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Have your child’s blood work checked often. Talk with your child’s doctor.
  • This drug may affect certain lab tests. Tell all of your child’s health care providers and lab workers that your child takes this drug.
  • If your child is allergic to tartrazine (FD&C Yellow No. 5), talk with your child’s doctor. Some products have tartrazine.
  • This drug prevents many other drugs from getting into the body. If your child takes other drugs, check with the doctor or pharmacist to see if your child needs to take them at some other time than this drug.
  • Accidental overdose of drugs that have iron in them is a leading cause of deadly poisoning in children younger than 6 years of age. Keep away from children. If this drug is taken by accident, call a doctor or poison control center right away.

If your child is pregnant or breast-feeding a baby:

  • Talk with the doctor if your child is pregnant, becomes pregnant, or is breast-feeding a baby. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks to your child and the baby.

What are some side effects that I need to call my child’s doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your child’s doctor or get medical help right away if your child has any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Black, tarry, or bloody stools.
  • Fever.
  • Throwing up blood or throw up that looks like coffee grounds.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your child’s doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother your child or do not go away:

  • Constipation, diarrhea, stomach pain, upset stomach, throwing up, or feeling less hungry.
  • Change in color of stool to green.
  • Stomach cramps.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your child’s doctor. Call your child’s doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to your national health agency.

How is this drug best given?

Give this drug as ordered by your child’s doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

All products:

  • This drug works better if your child takes it on an empty stomach. Your child may take this drug with food if it causes an upset stomach. Some foods like eggs, whole grain breads, cereal, dairy products, coffee, and tea may make this drug not work as well. If this drug causes an upset stomach, talk with the doctor about the best way to give this drug with food.
  • Give this drug with a full glass of water.
  • If antacids are used, they may need to be given at some other time than this drug. Talk with your child’s doctor or pharmacist.

Long-acting products:

  • Have your child swallow whole. Do not let your child chew, break, or crush.

What do I do if my child misses a dose?

  • Give a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your child’s next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your child’s normal time.
  • Do not give 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

How do I store and/or throw out this drug?

  • Store at room temperature protected from light. Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

General drug facts

  • If your child’s symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your child’s doctor.
  • Do not share your child’s drug with others and do not give anyone else’s drug to your child.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. If you have any questions about this drug, please talk with your child’s doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

This generalized information is a limited summary of diagnosis, treatment, and/or medication information. It is not meant to be comprehensive and should be used as a tool to help the user understand and/or assess potential diagnostic and treatment options. It does NOT include all information about conditions, treatments, medications, side effects, or risks that may apply to a specific patient. It is not intended to be medical advice or a substitute for the medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment of a health care provider based on the health care provider’s examination and assessment of a patient’s specific and unique circumstances. Patients must speak with a health care provider for complete information about their health, medical questions, and treatment options, including any risks or benefits regarding use of medications. This information does not endorse any treatments or medications as safe, effective, or approved for treating a specific patient. UpToDate, Inc. and its affiliates disclaim any warranty or liability relating to this information or the use thereof. The use of this information is governed by the Terms of Use, available at https://www. wolterskluwer.com/en/solutions/lexicomp/about/eula.

Last Reviewed Date

2020-08-03

Copyright

© 2021 UpToDate, Inc. and its affiliates and/or licensors. All rights reserved.

Ferrous Fumarate – an overview

Options for Oral and Intravenous Iron Treatments for Restless Legs Syndrome

There are different oral preparations of iron (ferrous sulfate 325 mg [alternately labeled as “65 mg of elemental iron”], ferrous fumarate 200 mg (66 mg of elemental iron), or ferrous gluconate 325 mg [sometimes better tolerated, but it has only 38 mg of elemental iron per pill]). A specific patient may better tolerate one preparation than the others. With iron deficiency anemia, a starting point is 50 to 65 mg of elemental iron, three times a day. Reduced stomach acidity (e.g., by use of medications, calcium, or food) reduces iron absorption. Therefore, oral iron should be ingested on an empty stomach (no food, milk, or any other calcium-containing vitamins) along with a minimum of 100 mg of vitamin C. Serum ferritin and percent transferrin saturation (%sat) should be checked 3 months after initiating treatment and then every 3 to 6 months thereafter, depending on how rapidly the initial serum ferritin level changed. Iron treatment should be stopped if elevated values of %sat or ferritin occur, because some patients with RLS may also have unrecognized hemochromotosis.7

The treatment end point is a serum ferritin level of 60 to 80 μg/L. It is not unusual to find patients in whom ferritin levels are difficult to elevate, despite the use of large doses of iron (195 mg or more per day of elemental iron). Once expected ferritin levels are achieved, then iron supplementation can be stopped or reduced. However, serum ferritin levels should again be checked in about 3 months, because some patients will show a precipitous drop in ferritin over 2 to 3 months. If ferritin levels are further checked in 6 months, one can get an estimate of the average rate of change over time. Some patients may need to remain on large oral doses of iron solely to maintain their ferritin at a given level and should be evaluated for possible pathological blood loss. Any regular blood donations should be discouraged in this population of patients being treated with iron.

There are three preparations of intravenous iron that are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Silverman and Rodgers8 published a comparison of the three parental forms of intravenous iron and a guide to their administration. Iron dextran (INFeD, Imferon, DexFerrum) has been associated with acute anaphylaxis, which appears to be related to the dextran component. Sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit) and iron sucrose (Venofer) do not contain polymerized dextran and have not, to date, been associated with anaphylaxis. When given at the approved dosing schedules, the side effects are relatively uncommon and include drop in blood pressure, headaches, nausea, vomiting, and other gastrointestinal symptoms.

It is important to remember that intravenous iron is an experimental treatment for RLS and should therefore be conducted on a research basis with appropriate oversight. It is, however, an accepted treatment for iron deficiency that cannot be adequately managed with oral iron treatments. Some RLS patients have a chronic iron deficiency that does not resolve even after several months of oral iron treatment. These patients may be appropriate candidates for intravenous iron treatment of their iron deficiency and this treatment of their iron deficiency may also prove to benefit their RLS. The treatment goal, however, should be limited to correcting the iron deficiency and not the RLS.

Ferrous Fumarate | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

This document, provided by Lexicomp ® , contains all the information you need to know about the drug, including the indications, route of administration, side effects and when you should contact your healthcare provider.

Trade names: USA

Ferretts [OTC]; Ferrimin 150 [OTC]; Hemocyte [OTC] [DSC]

What is this drug used for?

  • Used to meet the needs of the body with natural supplements.
  • It is used to treat and prevent iron deficiency.
  • This medicinal product may also be used for other indications. Check with your doctor.

What should I tell my doctor BEFORE taking this drug?

  • If you are allergic to this drug, any of its ingredients, other drugs, foods or substances. Tell your doctor about your allergy and how it manifested itself.
  • If you have any of the following health conditions: excess iron in your body or anemia other than iron deficiency.

This list of drugs and diseases that may be adversely associated with the use of this drug is not exhaustive.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the medicines you take (prescription and over-the-counter, natural products and vitamins) and your health problems. You need to make sure that this drug is safe for your medical condition and in combination with other drugs you are already taking.Do not start or stop taking any drug or change the dosage without your doctor’s approval.

What do I need to know or do while taking this drug?

  • Tell all healthcare providers that you are taking this drug. These are doctors, nurses, pharmacists and dentists.
  • Perform blood tests as directed by your healthcare practitioner. Please consult your doctor.
  • This drug may interfere with some laboratory tests.Tell all healthcare providers and lab staff that you are taking this drug.
  • If you are allergic to tartrazine (FD&C Yellow No. 5), consult your doctor. Some products contain tartrazine.
  • This drug interferes with the absorption of many other drugs. If you are taking other drugs, ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should take them at a time other than the time you took this drug.
  • Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is one of the most common causes of fatal poisoning in children under 6 years of age. Keep out of the reach of children. If you accidentally take this drug, call a doctor or poison control center right away.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. The benefits and risks for you and your child will need to be discussed.

What side effects should I report to my doctor immediately?

WARNING. In rare cases, some people with this drug can have serious and sometimes deadly side effects. Call your doctor right away or get medical help if you have any of the following signs or symptoms, which may be associated with serious side effects:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, such as rash, hives, itching, reddened and swollen skin with blistering or scaling, possibly associated with fever, wheezing or wheezing, tightness in the chest or throat, difficulty breathing, swallowing or speaking, unusual hoarseness, swelling in the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Black, tarry, or bloody stools.
  • High temperature.
  • Vomiting of blood or vomit in the form of coffee grounds.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

Any medicine can have side effects. However, many people have little or no side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if these or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Constipation, diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or decreased appetite.
  • Changing the color of the stool to green.
  • Stomach colic.

This list of potential side effects is not comprehensive. If you have any questions about side effects, please contact your doctor. Talk to your doctor about side effects.

You can report side effects to the National Health Office.

You can report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-332-1088.You can also report side effects at https://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

What is the best way to take this drug?

Use this drug as directed by your healthcare practitioner. Read all the information provided to you. Follow all instructions strictly.

All forms of issue:

  • This drug works best when taken on an empty stomach. If the drug is causing stomach upset, it can be taken with food.Certain types of foods, such as eggs, whole grain bread, oatmeal, dairy products, coffee, and tea, may reduce the effectiveness of this drug. If this drug causes stomach upset, talk to your doctor about taking it with food.
  • Take this drug with a full glass of water.
  • Antacids may need to be rescheduled for a different time than when this drug was taken. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Long-acting drugs:

  • Swallow whole. Do not chew, break, or crush.

What should I do if a dose of a drug is missed?

  • Take the missed dose as soon as you can.
  • If it’s time to take your next dose, do not take the missed dose and then return to your normal drug schedule.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or an additional dose.

How do I store and / or discard this drug?

  • Store at room temperature, protected from light. Store in a dry place. Do not store in the bathroom.
  • Store all medicines in a safe place. Keep all medicines out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Dispose of unused or expired drugs. Do not empty into toilet or drain unless directed to do so.If you have any questions about the disposal of your medicinal products, consult your pharmacist. There may be drug recycling programs in your area.

General information on medicinal products

  • If your health does not improve or even worsens, see your doctor.
  • You should not give your medicine to anyone and take other people’s medicines.
  • Some medicines may come with other patient information sheets.If you have questions about this drug, talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other healthcare professional.
  • Some medicines may come with other patient information sheets. Check with your pharmacist. If you have questions about this drug, talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other healthcare professional.
  • If you think an overdose has occurred, call a Poison Control Center immediately or seek medical attention.Be prepared to tell or show which drug you took, how much and when it happened.

Use of information by consumer and limitation of liability

This information should not be used to make decisions about taking this or any other drug. Only the attending physician has the necessary knowledge and experience to make decisions about which drugs are suitable for a particular patient. This information does not guarantee that the drug is safe, effective, or approved for the treatment of any disease or specific patient.Here are only brief general information about this drug. It does NOT contain all available information on the possible use of the drug with instructions for use, warnings, precautions, information about interactions, unwanted effects and risks that may be associated with this drug. This information should not be construed as a treatment guide and does not replace information provided to you by your healthcare professional. Check with your doctor for complete information on the possible risks and benefits of taking this drug.Use of this information is governed by the Lexicomp End User License Agreement available at https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/solutions/lexicomp/about/eula.

Copyright

© UpToDate, Inc. and its affiliates and / or licensors, 2021. All rights reserved.

Iron Ferrous Fumarate in Russian – Item

  • Can Iron Ferrous Fumarate be used for anemia and pregnancy?

    Yes, anemia and pregnancy are among the most common reported uses for Iron Ferrous Fumarate.Please do not use Iron Ferrous Fumarate for anemia or pregnancy without consulting first with your doctor. Click here and view the survey results to find out exactly how other users are using Iron Ferrous Fumarate.

  • Is it safe to drive or operate heavy equipment while using this product?

    If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, hypotension, or headache while taking Iron Ferrous Fumarate, you may need to stop driving and heavy industrial equipment.You should stop driving if taking the drug makes you drowsy, dizzy, or hypotensive. Doctors recommend to stop drinking alcohol with such drugs, because alcohol significantly increases side effects and drowsiness. Please check your body’s response while taking Iron Ferrous Fumarate. Be sure to contact your healthcare professional for advice based on your body and overall health.

  • Is this medication (product) addictive or addictive?

    Most drugs are not addictive or addictive. In most cases, the government classifies drugs that can be addictive as controlled dispensing drugs. For example, an H or X chart in India and an II-V chart in the United States. Please review the information on the drug packaging to make sure this drug is not a controlled drug.In addition, do not self-medicate or accustom your body to medication without consulting your healthcare professional.

  • Can I stop using this product immediately or do I need to slowly stop using it?

    Some drugs need to be discontinued gradually due to the recovery effect. Be sure to contact your healthcare professional for advice based on your body, general health, and other medications you are taking.

  • Iron fumarate 200 is … What is Iron fumarate 200?

    Ferrous fumarate 200

    Active ingredient

    ›› Ferrous fumarate

    Latin name

    Ferrous fumarate 200

    ATC:

    ›› B03Amacrate 9000 Ferrous fumarate groups
    ›› Stimulants of hematopoiesis

    Nosological classification (ICD-10)

    ›› D50 Iron deficiency anemia

    Composition and release form

    1 coated tablet contains iron fumarate 200 mg, which is equivalent to 65 mg of ferrous iron ; in a pack of 100, 500 and 1000 pcs.

    Pharmacological action

    Pharmacological action – antianemic, replenishing iron deficiency.

    Indications

    Iron deficiency anemia (treatment and prevention).

    Contraindications

    Hypersensitivity, anemia not associated with iron deficiency, hemoglobinuria (nocturnal), hemosiderosis, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer (exacerbation), enteritis, ulcerative colitis, repeated blood transfusions.

    Application during pregnancy and lactation

    Not recommended in the first trimester of pregnancy.

    Side effects

    Gastrointestinal disorders (discomfort and pain in the epigastric region, lack of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, black stool).

    Interaction

    Absorption is reduced by tetracycline and antacids (the intervals between doses should be at least 2-3 hours). The effect slows down chloramphenicol.

    Method of administration and dosage

    Inside (you can grind or chew). Adults, incl. the elderly – 1 table. 3 times a day; if necessary, the dose is doubled.For the prevention of anemia during pregnancy, it is prescribed in combination with folic acid.

    Precautions

    Avoid prescribing for a period longer than 6 months. Not recommended for patients with peptic ulcers. It should be borne in mind that in large doses, the drug can prevent the detection of occult blood in the stool (due to staining of the stool in black) and that the guaiac test (for blood) can give a false positive result.

    Shelf life

    5 years

    Storage conditions

    List B.: In a place protected from light and moisture, at a temperature not exceeding 25 ° C.

    Dictionary of Medicines.
    2005.

    90,000 TOP 14 iron preparations – rating of good products 2021

    Iron supplements are prescribed to treat iron deficiency anemia, which is diagnosed primarily in children and women. Among the main reasons for the development of this condition should be highlighted inappropriate nutrition and bleeding. With iron deficiency in the body, anemia develops, which is characterized by a decrease in hemoglobin.

    Typical signs are pallor of the skin, dizziness, fatigue, irritability and lethargy.

    Iron from food is not completely absorbed. Lack of a vital trace element leads to a decrease in the level of ferritin and hemoglobin in the blood, which is fraught with difficulty in tissue respiration. It is recommended to fill the deficit with the help of special medications. The best iron supplements are presented in the TOP. The following are effective medications for adults, children, and pregnant women.

    Classification of antianemic agents

    There are 2 main types of additives:

    • Divalent form (sulfates). The concentration of a trace element in the composition is greater. But they cause many side reactions.
    • Trivalent form (plus amino acids). The amino acid helps the microelement to be absorbed better. The readily available chelated form minimizes the likelihood of adverse reactions.

    The normal level of hemoglobin in the blood of an adult is between 120 and 150 g / l.If the body cannot maintain this indicator on its own, then there is a need for drug therapy.

    Groups of drugs that increase hemoglobin:

    • Monopreparations. Designed on the basis of Fe3 +. The composition does not contain additional active ingredients.
    • Vitamin complexes. Contains various minerals and trace elements, mainly B vitamins and amino acids.

    Medicines can only be taken after consulting a doctor.A specialist will help you choose an effective medicine and correctly calculate the dosage.

    Causes of iron deficiency anemia

    The body needs Fe3 + for the production of hemoglobin, a protein responsible for transporting oxygen to tissues. Anemia occurs when the hemoglobin level in red blood cells decreases. Therefore, when there is not enough trace element in the bloodstream, organs and tissues do not receive the oxygen they need.

    There are several reasons that lead to a deficiency of this mineral:

    • Menstruation or childbirth.Heavy menstrual bleeding and blood loss during childbirth usually lead to complications.
    • Internal bleeding. Taking pain relievers often leads to stomach bleeding. In addition, some pathologies can cause internal bleeding, such as stomach ulcers, intestinal polyps, and colon cancer.
    • Malabsorption of a trace element. Certain intestinal disorders, such as celiac disease and Crohn’s disease, interfere with the absorption of substances.On the other hand, bowel surgery such as a gastric bypass can also affect the amount of a trace mineral that the body is able to absorb.

    There are people who are most at risk. For example, vegetarians who exclude meat from their diet. Also, a predisposition exists in those who often donate blood and in children born seven months old.

    Those at risk and experiencing deficiency symptoms should see a doctor. The specialist will send for a blood test, and, possibly, suggest some changes in the diet and, if necessary, prescribe treatment.

    Rating of iron preparations

    TOP-15 will tell you which iron preparation to choose for anemia. We have collected the most effective medicines that practically do not cause adverse reactions. The rating of medicines is based on an analysis of the characteristics of all medicines and customer reviews.

    TOP of the best iron preparations with low hemoglobin

    No. 1 – Fenuls (capsules)

    The best iron supplement for anemia, represented by a complex of vitamins and minerals.The peculiarity lies in the microdialysis granules, which gradually release the constituent parts.
    “Fenuls” capsules are prescribed for:

    • chronic blood loss;
    • nutritional deficiency;
    • increased need.

    The B vitamins and ascorbic acid included in the composition improve the absorption of the active component, preventing oversaturation of the body.

    No. 2 – “Ferrum Lek” (chewable tablets)

    The best preparation for raising iron, which belongs to the group of trivalent.Differs in stability, without emitting free ions. The structure of the active component is similar to the natural compound Fe3 +, therefore it is well absorbed.

    Ions are actively absorbed in the intestinal area, which excludes the possibility of intoxication caused by an overdose. “Ferrum Lek” is prescribed for infants and young children, and can also be used during pregnancy.

    No. 3 – “Ferrum Lek” (solution)

    An effective remedy for the treatment of anemia, which is intended for persons suffering from disorders of the gastrointestinal tract.Differs in a stable macromolecular complex.

    Ferrum Lek solution is the best iron preparation for pregnant women. Due to the fact that Fe3 + enter the bloodstream from the intestines, being actively absorbed, overdose is excluded. Deficiency conditions are quickly eliminated. The solution can also be used for pediatric patients.

    No. 4 – “Sorbifer Durules” (tablets)

    Good iron in tablets, which is gradually released over a long period, gradually saturating the body.It is used as a prophylaxis during pregnancy, lactation and in people who are blood donors.

    No. 5 – “Totem” (oral solution)

    The combined preparation is indispensable for pregnant women. The composition includes:

    • Iron. We synthesize gem, which is part of hemoglobin and takes part in redox reactions.
    • Manganese and copper. Cofactors (compounds involved in biological activity) of enzymes.

    Laboratory and clinical symptoms of anemia gradually regress. The absorption of active substances is carried out in the upper part of the jejunum and in the duodenum.

    No. 6 – “Maltofer” (drops)

    Antianemic agent has proven clinical efficacy. It is widely used for newborns and premature babies. The absorbed substance Fe3 + is used by the body to synthesize hemoglobin in the bone marrow or is stored in the liver (where it binds to ferritin).

    No. 7 – “Maltofer Fall” (chewable tablets)

    Contains active ingredients such as iron hydroxide with polymaltose and folic acid. Suitable for adults and children from 12 years old. The disadvantage is the potential for overdose.

    In case of non-compliance with the manufacturer’s recommendations or with an individual predisposition of the body, the development of adverse reactions in the form of headaches, itching, muscle spasms is possible. Chewable tablets can cause the stool to become dark, but this is not an abnormality.

    No. 8 – “Maltofer” (chewable tablets)

    Prescribed for the treatment of latent deficiency (no anemia). The tablet form is convenient for calculating the dosage. Eliminates the likelihood of harm to the body caused by an overdose.

    An irreplaceable option for pregnant and lactating women. This is due to the absence of undesirable consequences for the fetus or infant. Not recommended for children under 12 years of age. Maltofer chewable tablets are the best medicine for problems with the pancreas.

    No. 9 – “Maltofer” (syrup)

    Iron preparation for anemia, which is better absorbed. The release form in the form of a syrup is convenient in that there is a possibility of more accurate dosing. Tablets need to be crushed or split in order to achieve the desired dose of the active ingredient. The syrup simplifies the process. It is produced in the form of a syrup and is absorbed faster.

    The only drawback is the higher price than other forms of release.

    No. 10 – “Ferlatum” (solution)

    Has a unique formula.Contains Fe3 + – a combination of atoms with a semi-synthetic protein carrier, which prevents damage to the gastric mucosa. The possibility of overdose is excluded due to the fact that the active ingredient enters the bloodstream by absorption (transport).

    No. 11 – “Ferlatum Fall” – powder for solution preparation

    Formulated on the basis of calcium folinate pentahydrate and Fe3 +.
    “Ferlatum Foul” is prescribed:

    • with latent and clinically pronounced deficiency;
    • for prophylaxis during pregnancy, lactation, with prolonged bleeding, during the period of active growth and with unbalanced or inadequate nutrition.

    When preparing the solution, it is recommended to follow the recommendations indicated by the manufacturer. No cases of overdose have been identified.

    No. 12 – “Ferretab” (capsules)

    If you do not know which iron preparation is better to buy, pay attention to the “Ferretab” extended-release capsules. The combined agent has a complex effect on the body:

    • Ferrous fumarate. Takes part in the synthesis of hemoglobin. It is presented in the form of salts, which quickly replenish the deficiency of trace elements in the body, gradually eliminating increased fatigue, weakness, tachycardia and dizziness.Dryness and pallor of the skin also disappears.
    • Folic acid. Promotes the normal maturation of megaloblasts and the formation of normoblasts. Takes part in the synthesis of amino acids. Prevents the development of anemia, miscarriages and premature birth. Eliminates mental impairment in children.

    No. 13 – “Feroglobin B12” (capsules)

    It is not the last in the ranking of iron supplements. Promotes the formation of red blood cells and the synthesis of amino acids.Copper and ascorbic acid increase the absorption efficiency of the main active ingredient. Manganese regulates carbohydrate metabolic processes in the body.

    Feroglobin B12 capsules normalize hemoglobin biosynthesis and activate redox processes, eliminating the symptoms that accompany anemia (lethargy and weakness, insufficient mental and physical activity).

    No. 14 – “Aktiferrin” (drops for oral administration)

    Antianemic agent contains Fe3 + and D, L-serine.Promotes the rapid restoration of normal balance. A unique pharmacological development ensures better tolerance of active ingredients, allowing you to reduce the required dose.

    High dosages can cause life-threatening conditions. That is why a specialist should calculate the dosage. Uncontrolled reception is unacceptable. Application during pregnancy and lactation is possible only if the potential benefit to the mother outweighs the possible harm to the child.

    Conclusions

    It is difficult to find the best tablets for raising the level of iron on your own. It is important to take into account the individual characteristics of the organism, concomitant diseases and laboratory parameters. The final decision must be made by the doctor. Before buying, be sure to consult with a specialist.

    Most buyers give preference to firms such as Lek d. d. (Slovenia), Vifor (Switzerland), Ranbaxy (India), etc. The question of which iron supplements are best to take, ask your doctor.The rating is presented for informational purposes only and should not be used as a therapeutic recommendation.

    References:
    https://health.mail.ru/disease/anemiya/
    https://www.eurolab.ua/medicine/atc/list/82/
    https://www.vidal.ru/ drugs / atc / b03ab

    instructions, use, analogues of the drug, composition, indications, contraindications, side effects in the reference book of medicines from UNIAN

    Application of Heferol

    Heferol – composition and release form of the drug

    Heferol: how to take the drug

    Heferol – contraindications, side effects

    Heferol contains elemental iron in the form of iron fumarate.About two-thirds of the iron in the body is contained in the hemoglobin of the circulating mass of red blood cells. With an insufficient intake of iron from food or a violation of its absorption, a latent or clinically pronounced iron deficiency develops in the body (iron deficiency anemia).

    Application of Heferol

    Treatment and prevention of iron deficiency anemia.

    Heferol – composition and release form of the drug

    Active ingredient: ferrous fumarate;

    1 capsule contains 350 mg of iron fumarate, which is equivalent to 115 mg of elemental iron;

    excipients: magnesium stearate; lactose monohydrate; sodium lauryl sulfate; anhydrous colloidal silicon dioxide;

    capsule composition: titanium dioxide (E 171), quinoline yellow (E 104), azorubin (E 122), patented blue V (E 131), brilliant black BN (E 151), gelatin.

    Dosage form – capsules.

    Heferol: how to take the drug

    Take capsules on an empty stomach 30 minutes before breakfast, drink plenty of liquid.

    Adults and children over 12 years old: for prophylaxis – 1 capsule per day; for treatment – 1 capsule 2 times a day.

    For the treatment and prevention of pregnant women in the II and III trimesters, the usual doses are prescribed as for adults.

    Elderly patients.

    For treatment and prevention, the doses are the same as for adults.

    The course of treatment is from 6 to 12 weeks. The drug should be continued for some time after the normalization of the peripheral blood picture in order to replenish the iron depot in the body.

    In some patients, a dose exceeding 30 mg / kg body weight may cause overdose symptoms. For children, doses above 75 mg / kg body weight may be toxic.

    Children. Capsules cannot be divided, therefore there are no recommendations for the use of Heferol for children under 12 years of age.

    Heferol – contraindications, side effects

    Contraindications.

    Hypersensitivity to the active substance or any of the excipients of the preparation.

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    Hemochromatosis, hemosiderosis and other types of anemias not associated with iron deficiency in the body (hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, thalassemia).

    Hemoglobinopathy.

    Active peptic ulcer.

    Regional enteritis (Crohn’s disease) and ulcerative colitis.

    Repeated blood transfusions.

    Parenteral administration of iron preparations.

    Children under 12 years of age.

    Adverse reactions.

    Most often, when treating with iron preparations, violations of the digestive tract are observed : epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, stool staining black, diarrhea, metallic taste in the mouth; allergic reactions including rash and itching.Prolonged unjustified use can lead to constipation and hemosiderosis.

    Source: State Register of Medicines of Ukraine. The instructions are published with abbreviations for information only. Before use, consult your doctor and read the instructions carefully. Self-medication can be harmful to your health.

    Ferrous fumarate – 1 review, instructions for use

    5000 600 recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    9075 0 doctors do not recommend recommend

    907rata 200 (Ferrous fumarate 200).Filmtablets Directory of medicines. Tomsk

    // = $ single_post [“name_eng”]?>
    // = $ single_post [“name_rus”]?>

    Packaging

    Film tablets

    Pharmacological action

    compensates for iron deficiency.

    Indications for use

    Iron deficiency anemia (treatment and prevention).

    Release form

    film tablets 200 mg;

    Pharmacodynamics

    Hematopoietic, erythropoietic, antianemic. Replenishes the body’s iron deficiency, which is necessary for the synthesis of hemoglobin, etc.globin enzymes. It is characterized by high bioavailability, since ferrous iron (ferrous) is easily absorbed, and fumaric acid enhances its absorption. The maximum concentration is reached 4 hours after administration. The half-life is about 12 hours. With iron deficiency anemia, taking 350 mg 1 time per day provides the minimum effective dose of iron. At the same time, the level of hemoglobin (and iron) in the blood serum rises, the number of erythrocytes increases; all hematological and clinical symptoms of anemia regress after 3-4 weeks of treatment.

    Use during pregnancy

    Not recommended in the first trimester of pregnancy.

    Contraindications to use

    Hypersensitivity, anemia not associated with iron deficiency, hemoglobinuria (nocturnal), hemosiderosis, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer (exacerbation), enteritis, ulcerative colitis, repeated blood transfusions.

    Side effects

    Gastrointestinal disorders (discomfort and pain in the epigastric region, lack of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, black stools).

    Method of application and dosage

    Inside (you can grind or chew). Adults, incl. the elderly – 1 table. 3 times a day; if necessary, the dose is doubled. For the prevention of anemia during pregnancy, it is prescribed in combination with folic acid.

    Interaction with other drugs

    Absorption is reduced by tetracycline and antacids (the intervals between doses should be at least 2-3 hours). The effect slows down chloramphenicol.

    Precautions

    Avoid prescribing for a period longer than 6 months.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.

    14 doctors recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    10 doctors recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    9055 9 doctors recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    8 doctors recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    2 doctors recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    2 doctors recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    4 doctors recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    0 doctors are not rivers recommend

    2 doctors recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    1 doctor recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    3 doctor 0 doctors do not recommend

    2 doctors recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    2 doctors recommend
    0 055 9055 9055 9055

    9055 9055

    1 doctor recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    1 doctor recommend
    0 do not recommend doctors

    1 doctor recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    9 0002 1 doctor recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    1 doctor recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    1 doctor recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend

    1 doctor recommend
    0 doctors do not recommend 9055