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Garlic side effects brain: Neuroprotective Effects of Garlic A Review

5 Side Effects Of Garlic You Must Be Aware Of

If you happen to be a garlic lover who loves to gorge on everything garlicky, then it’s time for you to get a reality check! Garlic is one of the most common ingredients in Indian kitchens, and is being consumed for more than thousand years now. It is not only used for cooking, but is often considered as a medicine as well. There are various varieties of garlic and the most popular ones are hardneck and softneck. Garlic helps to prevent many diseases because of its medicine properties. However, like everything has its own pros and cons, so does garlic. Here in this article, we have shared some side effects of having excess garlic. Read on to know more.Foul Odor
Lack of personal hygiene might not just be the only cause of foul odor, as consumption of garlic can break the deal too! There are various chemicals in garlic that contribute to bad breath. So before you think of gorging on your favourite garlic bread, make sure you have a mouth-refreshing spray handy as garlic breath can be quite embarrassing.
 

Garlic Bread can contribute to bad breath

Skin RashesEating excess garlic may lead to skin irritation and rashes. Garlic contains an enzyme called alliinase, which is usually the cause of skin rashes. It is quite often advised to wear hand gloves while cutting garlic, as the same enzyme present in it can cause rashes and itchiness.
 

Garlic can also cause of skin rashes

HeadacheGarlic if taken in its raw form may trigger headache as well. It doesn’t cause headache on the spot but can trigger the process. As per various studies, consuming raw garlic might stimulate the trigeminal nerve to release neuropeptides that goes to the membrane covering of the brain and triggers headache. 

Garlic if taken in its raw form may trigger headache

Could Aggravate Vaginal InfectionIt is of utmost importance for women to take proper care of their vaginal health. One of the crucial things to keep in mind while suffering from vaginal infection is to avoid eating garlic as it can aggravate the yeast infection by irritating the tender tissues of the vagina.
 

Garlic can aggravate the yeast infection

May Cause Vomiting And HeartburnAccording to various observational studies, consuming raw garlic bulbs in excess amounts may lead to vomiting and even heartburn. So to avoid this, you can always limit the intake of garlic.
(Also Read: Daily Use of Antacids May Up the Risk of Heart Attack: Study )
 

Raw garlic bulbs in excess amounts may lead to vomiting and heartburn

So it’s time to reduce your garlic intake as it can have an adverse impact on your health if consumed in excess amounts.Disclaimer:
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Garlic, Good for the Body, But Not for the Mind?

No doubt, garlic has many health benefits, but the yogis also discovered, thousands of years before Western science, that garlic is bad for your brain, both on and off meditation. It’s a brain toxin! In this snippet, from a lecture by Dr. Robert C Beck, you’ll learn why.

“The reason garlic is so toxic, the sulphone hydroxyl ion penetrates the blood-brain barrier, just like DMSO [Dimethyl sulfoxide, a solvent you may taste in your mouth shortly after it touches the skin] and is a specific poison for higher-life forms and brain cells.

We discovered this, much to our horror, when I (Bob Beck, DSc) was the world’s largest manufacturer of ethical EEG feedback equipment.

We’d have people come back from lunch that looked clinically dead on an encephalograph, which we used to calibrate their progress. “Well, what happened?” “Well, I went to an Italian restaurant and there was some garlic in my salad dressing!” So we had’em sign things that they wouldn’t touch garlic before classes or we were wasting their time, their money and my time.

Well, we didn’t know why for 20 years later, until I owned the Alpha-Metrics Corporation. We were building biofeed-back equipment and found out that garlic usually desynchronises your brain waves.

So I funded a study at Stanford and, sure enough, they found that it’s a poison. You can rub a clove of garlic on your foot – and you can smell it shortly later on your wrists. So it penetrates the body. This is why DMSO smells a lot like garlic: that sulphone hydroxyl ion penetrates all the barriers including the corpus callosum in the brain.

Any of you who are organic gardeners know that if you don’t want to use DDT, garlic will kill anything in the way of insects.

Now, most people have heard most of their lives garlic is good for you, and we put those people in the same class of ignorance as the mothers who at the turn of the century would buy morphine sulphate in the drugstore and give it to their babies to put’em to sleep.

If you have any patients who have low-grade headaches or attention deficit disorder, they can’t quite focus on the computer in the after-noon, just do an experiment – you owe it to yourselves.

Take these people off garlic and see how much better they get, very very shortly. And then let them eat a little garlic after about three weeks. They’ll say “My God, I had no idea that this was the cause of our problems.” And this includes the de-skunked garlics, Kyolic, some of the other products.

Very unpopular, but I’ve got to tell you the truth.”

Source: From a lecture by Dr. Robert C Beck, DSc, given at the Whole Life Expo, Seattle, WA, USA, in March 1996, Nexus Magazine.

In another study of garlic’s physical side-effects, it was found that it generates “pain signals” in the spine. From a yogic point of view, one wonders: what does this do to my kundalini?

“What are the side effects of garlic?
Although health benefits of garlic are frequently reported, excessive intake can have harmful effects.
In a rat study, allicin, the main pungent ingredient in garlic, was found to be an activator of TRPA1.

The neurons released neurotransmitters in the spinal cord to generate pain signals and released
neuropeptides at the site of sensory nerve activation, resulting in vasodilation as well as
inflammation. [2]

Other side effects include headache, itching garlic odor on breath and skin,
occasional allergic reactions, stomach disorders and diarrhea, decrease in serum protein and calcium
levels, association with bronchial asthma, contact dermatitis and complaints of garlic smell [5A] ”

See both the positives and negatives here: http://www.zhion.com/GARLIC.html

6 Surprising Ways Garlic Boosts Your Health – Cleveland Clinic

Garlic. Roasted in olive oil, it can melt in your mouth like butter, while chopped and raw, it can taste pungent and sharp. Either way, this herb-like vegetable offers significant benefits — on the inside and out. (Not to mention it’s delicious!)

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“It’s the organic sulfur compound allicin in garlic that gives it its pungent smell and makes it a healthy addition to your diet,” says dietitian Laura Jeffers, MEd, RD, LD.

Jeffers offers six surprising ways that garlic boosts your health:

1. Boosts immunity: Who knew boosting your immunity can be as simple as eating more garlic? According to one study involving 41,000 middle-aged women, those who routinely ate garlic, fruits and vegetables had a 35% lower colon cancer risk. Keep in mind that benefits came from raw and cooked garlic – not supplements.

2. Works as an anti-inflammatory: Research has shown that garlic oil works as an anti-inflammatory. If you have sore and inflamed joints or muscles, rub them with the oil. The Arthritis Foundation even recommends it to help prevent cartilage damage from arthritis. 

3. Improves cardiovascular health: Research indicates that it can have a positive impact on your arteries and blood pressure. Researchers believe red blood cells turn the sulfur in garlic into hydrogen sulfide gas that expands our blood vessels, making it easier to regulate blood pressure. The good news is that you may be able to put your blood pressure medication away, so consult with your doctor if adding more garlic to your diet could be helpful for you.

4. Gives you better hair and skin: Garlic’s antioxidants and antibacterial properties can clear up your skin by killing acne-causing bacteria. One study shows rubbing raw garlic over pimples can clear them away. Be aware, though, that it could cause a burning sensation on your skin. Consult with your dermatologist first before putting acne on your skin if you are using any other products, too.

5. Protects your food: Those same antibacterial properties in fresh garlic can kill the bacteria that lead to food poisoning, including salmonella and E.coli. Don’t use garlic as a substitute for proper food sanitation and food handling, though. 

6. Treat athlete’s foot: Garlic also fights fungus. If you have athlete’s foot, soak your feet in garlic water or rub raw garlic on your feet to attack the itch-causing fungus.  

Maximize the garlic

Did you know you can make tea from garlic? It’s true! You can steep chopped garlic in hot water and cover the taste with honey. However, sometimes taking advantage of garlic’s benefits gets a little complicated. Heating it or putting it in a recipe can change its pH balance. The enzymes from the allicin need a few minutes to start working, so let it sit after you mince, crush or chop it.

“You’ll get the most benefit from raw garlic,” she says. “But if you choose to cook it, don’t heat it above 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Higher temperatures kill the allicin, so add garlic to your recipes when you’re almost done cooking.”

A few words of caution

Garlic’s health benefits are plenty, but don’t add too much to your diet too quickly, as tempting as it may be. Overdoing it can cause discomfort, including upset stomach, bloating, diarrhea, body odor and bad breath. (Pass the gum, please!)

“You may also get a stinging feeling on the skin if you handle significant amounts of fresh and dried garlic,” says Jeffers. “To avoid garlic-induced skin lesions, wear kitchen gloves.”

On rare occasions, garlic supplements can cause headaches, fatigue, appetite loss, muscle aches, dizziness and allergic reactions such as asthma attacks or skin rashes. If you take blood thinners, taking a garlic supplement can increase the medication’s effect, making it even harder for your blood to clot. Be sure to consult your doctor before taking any garlic supplement.​

Could eating garlic reduce aging-related memory problems? — ScienceDaily

Consuming garlic helps counteract age-related changes in gut bacteria associated with memory problems, according to a new study conducted with mice. The benefit comes from allyl sulfide, a compound in garlic known for its health benefits.

“Our findings suggest that dietary administration of garlic containing allyl sulfide could help maintain healthy gut microorganisms and improve cognitive health in the elderly,” said Jyotirmaya Behera, PhD, who lead the research team with Neetu Tyagi, PhD, both from University of Louisville.

Behera will present the research at the American Physiological Society’s annual meeting during the 2019 Experimental Biology meeting to be held April 6-9 in Orlando, Fla.

The gut contains trillions of microorganisms collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. Although many studies have shown the importance of these microorganisms in maintaining human health, less is known about health effects linked to gut microbiota changes that come with age.

“The diversity of the gut microbiota is diminished in elderly people, a life stage when neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s develop and memory and cognitive abilities can decline,” said Tyagi. “We want to better understand how changes in the gut microbiota relate to aging-associated cognitive decline.”

For the study, the researchers gave oral allyl sulfide to mice that were 24 months old, which correlates to people between 56 and 69 years of age. They compared these mice with 4- and 24-month-old mice not receiving the dietary allyl sulfide supplement.

The researchers observed that the older mice receiving the garlic compound showed better long- and short-term memory and healthier gut bacteria than the older mice that didn’t receive the treatment. Spatial memory was also impaired in the 24-month-old mice not receiving allyl sulfide.

Additional experiments revealed that reduced gene expression of neuronal-derived natriuretic factor (NDNF) in the brain was likely responsible for the cognitive decline. This gene was recently discovered by the University of Louisville researchers and is required for long-term and short-term memory consolidation.

The researchers found that mice receiving the garlic compound exhibited higher levels of NDNF gene expression. In addition, recombinant-NDNF protein therapy in the brain restored the cognitive abilities of the older mice that did not receive the garlic compound. The researchers also found that oral allyl sulfide administration produces hydrogen sulfide gas — a messenger molecule that prevents intestinal inflammation — in the gut lumen.

Overall, the new findings suggest that dietary allyl sulfide promotes memory consolidation by restoring gut bacteria. The researchers are continuing to conduct experiments aimed at better understanding the relationship between the gut microbiota and cognitive decline and are examining how garlic might be used as a treatment in the aging human population.

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Eating Raw Garlic Could Prevent Memory Problems—At Least, in Mice

Garlic’s list of health benefits is long; it’s naturally antimicrobial and can help fight infections, it has anti-inflammatory properties and studies suggest it helps protect the liver and lower blood sugar levels. And now, you can add staving off dementia to that list, too, according to a new study.

Raw Garlic and Memory

Scientists from the University of Louisville found that eating raw garlic could slow age-related memory loss experienced in diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

“Our findings suggest that dietary administration of garlic containing allyl sulfide could help maintain healthy gut microorganisms and improve cognitive health in the elderly,” said Jyotirmaya Behera, Ph.D., who led the research team with Neetu Tyagi, Ph.D., both from the University of Louisville.

The Gut-Brain Connection

That’s right—garlic appears to help the brain by maintaining a healthy gut. Past studies have implicated gut bacteria in Alzheimer’s disease, finding that people with higher levels of certain substances—ammonia, indole, skatole and phenol—and lower levels of infection-clearing agents called Bacteroides were more likely to have dementia. We’re still learning about the gut-brain connection, but what happens in your gut may affect what happens in your brain—for better or worse.