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Headache fatigue and diarrhea: Headache, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pain: Cause

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Headache, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pain: Cause

Many illnesses can cause a headache, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, and stomach pain. It is difficult to narrow down the specific condition a person may have, based on symptoms alone.


The symptoms may also be interlinked. For example, a person may experience a headache and dizziness as symptoms of changes in their head. They may experience stomach pain as a result of nausea. Fatigue may result if a person is tired due to pain.

This article will explain some possible causes of headaches, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pain, including gastroenteritis, migraine, and COVID-19. It will also advise when a person should contact a doctor or healthcare professional for each possible cause.

There are many possible causes for these symptoms, including those below. If someone experiences the symptoms, it is essential to contact their doctor and avoid self-diagnosing. This way, they can obtain the most accurate diagnosis and receive appropriate treatment.

Gastroenteritis results from inflammation of the stomach and intestines. Different conditions can cause gastroenteritis, including viruses such as norovirus and bacterial infections such as Salmonella. Some people refer to viral gastroenteritis as stomach flu.

Symptoms

A person with gastroenteritis may experience:

  • vomiting
  • watery diarrhea
  • headache
  • fever
  • muscle cramps
  • stomach cramps

Headaches can be a symptom of dehydration resulting from the gastroenteritis infection itself. They may also occur due to muscle stiffness from vomiting or having to stay in bed for long periods.

Dizziness may occur because of lost fluids from diarrhea or vomiting.

Learn what a person with stomach flu should eat here.

When to contact a doctor

Most cases of gastroenteritis are viral and go away on their own.

However, if a person shows signs of dehydration or the illness becomes severe, they should contact a doctor or healthcare professional. Symptoms of dehydration or severe gastroenteritis may include:

  • irritability
  • diarrhea for more than 2 days
  • high fever
  • six or more bouts of diarrhea a day
  • severe pain in the stomach or rectum
  • black or bloody stools
  • stools with pus
  • sunken eyes
  • extreme thirst
  • dark urine

Treatment of gastroenteritis may involve antibiotics, especially if a person is a young child, an older adult, or pregnant.

Learn more about signs of dehydration here.

Sometimes people experience headaches, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pain during pregnancy. Some people may experience these symptoms early on in pregnancy as pregnancy hormone levels rise. However, symptoms can occur at any time during pregnancy.

Symptoms

A 2021 review confirms that a person who is pregnant may experience:

  • headaches
  • vomiting or nausea
  • stomach pain
  • pelvic pain
  • dizziness or lightheadedness
  • low blood pressure
  • high heart rate
  • changes in vaginal discharge or urine

When to contact a doctor

These symptoms are usually normal during pregnancy. However, it is important to tell a doctor about all symptoms and to ask about treatment options for those that disrupt daily life.

If a person experiences severe dizziness, a headache so intense it is unbearable, or they cannot keep any food down, they should seek care right away.

Some people find relief from pregnancy symptoms by avoiding certain foods, drinking more water, or resting.

Learn more about what to expect during pregnancy here.

Migraine is a chronic condition. Most people who have migraine experience it often during their life.

Symptoms

A migraine headache is a type of neurological headache that causes:

  • intense head pain
  • nausea
  • changes in mood
  • dizziness

Some people also experience unusual sensations, such as strange lights or sounds.

When to contact a doctor

Migraine is not dangerous. However, if a person experiences the following symptoms alongside a migraine headache, they should contact their doctor:

  • fever
  • chills
  • unexplained weight loss
  • night sweats
  • sudden severe pain
  • facial tingling
  • vision changes
  • persistent pain in the same place in the head
  • changes in the headache pain when:
    • changing position
    • sneezing, coughing, or straining

Identifying migraine triggers can help a person avoid headaches. A doctor can also prescribe a wide range of medications, including medicines that can either prevent or treat migraines.

Read more on when to worry about a headache here.

The cold and the flu are both common respiratory illnesses, but they differ based on which virus has caused them. The flu could lead to more serious health complications, such as pneumonia.

Symptoms

People with the cold or influenza virus may develop the following symptoms:

  • headaches
  • stomach pain
  • dizziness
  • fever or chills
  • fatigue
  • chest pain
  • sneezing or coughing
  • sore throat

Symptoms of the flu tend to be more severe, last longer, and may come on suddenly.

When to contact a doctor

Both the cold and flu are viruses that usually go away on their own.

However, a person should contact a doctor if they experience:

  • difficulty breathing
  • ongoing chest or stomach pain or pressure
  • ongoing dizziness or confusion
  • seizures
  • severe muscle pain
  • extreme weakness
  • fever or cough that goes away and comes back or worsens

A doctor can also prescribe a drug to make the flu less severe if a person seeks treatment early. A person should drink plenty of fluids, rest, and stay home to avoid spreading the virus.

Learn how to treat a cold or flu at home here.

The novel coronavirus causes COVID-19, which is a respiratory illness. Symptoms can be severe, moderate, or a person may not notice them at all.

Symptoms

A person experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 may notice:

  • fever or chills
  • coughing
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle and body aches
  • stuffy nose
  • headache
  • diarrhea
  • nausea or vomiting
  • loss of taste or smell

Learn to tell the difference between COVID-19, cold, and flu symptoms here.

When to contact a doctor

A person should seek emergency medical care if they experience the following symptoms:

  • difficulty breathing
  • chest pain or pressure that does not go away
  • new confusion
  • difficulty staying awake or waking up
  • pale, blue, or gray hues to their skin

People with concussion may have recently had a blow to the head, such as from a fall or car wreck.

Symptoms

A head injury can cause a headache, as well as neurological symptoms such as:

  • dizziness
  • vomiting
  • nausea
  • confusion

Learn about the symptoms of concussion here.

When to contact a doctor

Treatment depends on the severity of the injury. However, it can require a doctor to hospitalize and observe the person.

Depending on the nature of the head injury, a person might need ongoing support or rehabilitation such as occupational therapy.

A stroke happens when blood flow to the brain becomes blocked, usually because of a blood clot.

Symptoms

The symptoms of a stroke vary from person to person and may change based on which area of the brain a stroke affects. Some people experience nausea, dizziness, or vomiting.

The most common symptoms of a stroke include:

  • not being able to raise both arms to the same level
  • one side of the face drooping, especially when a person smiles
  • severe headache
  • changes in speech, especially not being able to repeat words

When to contact a doctor

A person should go to the emergency room or call 911 immediately if they notice these symptoms in themselves or someone else. Delaying care can result in death.

There is no safe home treatment for a stroke. A doctor may perform surgery, admit a person to the hospital, or recommend long-term care, such as physical or speech therapy.

Because the brain controls much of what the body does, neurological conditions can cause symptoms such as nausea and dizziness, as well as a headache. Although rare, the appearance of these symptoms together may signal another neurological condition, such as a brain tumor.

Only a doctor can properly diagnose a neurological condition, so it is important to see a neurologist for any unexplained symptoms that do not go away with home treatment. The treatment for these symptoms will vary depending on the underlying cause.

Learn about different types of headache here.

Headaches can be scary, and nausea can make even basic daily functions difficult.

If a person experiences these symptoms alongside dizziness, stomach pain, and fatigue, they may feel concerned. However, in many cases, symptoms go away on their own or happen because of a minor illness, not because of a major health crisis.

There are many possible causes of these symptoms, in addition to the conditions above. A person should discuss their symptoms and history with a doctor to obtain a proper diagnosis.

It is important to contact a doctor as soon as possible if these symptoms do not clear up on their own or worsen, or if there are additional symptoms.

Headache, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pain: Cause

Many illnesses can cause a headache, nausea, fatigue, dizziness, and stomach pain. It is difficult to narrow down the specific condition a person may have, based on symptoms alone.


The symptoms may also be interlinked. For example, a person may experience a headache and dizziness as symptoms of changes in their head. They may experience stomach pain as a result of nausea. Fatigue may result if a person is tired due to pain.

This article will explain some possible causes of headaches, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pain, including gastroenteritis, migraine, and COVID-19. It will also advise when a person should contact a doctor or healthcare professional for each possible cause.

There are many possible causes for these symptoms, including those below. If someone experiences the symptoms, it is essential to contact their doctor and avoid self-diagnosing. This way, they can obtain the most accurate diagnosis and receive appropriate treatment.

Gastroenteritis results from inflammation of the stomach and intestines. Different conditions can cause gastroenteritis, including viruses such as norovirus and bacterial infections such as Salmonella. Some people refer to viral gastroenteritis as stomach flu.

Symptoms

A person with gastroenteritis may experience:

  • vomiting
  • watery diarrhea
  • headache
  • fever
  • muscle cramps
  • stomach cramps

Headaches can be a symptom of dehydration resulting from the gastroenteritis infection itself. They may also occur due to muscle stiffness from vomiting or having to stay in bed for long periods.

Dizziness may occur because of lost fluids from diarrhea or vomiting.

Learn what a person with stomach flu should eat here.

When to contact a doctor

Most cases of gastroenteritis are viral and go away on their own.

However, if a person shows signs of dehydration or the illness becomes severe, they should contact a doctor or healthcare professional. Symptoms of dehydration or severe gastroenteritis may include:

  • irritability
  • diarrhea for more than 2 days
  • high fever
  • six or more bouts of diarrhea a day
  • severe pain in the stomach or rectum
  • black or bloody stools
  • stools with pus
  • sunken eyes
  • extreme thirst
  • dark urine

Treatment of gastroenteritis may involve antibiotics, especially if a person is a young child, an older adult, or pregnant.

Learn more about signs of dehydration here.

Sometimes people experience headaches, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pain during pregnancy. Some people may experience these symptoms early on in pregnancy as pregnancy hormone levels rise. However, symptoms can occur at any time during pregnancy.

Symptoms

A 2021 review confirms that a person who is pregnant may experience:

  • headaches
  • vomiting or nausea
  • stomach pain
  • pelvic pain
  • dizziness or lightheadedness
  • low blood pressure
  • high heart rate
  • changes in vaginal discharge or urine

When to contact a doctor

These symptoms are usually normal during pregnancy. However, it is important to tell a doctor about all symptoms and to ask about treatment options for those that disrupt daily life.

If a person experiences severe dizziness, a headache so intense it is unbearable, or they cannot keep any food down, they should seek care right away.

Some people find relief from pregnancy symptoms by avoiding certain foods, drinking more water, or resting.

Learn more about what to expect during pregnancy here.

Migraine is a chronic condition. Most people who have migraine experience it often during their life.

Symptoms

A migraine headache is a type of neurological headache that causes:

  • intense head pain
  • nausea
  • changes in mood
  • dizziness

Some people also experience unusual sensations, such as strange lights or sounds.

When to contact a doctor

Migraine is not dangerous. However, if a person experiences the following symptoms alongside a migraine headache, they should contact their doctor:

  • fever
  • chills
  • unexplained weight loss
  • night sweats
  • sudden severe pain
  • facial tingling
  • vision changes
  • persistent pain in the same place in the head
  • changes in the headache pain when:
    • changing position
    • sneezing, coughing, or straining

Identifying migraine triggers can help a person avoid headaches. A doctor can also prescribe a wide range of medications, including medicines that can either prevent or treat migraines.

Read more on when to worry about a headache here.

The cold and the flu are both common respiratory illnesses, but they differ based on which virus has caused them. The flu could lead to more serious health complications, such as pneumonia.

Symptoms

People with the cold or influenza virus may develop the following symptoms:

  • headaches
  • stomach pain
  • dizziness
  • fever or chills
  • fatigue
  • chest pain
  • sneezing or coughing
  • sore throat

Symptoms of the flu tend to be more severe, last longer, and may come on suddenly.

When to contact a doctor

Both the cold and flu are viruses that usually go away on their own.

However, a person should contact a doctor if they experience:

  • difficulty breathing
  • ongoing chest or stomach pain or pressure
  • ongoing dizziness or confusion
  • seizures
  • severe muscle pain
  • extreme weakness
  • fever or cough that goes away and comes back or worsens

A doctor can also prescribe a drug to make the flu less severe if a person seeks treatment early. A person should drink plenty of fluids, rest, and stay home to avoid spreading the virus.

Learn how to treat a cold or flu at home here.

The novel coronavirus causes COVID-19, which is a respiratory illness. Symptoms can be severe, moderate, or a person may not notice them at all.

Symptoms

A person experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 may notice:

  • fever or chills
  • coughing
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle and body aches
  • stuffy nose
  • headache
  • diarrhea
  • nausea or vomiting
  • loss of taste or smell

Learn to tell the difference between COVID-19, cold, and flu symptoms here.

When to contact a doctor

A person should seek emergency medical care if they experience the following symptoms:

  • difficulty breathing
  • chest pain or pressure that does not go away
  • new confusion
  • difficulty staying awake or waking up
  • pale, blue, or gray hues to their skin

People with concussion may have recently had a blow to the head, such as from a fall or car wreck.

Symptoms

A head injury can cause a headache, as well as neurological symptoms such as:

  • dizziness
  • vomiting
  • nausea
  • confusion

Learn about the symptoms of concussion here.

When to contact a doctor

Treatment depends on the severity of the injury. However, it can require a doctor to hospitalize and observe the person.

Depending on the nature of the head injury, a person might need ongoing support or rehabilitation such as occupational therapy.

A stroke happens when blood flow to the brain becomes blocked, usually because of a blood clot.

Symptoms

The symptoms of a stroke vary from person to person and may change based on which area of the brain a stroke affects. Some people experience nausea, dizziness, or vomiting.

The most common symptoms of a stroke include:

  • not being able to raise both arms to the same level
  • one side of the face drooping, especially when a person smiles
  • severe headache
  • changes in speech, especially not being able to repeat words

When to contact a doctor

A person should go to the emergency room or call 911 immediately if they notice these symptoms in themselves or someone else. Delaying care can result in death.

There is no safe home treatment for a stroke. A doctor may perform surgery, admit a person to the hospital, or recommend long-term care, such as physical or speech therapy.

Because the brain controls much of what the body does, neurological conditions can cause symptoms such as nausea and dizziness, as well as a headache. Although rare, the appearance of these symptoms together may signal another neurological condition, such as a brain tumor.

Only a doctor can properly diagnose a neurological condition, so it is important to see a neurologist for any unexplained symptoms that do not go away with home treatment. The treatment for these symptoms will vary depending on the underlying cause.

Learn about different types of headache here.

Headaches can be scary, and nausea can make even basic daily functions difficult.

If a person experiences these symptoms alongside dizziness, stomach pain, and fatigue, they may feel concerned. However, in many cases, symptoms go away on their own or happen because of a minor illness, not because of a major health crisis.

There are many possible causes of these symptoms, in addition to the conditions above. A person should discuss their symptoms and history with a doctor to obtain a proper diagnosis.

It is important to contact a doctor as soon as possible if these symptoms do not clear up on their own or worsen, or if there are additional symptoms.

Why headache and vomiting occur: causes and symptoms

Contents

  • 1 Headache and vomiting: causes, symptoms and treatments
    • 1.1 Headache and vomiting: symptoms and causes
      • 1.1.1 What is headache and vomit?
      • 1.1.2 Symptoms of headache and vomiting
      • 1.1.3 Causes of headache and vomiting
      • 1.1.4 What to do if you have a headache and vomiting?
    • 1.2 Causes of headache and vomiting
      • 1.2.1 Migraine
      • 1.2.2 Acute respiratory viral infection
      • 1. 2.3 Head stroke
    • 1.3 Symptoms that occur with headache and vomiting
      • 1.3 .1 Headache
      • 1.3.2 Vomiting
    • 1.4 Diagnosis of headache and vomiting
      • 1.4.1 Source of pain and vomiting
      • 1.4.2 Additional investigations
      • 1.4.3 Specialist consultation
    • 1 .5 Treatment of headache and vomiting
      • 1.5.1 Non-pharmacological treatments
      • 1.5.2 Pharmacological treatments
      • 1.5.3 Medication selection
      • 1.5.4 Avoiding recurrence of symptoms
    • 1.6 Head control pain and vomiting
      • 1.6.1 Strengthening the immune system
      • 1.6.2 Regular meals
      • 1.6.3 Proper hygiene
      • 1.6.4 Stress control
    • hydration
    • 1.7.2 Changes in stomach function
    • 1.7.3 Reduced productivity
    • 1.7.4 Risk of respiratory infections
  • 1.8 Traditional methods of treating headache and vomiting
    • 1. 8. 1 Massage
    • 1.8.2 Herbal infusions
    • 1.8.3 Relaxation exercises
  • 1.9 Alternative treatments for headaches and vomiting
    • 1.9.1 Massage
    • 1.9.2 Herbs and essential oils
    • 1.9.3 Acupressure
    • 1.9.4 Diet
    • 1.9.5 Relaxation
  • 1.10 When should I see a doctor about headaches and vomiting?
  • 1.11 Related videos:
  • 1.12 Q&A:
      • 1.12.0.1 What causes a headache with vomiting?
      • 1.12.0.2 How to treat headache and vomiting?
      • 1.12.0.3 Can hormonal changes cause headaches and vomiting?
      • 1.12.0.4 How can I tell if headache and vomiting are signs of a serious illness?
      • 1.12.0.5 When can headache and vomiting be symptoms of alcohol intoxication?
      • 1.12.0.6 Is there a link between headache, vomiting and stress?

An article about headaches and vomiting: what does it mean, what symptoms should I look out for and how to deal with them? Find answers to your questions and learn how to avoid tension and discomfort in your head.

Headache and vomiting are fairly common symptoms that can occur in both children and adults. They can be caused by a variety of factors, ranging from the common cold to serious illnesses.

Headache can be of various nature: throbbing, bursting, sharp or dull. Vomiting can occur as an independent symptom or be concomitant with other diseases.

In this article, we look at the main causes of headaches and vomiting, and describe the most effective treatments. Be attentive to your health and do not postpone a visit to the doctor in case of such symptoms.

Headache and vomiting: symptoms and causes

What is headache and vomiting?

Headache and vomiting are troubles that can bring a lot of discomfort and difficulties to a person in everyday life. A headache is a feeling of pressure or sharp pain in the head that can be caused by a variety of things. Vomiting is the body’s response to irritation of the lining of the stomach, intestines, or brain.

Symptoms of headache and vomiting

Headache may present as a sharp, throbbing or pressing pain in various parts of the head. Vomiting can manifest as nausea, vomiting, increased salivation, and abdominal discomfort.

Causes of headache and vomiting

  • Migraine is an acute head disease that can be accompanied by severe pain, nausea and vomiting.
  • Head injuries – may cause headache and vomiting due to damage to the brain or internal organs.
  • Stress – can cause headaches and vomiting due to increased levels of adrenaline in the blood.
  • Gastrointestinal disorders – may cause vomiting and headache due to irritation of the lining of the stomach and intestines.

What if you have a headache and are vomiting?

If you experience headaches and vomiting, seek medical attention. Doctors will perform the necessary tests and help you find the cause and treatment for your symptoms. If the headache and vomiting are caused by stress, it is worth relaxing, drinking water and taking a break.

Causes of headache and vomiting

Migraine

Migraine is one of the main causes of headache and vomiting. It can be the result of changes in hormone levels, sleep or eating disorders, exercise, stress, and other factors. Many people with migraine have precursors to the disease, such as changes in visual function, tinnitus, weakness, etc.

Acute respiratory viral infection

Acute respiratory viral infection can also cause headache and vomiting. It is transmitted from person to person through the air, usually during epidemics. The virus infects the upper respiratory tract, causing unpleasant symptoms such as headache, weakness, severe sore throat, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Head stroke

Head stroke is an acute circulatory disorder in the brain and can cause headache and vomiting. It can occur as a result of circulatory disorders or traumatic brain injury. One of the clear signs of a head stroke is a feeling of a sharp headache, accompanied by vomiting and dizziness.

  • Other causes of headache and vomiting include:
  • Brain damage
  • High blood pressure
  • Nervous and physical strain
  • Food poisoning
Signs of headache and vomiting
Possible causes
Acute pain in the frontal part of the head Migraine
Weakness and dizziness Headache stroke
Severe sore throat Acute respiratory viral infection

Symptoms that occur with headache and vomiting

Headache

Headache is a feeling of discomfort, discomfort or pain in the head. It can be mild, moderate, or severe and can last from a few minutes to several days.

Headache may cause additional symptoms such as:

  • feeling unwell;
  • dizziness;
  • hypersensitivity to light, sound or smell;
  • muscle weakness;
  • impaired vision or hearing.

Vomiting

Vomiting is a physiological process that removes the contents of the stomach through the mouth. It can be caused by various causes, including diseases of the gastrointestinal tract or poisoning.

Vomiting may cause additional symptoms such as:

  • nausea;
  • dizziness;
  • muscle weakness;
  • heavy sweating;
  • violation of the water-salt balance.

It is important to understand that headache and vomiting can be a symptom of a serious illness and require immediate medical attention.

Diagnosis of headache and vomiting

Source of pain and vomiting

Headache and vomiting occurring together can have different causes. This may be due to food poisoning, migraines, flu, infectious diseases, as well as a violation of pressure, blood circulation in the brain, or tumor processes in the brain. Diagnosis depends on symptoms and additional tests.

Additional testing

Additional testing will help determine the cause of headaches and vomiting. For example, these tests may include brain imaging, an ECG to evaluate heart function, and blood and urine laboratory tests. They help to detect the presence of inflammation or infection, tumors, changes in the composition of the blood, which can cause pain symptoms and vomiting.

Specialist consultation

If headache and vomiting persist, visit a specialist for an appointment. Not all types of headaches require medication, but if pain symptoms are frequent or accompany other symptoms, a specialist may prescribe medications to treat them. An illness that causes headaches and vomiting can be a symptom of a serious illness, so it’s a good idea to see a doctor if you experience these symptoms.

Treatment of headache and vomiting

Non-pharmacological treatments

In some cases, non-pharmacological treatments may help with headache and vomiting. For example, rest and sleep can reduce symptoms. A healthy lifestyle, including moderate physical activity, a healthy diet, and regular sleep, can also help. Relaxation exercises, massage, and paramedical techniques may also improve the condition.

Pharmacological treatments

If non-pharmacological methods fail, medication may be required. Mainly, painkillers and antiemetics are used. Analgesics such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and paracetamol can relieve headaches. Antiemetics such as metoclopramide or promethazine may help with vomiting.

Choice of medication

Choice of medication depends on the type and cause of headache and vomiting. Minor headaches can be relieved with an analgesic. However, if the headache is accompanied by vomiting, medications may be needed that can improve the symptoms of both conditions. Also, the choice of medication may be affected by the presence of pre-existing diseases and medications taken.

How to avoid recurrence of symptoms

To avoid recurrence of headaches and vomiting, it is recommended to avoid stressful situations, do not overeat and do not drink alcohol. Regular exercise, sleep hygiene, and a healthy lifestyle can also help. With severe headaches and vomiting, you should not delay contacting a doctor to determine the exact cause and conduct treatment.

Headache and vomiting medicines

Name
Dose
Action
Aspirin 500-1000 mg, 3-4 times a day Anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effect, headache relief
Ibuprofen 200-400 mg 3-4 times per day Anti-inflammatory action, headache relief
Paracetamol 500-1000 mg, 3-4 times a day Headache relief
Metoclopramide 10 mg, 2-3 times a day Relief of vomiting
Promethazine 2 times a day Relief of vomiting

Headache prevention pain and vomiting

Strengthening the immune system

One of the most important measures to prevent headaches and vomiting is to strengthen the body’s immune system. Regular consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables, moderate exercise, and weight control will help keep the immune system functioning properly.

Regular meals

Regular meals are another important factor in preventing headaches and vomiting. Try to keep track of your food intake and do not skip meals. Nutrition should be rich in proteins, vegetables and fruits, while deficient in fats, salts and sugars.

Proper hygiene

Proper hygiene, thoughtful seating, and moderation in the use of alcohol and tobacco can help prevent headaches and vomiting. \n Make sure that there are no people suffering from infectious diseases around, and devote the necessary amount of time to sleep and rest.

Stress management

Last but not least is stress management. Practice daily breathing exercises and meditation, perform relaxation techniques, keep your emotional state under control. These measures will reduce the risk of headaches and vomiting and improve the quality of life in general.

Sequelae of headache and vomiting

Dehydration

Repeated vomiting and diarrhea can lead to severe dehydration. Fluid loss weakens body tissues, including the brain. This can aggravate the headache and increase the duration of the pain condition.

Alterations in the functioning of the stomach

Repeated vomiting can alter the functioning of the stomach, causing disturbances in the digestive process. This can lead to additional headaches and fatigue.

Decreased productivity

Headache and nausea can lead to decreased productivity at work or school. The sick person may have difficulty completing tasks and concentrating on work. You may even need to be away from work for a day or several days to fully recover.

Risk of respiratory infections

Scientists believe that vomiting and headaches can be signs of respiratory infections. People who experience these symptoms frequently may have an increased risk of developing more serious lung conditions such as pneumonia.

Traditional Treatments for Headaches and Vomiting

Massage

Massage is one of the most affordable and effective ways to relieve headaches and vomiting. Gentle massage movements can help relax the muscles in your neck and back, as well as reduce tension in your head.

How to:

  • Lightly massage the neck with both hands, starting from the base of the skull to the top vertebrae.
  • Gently move the skin around the temples.
  • Place your fingers on your forehead and gently move the skin from your forehead to the back of your head.
  • Lightly rub temples with two fingers.

Herbal infusions

Herbal infusions may be useful in treating headaches and vomiting. A number of herbs contain properties that can help reduce tension, improve circulation, and reduce inflammation in the head.

Some of the herbs recommended for headaches and vomiting include:

  • Mint
  • Chamomile
  • Lemongrass
  • St. John’s Wort
Herb
Application
Mint Migraine Help and spasms
Chamomile Pain and tension relief
Lemongrass Headache and vomiting relief
St. John’s wort Tension and stress relief

Relaxation exercises

Relaxation exercises can help reduce tension caused by headaches and vomiting. These exercises can be done anywhere and any time of the day.

Some exercises that can help:

  1. Deep breathing and meditation.
  2. Yoga and Pilates.
  3. Neck and back stretch marks.
  4. Slow swimming.

Alternative Treatments for Headaches and Vomiting

Massage

Massage can be a great way to treat headaches and vomiting. Massage therapists use a variety of techniques to ease muscle tension, increase circulation, and relieve stress. Self-massage can also be effective, including massage of the neck, cheekbones, and top of the head.

Herbs and essential oils

Essential oils and herbs may be helpful in treating headaches and vomiting. Lavender essential oil has a calming effect on the nervous system, and mint oil reduces pain in the head. Peppermint tea can also relieve unpleasant symptoms. In addition to this, herbs such as ginger, chamomile, and echinacea can be used.

Acupressure

Acupressure is a common treatment for headaches and vomiting. Acupressure uses points on the body to stimulate the self-healing system. Point ХГ-6 , which is found between the thumb and index finger, can help relieve nausea, headaches, and other symptoms.

Diet

Diet can be a key factor in managing headaches and vomiting. Choosing nutritious foods like fresh fruits and vegetables is good for the body. However, fast food, foods high in sugar and fat, and alcohol should be avoided.

Relaxation

Of course, relaxation is the key to eliminating headaches and vomiting. Try meditation, yoga, or other relaxation techniques to relieve stress and tension.

When should I see a doctor about headaches and vomiting?

Headache and vomiting can occur for a variety of reasons, from simple fatigue to serious illness. But when there are already certain symptoms, it is important to know when to seek medical help.

The following signs may indicate the need to see a doctor:

  • The frequency and intensity of the headache has increased significantly, and is not relieved by conventional means;
  • Vomiting does not stop for a long time and there is a loss of appetite;
  • Swollen veins in the temples and severe pain around the eyes;
  • Accompanied by convulsive conditions, headache attacks;
  • Increased body temperature;
  • Feeling of numbness in the limbs;

If you experience these symptoms, you should immediately contact a specialist. The doctor will conduct the necessary research and prescribe the necessary course of treatment to save you from discomfort and possible complications.

Related videos:

Q&A:

What causes a headache with vomiting?

Headache and vomiting can be caused by many factors, including migraines, irregular diets, alcohol and drug use, serious infections, and other illnesses.

How to treat headache and vomiting?

Treatment of headache and vomiting depends on the cause of the symptoms. In some cases, just resting, getting enough sleep and eliminating stress may be enough. In more severe cases, medications such as analgesics, antiemetics, and triptans may be required.

Can hormonal changes cause headaches and vomiting?

Yes, hormonal changes, such as those that occur during menstruation or pregnancy, can cause headaches and vomiting in some women.

How can you tell if a headache and vomiting are signs of a serious illness?

If symptoms do not improve with simple treatments, or if they are accompanied by other unusual symptoms such as fever or dizziness, seek immediate medical attention. Also, if symptoms occur as a result of an injury or unusual physical activity, medical attention should be sought immediately.

When can headache and vomiting be symptoms of alcohol intoxication?

Headache and vomiting may be symptoms of alcohol intoxication, especially if alcohol consumption has been excessive and unusual for the body. In this case, the most effective treatment is rest and increased water intake to prevent dehydration.

Is there a connection between headache, vomiting and stress?

Yes, stress can be one of the causes of headaches and vomiting. Constant tension can cause muscle tension, which can lead to headaches and vomiting. However, if symptoms become chronic, a doctor should be consulted to assess possible causes.

Headache – causes, examination and treatment | Symptoms

Cluster headache
Signs: Severe, piercing pain that affects one part of the head and is concentrated in the periocular region, usually lasts from 30 minutes to 1 hour, often occurs at the same time of day, occurs in clusters and is separated by intervals with a complete absence of headache, usually not aggravated by exposure to light, sounds or smells and is not accompanied by vomiting. Inability to lie down and restlessness. On the part of the manifestation of pain: runny nose, lacrimation, drooping eyelid (Bernard-Horner syndrome) and sometimes swelling under the eye.

Migraine headache
Signs: Moderate to severe headache, usually throbbing, unilateral and bilateral, lasting from several hours to several days, may be caused by lack of sleep, head trauma, hunger, or consumption of certain wines and foods, may be aggravated by physical activity and relieved after sleep, often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to loud noises, bright lights, and/or smells, including possible mood changes, loss of appetite, and nausea, sometimes preceded by temporary disturbances in sensation, balance, muscle coordination, speech, or vision (seeing flashes or blind spots ).

Tension headache
Signs: Usually mild to moderate headache that feels like a band of pressure on the head and begins in the front of the head or around the eyes, affects the entire head, lasts from 30 minutes to several days, may worsen at the end of the day, does not worsen with physical exertion, under the influence of light, sounds or smells, is not accompanied by nausea, vomiting or other symptoms.

Altitude sickness
Signs: Dizziness, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, fatigue, weakness, irritability, or trouble sleeping. People who have recently climbed to high altitudes (including those who have been in an airplane for 6 hours or longer).

Brain tumor, abscess or other neoplasm in the brain
Signs: Mild to severe headache that may get progressively worse, usually comes on more frequently and eventually becomes permanent with no signs of relief, may cause blurred vision with a sudden change in body position, may be accompanied by clumsiness, weakness, disorientation, nausea, vomiting, seizures, or blurred vision.

Carbon monoxide exposure
Signs: Possible unawareness of exposure as carbon monoxide is colorless and odorless.

Dental infection (upper teeth)
Signs: Pain, which is usually felt in the facial region and is mainly one-sided, aggravated by chewing, toothache.

Encephalitis (brain infection)
Signs: Headaches with variable characteristics. Often accompanied by fever, increased drowsiness, confusion, agitation, weakness and/or poor coordination. Convulsive seizures and coma.

Giant cell (temporal) arteritis
Signs: Unilateral throbbing pain in the temporal part of the head. Pain when combing hair or while chewing. Sometimes enlarged arteries in the temples (temporal arteries) and aching and dull pain, especially in the shoulders, hips, and pelvis. Vision may be impaired or lost, and is more common in people over the age of 55.

Glaucoma (angle-closure glaucoma)
Signs: Moderate to severe pain that occurs in the front of the head or in the ocular or supraocular region. Redness of the eyes, iridescent circles around light sources, nausea, vomiting, and loss of vision.

Head injury (post-concussion syndrome)
Signs: Headache begins immediately or shortly after a head injury (with or without loss of consciousness). Sometimes memory lapses, personality changes, or both.

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (increased intracranial pressure)
Signs: Headaches that occur daily or almost daily with fluctuating intensity, affecting both sides of the head, sometimes double vision or blurred vision, nausea, or ringing in the ears in rhythm with the beats of the pulse (throbbing tinnitus).

Cerebral hemorrhage
Signs: Mild or severe pain that starts suddenly, occurs on one or both sides of the head, is often accompanied by nausea and sometimes vomiting. Possible severe drowsiness, clumsiness, weakness, difficulty speaking and understanding speech, loss of vision, loss of sensation or disorientation, occasionally seizures or coma.

Low blood pressure headache (caused by removal or leakage of cerebrospinal fluid)
Signs: Intense headaches, often accompanied by neck stiffness and nausea. Pain that gets worse when the person is sitting or standing and gets better when the person lies down. It usually occurs after a spinal tap (lumbar puncture) is performed.

Medicine overuse headache
Signs: Chronic and often daily headaches. Often with migraine or tension headaches

Meningitis
Signs: Severe, persistent headache. fever, stiff neck, in connection with which it is painful to lower the chin to the chest, sometimes it is impossible. Malaise, drowsiness, nausea or vomiting.

Sinusitis
Signs: Pain, which is sometimes felt in the face, front of the head, or like a toothache, may start suddenly and last for days or hours, or start gradually and become persistent. Runny nose, sometimes with pus or blood, malaise, cough at night, and often fever.

Subarachnoid hemorrhage (bleeding between the inner and middle layers of tissue covering the brain)
Symptoms: Severe, persistent pain that starts suddenly and reaches its maximum intensity within a few seconds is often described as the worst headache ever experienced. There may be a brief loss of consciousness at the onset of the headache, and there may be drowsiness, confusion, difficulty waking up, or coma.