About all

Fever sweating while sleeping: Fever and Night Sweats. Fever Information. Patient

Содержание

Fever and Night Sweats. Fever Information. Patient

See also the separate Ill and Feverish Child article.

Fever is a common sign that on its own is usually little help in making a diagnosis. Persistent high fever needs urgent treatment. Fever over 42.2°C (108°F) produces unconsciousness and leads to permanent brain damage if sustained. Fever can be classified as:

  • Low: 37.2°-38°C (99°-100.4°F).
  • Moderate: 38.1°-40°C (100.5°-104°F).
  • High: >40°C (104°F).

Fever may also be described as:

  • Remitting – the most common type with daily temperatures fluctuating above the normal range.
  • Intermittent – daily temperature drops into the normal range and then rises back above normal. If temperature fluctuates widely causing chills and sweating, it is called a hectic fever.
  • Sustained – persistent raised temperature with little fluctuation.
  • Relapsing – alternating feverish and afebrile periods.
  • Undulant – gradual increase in temperature, which stays high for a few days then gradually reduces.

Fever may also be described in terms of its duration; brief (<3 weeks), or prolonged. The term pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) is used to describe a condition where no underlying cause can be found[1].

Night sweats are common and there is a long list of possible causes, mostly benign but important to diagnose in order to manage effectively. Serious causes of night sweats can usually be excluded by a thorough history, examination and simple investigations if required.

Causes of fever

Most cases of fever are due to self-limiting viral infections, especially upper respiratory tract infections and childhood exanthemas.

Urinary tract infections are also common but more severe infections (eg, meningitis, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, AIDS) should always be considered. Recent foreign travel should prompt consideration of referral to secondary care for full investigations for tropical infections – eg, malaria.

Non-infection causes of fever include connective tissue disorders, allergy, thyrotoxicosis and malignancy. Disorders of thermoregulation: temperature can suddenly rise up to as high as 41.7°C (107°F) in a life-threatening condition such as heatstroke, thyroid storm, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and malignant hyperthermia and in certain disorders of the central nervous system.

Causes of fever include

  • Infection: bacterial, viral or fungal. The origin of infection may be obvious or may require careful assessment for diagnosis – eg, infective endocarditis, tuberculosis or other occult long-term infection.
  • Inflammatory: phlebitis, thyroiditis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, pancreatitis, familial Mediterranean fever, sarcoidosis, pemphigus, severe or exfoliative dermatitis, bullous pemphigoid.
  • Connective tissue disorders: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polyarteritis nodosa, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, giant cell arteritis.
  • Malignancy: carcinoma (especially lung cancer, renal cancer), sarcomas, lymphoma.
  • Endocrine and metabolic disorders: thyroid disease, gout, porphyria.
  • Tissue destruction – eg, surgery, infarction, haemolysis, crush syndrome, rhabdomyolysis.
  • Thromboembolic causes, including pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis.
  • Blood disorders: aplastic anaemia, agranulocytosis, leukaemias.
  • Allergic conditions: allergic reactions, transfusion reactions, Henoch-Schönlein purpura,
  • Other conditions causing pyrexia: these include cirrhosis, cerebral haemorrhage, Kawasaki disease.
  • Drug reactions: sulfonamides, other antibiotics, barbiturates.
  • Factitious pyrexia.

Prolonged fever

Prolonged fever is used to describe a raised temperature persisting for at least three weeks (persistent, remittent or intermittent). Possible causes of a prolonged fever include:

  • Infection – eg, infectious mononucleosis, abscess, chronic pyelonephritis, malaria, Lyme disease, tuberculosis, syphilis, actinomycosis, AIDS, infective endocarditis.
  • Prolonged infection associated with underlying disorders – eg, immunodeficiency, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis.
  • Malignancy – eg, lung cancer, lymphoma, leukaemia.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polyarteritis nodosa, dermatomyositis, giant cell arteritis, vasculitis.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease – Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis.
  • Cirrhosis, aplastic anaemia, agranulocytosis, haemolytic anaemia.
  • Drug reactions.
  • Factitious.

Night sweats

  • Night sweats are usually defined as episodes of significant night-time sweating that soak the bedclothes or bedding. This is a fairly common symptom.
  • Although uncomfortable, night-time sweating typically isn’t a sign of a serious underlying medical condition. It may be triggered by something as simple as too warm a room or too many blankets on the bed.

Causes of night sweats

Assessment

  • Immediate assessment includes measurement of temperature, assessment of the likely underlying cause, well-being of the patient and signs of dehydration.
  • It is important to know the complete medical history, including immunosuppressive treatments or disorders, infection, trauma, surgery, any medication.
  • Recent travel may suggest more exotic causes of fevers.

Temperature measurement

  • Infrared ear thermometers or thermometers placed in the axilla should be used.
  • Oral measurements are affected by mouth breathing, liquids and respiratory rate.
  • Forehead chemical thermometers are unreliable and should not be used by healthcare professionals.
  • There are diurnal, menstrual and exercise-induced variations in normal body temperature.

Investigations

Investigations are often unnecessary in primary care when the cause of an infection is clear from the history and examination. Possible investigations may include:

  • FBC: raised white cell count in infection, inflammatory conditions and malignancy; tests for infectious mononucleosis.
  • Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP): nonspecific and again raised in a wide range of conditions, including infection, inflammation and malignancy.
  • Urinalysis: may provide clear evidence of a urinary tract infection.
  • Cultures: rarely indicated in primary care apart from sending an MSU.

The patient admitted to hospital will often require a much more extensive list of investigations when exploring the underlying cause of fever, including:

  • Full infection screen, including lumbar puncture for cerebrospinal fluid and also stool and blood cultures.
  • Renal function tests, electrolytes, LFTs and blood gases may also be required.
  • Autoimmune antibody screen may be required when considering a possible underlying connective tissue disorder.
  • Tuberculin test for possible tuberculosis.
  • CXR may be indicated to identify pneumonia, tuberculosis or malignancy.
  • Further investigation for infection – eg, syphilis, HIV, malaria and other tropical diseases.
  • Further radiology – eg, ultrasound, isotope scans, CT or MRI, depending on specific presentation of the patient.

Management

  • The most important aspect of management is the identification and appropriate management of the underlying cause. However, in the case of self-limiting viral infections, the only management required is advice and reassurance.
  • Do not prescribe oral antibiotics to a child with fever without apparent source – see Further Reading, below.
  • If meningococcal disease is suspected, give parenteral antibiotics at the earliest opportunity (either benzylpenicillin or a third-generation cephalosporin) – see Further Reading, below.

Immediate hospital treatment of a child with a very high fever

  • Children with shock: give immediate intravenous fluid bolus of 0.9% sodium chloride (20 ml/kg). Give further boluses as necessary.
  • Give oxygen if there are signs of shock, oxygen saturation of less than 92%, or as clinically indicated.

Simple explanations for patients and their relatives

  • Drink lots of fluid.
  • Do not wear too many clothes (do not overdress or underdress) or use too many blankets.
  • Keep the room at a comfortable temperature but make sure that fresh air is circulating (use a fan if available).
  • A damp vest and a fan can be effective in lowering temperature.
  • Don’t wipe the sweat off immediately as this helps to cool the body.
  • Cool baths and tepid sponging are not recommended.

Antipyretic drugs

  • There is evidence that host defence mechanisms are enhanced by a raised temperature.
  • Fever is the normal response of the body to infection and unless the child becomes distressed or symptomatic, fever alone should not be routinely treated[2].
  • Antipyretics (eg, paracetamol and ibuprofen) should therefore not be used routinely but can be of value, especially for patients with systemic disease (particularly heart failure or respiratory failure) and when fever causes acute confusion.
  • Consider either paracetamol or ibuprofen as an option if a child appears distressed or is unwell.
  • Do not administer paracetamol and ibuprofen at the same time but consider using the alternative agent if there is insufficient response to the first drug – see Further Reading, below.
  • There is some evidence that both alternating and combined antipyretic therapy may be more effective at reducing temperatures than monotherapy alone. However, there is insufficient evidence to know which of combined or alternating therapy might be more beneficial[2].
  • Antipyretic agents do not prevent febrile convulsions in young children and should not be used specifically for this purpose – see Further Reading, below.

Frustrated By Night Sweats While You’re Sleeping? – Cleveland Clinic

It’s no fun to have to change your clothes (or sheets) in the middle of the night, but it may be a common occurrence if night sweats are disrupting your sleep.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Night sweats are drenching sweats that can soak your clothing and bedding, regardless of the temperature in your bedroom. Various factors may cause them, but most of the common causes are treatable, says family medicine physician Donald Ford, MD.

Common causes of night sweats

“There’s no easy way to distinguish different types of sweating, so getting to the root of the cause can help you take steps to preventing or managing if and how you experience them,” Dr. Ford says. Night sweats can be traced to any one of these causes:

  • Menopause.
  • Infections.
  • Medication to treat diabetes or depression.
  • Hormonal imbalance.
  • Neurological issues, anxiety disorders and stress.
  • Substance abuse and addiction.
  • Some types of cancer.

Night sweats during menopause

Night sweats​ can be common nightly symptoms in women who are going through menopause — unlike hot flashes which happened during the day. Generally, night sweats symptoms will wake you up after they have already occurred.

However, many women find that they can control night sweats as well as other symptoms of menopause with relative ease through common-sense lifestyle changes like:

  • Eating well.
  • Exercising regularly.
  • Protecting the skin from sun damage.
  • Taking the right vitamins and supplements (particularly vitamin D3 if you live in a northern climate).
  • Staying actively involved in life.

If you’re going through menopause, you may find relief from your symptoms by avoiding triggers such as caffeine, alcohol, spicy foods and cigarettes, Dr. Ford says.

“Making good health decisions generally will result in occurrences lessening over time — the majority of women who experience night sweats find that they go away within a few years,” he says. “Only a small percentage of women find that they persist beyond that.”

Medications that can cause night sweats

Commonly used medications may also cause night sweats. These include some diabetes medications, where you may experience night sweats if your blood sugar levels get too low. 

Hormone therapy and hormone-blocking drugs used to treat certain cancers, as well as some anti-depressant drugs may also cause night sweating symptoms. 

Illnesses and disorders that may result in night sweats

Some people have other illnesses or disorders that cause excessive sweating (known as hyperhidrosis) at any time of day or night. But night sweats are different — and they may be temporary or recurring.

Some other medical or health conditions that case night sweats include:

  • ​Anxiety or autoimmune disorders
  • Viral illnesses such as colds and the flu cause night sweats, but they resolve on their own — and the associated fever and sweating typically respond to anti-fever medications, such as acetaminophen (TYLENOL®) or ibuprofen (Advil®).
  • Abusing or withdrawal from substances like opioids, cannabis, cocaine, benzodiazepines or alcohol.
  • Sleep disorders such as night terrors or obstructive sleep apnea.

Night sweats and night terrors

Some people confuse night sweats and night terrors. Night terrors (also known as sleep terrors) are a sleep disorder in which a person quickly wakes from sleep in a terrified state.“Sweating can be a symptom of night terrors, but night terrors are defined by the emotional upset that occurs, with or without sweating,” Dr. Ford says. “Night sweats in other conditions don’t usually involve anxiety, although having night sweats can make a person feel anxious.” 

What you can do to relieve night sweats

Lifestyle changes relieve night sweats in some cases. While the causes may be varied, relief may come by looking at the cause on a case by case basis. 

For example, if gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is causing your night sweats, Dr. Ford’s advice is to avoid eating right before you go to bed and to raise the head of the bed.

If you are experiencing perimenopause, menopause or other hormone imbalance-based medical conditions, maintaining your overall health in terms of cardiovascular function, diet and weight can help influence your symptoms. Talk to you doctor for their specific recommendations.

How your diet can affect symptoms of night sweats

“Eating a balanced diet and avoiding extremes in your nutrition is important in your overall health. It can help prevent the onset of some illnesses and help the treatment of certain medical conditions that result in night sweats as symptoms,” Dr. Ford says.

There are some foods to avoid in general since they can only worsen some medical conditions. Some of these include processed foods, spicy foods, alcoholic beverages and caffeinated drinks. Cutting back on all of these in your diet can only help your overall health,” Dr. Ford emphasizes.

When to see a doctor

Most causes of night sweats are not serious, Dr. Ford says. “But there are enough other causes that patients should get evaluated if their symptoms last more than a week and they’re not obviously related to a viral illness or disorder,” he adds.

Medical treatments for night sweats vary depending on the cause. Treating the underlying cause is the way to relieve the symptoms. “Almost all causes of night sweats are treatable,” Dr. Ford says. So if you have persistent night sweats, go see your family doctor.”

Diagnosing Night Sweats – American Family Physician

The symptom of night sweats is commonly encountered in clinical medicine, but there are no data regarding its actual frequency. Night sweats has been defined as drenching sweats that require the patient to change bedclothes.1 This definition, however, probably does not describe the majority of patients who may complain of the symptom, and not all reports or studies cited through this article use this strict definition. The key words “night sweats” and “nocturnal hyperhidrosis” were used to search the MEDLINE literature from 1966 to July 2001, Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine, 13th ed. CD-ROM, and the January 1999 Physicians’ Desk Reference (PDR) Electronic Library CD-ROM. Abstracts for 338 citations in the MEDLINE literature were reviewed for articles, letters, and commentaries about diagnoses that had night sweats as a feature. There were 16 matches for night sweats in Harrison’s and 11 pharmaceuticals with night sweats as a reported side effect in the PDR.

Evaluation

An extensive list of diagnostic considerations in patients with night sweats is provided in Table 1.2–9  The history and physical examination are aimed at revealing associated symptoms that will narrow this broad differential diagnosis and guide additional studies. Table 2 lists diagnostic actions to be considered based on findings from the history and physical.

View/Print Table

TABLE 1

Causes of Night Sweats

Malignancy

Lymphoma

Leukemia

Other neoplasm

Infections

Human immunodeficiency virus

Tuberculosis

Mycobacterium avium complex

Infectious mononucleosis

Fungal infections (histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis)

Lung abscess2

Endocarditis

Other infection

Endocrine

Ovarian failure

Hyperthyroidism

Diabetes mellitus (nocturnal hypoglycemia)

Endocrine tumors (pheochromocytoma, carcinoid tumor)

Orchiectomy3

Rheumatologic

Takayasu’s arteritis

Temporal arteritis4

Other

Obstructive sleep apnea

Gastroesophageal reflux disease

Chronic fatigue syndrome

Granulomatous disease5

Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

Lymph node hyperplasia6

Diabetes insipidus8

Prinzmetal’s angina9

Anxiety

Pregnancy9

Drugs (Table 3)

Antipyretics (salicylates, acetaminophen)

Antihypertensives

Phenothiazines

Substances of abuse: alcohol, heroin

Over-bundling

Autonomic over-activity

TABLE 1

Causes of Night Sweats

Malignancy

Lymphoma

Leukemia

Other neoplasm

Infections

Human immunodeficiency virus

Tuberculosis

Mycobacterium avium complex

Infectious mononucleosis

Fungal infections (histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis)

Lung abscess2

Endocarditis

Other infection

Endocrine

Ovarian failure

Hyperthyroidism

Diabetes mellitus (nocturnal hypoglycemia)

Endocrine tumors (pheochromocytoma, carcinoid tumor)

Orchiectomy3

Rheumatologic

Takayasu’s arteritis

Temporal arteritis4

Other

Obstructive sleep apnea

Gastroesophageal reflux disease

Chronic fatigue syndrome

Granulomatous disease5

Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

Lymph node hyperplasia6

Diabetes insipidus8

Prinzmetal’s angina9

Anxiety

Pregnancy9

Drugs (Table 3)

Antipyretics (salicylates, acetaminophen)

Antihypertensives

Phenothiazines

Substances of abuse: alcohol, heroin

Over-bundling

Autonomic over-activity

View/Print Table

TABLE 2

Evaluation of Night Sweats Based on Associated Symptoms or Signs
Associated symptoms or signs Action to consider

Fever, TB exposure, HIV status or risk factors, cough, weight loss, immunocompromise

Purified protein derivative, chest radiograph, CBC, HIV test (CD4+ if known HIV positive), possibly blood cultures

Menopausal

Hormone replacement therapy (an elevated FSH test if uncertain based on history, helps confirm the diagnosis)

Firm lymphadenopathy in absence of current or recent infection

Lymph node biopsy

Recent upper respiratory tract infection

CBC; heterophile antibodies or anti-VCA evaluation

Diabetic

Rule out nocturnal hypoglycemia

Overweight; excessive daytime sleepiness, partner reports loud snoring and gasping during sleep, small oropharynx

Sleep study

Heartburn, indigestion

Trial of histamine H2 blocker

Heat intolerance, exophthalmos, tremor, other symptoms or signs of hyperthyroidism

Thyroid function test

Labile hypertension, paroxysms of headache or palpitations

Urine catecholamines or metanephrines measured in a 24-hour collection; if diagnosed, the tumor must be localized using radiologic imaging

Attacks of cyanotic flushing, watery diarrhea, wheezing, hypotension, or edema

High levels of urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) confirms diagnosis. Certain foods and medications may cause false-positive results (Table 3). Once diagnosed, the tumor must be localized using radiologic imaging.

Splinter hemorrhages, Janeway lesions, Osler’s nodes, new heart murmur

Blood cultures including HACEK organisms, echocardiogram

No associated symptoms or signs

See Figure 1.

TABLE 2

Evaluation of Night Sweats Based on Associated Symptoms or Signs
Associated symptoms or signs Action to consider

Fever, TB exposure, HIV status or risk factors, cough, weight loss, immunocompromise

Purified protein derivative, chest radiograph, CBC, HIV test (CD4+ if known HIV positive), possibly blood cultures

Menopausal

Hormone replacement therapy (an elevated FSH test if uncertain based on history, helps confirm the diagnosis)

Firm lymphadenopathy in absence of current or recent infection

Lymph node biopsy

Recent upper respiratory tract infection

CBC; heterophile antibodies or anti-VCA evaluation

Diabetic

Rule out nocturnal hypoglycemia

Overweight; excessive daytime sleepiness, partner reports loud snoring and gasping during sleep, small oropharynx

Sleep study

Heartburn, indigestion

Trial of histamine H2 blocker

Heat intolerance, exophthalmos, tremor, other symptoms or signs of hyperthyroidism

Thyroid function test

Labile hypertension, paroxysms of headache or palpitations

Urine catecholamines or metanephrines measured in a 24-hour collection; if diagnosed, the tumor must be localized using radiologic imaging

Attacks of cyanotic flushing, watery diarrhea, wheezing, hypotension, or edema

High levels of urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) confirms diagnosis. Certain foods and medications may cause false-positive results (Table 3). Once diagnosed, the tumor must be localized using radiologic imaging.

Splinter hemorrhages, Janeway lesions, Osler’s nodes, new heart murmur

Blood cultures including HACEK organisms, echocardiogram

No associated symptoms or signs

See Figure 1.

View/Print Table

TABLE 3

Some Foods and Medications That May Interfere with 5-HIAA Test

Tomatoes Red plums Pineapple Walnuts Avocado Eggplant Bananas

Acetaminophen Caffeine Methocarbamol (Robaxin) Diazepam (Valium) Glyceryl guaiacolate (many cough medicines) Phenothiazine*

Mephenasin carbamate (some muscle relaxants) Phenacetin Aspirin* Levodopa (Sinemet)*

TABLE 3

Some Foods and Medications That May Interfere with 5-HIAA Test

Tomatoes Red plums Pineapple Walnuts Avocado Eggplant Bananas

Acetaminophen Caffeine Methocarbamol (Robaxin) Diazepam (Valium) Glyceryl guaiacolate (many cough medicines) Phenothiazine*

Mephenasin carbamate (some muscle relaxants) Phenacetin Aspirin* Levodopa (Sinemet)*

HISTORY

Physicians should ask about fever, cough, and risk factors for tuberculosis (TB). In its pulmonary form, reactivation TB generally presents with cough in addition to the constitutional symptoms of weight loss and low-grade fever. Many patients experience night sweats several times per week. A history of (or risk factors for) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is important. The most common complaint with HIV infection is fever, with or without night sweats. This may be because of the virus or the result of HIV sequelae such as lymphoma or opportunistic infections.

Most patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphoma have a history of fever, weight loss, and night sweats.10 AIDS-related infections might also cause night sweats, including Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection and cytomegalovirus (CMV) syndromes. MAC infection in patients with HIV typically presents with fever, weight loss, and night sweats. It is a late complication of HIV infection that generally occurs in patients with CD4+ cell counts of less than 100 cells per mm3. TB also can be present in a patient infected with HIV. In this population, patients often present in the classic manner with cough, fever, and night sweats.

Sometimes, travel history is helpful in evaluating the potential for other infectious diseases. Persons with the chronic pulmonary form of histoplasmosis present similarly to those who have TB, with an increasing productive cough, weight loss, and night sweats.11 Persons with coccidioidomycosis may present with cough, fever, and night sweats.12 Risk factors for endocarditis also should be determined. The symptoms of infectious endocarditis are protean and include fever, chills, fatigue, sweats, and malaise. These night sweats may be related to nocturnal fever caused by transient bacteremia.

Low-grade fever that may be associated with night sweats is the most common systemic symptom of Hodgkin’s disease. High fluctuating fevers accompanied by drenching night sweats (Pel-Ebstein fevers) may persist for several weeks with Hodgkin’s disease. Night sweats may be the only presenting complaint for some patients. One study13 of patients with Hodgkin’s disease who had sweating as their only symptom found a correlation with unperceived elevations in body temperature, or minor febrile pulses. Occasionally, patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma also may experience night sweats.

A history of recent upper respiratory infection may be significant because infectious mononucleosis (IM), usually caused by Epstein-Barr virus, may cause night sweats, particularly during the acute phase. In a study14 where the symptoms of IM were compared with other upper respiratory infections, night sweats were significantly more common in patients with IM.14 By the third week of illness, heterophile antibodies were positive in 90 percent of patients. If heterophile antibodies are not elevated, but the diagnosis is strongly suspected, IgM antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (anti-VCA) may be measured, because they can be elevated for weeks to months after infection.

Women in the appropriate age range should be asked about symptoms of menopause, because patients with ovarian failure may experience hot flushes. Some women may experience a predominance of these during nocturnal hours.15 An elevated follicle-stimulating hormone test may be helpful in diagnosing menopause when the history is unclear.

Patients with diabetes experiencing nocturnal hypoglycemia may have night sweats without other hypoglycemic symptoms.16 This may be caused by missing a meal or performing unusually excessive exercise. Patients who are receiving large doses of evening insulin may be especially prone to nocturnal hypoglycemia.17 Risk factors for hypoglycemia may include tight diabetes control, renal insufficiency, polypharmacy, higher sulfonylurea or insulin doses, and advanced age.17

An association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and night sweats has been suggested. Informal observations suggest that patients treated for GERD often have dramatic relief of their night sweats. 18

Physicians should inquire about symptoms of hyperthyroidism, such as nervousness, palpitations, weight loss, and menstrual irregularity. The heat intolerance of hyperthyroidism may lead to night sweats, especially when combined with over-bundling or an overheated room.

Sleeping partners should be questioned about the patient’s sleeping habits (snoring, apneic spells, and daytime sleepiness). Obstructive sleep apnea is a relatively common disorder affecting up to 4 percent of middle-aged men.19 It may be a common cause of heavy night sweats.20

Several medications may contribute to night sweats, but antipyretics are the most common. Acetaminophen and aspirin are cited as causes of night sweats. This is most likely a rebound effect as the antipyretic effects subside.9 Use of some antihypertensives, anti-depressants, tamoxifen (Nolvadex), leuprolide (Lupron), and niacin are possibly causal as well.1  Alcohol use, particularly alcohol dependence, also may cause night sweats. The PDR search revealed 11 pharmaceutical agents that were labeled as having night sweats as a side effect (Table 4).21

View/Print Table

TABLE 4

Drugs with the Labeled Side Effect of Night Sweats
Drug Incidence

Donepezil (Aricept)

Infrequent

Indinavir (Crixivan)

Infrequent

Saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase)

Less than 2 percent

Zalcitabine (Hivid)

Less than 1 percent

Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune)

Rare

Pegaspargase (Oncaspar)

1 to 5 percent

Rituximab (Rituxan)

Among most frequent

Interferon alfa-2a (Roferon)

8 percent

Daclizumab (Zenapax)

2 to 5 percent

TABLE 4

Drugs with the Labeled Side Effect of Night Sweats
Drug Incidence

Donepezil (Aricept)

Infrequent

Indinavir (Crixivan)

Infrequent

Saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase)

Less than 2 percent

Zalcitabine (Hivid)

Less than 1 percent

Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune)

Rare

Pegaspargase (Oncaspar)

1 to 5 percent

Rituximab (Rituxan)

Among most frequent

Interferon alfa-2a (Roferon)

8 percent

Daclizumab (Zenapax)

2 to 5 percent

Directed inquiry of symptoms suggestive of myocardial ischemia, anxiety, depression, and rheumatologic diseases may be useful. While not specifically revealed in the searches, it is likely that any disease that results in autonomic overactivity (e.g., congestive heart failure via neurohumoral activation) may result in night sweats.

Carcinoid syndrome should be a consideration if the patient (usually in the sixth to eighth decade of life) has a history of attacks of severe cyanotic flushing of the skin that lasts from minutes to days and is associated with other symptoms such as watery diarrhea, wheezing, hypotension, or edema. Symptoms are caused by a tumor that secretes serotonin and other biologically active substances.

The diagnosis of pheochromocytoma should be considered for patients with paroxysms of headache, palpitations, and sweating—especially in combination with hypertension. The paroxysms typically last from minutes to hours and may occur with varying frequency from once per month to multiple times in a 24-hour period.

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION

On physical examination, the patient’s vital signs (particularly temperature and blood pressure) and body habitus should be noted. Lymphadenopathy or splenomegaly may prompt an evaluation for possible lymphoma or leukemia. Lymph nodes in either form of lymphoma are generally nontender and firm. Most patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma present with cervical lymphadenopathy, while those with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma present with peripheral lymphadenopathy. Biopsy is essential for diagnosis.

Signs of immunocompromise may include cachexia or oral candidiasis. The oropharynx should be examined for redundant tissue consistent with the findings in obstructive sleep apnea. A fine hand tremor, exophthalmos, eyelid lag, or hyperreflexia suggests hyperthyroidism. An elevated blood pressure in association with night sweats may prompt an evaluation for pheochromocytoma. Signs of endocarditis such as splinter hemorrhages (dark red linear streaks under the nails), Janeway lesions (small, nodular hemorrhages on palms and soles), Osler’s nodes (small, tender nodules on finger or toe pads), and a heart murmur should be sought as well.

Evaluation When History and Physical Are Unrevealing

If the history and physical examination fail to reveal the possible etiology of the patient’s symptoms, consider obtaining a complete blood count, purified protein derivative test, chest radiograph, and thyroid-stimulating hormone test. These tests are widely available, not particularly costly, and help rule out many of the potential diagnoses. An HIV test and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) evaluation may be added if necessary (Figure 1). The ESR evaluation helps rule out disorders that may cause night sweats but otherwise are relatively silent early in their course, such as endocarditis and Takayasu’s arteritis.

View/Print Figure

Evaluating Night Sweats

FIGURE 1.

Evaluation of a patient with night sweats and no associated symptoms. (CBC = complete blood count; ppd = purified protein derivative; CXR = chest radiograph, TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone; HIV = human immunodeficiency virus; ESR = erythrocyte sedimentation rate; HACEK = Haemophilus species, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Kingella; CT = computed tomographic) Evaluating Night Sweats

Evaluating Night Sweats

FIGURE 1.

Evaluation of a patient with night sweats and no associated symptoms. (CBC = complete blood count; ppd = purified protein derivative; CXR = chest radiograph, TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone; HIV = human immunodeficiency virus; ESR = erythrocyte sedimentation rate; HACEK = Haemophilus species, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Kingella; CT = computed tomographic) Evaluating Night Sweats

An elevated ESR and positive blood cultures are present in more than 90 percent of cases of endocarditis. An echocardiogram also may assist in the evaluation of a patient with suspected endocarditis.

Takayasu’s arteritis is a chronic inflammatory disease involving the aorta and its branches. Its cause is unknown. It also has been called pulseless disease because of the physical examination finding of diminished pulses in the upper extremities. A patient with Takayasu’s arteritis may present with malaise, fever, night sweats, arthralgias, and weight loss months before vessel involvement is noted. An elevated ESR is a characteristic, but nonspecific laboratory finding. Diagnosis would be confirmed by aortography.

If the screening tests are normal and nocturnal GERD is suspected, a trial of antireflux measures may be considered. If the patient continues to complain of night sweats, a diary of the patient’s temperature variations through the night may be helpful in revealing the presence or absence of febrile micropulses. Febrile pulses should reprompt a search for lymphoma or endocarditis. Blood cultures should be obtained to include cultures designated for the fastidious, gram-negative HACEK (Haemophilus species, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella) organisms, which are not found with routine culture methods. Computed tomographic scans of the chest and abdomen, and a bone marrow biopsy to evaluate for silent neoplastic or granulomatous disease would complete the work-up.

If all studies are negative, the patient can be reassured that the night sweats are most likely benign (may be the result of over-bundling). The patient should be taught to do self lymph node examinations and report any changes noted in the absence of active infection. The patient should report development of any new symptoms and continue annual health examinations.

4 Common Causes and How to Get Rid of Them

  • Night sweats can be caused by hormonal fluctuations or disorders, infection, fever, and more.
  • Many women will experience night sweats during menopause or perimenopause. 
  • Occasional night sweats aren’t a cause for concern, but see a doctor if they are persistent. 
  • Visit Insider’s Health Reference library for more advice.

LoadingSomething is loading.

Ever wake up in the middle of the night dripping in sweat, like you just ran a marathon? Then you’re one of many people who have experienced night sweats, or sleep hyperhidrosis.

Night sweats aren’t related to your environment, like if your room is too hot. Rather, they’re usually caused by hormonal fluctuations in the body or are a side effect of medication. 

Either way, they can have a big impact on your sleep. Night sweats often wake you up, and you may have to change your clothes or sheets in order to comfortably fall back asleep. 

Here’s what you need to know about the common causes of night sweats and when to see a doctor. 

1. Menopause  

Night sweats are often linked to the hormonal fluctuations during menopause and perimenopause. 

More than 80% of women in perimenopause and menopause experience hot flashes — or sudden, intense feelings of warmth. When these happen at night, they can cause night sweats. 

Menopause occurs 12 months after a woman has her last menstrual period, usually between the ages of 45 and 55. Perimenopause occurs in the 7 to 14 years before menopause.  

Specifically, the drop in the hormone estrogen, which occurs during perimenopause, is linked to night sweats because it affects the body’s temperature regulation. 

“Women experience more night sweats related to hormonal changes during perimenopause and menopause,” says Soma Mandal, MD, board-certified internist at Summit Medical Group, in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey. 

Night sweats during menopause aren’t cause for concern, but they can be uncomfortable. 

If you’re experiencing night sweats during menopause, talk to your doctors about treating the symptoms with medications that help replace estrogen. 

2. Hormonal disorders

Hormonal disorders can make it difficult for your body to regulate its normal temperature, which can cause night sweats. 

Body temperature is regulated by the hypothalamus, an area in the brain that produces hormones. When your hormones are out of balance, it sometimes means that the hypothalamus isn’t able to regulate temperature correctly.  

Hormonal disorders that can affect body temperature and cause night sweats include: 

  • Hyperthyroidism. This condition leads to overproduction of the thyroid hormone, which causes increased sweating, including night sweats. 
  • Pheochromocytoma. This is a tumor on the adrenal gland which makes it produce too many hormones. Symptoms can include night sweats and elevated heart rate. 
  • Carcinoid syndrome. This is a rare disease linked to tumors in the endocrine system. In some cases, it can lead to excess production of the neurotransmitter serotonin. One of the symptoms is excess sweating. 

If you experience other symptoms of a hormonal imbalance, such as weight changes or headaches, talk with your doctor about these symptoms. 

3. Infection

If you’re sick with a viral or bacterial infection, your body raises its internal temperature to fight off the infection, which is what causes fever.  

This increase in body temperature can lead to sweating — and night sweats are a common symptom associated with fevers. 

“Various infections such as HIV, tuberculosis, and infectious mononucleosis can cause night sweats,” Mandal says. “These conditions can produce chemicals called cytokines which combat infection. Cytokines can induce fever and night sweats.”

If you experience a fever in addition to night sweats, you may want to check in with your doctor about what type of infection you have. 

4. Medications

Certain medications can cause night sweats, including antidepressants for depression or anxiety.  

A 2018 study found that up to 14% of people on Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) — the most common form of antidepressants — experience excessive sweating and night sweats. 

The study authors concluded that these medications likely affect the areas of the brain that produce hormones, which help control temperature and sweating.  

Other medications that may cause night sweats include:

  • Triptan migraine medications, like Relpax or Frova
  • Hormone-blocking medications, like Arimidex or Femara 
  • Diabetes medications, like Metformin or insulin (if you’re taking these, check your blood sugar to ensure that it isn’t too low and causing the night sweats) 

If your medications are causing night sweats, you can try sleeping in lighter clothes or keeping the room cooler. If night sweats continue to interrupt your sleep, you should talk to your doctor about your concerns. 

When to be concerned about night sweats

According to Mandal, night sweats by themselves aren’t always a cause for concern. 

That’s especially true if they’re happening for a common reason — like if you’re going through menopause or taking SSRIs. However, if you’re experiencing other symptoms as well, your night sweats could indicate a bigger problem. 

“If they are accompanied by fever,

weight loss
, general malaise, or change in appetite, then it’s time to get checked out by your primary care physician,” Mandal says. 

Insider’s takeaway

Night sweats may be caused by a number of reasons including menopause, hormonal disorders, infection, and the side effects of certain medications like migraine medications and hormone-blocking medications. You shouldn’t be concerned if you have occasional night sweats, but you should see your doctor if it’s accompanied by fever, weight loss, or changes in appetite. 

Is it normal for my preschooler to wake up drenched in sweat?

Yes, most of the time it’s normal.

“It’s very common for children to sweat while they’re in a deep stage of sleep,” says Jennifer Shu, a pediatrician and author of Baby and Child Health: The Essential Guide From Birth to 11 Years.

According to Shu, children are more likely than adults to sweat at night because they spend more time in deep sleep, their temperature regulation systems aren’t as mature, and they have a higher proportion of sweat glands compared to their body size.

Even though your child is waking up in sweaty, damp pajamas, she may be entirely comfortable at night. On the other hand, your child might be sweating because she’s too hot.

How can you tell the difference between an overheated child and a child with normal night sweating? An overheated child feels warm earlier in the night, before she reaches the deep sleep stage, says Shu.

So if your child is sweating earlier in the night, or if she complains about being too warm, adjust the temperature of her room and make sure she doesn’t have too many blankets on her. Also, avoid overdressing her – one layer of pajamas is generally enough.

Night sweating can sometimes indicate a mild, temporary problem or a more serious medical condition. For example, a child with an infection might sweat as her body works to fight it off. And a child with sleep apnea, a disorder in which breathing stops repeatedly during sleep, may sweat as she works harder to get a breath.

The red flag to watch for is any additional symptoms that accompany your child’s night sweats. “Watch for fever, snoring, gasping, pauses in breathing, and any symptoms of illness,” says Shu. Also pay attention to whether she’s in pain or fatigued during the day. If your child has one or more of these symptoms, or if you just want to make sure there’s no cause for worry, call your child’s doctor.

Otherwise, night sweating is just one of those things that will happen less often over time. As your child grows, she’ll still sweat at night (everyone does), but she probably won’t wake up drenched.

Night Sweat – an overview

Menopausal Symptoms

Hot flashes and night sweats are menopause-related vasomotor symptoms, which occur more frequently in North American (70–80%) than in Asian (10–20%) women (NAMS, 2011). Prescription hormone replacement therapy relieves hot flashes, yet increases breast cancer risk (Steward and Wild, 2014).

Thus, the question was whether estrogenic soy isoflavones (see Estrogenicity) present in the soy rich Asian diet might provide the same benefit as hormone replacement therapy, preferably without any adverse effects.

Yet, the outcome of clinical trials and their meta-analyses and systematic reviews investigating isoflavones (soy-based and red clover–based supplements) and menopausal vasomotor symptoms is ambiguous (Sacks et al., 2006; NAMS, 2011; Taku et al., 2012; Lethaby et al., 2013; D’Adamo and Sahin, 2014; Newton, 2014). In a systematic review of 14 randomized, controlled trials, a significant improvement of vasomotor symptoms by isoflavones (40–160 mg/day) was observed in 11 studies reducing the daily frequencies of hot flashes by 24–60% (NAMS, 2011). However, a strong placebo effect is generally observed in many trials on hot flashes, resulting in the reduction of daily hot flashes frequencies by up to 60% (Sacks et al., 2006; Lethaby et al., 2013). Thus, a clear dose-response relationship is difficult to establish when such a high placebo effect prevails.

Nevertheless, a recent meta-analysis observed that soy isoflavones (median 54 mg/day) reduced frequency and severity by 21% and 26%, respectively, and dietary supplements providing more than 19 mg genistein were more potent than supplements providing less (Taku et al., 2012). Genistein was reported to have beneficial effects on vasomotor symptoms (NAMS, 2011), and a recent systematic review suggests that genistein supplements providing more than 30 mg/day are effective in reducing hot flashes (Lethaby et al., 2013). This result was independently confirmed by Newton (2014), who stated that three out of five trials using high genistein extracts (30–60 mg/day) observed a significant reduction in daily vasomotor symptoms (41–61%) when compared with placebo (7–29%). However, the author noted that finding “studies adequate enough to merit trust in their findings” was challenging and that there was a high risk of attrition and reporting bias (Newton, 2014).

In summary, the conclusion of systematic reviews and meta-analyses for isoflavones and vasomotor symptoms remains ambiguous because even significant reductions of vasomotor symptoms lie within the placebo effect generally observed in many trials on vasomotor symptoms (up to 60%) (Sacks et al., 2006; Lethaby et al., 2013). This ambiguity is also reflected in the conclusions drawn by the American Heart Association (“it seems unlikely that soy isoflavones have enough estrogenic activity to have an important impact on vasomotor symptoms of estrogen deficiency in perimenopausal women”) (Sacks et al., 2006) and by The North American Menopause Society (“Soy-based isoflavones are modestly effective in controlling hot flashes, as demonstrated to date in predominantly Caucasian women in early postmenopause who have at least four hot flashes a day”) (NAMS, 2011).

Taken together, no isoflavone-related health claim has been approved up to now. Besides the possibility that isoflavones simply do not induce the claimed effect, the large variation in results between studies (particularly in clinical trials) renders the establishment of a cause-and-effect relationship particularly difficult. The heterogeneity of study results seems to be due to different isoflavone sources that were often not adequately chemically characterized, different dosages, and experimental designs, as well as large interindividual variations in the susceptibility to isoflavones.

What could be causing my night sweats?

Sweating is a naturally occurring bodily function. It is your body’s way of cooling itself. However, there are certain times when sweating is not normal and is actually a warning sign of something more serious.

Some people experience periods of heavy sweating, or hyperhidrosis, at night. Night sweating is more than just getting overheated from too many blankets on your bed. It can cause you to become drenched. And it can happen even if your room is cool and the bedding is comfortable.

What causes night sweating?

Night sweating has a number of causes. It can often be pinpointed to some fairly innocuous causes, such as exercising before bed, drinking alcohol or caffeine and/or eating spicy foods close to bedtime, or simply sleeping in a room that’s too warm. Stress and anxiety have also been linked to night sweating.

Sweating at night may be a side effect of various medical conditions, ranging from a fever, to low blood sugar, to an overactive thyroid. An estimated 75 percent of American women in perimenopause or menopause experience night sweats and hot flashes associated with hormonal changes. Certain medications, such as antidepressants and hormone therapy drugs, may also cause night sweating.

Though it hasn’t been determined why, night sweats may also be an early symptom of some cancers, such as leukemia, lymphoma, mesothelioma, bone or liver cancer. If your night sweats are due to cancer, you will probably experience other symptoms as well, like fever, unexplained weight loss or fatigue.

More commonly, night sweats may occur as a side effect of cancer treatments for someone who is already combating the disease. Certain chemotherapy drugs, hormone therapy drugs, pain relievers and steroids can cause sweating at night. Night sweats are common in people undergoing treatment for breast or prostate cancer.

Combating night sweats related to cancer

Treatment for night sweats depends on their cause. If it’s environmental or lifestyle, you may be able to alleviate symptoms by avoiding factors that trigger them.

If cancer or cancer treatment is causing your night sweats, they may subside as your body adjusts to treatment. In the meantime, your doctor may prescribe medication to help treat night sweats, although some of these medicines can cause side effects, so your doctor will need to see what works for you.

The American Cancer Society offers tips to help manage night sweats related cancer:

  • Drink plenty of fluids during the day to prevent dehydration
  • Change wet bedsheets/clothing right away
  • Bathe often to soothe the skin and maintain good hygiene
  • Wear loose-fitting cotton clothing
  • Wear two layers of clothing, to help wick the moisture away from the skin
  • Keep the temperature of your bedroom cool
  • Avoid spicy foods and large meals just before sleeping
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine before bedtime
  • Check for signs of a fever, and contact your doctor if you have one

Night sweats alone are usually harmless, but persistent and excessive sweating while you sleep may be your body’s way of alerting you that something is wrong.

If night sweats start unexpectedly or occur regularly or alongside other symptoms, talk to your doctor to find out what’s causing them.

Prevention is powerful medicine. At Edward-Elmhurst Health, we provide the latest screening and diagnostic tools to detect cancer early, when it’s most treatable. Learn more about our cancer screenings.

Related blogs:

Why cancer and trouble sleeping go hand-in-hand

Don’t overlook these possible symptoms of cancer

Learn more from Healthy Driven Chicago:

Eight tips for better sleep

Common signs of sleep disorders




90,000 Doctors talked about the symptoms of the new postcoid syndrome

Doctors are urging people who have had coronavirus to seek immediate help if symptoms of a new postcoid syndrome are detected. One of the most dangerous manifestations of it can be a violation of thermoregulation – according to doctors, sudden jumps in body temperature can lead to malfunctions of all organs. Other important signals of the syndrome are memory lapses, inability to concentrate, shortness of breath and numbness in the limbs.

People who have had coronavirus may experience excessive sweating, impaired concentration and excessive fatigue. All these are signs of a new post-coccygeal syndrome, to which the director of the “Treatment and Rehabilitation Center” of the Ministry of Health Igor Nikitin drew attention.

In this case, it can also manifest itself in the form of sudden shortness of breath, palpitations and memory impairment, therapist Tina Petrovskaya told Gazeta.Ru. However, all of these symptoms are not specific and not all develop.

“According to statistics, postcoid syndrome occurs in 20% of people, but, as practice shows, this percentage is clearly higher. All those who have had covid disease describe at least a single symptomatology – at least some consequence appears, “the therapist explained to Gazeta.Ru.

Neurologist Vladimir Marchenko, in turn, noted that more often than others he met numbness of the extremities, upset of the gastrointestinal tract or skin diseases against a background of increased stress in his patients who came to him after coronavirus.

“All body functions are closely related to the central nervous system, that is, damage to a certain area can cause irreversible consequences for a person. This syndrome is a manifestation of a long-term or protracted coronavirus. Let me give you a personal example. After I had been ill, various injuries that I had received earlier began to make themselves felt. The joints and the head ached terribly – this is the postcoid syndrome, ”the doctor said.

In addition, heart disease becomes a frequent manifestation of the syndrome.This condition is also called “broken heart syndrome” – it feels like an acute myocardial infarction, cardiologist Lyudmila Medvedeva explained to Gazeta.Ru. Most often, the pathology occurs in women over 55 years old, although some cases were observed among men.

“Takotsubo syndrome is a pathology of the heart in which its apex expands. At the same time, spontaneous increased movements of the left ventricle are observed. The patient experiences this as an acute heart attack. However, this pathology is completely reversible, ”the doctor said.

She added that the development of the syndrome may be associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, the release of adrenaline into the bloodstream, and an inflammatory response to infection. In addition, blood clotting disorders, which are common in patients with COVID-19, may be the cause.

Despite the variety of symptoms, the most dangerous of them is a violation of body thermoregulation, infectious disease specialist Lilia Baranova is sure: “This is due to the fact that people can have a constantly elevated temperature, or vice versa, lowered.This imbalance can lead to disruption of the work of other organs. ”

In terms of the manifestation of the symptoms of post-coccygeal syndrome, the first thing that matters is the form in which a person has suffered a coronavirus and what concomitant diseases he has. “The danger lies in the progression of these symptoms. For example, autoimmune diseases can occur, and the complications themselves can also be aggravated. In order to prevent this, it is extremely important to carry out rehabilitation as soon as possible after the illness, ”stressed therapist Tina Petrovskaya.

The concept of rehabilitation includes, for example, gradual physical activity. Every day they should be increased by 5-10%, the doctor advised. Nutrition is also important, which should include a sufficient amount of protein and vegetables.

“You also need to pay attention to your dream. It is a very important component when recovering from any illness. All in all, this is a lifestyle change. In postcoid syndrome, it becomes the leading factor for recovery, ”the doctor is sure.

It is worthwhile to understand that postcoid syndrome, like the coronavirus itself, is dangerous in that it requires long and patient treatment, said therapist Yekaterina Yashina:

“The main problem is that no one knows what exactly might be affected. As a result, people begin to fear that they will remain sick forever, and prefer to move everything on their feet. But this is wrong: you need to be examined and, together with a doctor, select adequate rehabilitation. ”

Therapist Sergei Cheremushkin also advises not to hesitate in contacting doctors.“The main key to the success of prevention of covid complications is timely access to medical care from specialists. Do not self-medicate, so as not to aggravate the situation, ”concluded the doctor.

90,000 6 signs that you are stressed 9,0001

Stress manifests itself in different ways, you may not even guess about some signs. After all, stress occurs not only in terrible, dangerous situations, but also in everyday life. In the progressive world, there are many things that can trigger a stressful response, such as working with increased responsibility or frequent information changes.Therefore, it is important to be able to diagnose the main symptoms of stress in oneself and work them out in time so that ordinary stress does not develop into chronic stress.

1. Excessive sweating, fever

Sweating on a hot day or during sports is a natural process. But you are probably familiar with the situation when you are going to an important interview and you are thrown into a fever. Or when you meet a person who is not indifferent to you, and you start to blush and your palms sweat from embarrassment.This is a clear sign of a stress response.

2. Lump in throat, nausea

A lump in the throat is a spasm of the esophagus, in which a person begins to feel slightly nauseous, even hard to swallow. Usually, in a stressful situation, many for a moment suddenly lose their appetite, it seems that you will now vomit. But there are people who, on the contrary, can seize stress, thereby calming themselves with it. Both manifestations will indicate stress.

3. Tinnitus and sensitivity to odors

Our emotions directly affect the sense of smell, hearing, so many people during the most intense stress can hear ringing or buzzing in their ears, or feel unpleasant odors.

Take online courses for free
and discover new opportunities
Start learning

4. Gastrointestinal problems

Stress can cause diarrhea, constipation, bloating and flatulence. There is a connection between the gut and the brain that, when stressed, can cause imbalances in the gut flora.

5. Lots of hair loss

Chronic stress can provoke a certain condition in which hair follicles stop growing and hair simply falls out.Stress can also affect pigment and cause gray hair. Therefore, you can find young people with gray hair.

6. Pain and fatigue

Often stress is accompanied by constant fatigue, back pain or headache. According to research, with regular stressful situations, the “tolerance” to different types of pain decreases. Therefore, people feel much sharper and more unpleasant manifestations of pain.

Light, rare stress does not affect health. But if you have all of the above symptoms, then this is already a chronic condition, with which you need to start working as soon as possible.Learn how to cope with stress on your own by taking the stress management online course. From the course you will learn how to recognize early signs of stress, what are the external and internal stressors, what effective methods exist.

90,000 Specialists have voiced 5 main reasons why a person is thrown into a fever

Attacks of heat that periodically roll over the human body may indicate the presence of some serious diseases. Doctors identify five main reasons for this state of health.

For example, heat waves can appear with vegetative-vascular dystonia, which, in fact, is not a disease. Symptoms of dystonia include memory impairment, sensitivity to weather changes, sleep problems, nausea, chest pain, and shortness of breath.

As a rule, this condition is not associated with a change in the functioning of the heart or blood vessels. Often, it throws many adolescents and young people into the cold, then into the heat, they are worried about a sharp change in temperature, and all because of unformed hormones and a rapid release of adrenaline.

People who are susceptible to suspiciousness and bouts of irritation are also well aware of a similar condition, which is especially manifested during bouts of aggression, stress, fear, in moments of sharp emotional fluctuations.

The second reason, when a person can be thrown into heat and cold, is the period of menopause. Such a sharp change in well-being is often manifested in menopause (the so-called hot flushes). In a similar way, the female body makes attempts to regulate body temperature during a period of decreasing levels of estrogen, a sex hormone in women.There is an expansion of blood vessels, then a state of heat and sweating occurs, and during their decrease – a feeling of chills.

But the prerequisites for this condition during menopause are still unknown. But the risks and fears are pointless. Although this condition is quite uncomfortable, it includes sleep disturbances, high sweating, and low blood pressure.

The third cause is colds or flu. A state of either fever or chills is more often manifested with the flu.

The fourth cause of fever by doctors named pressure. At high pressure, a sharp change in temperature occurs most often at night. Often, people who have experienced a stroke or a heart attack are exposed to attacks of either heat or cold. This is accompanied by increased blood pressure, frequent pulse, facial flushing, and anxiety.

Reason number 5 is endocrine diseases. Diseases of the endocrine system are diseases that cause unstable work of the endocrine glands. Ailments such as thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism, and diabetes mellitus can also cause jumps in thermoregulation.

  • Forward>

90,000 What armpit sweating speaks about – armpits sweat a lot, what to do, how to get rid of sweating forever

Sweat glands are located throughout the human body. They release a liquid that, when evaporated, helps to cool the body. This is how thermoregulation occurs. Sometimes the amount of sweat increases several times, this condition is called hyperhidrosis.Excessive sweating can be local and only affect the armpits or palms. Sometimes this condition spreads to the whole body. In this case, the reasons are most often associated with various pathologies.

What is hyperhidrosis

There are 2 types of sweat glands in humans, which differ in their functions and regulatory mechanisms:

  • Apocrine glands – most of all located in the armpits and around the external genital organs, are regulated by the sympathetic nervous system, adrenergic fibers, where the main substance is adrenaline.They begin to function in adolescence, they develop a secret with pheromones – an individual smell, under stress the function grows, but they do not participate in thermoregulation.
  • Eccrine glands – the largest number – in the armpits, feet and palms, secrete a liquid part of sweat. The main regulator of function is acetylcholine. The glands are involved in thermoregulation and sweating during stress.

The work of the vegetative unequal system, which controls the sweat glands, is not controlled by consciousness.Therefore, it is impossible to cause increased sweating on your own, it increases in response to an increase in body temperature during illness, in hot weather or after physical exertion. Sweating increases with excitement, emotional stress, which leads to the release of adrenaline.

But the state of hyperhidrosis is different from the usual production of sweat. The glands work actively when a person is calm and not overheated. This is often associated with various pathologies. Diffuse hyperhidrosis is distinguished, in which sweating increases throughout the body.The disease is more often associated with a pathology of the nervous system. Local, or focal hyperhidrosis, affects only one part of the body. This form is more common than others.

Sweating may be seasonal in nature and is observed only in the hot season, but for most people with pathology, it does not depend on the season.

Causes of excessive sweating

Dermatologists are most often referred to by patients with a primary form of pathology, in which it is impossible to establish the cause.The first symptoms of hyperhidrosis appear during puberty. In girls and boys, this is associated with an increase in the activity of the hormone testosterone and cortisol, the immaturity of the nervous system. Daily sweat production becomes strong, activity increases in all types of sweat glands. Therefore, in adolescents, body odor increases.

It is believed that primary hyperhidrosis in 30-50% of patients is associated with hereditary factors. But the first symptoms may appear between the ages of 20-30. They are provoked by chronic stress, hormonal changes and other reasons.A secondary form of increased underarm sweating is associated with the following conditions:

  • excitability and high activity of the autonomic nervous system;
  • endocrine pathologies, most often a state of hyperthyroidism, insulin resistance in diabetes mellitus;
  • diseases of the cardiovascular system, accompanied by an irregular heart rhythm, palpitations;
  • some types of malignant and benign tumors;
  • metabolic disorders and overweight;
  • Overdose or side effects of drugs that affect the autonomic nervous system.

It is not always possible to determine the cause of the excessive perspiration. But it helps to effectively fight sweating.

Underarm sweating in women

In the female body, the secretion of a large amount of sweat depends on hormonal levels. When it changes, the interaction of various links of the autonomic nervous system changes. This process is most pronounced during menopause.

With a decrease in the function of the ovaries in women, their stimulation by pituitary hormones – follicle-stimulating and luteinizing – increases.But due to physiological characteristics, the release of thyroid-stimulating hormone increases, which increases blood flow in the thyroid gland. Most often, this process is started in the evening or at night. It manifests itself in the form of hot flashes – the appearance of a feeling of heat in the upper body and head. The woman begins to sweat a lot. The duration of such an attack is several minutes.

The likelihood of severe sweating is higher if you are overweight. Thermoregulation disorders appear with arterial hypertension.These diseases also often progress after age 50. Hyperhidrosis in this case is secondary. It does not pose a danger to life, but it does cause discomfort.

Underarm sweating in men

The hormone testosterone regulates the work of the male body. It performs an anabolic function, accelerates metabolism. Men are also more sensitive to adrenaline. Therefore, small bursts of this hormone speed up the heartbeat, increase the reaction rate and lead to armpit sweating.

A man can sweat more than usual if he prefers hot and spicy food. Sweating of the armpits and the whole body greatly increases with the use of alcoholic beverages. In this case, hyperhidrosis is associated with metabolic processes, as the body removes toxic substances after the disposal of ethanol. Nicotine has a direct stimulating effect. It increases the synthesis of acetylcholine, which enhances the work of the sweat glands. Therefore, sweating is a natural phenomenon in men who smoke.

Sweating occurs with severe nervous overstrain. The work of men is more likely than that of women to be associated with stress or hazardous activities.

Men are susceptible to the development of obesity, metabolic disorders and arterial hypertension. The risk group includes those who lead an inactive lifestyle, have a large waist circumference at 45-50 years old. These disorders affect the tone of the sympathetic nervous system and sweating.

When to see a doctor

If a person starts to sweat during exercise, hot weather or extreme excitement, there is no cause for concern.Sweating, which occurs against a background of complete calmness or is accompanied by additional symptoms, speaks of health problems.

Slightly elevated body temperature, accompanied by night or evening sweats, may be a sign of a chronic infection. Sometimes pulmonary tuberculosis, immune disorders, and the initial stages of cancer are manifested in this way.

A dangerous symptom is the appearance of weakness, dizziness, loss of consciousness against the background of increased sweating.This could be a sign of low glucose levels – hypoglycemia. The condition is life threatening, and therefore requires emergency medical attention. Hyperhidrosis is cured only after normalization of glucose levels.

Older women who have menstrual irregularities and the first symptoms of approaching menopause require special treatment. Without special means, the condition can gradually worsen, menopause will be difficult.

Increased sweating is one of the signs of thyrotoxicosis.This disease is accompanied by an increase in the function of the thyroid gland and the release of high doses of hormones into the blood. At the same time, the heartbeat increases, heart rhythm disturbances appear, the person quickly loses body weight, despite the preservation of the nature of the diet.

Methods and means of treating heavy sweating

To get rid of excessive sweating, you need to eliminate provoking factors. Start with simple measures:

  • eat food warm, refuse spicy foods;
  • exclude alcohol from the diet;
  • 90,097 quit smoking;

    90,097 avoid stress or learn to control emotions.

In mild cases, antiperspirant deodorants help to cope with the problem. Vichy contains aluminum chloride and dimethicone to help regulate perspiration. A similar composition in the Dry Control Extra forte deodorant. For those who are allergic to deodorants, special Elfarma liners, which are also available in black, will help prevent soaking of clothes.

Folk remedies help to cure sweating. At home, prepare a decoction of mint, chamomile flowers, oak bark.A napkin is moistened in the solution, which is used to wipe problem areas. Baths with the addition of infusion on sage leaves are effective. But you need to carry out therapeutic bathing no more than 1 time per week.

A cold compress can be used as an emergency remedy for increased sweating. It does not cure the cause of the disease, but it helps to narrow blood vessels and reduce manifestations.

The use of anticholinergic drugs helps to cope with increased sweating. But this method has many disadvantages, the drugs act simultaneously on the entire sympathetic nervous system, therefore:

  • salivation decreases;
  • dry mouth appears;
  • worried about visual impairment;
  • pupils dilate;
  • may disrupt the rhythm of the heart.

Hyperhidrosis is treated with botulinum toxin injections. This agent belongs to the group of neurotoxins. After the injection of the drug into the armpit, the innervation of the sweat glands is disrupted, they stop producing sweat in large quantities. But this is a temporary treatment for the disease that lasts for 5 months. With the secondary form of hyperhidrosis, it is necessary to treat the underlying disease that causes excessive sweating.


& nbsp

Tokareva Lyudmila Georgievna, therapist of medical offices 36.6

& nbsp

THERE ARE CONTRAINDICATIONS, BEFORE USING IT IS NECESSARY TO CONSULT A SPECIALIST

90,000 Hyperhidrosis – How to survive the heat without awkward situations

Types of hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis manifests itself in the form of excessive sweating in the armpits, feet, palms, head, under the knees and bends of the elbows.

At the usual rate of sweat production of 500-600 grams per day, under the same conditions, a person with hyperhidrosis can have up to 14 grams! liters!

There are two types of hyperhidrosis:

  • Local – in this case, only one specific area is subject to profuse sweating.
  • General – when all parts of the body sweat equally profusely.

In addition, this disease has two types:

Primary hyperhidrosis

Increased sweating, which is most often hereditary.The reasons for its occurrence are unknown.

It can manifest itself in childhood and increase over time. Primary hyperhidrosis, in most cases – local and manifests itself in the daytime.

Secondary hyperhidrosis

Occurs as a result of a malfunction of the endocrine or nervous system. It can also appear due to normal physiological processes.

Secondary hyperhidrosis is generally general and manifests itself throughout the body.The amount of sweat does not depend on the influence of temperature or time of day.

This type of pathology is dangerous in that it leads to the development of bacteria, various fungal diseases, as well as irritations on the skin.

In order not to lead to disastrous consequences, treatment and elimination of the problem with sweating is necessary.

Causes of manifestation of hyperhidrosis

The causes of secondary hyperhidrosis can be:

  • Stress and disruption of the nervous system
  • Changes in hormonal levels, including pregnancy, menopause
  • Hypertension and diseases of the cardiovascular system
  • Diabetes mellitus, thyroid diseases and other endocrine diseases
  • Alcohol or drug poisoning
  • Kidney disease

Treatment of excessive sweating

Very often, hyperhidrosis is characterized not only by profuse sweating, but also by an unpleasant odor.

Deodorant will not cope with such problems, too frequent showering is harmful to the skin, what to do in such a situation?

If hyperhidrosis is provoked by a serious illness, then, of course, complex treatment is necessary. But if we are talking about the reaction to stress and other neurological reasons, then the treatment of hyperhidrosis with botulinum therapy is very effective.

The essence of the procedure is to inject a preparation containing botulinum toxin into areas prone to hyperhidrosis.Under the action of the drug, nerve impulses are blocked. This allows you to get rid of profuse sweating for up to 10 months!

Sign up

When is Botox used for hyperhidrosis?

  • Botulinum therapy is excellent for eliminating hyperhidrosis at stages 2 and 3.
  • In addition, the technique is actively used to combat sweat in the summer. Even those who do not have problems with perspiration, in the heat, face the problem of excessive sweating.The volume of sweat can increase from the usual 600 grams to 8 liters!
    The fact is that sweating is a normal reaction to fever. Thus, the skin is hydrated and protected from overheating. Therefore, botulinum therapy is a must-have for the summer season!
  • Occupational necessity is a common reason for using Botox for sweat.
    Presenters, actors, bloggers, etc. work in front of the camera under specific lighting. This often results in an elevated room temperature and, as a result, increased sweating.
    Also, people who need to look perfect 24/7 regularly use the procedure!

Do not endure discomfort and constantly worry about stains on clothes and an unpleasant smell! Just one procedure and your problem is solved in a long time!

Give this summer a chance to be the best and most carefree!

Join us at INSTAGRAM !!

90,000 ARVI in children. What parents need to know? | District news

26 March 2018

The fact that children from time to time get sick with colds (otherwise acute respiratory infections or ARVI) is not news to anyone.

There are several types of viruses that cause SARS, but within each type there is a huge number of variations. “This music will be eternal,” as the song says, so it seems that the process of respiratory diseases is endless, the child is sick and sick, especially until the age of six or seven, while the immunological “repertoire” is being formed.

The disease can occur throughout the year, but mainly during the colder months (autumn, winter, spring).

Causative agents of viral infections are full in the air around us.Hypothermia, like stress, can be a provoking factor for the activation of viruses.

It is not only impossible, but also unnecessary to protect children from respiratory viral infections, because it is thanks to the transferred ARVI that the child’s immunity is gradually formed.

The main symptoms of the disease can be a runny nose and nasal congestion, sneezing, sore throat, voice changes (hoarseness, hoarseness, nasalness), cough, general malaise, headache, fever.

And most parents probably know the strategy of drug therapy in this case – antipyretic syrup, cough pills, nose drops. Self-medication is a deceptive maneuver that can first improve the patient’s condition, and then only aggravate it. Often, acute respiratory viral infections in children can acquire a severe course.

How to understand that the disease becomes threatening?

It is necessary to pay attention to the following symptoms: discoloration of the skin (sharp pallor, cyanosis), the appearance of a rash, a prolonged increase in body temperature above 39.0 ° C or a decrease to 36.0 ° C and below, increasing cough, respiratory failure, sweating or cold sweat, weakness, refusal to eat and drink, stool disturbance, agitation, or, conversely, lethargy, drowsiness, crying out during sleep.

What are the most dangerous symptoms?

A sharp cry, pallor, cold sweat, sudden lethargy with a low temperature, the appearance of an unusual rash, repeated vomiting, impaired consciousness: convulsions, fainting, an inadequate child’s response to a question-answer, a sudden hoarse voice in a child, breathing disorders, first-ever complaints of headache.

These symptoms require immediate medical advice. If these symptoms appear suddenly and sharply increase, it is necessary to call an ambulance, as a situation may arise that threatens the life of the child.

All news

90,000 Night sweats in men – causes, diagnosis and treatment

Night sweats in men is a pathological increase in sweating at night, which causes discomfort to a person. Frequent causes of increased sweating are a decrease in the amount of testosterone and other endocrine diseases, alcohol and drug use, chronic infections, and damage to internal organs.To establish the origin of night sweats, laboratory tests, ultrasound and X-ray imaging, and neurological examination are prescribed. Elimination of sweating disorder is carried out by treating the underlying disease.

Causes of night sweats in men

Male climax

A common cause of nocturnal hyperhidrosis in men after 45-50 years is a physiological decrease in testosterone production, which disrupts autonomic regulation and periodically increases the work of the sweat glands.Sweating attacks in male menopause occur several times per night. Sweat covers profusely the face, scalp, upper half of the body. Hyperhidrosis is accompanied by redness of the skin, “flushes” of blood to the face. If manifestations occur rarely, they are considered a variant of the norm, with an increase in episodes of night sweats, the development of insomnia, you should consult a doctor.

Bad habits

Excessive sweating can be triggered by the effects of nicotine on the sweat glands and peripheral nerve endings, so people with nicotine addiction often complain of profuse sweating at night.The symptom worsens when sleeping in a stuffy room, the man sleeps restlessly, snores heavily or talks in his sleep. Large amounts of sweat leave stains on bedding and underwear. Similar signs are observed when eating fatty heavy foods at night, especially in combination with alcohol intoxication. Patients complain of sleep disturbances, nightmares.

Sleep apnea syndrome

Short-term respiratory stops during sleep, accompanied by sweating in men, periodically occur in every fifth patient after 35-40 years.Increased sweating occurs 1-2 hours after falling asleep during deep sleep, while the person snores heavily. Breathing suddenly stops for a few seconds, then resumes again, sweat is profusely released. Sleep apnea attacks can be repeated up to several dozen times during one night. The causes of night sweats are increased pressure in response to hypoxia, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system.

Withdrawal symptoms

With a sharp cessation of alcoholic beverages in people suffering from alcoholism, there is a disruption in the work of all body systems, massive intoxication is observed, which causes night sweats.A similar picture is observed in patients with drug addiction. Profuse perspiration is characteristic: bed and underwear gets wet completely, trickles of sweat with a pungent unpleasant odor run down the man’s face and body. Hyperhidrosis is accompanied by restless sleep, frightening dreams, and frequent nighttime awakenings.

In severe abstinence, which can turn into delirious disorder, insomnia sets in, frightening visual and auditory hallucinations haunt at night, the whole body is covered with sticky cold sweat.If hypotension develops, the color of the skin becomes pale, drops of sweat appear on the forehead, neck and torso, heart palpitations are noted, and hyperthermia is possible. A patient with alcoholic delirium is able to injure himself or others, therefore emergency hospitalization in a specialized hospital is necessary.

Tuberculosis

If a man has perspiration at night for 1 to 2 months, it may be a sign of infection with Koch’s bacillus. A person has a growing syndrome of tuberculous intoxication, which provokes increased sweating.Typically, hyperhidrosis does not cause sleep disturbances. In the morning, spots of sweat on the bed linen are noticeable, due to increased night sweats of the head, the man’s hair looks “oily”. In tuberculosis, this symptom is often combined with a decrease in working capacity, a slight increase in body temperature, possibly dry coughing and chest pain.

Other infectious diseases

Most infections are accompanied by the development of inflammatory reactions, fever. Such changes in the body lead to endogenous intoxication, disruption of the thermoregulatory center, which provokes increased sweat production.Sweating is more pronounced before bedtime and at night, which is associated with a decrease in fever, dysfunction of autonomic regulation. Hyperhidrosis is provoked by the following infectious causes:

  • Damage to the respiratory tract : SARS, tonsillitis (bacterial, herpetic, fungal), bronchitis and pneumonia.
  • Pathology of the digestive system : viral hepatitis, intestinal infections (giardiasis, escherichiosis), helminthiasis.
  • Diseases of the genitourinary organs : trichomoniasis, gonorrhea, nonspecific urethritis.
  • HIV infection .

Endocrine Disorders

Various hormonal causes cause dysfunction of the sweat glands in men and increased sweating. Profuse night sweats occur in diabetes mellitus, the symptom is due to a sharp drop in blood glucose levels in the pre-morning hours. The man has restless sleep, erratic movements of his arms and legs. Thyrotoxicosis is characterized by increased sweating with especially strong sweating of the face and scalp.Sweating is combined with reddening of the skin, constant nighttime awakenings, and a subjective feeling of heat.

Tumors

The formation of a malignant neoplasm causes the accumulation of toxic metabolites and cellular debris in the body, which causes sweating at night. The occurrence of night sweats can be one of the first clinical manifestations of tumors of any localization, especially neoplasia of lymphoid tissue. In men, profuse sweating is most often caused by such oncological reasons as:

Rare causes

  • Rheumatic diseases : rheumatoid arthritis, periarteritis nodosa, dermatomyositis.
  • Allergies : allergic rhinitis and pharyngitis, urticaria, anaphylactic shock.
  • Neurological pathology : epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, meningitis and encephalitis.
  • Systemic diseases : sarcoidosis, histiocytosis H.

Diagnostics

A general practitioner or general practitioner is involved in determining the cause of night sweating in men. During the examination, the work of internal organs is assessed, the most common diseases that occur with nocturnal hyperhidrosis are excluded.The diagnostic search scheme includes instrumental imaging methods and laboratory tests. The most informative are:

  • Blood test . First of all, general and biochemical analyzes are performed to identify signs of an inflammatory process, the presence of endogenous intoxication. Be sure to determine the levels of testosterone, thyroid hormones, adrenal cortex. To exclude diabetes mellitus, fasting blood sugar and a glucose tolerance test are examined.
  • Bacteriological tests . To confirm the tuberculous etiology of night sweats in men, multiple sputum sampling for the detection of Koch’s bacillus is recommended. A tuberculin skin test is used as a screening method. Do standard tests for markers of viral hepatitis, HIV infection, take a swab from the urethra for bacterioscopy.
  • Instrumental Visualization . To exclude inflammation or volumetric neoplasms, a chest x-ray in two projections is required.An ultrasound of the peripheral endocrine organs is shown – the adrenal glands, thyroid gland, testicles. To clarify the causes of night sweats in men, thyroid scintigraphy and abdominal CT are used.
  • Neurological examination . On examination, the symmetry of reflexes, coordination of the work of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems are assessed. Patients in agitated and aggressive states require psychiatric evaluation to exclude severe withdrawal symptoms.Additionally, CT or MRI of the brain is prescribed.

Night sweats require a comprehensive examination

Treatment

Help before diagnosis

To reduce night sweats associated with bad habits, a man should adhere to several rules: avoid heavy meals and alcohol at night, quit smoking if possible, and normalize sleep patterns. To eliminate skin irritation, it is necessary to take a shower regularly, and change bed linen more often.If sweating is accompanied by other unpleasant symptoms, you should see a doctor to rule out or confirm more serious causes of the disorder.

Conservative therapy

Medical tactics depend on the etiological factor. Most often, etiotropic therapy is performed to eliminate the underlying disease, while a decrease in pathological sweating is observed. If hyperhidrosis is due to withdrawal, addiction treatment is carried out in specialized centers and involves a combination of medication with psychotherapeutic help.For the treatment of the cause of severe sweating at night in men, drugs of the following groups are used:

  • Hormonal agents . Pathogenetic treatment with androgens in male menopause helps to eliminate attacks of heat and night sweats, normalizes the genitourinary system and increases sexual desire. For patients with diabetes mellitus, a suitable insulin therapy regimen is selected to correct glycemia.
  • Antibiotics . The drugs are indicated for bacterial infections of any localization for the rapid eradication of the pathogen from the body.Antibiotics are selected empirically, as well as taking into account the results of bacteriological tests. Antifungal and antiviral agents may be prescribed.
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs . Medicines from the NSAID group quickly normalize body temperature, reduce the amount of inflammatory cytokines and accelerate the healing process. In severe situations, NSAIDs are combined with interferons, specific immunoglobulins.
  • Sedatives .Herbal and synthetic preparations affect the functioning of the autonomic nervous system, due to which the function of the sweat glands decreases, and the unpleasant manifestations of night sweats are eliminated. If necessary, add “daytime” tranquilizers, antidepressants to the treatment regimen.

Surgical treatment

Adenoidectomy and septoplasty are performed to eliminate the cause of severe forms of sleep apnea.