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Cholesterol Tests: Understand Your Results

Your health care provider may send you for cholesterol tests, either as a part of a standard check-up or because they suspect you may be at risk for developing heart disease. But do you know what the cholesterol test results actually mean? Read on to learn how to interpret the numbers.

Why Do I Need a Cholesterol Test?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance. Your liver makes all the cholesterol your body needs. But you take in more cholesterol from certain foods, such as those from animals. If you have too much cholesterol in your body, it can build up in the walls of your arteries (as “plaque”) and eventually harden. This process, called atherosclerosis, actually narrows the arteries, making it harder for blood to travel through the vessels. 

Unfortunately, high cholesterol doesn’t cause symptoms. In later stages of atherosclerosis, though, you may suffer angina — severe chest pain from lack of blood flow to the heart. If an artery gets totally blocked, a heart attack results. A routine blood cholesterol test is a far better way of finding out what your cholesterol level is.

What Does a Cholesterol Test Measure?

In addition to measuring the total cholesterol in your blood, the standard cholesterol test (called a “lipid panel”) measures three specific kinds of fat:

  • Low-density lipoproteins (LDL). This is the “bad cholesterol,” the main cause of plaque build-up, which increases your risk for heart disease. In general, the lower the number, the better. But LDL cholesterol is only one part of a larger equation that measures a person’s overall risk of having a heart attack or stroke. For years, guidelines focused on specific target numbers for individuals to achieve to lower their risk. The most recent guidelines focus on a person’s overall risk and, based on that risk, recommend a certain percentage of LDL reduction as one part of a strategy for preventing serious heart and vascular problems.
  • High-density lipoproteins (HDL). This is the “good cholesterol.” It transports bad cholesterol from the blood to the liver, where it is excreted by the body. Your HDL is another part of the equation that identifies the risk of a cardiovascular event. In general, the higher the number the better, although, as with LDL, the emphasis has shifted from specific target numbers to strategies for reducing the overall risk.
  • Triglycerides. Another type of fat in the bloodstream, triglycerides are also linked to heart disease. They are stored in fat cells throughout the body.

What Do Cholesterol Test Numbers Mean?

If you have a lipoprotein profile, it’s important to look at all the numbers from the cholesterol test, not just the total cholesterol number. That’s because LDL and HDL levels are two primary indicators of potential heart disease. Use the information below to interpret your results (with the help of your doctor, of course). This will help you get a better idea about your risk for heart disease.

Total blood cholesterol level:

  • High risk: 240 mg/dL and above
  • Borderline high risk: 200-239 mg/dL
  • Desirable: Less than 200 mg/dL

LDL cholesterol levels:

190 mg/dL and above represents a high risk for heart disease and is a strong indicator that the individual can benefit from intensive treatment, including lifestyle changes, diet, and statin therapy for reducing that risk.

For LDL levels that are equal to or less than 189 mg/dL, the guidelines recommend strategies for lowering LDL by 30% to 50% depending on what other risk factors you have that can affect the health of your heart and blood vessels.

Continued

HDL cholesterol:

  • High risk: Less than 40 mg/dL for men and less than 50 mg/dL for women

Triglycerides:

  • Very high risk: 500 mg/dL and above
  • High risk: 200-499 mg/dL
  • Borderline high risk: 150-199 mg/dL
  • Normal: Less than 150 mg/dL

How Do I Prepare for My Cholesterol Test?

If your doctor recommends a “non-fasting” cholesterol test, the lab will look only at your total cholesterol (and sometimes your HDL) numbers. For that test, you merely need to show up at the lab and have some blood drawn. If your doctor suggests a “fasting” cholesterol test (also called a “lipid profile”), the lab will analyze your levels of LDL, HDL, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. For that test, you will need to fast nine to 12 hours before the blood test.

Sometimes a doctor will ask you to do a non-fasting cholesterol test first. Depending on the results, they may then send you back for the more complete lipid profile.

How Will My Doctor Use Results From My Cholesterol Test?

After reviewing your blood test, The doctor will also consider other risk factors you might have for heart disease, including:

  • Your family history
  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race
  • Gender
  • Diet
  • Blood pressure and whether or not you’re being treated for high blood pressure
  • Activity level
  • Smoking status
  • History of diabetes
  • Evidence of elevated blood sugars

Then, your doctor will talk with you about your level of risk and the potential benefit to be derived by taking steps that include changes in your level of activity and diet as well as using medication to improve your cholesterol levels in order to reduce your overall risk.

How Often Should I Have A Cholesterol Test?

The National Cholesterol Education Program recommends adults age 20 years or older have a cholesterol test every five years. People who are at risk for heart attack or heart disease or who have a family history of either should be checked more often.

Cholesterol Tests: Understand Your Results

Your health care provider may send you for cholesterol tests, either as a part of a standard check-up or because they suspect you may be at risk for developing heart disease. But do you know what the cholesterol test results actually mean? Read on to learn how to interpret the numbers.

Why Do I Need a Cholesterol Test?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance. Your liver makes all the cholesterol your body needs. But you take in more cholesterol from certain foods, such as those from animals. If you have too much cholesterol in your body, it can build up in the walls of your arteries (as “plaque”) and eventually harden. This process, called atherosclerosis, actually narrows the arteries, making it harder for blood to travel through the vessels. 

Unfortunately, high cholesterol doesn’t cause symptoms. In later stages of atherosclerosis, though, you may suffer angina — severe chest pain from lack of blood flow to the heart. If an artery gets totally blocked, a heart attack results. A routine blood cholesterol test is a far better way of finding out what your cholesterol level is.

What Does a Cholesterol Test Measure?

In addition to measuring the total cholesterol in your blood, the standard cholesterol test (called a “lipid panel”) measures three specific kinds of fat:

  • Low-density lipoproteins (LDL). This is the “bad cholesterol,” the main cause of plaque build-up, which increases your risk for heart disease. In general, the lower the number, the better. But LDL cholesterol is only one part of a larger equation that measures a person’s overall risk of having a heart attack or stroke. For years, guidelines focused on specific target numbers for individuals to achieve to lower their risk. The most recent guidelines focus on a person’s overall risk and, based on that risk, recommend a certain percentage of LDL reduction as one part of a strategy for preventing serious heart and vascular problems.
  • High-density lipoproteins (HDL). This is the “good cholesterol.” It transports bad cholesterol from the blood to the liver, where it is excreted by the body. Your HDL is another part of the equation that identifies the risk of a cardiovascular event. In general, the higher the number the better, although, as with LDL, the emphasis has shifted from specific target numbers to strategies for reducing the overall risk.
  • Triglycerides. Another type of fat in the bloodstream, triglycerides are also linked to heart disease. They are stored in fat cells throughout the body.

What Do Cholesterol Test Numbers Mean?

If you have a lipoprotein profile, it’s important to look at all the numbers from the cholesterol test, not just the total cholesterol number. That’s because LDL and HDL levels are two primary indicators of potential heart disease. Use the information below to interpret your results (with the help of your doctor, of course). This will help you get a better idea about your risk for heart disease.

Total blood cholesterol level:

  • High risk: 240 mg/dL and above
  • Borderline high risk: 200-239 mg/dL
  • Desirable: Less than 200 mg/dL

LDL cholesterol levels:

190 mg/dL and above represents a high risk for heart disease and is a strong indicator that the individual can benefit from intensive treatment, including lifestyle changes, diet, and statin therapy for reducing that risk.

For LDL levels that are equal to or less than 189 mg/dL, the guidelines recommend strategies for lowering LDL by 30% to 50% depending on what other risk factors you have that can affect the health of your heart and blood vessels.

Continued

HDL cholesterol:

  • High risk: Less than 40 mg/dL for men and less than 50 mg/dL for women

Triglycerides:

  • Very high risk: 500 mg/dL and above
  • High risk: 200-499 mg/dL
  • Borderline high risk: 150-199 mg/dL
  • Normal: Less than 150 mg/dL

How Do I Prepare for My Cholesterol Test?

If your doctor recommends a “non-fasting” cholesterol test, the lab will look only at your total cholesterol (and sometimes your HDL) numbers. For that test, you merely need to show up at the lab and have some blood drawn. If your doctor suggests a “fasting” cholesterol test (also called a “lipid profile”), the lab will analyze your levels of LDL, HDL, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. For that test, you will need to fast nine to 12 hours before the blood test.

Sometimes a doctor will ask you to do a non-fasting cholesterol test first. Depending on the results, they may then send you back for the more complete lipid profile.

How Will My Doctor Use Results From My Cholesterol Test?

After reviewing your blood test, The doctor will also consider other risk factors you might have for heart disease, including:

  • Your family history
  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race
  • Gender
  • Diet
  • Blood pressure and whether or not you’re being treated for high blood pressure
  • Activity level
  • Smoking status
  • History of diabetes
  • Evidence of elevated blood sugars

Then, your doctor will talk with you about your level of risk and the potential benefit to be derived by taking steps that include changes in your level of activity and diet as well as using medication to improve your cholesterol levels in order to reduce your overall risk.

How Often Should I Have A Cholesterol Test?

The National Cholesterol Education Program recommends adults age 20 years or older have a cholesterol test every five years. People who are at risk for heart attack or heart disease or who have a family history of either should be checked more often.

Cholesterol Tests: Understand Your Results

Your health care provider may send you for cholesterol tests, either as a part of a standard check-up or because they suspect you may be at risk for developing heart disease. But do you know what the cholesterol test results actually mean? Read on to learn how to interpret the numbers.

Why Do I Need a Cholesterol Test?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance. Your liver makes all the cholesterol your body needs. But you take in more cholesterol from certain foods, such as those from animals. If you have too much cholesterol in your body, it can build up in the walls of your arteries (as “plaque”) and eventually harden. This process, called atherosclerosis, actually narrows the arteries, making it harder for blood to travel through the vessels. 

Unfortunately, high cholesterol doesn’t cause symptoms. In later stages of atherosclerosis, though, you may suffer angina — severe chest pain from lack of blood flow to the heart. If an artery gets totally blocked, a heart attack results. A routine blood cholesterol test is a far better way of finding out what your cholesterol level is.

What Does a Cholesterol Test Measure?

In addition to measuring the total cholesterol in your blood, the standard cholesterol test (called a “lipid panel”) measures three specific kinds of fat:

  • Low-density lipoproteins (LDL). This is the “bad cholesterol,” the main cause of plaque build-up, which increases your risk for heart disease. In general, the lower the number, the better. But LDL cholesterol is only one part of a larger equation that measures a person’s overall risk of having a heart attack or stroke. For years, guidelines focused on specific target numbers for individuals to achieve to lower their risk. The most recent guidelines focus on a person’s overall risk and, based on that risk, recommend a certain percentage of LDL reduction as one part of a strategy for preventing serious heart and vascular problems.
  • High-density lipoproteins (HDL). This is the “good cholesterol.” It transports bad cholesterol from the blood to the liver, where it is excreted by the body. Your HDL is another part of the equation that identifies the risk of a cardiovascular event. In general, the higher the number the better, although, as with LDL, the emphasis has shifted from specific target numbers to strategies for reducing the overall risk.
  • Triglycerides. Another type of fat in the bloodstream, triglycerides are also linked to heart disease. They are stored in fat cells throughout the body.

What Do Cholesterol Test Numbers Mean?

If you have a lipoprotein profile, it’s important to look at all the numbers from the cholesterol test, not just the total cholesterol number. That’s because LDL and HDL levels are two primary indicators of potential heart disease. Use the information below to interpret your results (with the help of your doctor, of course). This will help you get a better idea about your risk for heart disease.

Total blood cholesterol level:

  • High risk: 240 mg/dL and above
  • Borderline high risk: 200-239 mg/dL
  • Desirable: Less than 200 mg/dL

LDL cholesterol levels:

190 mg/dL and above represents a high risk for heart disease and is a strong indicator that the individual can benefit from intensive treatment, including lifestyle changes, diet, and statin therapy for reducing that risk.

For LDL levels that are equal to or less than 189 mg/dL, the guidelines recommend strategies for lowering LDL by 30% to 50% depending on what other risk factors you have that can affect the health of your heart and blood vessels.

Continued

HDL cholesterol:

  • High risk: Less than 40 mg/dL for men and less than 50 mg/dL for women

Triglycerides:

  • Very high risk: 500 mg/dL and above
  • High risk: 200-499 mg/dL
  • Borderline high risk: 150-199 mg/dL
  • Normal: Less than 150 mg/dL

How Do I Prepare for My Cholesterol Test?

If your doctor recommends a “non-fasting” cholesterol test, the lab will look only at your total cholesterol (and sometimes your HDL) numbers. For that test, you merely need to show up at the lab and have some blood drawn. If your doctor suggests a “fasting” cholesterol test (also called a “lipid profile”), the lab will analyze your levels of LDL, HDL, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. For that test, you will need to fast nine to 12 hours before the blood test.

Sometimes a doctor will ask you to do a non-fasting cholesterol test first. Depending on the results, they may then send you back for the more complete lipid profile.

How Will My Doctor Use Results From My Cholesterol Test?

After reviewing your blood test, The doctor will also consider other risk factors you might have for heart disease, including:

  • Your family history
  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race
  • Gender
  • Diet
  • Blood pressure and whether or not you’re being treated for high blood pressure
  • Activity level
  • Smoking status
  • History of diabetes
  • Evidence of elevated blood sugars

Then, your doctor will talk with you about your level of risk and the potential benefit to be derived by taking steps that include changes in your level of activity and diet as well as using medication to improve your cholesterol levels in order to reduce your overall risk.

How Often Should I Have A Cholesterol Test?

The National Cholesterol Education Program recommends adults age 20 years or older have a cholesterol test every five years. People who are at risk for heart attack or heart disease or who have a family history of either should be checked more often.

Getting Your Cholesterol Checked | cdc.gov

Many people have never had their cholesterol checked, so they don’t know whether they are at risk.

High cholesterol usually has no signs or symptoms.

The only way to know whether you have high cholesterol is to get your cholesterol checked. Your health care team can do a simple blood test, called a “lipid profile,” to measure your cholesterol levels.

What Happens During a Cholesterol Test?

The cholesterol test, or screening, requires a simple blood draw. You may need to fast (not eat or drink) for 8 to 12 hours before your cholesterol test. Be sure to ask your doctor how to prepare for the test.

The cholesterol test checks your levels of:

  • Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol. Having high levels of LDL cholesterol can lead to plaque buildup in your arteries and result in heart disease or stroke.
  • High-density lipoprotein (HDL) or “good” cholesterol. HDL is known as “good” cholesterol because high levels can lower your risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • Triglycerides, a type of fat in your blood that your body uses for energy. The combination of high levels of triglycerides with low HDL cholesterol or high LDL cholesterol levels can increase your risk for heart attack and stroke.
  • Total cholesterol, the total amount of cholesterol in your blood based on your HDL, LDL, and triglycerides numbers.

Learn more about LDL and HDL cholesterol.

What Do the Numbers Mean?

Cholesterol is measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL).

Desirable Cholesterol Levels1,2
Total cholesterol Less than 200 mg/dL
LDL (“bad”) cholesterol Less than 100 mg/dL
HDL (“good”) cholesterol Greater than or equal to 60 mg/dL
Triglycerides Less than 150 mg/dL

Your cholesterol numbers are important, but they are just part of your overall health. Your doctor will look at your cholesterol numbers, along with your family history, age, gender, and other parts of your lifestyle or health, such as smoking, that could raise your risk for high cholesterol.

This complete picture helps your doctor determine whether you should take steps, such as lifestyle changes or cholesterol-lowering medicine, to lower your risk for heart disease and stroke.

Who Needs to Get Their Cholesterol Checked?

  • Most healthy adults should have their cholesterol checked every 4 to 6 years.
  • Some people, such as people who have heart disease or diabetes or who have a family history of high cholesterol, need to get their cholesterol checked more often.3
  • Children and adolescents should have their cholesterol checked at least once between ages 9 and 11 and again between ages 17 and 21.1

Talk to your health care team about your health history and how often you need to have your cholesterol checked.

More Information

From CDC:

From Others:

References

  1. Grundy SM, Stone NJ, Bailey AL, Beam C, Birtcher KK, Blumenthal RS, et al. 2018 ACC/AHA/AACVPR/AAPA/ ABC/ACPM/ADA/AGS/APhA/ASPC/NLA/PCNA guideline on the management of blood cholesterol: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelinesexternal icon. Circulation. 2018;0:CIR.0000000000000625.
  2. National Cholesterol Education Program. Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III) Final Reportpdf iconexternal icon[PDF-1M]. NIH Pub. No. 02-5215. Bethesda, MD: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; 2002.
  3. HealthFinder.gov. Get Your Cholesterol Checkedexternal icon. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2018.

Cholesterol Test | Lab Tests Online

Sources Used in Current Review

Stone N.J. et al. (2013 November 12). 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults. Circulation 10.1161/01.cir.0000437738.63853.7. Available online at https://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2013/11/11/01.cir.0000437738.63853.7a. Accessed on 5/01/16.

Martin, S. et al, (2014 June 24). 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol treatment guideline: what was done well and what could be done better. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jun 24;63(24):2674-8. Available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24681146. Accessed on 5/01/16.

Hendrani, A. et al. (2016 February 26). Dyslipidemia management in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: Current guidelines and strategies. World J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 26;8(2):201-10. doi: 10.4330/wjc.v8.i2.201. Available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26981215. Accessed on 5/01/16.

Chen, M. (2015 April 20 Updated). High blood cholesterol levels. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. Available online at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000403.htm. Accessed on 5/01/16.

Genzen, J. (2016 April Updated). Cardiovascular Disease (Traditional Risk Markers) – Risk Markers – CVD (Traditional). ARUP Consult. Available online at https://arupconsult.com/content/cardiovascular-disease-traditional-risk-markers. Accessed on 5/01/16.

(2016 March 28 Updated). About Cholesterol. American Heart Association. Available online at http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Cholesterol/AboutCholesterol/About-Cholesterol_UCM_001220_Article.jsp#.Vy9WX3q9b5M. Accessed on 5/01/16.

Hughes, S. (2015 November 13 Updated). Focus More on % LDL Reductions: New JUPITER Data. Medscape Multispecialty from American Heart Association (AHA) 2015 Scientific Sessions. Available online at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/854491. Accessed on 5/01/16.

Lloyd-Jones DM, Morris PB, Ballantyne CM, Birtcher KK, Daly Jr DD, DePalma SM, Minissian MB, Orringer CE, Smith SC. 2016 ACC expert consensus decision pathway on the role of non-statin therapies for LDL-cholesterol lowering in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk: a report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Clinical Expert Consensus Documents. J Am Coll Cardiol 2016. Available as pdf at http://content.onlinejacc.org/article.aspx?articleID=2510936#tab1.

Sources Used in Previous Reviews

Thomas, Clayton L., Editor (1997). Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary. F.A. Davis Company, Philadelphia, PA [18th Edition].

Pagana, Kathleen D. & Pagana, Timothy J. (2001). Mosby’s Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 5th Edition: Mosby, Inc., Saint Louis, MO.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services. Third report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure in adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). Bethesda, Md. 2001 May. Available online at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/cholesterol/atp3_rpt.htm

American Heart Association. How to Get Your Cholesterol Tested. (Updated April 4, 2008) Available online at http://americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=541. Accessed July 2008.

Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). May 2001. PDF available for download at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/cholesterol/atp3full.pdf. Accessed July 2008.

American Academy of Family Physicians. Cholesterol: What Your Level Means. (Updated October 2007). Available online at http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/common/heartdisease/risk/029.html. Accessed July 2008.

Daniels, SR, Greer FR, and the Committee on Nutrition. Lipid screening and cardiovascular health in childhood (clinical report). Jul 2008. Pediatrics 122:198-208.

American Academy of Pediatrics. AAP issues new guidelines on cholesterol screening (press release). 7 Jul 2008. Available online at http://www.aap.org/new/july08lipidscreening.htm. Accessed August 2008.

American Academy of Pediatrics Lipid Screening and Cardiovascular Health in Childhood. Pediatrics Vol. 122 No. 1 July 2008, pp. 198-208. Available online at http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/pediatrics;122/1/198. Accessed September 2008.

Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). Sep 2002. PDF available for download at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/cholesterol/atp3full.pdf. Accessed July 21, 2013.

(©2012) American Heart Association. Cholesterol Levels. Available online at http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Cholesterol/Cholesterol_UCM_001089_SubHomePage.jsp. Accessed July 21, 2013.

(November 2012) American Association of Family Physicians. High Cholesterol. Available online at http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/high-cholesterol.html. Accessed July 19, 2013.

Kavey R-EW, et al. Expert panel on integrated guidelines for cardiovascular health and risk reduction in children and adolescents: Summary report. Pediatrics 2011; 128: DOI:10.1542/peds.2009-2107C. PDF available for download at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/site/misc/2009-2107.pdf. Accessed July 19, 2013.

KidsHealth.org. Cholesterol and Your Child. Available online at http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/heart/cholesterol.html#. Accessed July 20, 2013.

Kathiresan, S. 2006. Increased Small Low-Density Lipoprotein Particle Number, A Prominent Feature of the Metabolic Syndrome in the Framingham Heart Study. Circulation. PDF available for download at http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/113/1/20.full.pdf. Accessed July 20, 2013.

Blake G, et al. September 23, 2002. Low-Density Lipoprotein Particle Concentration and Size as Determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy as Predictors of Cardiovascular Disease in Women. Circulation. Available online at http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/106/15/1930.full. Accessed July 20, 2013.

Blakenstein R, et al. July 2011. Predictors of Coronary Heart Disease Events Among Asymptomatic Persons With Low Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol. Journal of the American College of Cardiology Volume 58, Issue 4, Pp 364–374.

Krauss R. 2010 Aug;21. Lipoprotein subfractions and cardiovascular disease risk. Curr Opin Lipidol (4):305-11. Abstract available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20531184. Accessed July 2013.

Prado K, et al. 2011 Sep-Oct. Low-density lipoprotein particle number predicts coronary artery calcification in asymptomatic adults at intermediate risk of cardiovascular disease. J Clin Lipidol (5):408-13. Abstract available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21981843. Accessed July 2013.

Lavie C, et.al. May 2012. To B or Not to B: Is Non–High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol an Adequate Surrogate for Apolipoprotein B? Mayo Clin Proc. 2010 May; 85(5): 446–450. Available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2861974/. Accessed July 2013.

High cholesterol – Getting tested

High cholesterol does not cause symptoms. You can only find out if you have it from a blood test.

Your GP might suggest having a test if they think your cholesterol level could be high.

This may because of your age, weight or another condition you have (like high blood pressure or diabetes).

Non-urgent advice: Ask your GP surgery for a cholesterol test if:

  • you have not had a test before and you’re over 40, overweight, or high cholesterol or heart problems run in your family

You’re more likely to have high cholesterol.

Information:

Coronavirus update: how to contact a GP

It’s still important to get help from a GP if you need it. To contact your GP surgery:

  • visit their website
  • use the NHS App
  • call them

Find out about using the NHS during coronavirus

Having a cholesterol test

There are 2 ways of having a cholesterol test.

Taking blood from your arm

Some blood will usually be taken from your arm with a needle.

This is sent to a lab to check your cholesterol level. You should get the result in a few days.

You might be asked not to eat anything for up to 12 hours before the test. But this is not always needed.

Finger-prick test

If you’re over 40, you may have a test during your NHS Health Check.

This is a check-up that can help spot early signs of problems like heart disease and diabetes.

The test can be done by pricking your finger. A drop of blood is put on a strip of paper. This is put into a machine that checks your cholesterol in a few minutes.

What happens next

If you have high cholesterol, a doctor or nurse will talk to you about how you can lower it.

This might include things like changing your diet or taking medicine.

They may also work out your risk of having a heart attack or stroke in the next 10 years.

They can do this using your:

  • cholesterol levels
  • blood pressure
  • height and weight
  • age, sex and ethnicity

Lowering your cholesterol can help lower your risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

Cholesterol and Triglycerides Tests | Michigan Medicine

Test Overview

Cholesterol and triglyceride tests are blood tests that measure lipids—fats and fatty substances used as a source of energy by your body. Lipids are found in your blood and are stored in tissues. They are an important part of cells, and they help keep your body working normally. Lipids include cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL).

Cholesterol and triglyceride tests measure:

  • Total cholesterol level.
  • Triglyceride level.
  • HDL cholesterol level. This is the “good” cholesterol.
  • LDL cholesterol level. This is the “bad” cholesterol.

Other measurements that may be done include:

  • Very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol level.
  • The ratio of total cholesterol to HDL.
  • The ratio of LDL to HDL.

Your doctor may order these tests as part of a regular health exam. Your doctor may use the results to prevent, check on, or diagnose a medical condition. The results help your doctor check your risk of heart attack and stroke.

Follow your doctor’s instructions on how to prepare for these tests. Your doctor may ask you to not eat or drink anything except water for 9 to 14 hours before your blood test. In most cases, you are allowed to take your medicines with water the morning of the test. Fasting is not always needed, but it may be recommended. Do not drink alcohol for 24 hours before the test.

Why It Is Done

Cholesterol and triglyceride testing is done:

  • As part of a routine physical exam to screen for a lipid disorder.
  • To check your response to medicines used to treat lipid disorders.
  • To help find your risk of having heart and blood flow problems, including heart attack and stroke.
  • If you have unusual symptoms, such as yellow fatty deposits in the skin (xanthomas). These symptoms may be caused by a rare genetic disease that causes very high cholesterol levels.

Cholesterol tests and heart attack risk

Your cholesterol levels can help your doctor find out your risk for having a heart attack or stroke.

But it’s not just about your cholesterol. Your doctor uses your cholesterol levels plus other things to calculate your risk. These include:

  • Your blood pressure.
  • Whether or not you have diabetes.
  • Your age, sex, and race.
  • Whether or not you smoke.

Learn more

How To Prepare

  • Your doctor may ask you to not eat or drink anything except water for 9 to 14 hours before the tests. In most cases, you can take your medicines with water the morning of the test.
  • Do not drink alcohol for 24 hours before the tests.
  • Tell your doctor ALL the medicines, vitamins, supplements, and herbal remedies you take. Some may increase the risk of problems during your test. Your doctor will tell you if you should stop taking any of them before the test and how soon to do it.

How It Is Done

A health professional uses a needle to take a blood sample, usually from the arm.

Watch

How It Feels

When a blood sample is taken, you may feel nothing at all from the needle. Or you might feel a quick sting or pinch.

Risks

There is very little chance of having a problem from this test. When a blood sample is taken, a small bruise may form at the site.

Results

Resultsfootnote 1, footnote 2 are usually available within 24 hours.

Ideal cholesterol and triglyceride numbers for adults

Total cholesterol

Less than 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)

HDL cholesterol

40 mg/dL or higher

LDL cholesterol

Less than 100 mg/dL (less than 70 mg/dL for people at high risk for a heart attack)

Triglycerides

Less than 150 mg/dL

If your LDL cholesterol is 190 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or more, it might mean that you have a familial lipid disorder.

For children and teens, test results are slightly different than for adults.

Watch

References

Citations

  1. Grundy S, et al. (2002). Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III) (NIH Publication No. 02–5215). Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health. Also available online: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/cholesterol/atp3full.pdf.
  2. Grundy SM, et al. (2004). Implications of recent clinical trials of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III Guidelines. Circulation, 110(2): 227–239. [Erratum in Circulation, 110(6): 763.]

Credits

Current as of:
August 31, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD – Internal Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD – Family Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD – Family Medicine
Elizabeth T. Russo MD – Internal Medicine
Adam Husney MD – Family Medicine

Current as of: August 31, 2020

Author:
Healthwise Staff

Medical Review:E. Gregory Thompson MD – Internal Medicine & Kathleen Romito MD – Family Medicine & Martin J. Gabica MD – Family Medicine & Elizabeth T. Russo MD – Internal Medicine & Adam Husney MD – Family Medicine

Grundy S, et al. (2002). Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III) (NIH Publication No. 02-5215). Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health. Also available online: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/cholesterol/atp3full.pdf.

Grundy SM, et al. (2004). Implications of recent clinical trials of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III Guidelines. Circulation, 110(2): 227-239. [Erratum in Circulation, 110(6): 763.]

90,000 How and when should you check your cholesterol level?

How and when should you check your cholesterol level?

There are certain symptoms that indicate high blood cholesterol levels. If they are found, you must consult a doctor and take a cholesterol test.

Many people know that high cholesterol is bad. But not everyone understands how to check the level of cholesterol in the body. There are certain symptoms that indicate high blood cholesterol levels.If they are found, it is necessary to consult a doctor and pass the recommended tests for cholesterol, since problems with the level of this substance lead to poor health.

The need to control blood cholesterol levels

There are two types of cholesterol in the blood: high and low density lipoproteins. LDL is the “bad” cholesterol, which has a negative effect on the body, and especially on the cardiovascular system.

Controlling the level of LDL in the blood is necessary for patients who are at risk of:

  • overweight;
  • with cardiovascular diseases;
  • with the presence of diabetes mellitus;
  • with a previous heart attack or stroke;
  • with a genetic predisposition to all of the above problems.

Attention! The earlier a person takes a measurement and notices an elevated cholesterol level, the more chances of avoiding consequences for the body.

Symptoms

There are some symptoms that help to understand that there are problems with blood cholesterol levels. It will not be possible to obtain accurate data this way, but this is the first step towards understanding that it is necessary to pass tests. These symptoms include:

  • recurrent chest pain;
  • 90,017 problems with male power;

  • limb numbness and pain;
  • The appearance of yellow spots around the eyes.

Any of these points indicate the presence of a problem and the development of a serious illness. In such a situation, it is imperative to go to the clinic in order to measure the level of LDL in the blood with the help of tests and establish an accurate indicator of excess of the norm.

Also, patients begin to have problems with memory, incoherence, and deteriorate visual functions.

Using the meter

There are various technical devices on the market with which you can measure your cholesterol level in just 3-4 minutes. The only negative is that most often glucometers indicate general indicators. Separately, “bad” cholesterol is considered only by some models. At the same time, the device itself does not differ in the complexity of use. One test strip is enough to measure the desired substance in the blood.

We hand over the analysis in the clinic

Compared to home conditions, an analysis carried out in a polyclinic guarantees several obvious advantages:

  • instant check;
  • accurate data;
  • minimum costs.

Immediately after passing the analysis, you can consult with a doctor who will tell you how to properly correct this substance in the blood. First of all, you need to adjust your diet and start leading an active lifestyle.

Attention! The older a person gets, the greater the risk of high blood cholesterol and the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, the level of this substance should be monitored. This can be done both with the help of a glucometer and by taking cholesterol tests at the clinic at least once a year.

Disclaimer

Please note that all information posted on the website
Prowellness is provided for informational purposes only and is not a personal program, direct recommendation for action or medical advice. Do not use these materials for diagnosis, treatment, or any medical manipulation. Consult a physician before using any technique or using any product.This site is not a specialized medical portal and does not replace the professional advice of a specialist. The owner of the Site does not bear any responsibility to any party that has suffered indirect or direct damage as a result of improper use of materials posted on this resource.

90,000 9 habits for healthy cholesterol levels.

It is known that low density cholesterol (LDL) or “bad cholesterol” should be low, and high density cholesterol (HDL) or “good cholesterol” should be high.But for many of us, keeping those numbers at a well-balanced level is a real challenge. The reasons can be different: genetics, nutrition, an inactive lifestyle, or being overweight.

Before you go to a doctor to get medicines that “will fix everything”, it should be remembered that health experts recommend that people with slightly elevated cholesterol levels – up to 5.3 mmol / L – start by changing their lifestyle – start eating healthy, move more, reduce excess weight, quit smoking, and then after 3-6 months check if the cholesterol level has improved.

9 HABITS That Can Dramatically Improve Your Cholesterol

1. Eat Healthy

By changing your menu, you can normalize your cholesterol levels by 10-15%. However, fasting is undesirable, since then the liver begins to synthesize even more cholesterol. On a zero cholesterol diet, eating only lettuce, vegetables and fruits, a person is not getting all the nutrients they need, which leads to negative effects on the immune system.Choose foods that help lower cholesterol and protect your heart – Top 10 Foods

2. LIMIT CHOLESTEROL FOOD

Most cholesterol is found in red meat and fatty dairy products, seafood, egg yolks. Choose lean meats, fish, low-fat dairy products, and olive oil. Limit the number of eggs in your diet; remember that 1 egg yolk contains the daily amount of cholesterol.

3. AVOID TRANSFATS

They increase the level of “bad cholesterol” and lower the “good cholesterol”.Trans fats are found in margarine, convenience foods, store-bought cookies, rolls, cakes, dry broths, ready-made salad dressings, sausages, chips, and frozen fries. Before purchasing a product, familiarize yourself with its composition and avoid those products that contain partially hydrogenated vegetable oils.

4. USE OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS

Omega-3s help increase good cholesterol, reduce triglycerides and lower blood pressure.Use fish oil, eat fish – salmon, sardines, mackerel, herring. Omega-3 is also found in walnuts and almonds.

5.

EAT MORE FIBER

Eat more vegetables, fruits, beans, lentils, buckwheat, brown rice, rye bread. Start your day with whole grain oatmeal! The beta-glucans contained in it optimize the circulation of cholesterol in the body and improve its levels in the blood.

6. BE MORE ACTIVE

Regular exercise can help increase your “good cholesterol” levels.Walk, bike, swim. You need to move from 30 to 60 minutes a day. You can divide this time into several times, each of which should be at least 10 minutes.

7. USE ALCOHOL MODERATELY

Drink alcohol in moderation or not at all. Moderate dosage means 1 glass per day for women, 2 glasses for men.

8. REDUCE OVERWEIGHT

Being overweight contributes to high cholesterol levels.Losing 2–5 kg can help lower cholesterol levels.

9. DO NOT SMOKE

If you smoke, quit. Stopping smoking can improve good cholesterol levels. Smoking is more likely to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease because it damages blood vessels.

If your cholesterol level does not decrease enough as a result of your lifestyle change, then medication to lower your cholesterol will help you. Check with your doctor about the best way to lower your cholesterol levels.

Photo: Shutterstock

Get tested for total cholesterol

Method of determination
Enzymatic (CHOD-PAP).

Study material
Blood serum

Home visit available

Online check-in

Synonyms: Cholesterol, cholesterol.Blood cholesterol, Cholesterol, Chol, Cholesterol total.

Brief characteristics of the analyte Total cholesterol

About 80% of all cholesterol is synthesized by the human body (liver, intestines, kidneys, adrenal glands, sex glands), the remaining 20% ​​comes from food of animal origin (meat, butter, eggs). Cholesterol is insoluble in water; in the blood it is transported in lipoprotein complexes. There are isolated fractions of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL) and some others that differ in composition and function.Total cholesterol includes cholesterol found in all circulating lipoproteins, esterified and free.

The content of cholesterol in the blood largely depends on age. Its level at birth is less than 3.0 mmol / l, then gradually increases. The emerging differences in its concentration are associated with gender. In men, the concentration of cholesterol in the blood rises in early and middle age and decreases in old age. In women, cholesterol levels increase more slowly with age, up to menopause; in the future, it may exceed the cholesterol levels in men.The described age-related changes in blood cholesterol levels are associated with the action of sex hormones: estrogens decrease, and androgens increase total cholesterol levels. During pregnancy, there is a physiological increase in total cholesterol levels.

Determination of cholesterol is used primarily to assess the risk of atherosclerosis and in the diagnosis of any type of lipid metabolism disorders. It has been established that an increased blood cholesterol content contributes to the development of vascular atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease.The level of total cholesterol in combination with data on existing diseases, age, sex, blood pressure, and the fact of smoking are taken into account when assessing the individual risk of developing severe complications of cardiovascular diseases (myocardial infarction or stroke) according to the SCORE scale (Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation). It is advisable to investigate cholesterol in combination with the determination of triglycerides (see test # 30), HDL cholesterol (see test # 32), calculation of non-HDL cholesterol (see test # NHDL) and LDL cholesterol (see test # 32). test No. 33), since for a correct assessment of cardiovascular risks it is important to understand the ratio of different lipoprotein fractions. So, a high content of HDL cholesterol indicates a low risk, and the detection of an increased concentration of triglycerides, in combination with a decrease in HDL, allows one to suspect certain pathological conditions (including metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance), which are themselves associated with increased cardiovascular risk.

For what purpose is the level of total cholesterol in the blood determined?

A change in diet can reduce blood cholesterol levels by 10-15%, although the sensitivity to changes in food cholesterol and the effect of diet on cholesterol levels may vary from person to person.To reduce the risk of complications of cardiovascular diseases, it is recommended to maintain the concentration of total cholesterol in the blood below 5.0 mmol / L. The therapeutic goal of lipid-lowering therapy is to lower LDL cholesterol.

Disorders of cholesterol metabolism, accompanied by an increase in its content in the blood, are characteristic of hypothyroidism. Secondary hypercholesterolemia is also observed in hepatic cholestasis, nephrotic syndrome, chronic renal failure, gout, diabetes and other diseases.Before starting therapy with lipid-lowering drugs, diseases leading to an increase in cholesterol should be excluded.

The cholesterol level reflects the activity of the synthesis processes in the liver. With severe liver damage, there is a significant decrease in the concentration of cholesterol in the blood. Acute tissue damage also causes a marked drop in total and LDL cholesterol levels. It begins within the first day after a heart attack, surgery or septicemia and can reach a 40% decrease from the initial level.Lipid levels do not return to normal for up to three months. Therefore, lipid testing should not be performed to assess the risk of atherosclerosis within three months of acute conditions.

More details on laboratory assessment of lipid metabolism parameters can be found here.

Literature

Basic literature

  1. Boytsov S.A. et al. Cardiovascular prophylaxis 2017. Russian national guidelines. Russian Society of Cardiology, National Society for Preventive Cardiology, Russian Society for the Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases.Russian journal of cardiology. 2018; 23 (6): 118.
  2. Ezhov M.V. and other Diagnostics and correction of lipid metabolism disorders for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. Russian recommendations VI revision. Atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. 2017; 3: 5-22.
  3. Catapano A.L. et al. 2016 ESC / EAS guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias. European heart journal. 2016; 37 (39): 2999-3058.
  4. Tietz Clinical guide to laboratory tests.4-th ed. Ed. Wu A.N.B. USA, W.B. Sounders Company. 2006: 1798.

Cholesterol

Control over the correction of high cholesterol levels

Cholesterol (chemical name – cholesterol) is an organic substance of a fatty nature that is constantly present in the human body and is necessary for normal metabolism. Most of the cholesterol is produced inside the body by the hepatic cells, some of the cholesterol comes from the outside with food.

Cholesterol standards.

Symptoms.

Your symptoms will tell you nothing that you have high cholesterol. Signs of this condition are signs of the disease that caused the increased level of this substance in the blood. Therefore, the most basic prevention is to periodically check the blood for lipids. If you do not monitor your health and do not control the blood formula, then you can find out that there is an increased level of cholesterol in the blood after a stroke or heart attack.

What diseases are caused most often by high cholesterol? First of all, it is atherosclerosis. This disease can be recorded as symptoms of high blood cholesterol in women. This condition makes itself felt by the compaction of the walls of blood vessels, a decrease in their elasticity, a decrease in the diameter of the lumen of the vessels, which leads to a disruption in the supply of blood to the corresponding organs.

Thus, it is almost impossible to externally determine the presence of high cholesterol levels: this is an internal disease.For example, a person with a full physique will not necessarily suffer from high cholesterol, although he is undoubtedly at risk.

But despite all this, there are still a few symptoms of a high content of lipoproteins in the blood. These include the following:

  • angina pectoris, heart pain;
  • pain in the legs with light exertion and even walking;
  • Xanthomas and Xanthelasmas are specific cholesterol deposits under the skin.

Since all of the listed symptoms, except for the last ones, can be caused by other diseases, xanthomas should be considered the main ones – white points under the skin, which are often located in the eyelid area

Another rather characteristic sign of a high lipoprotein content is early gray hair. Usually it appears after a certain age and is caused by atherosclerotic changes in the capillaries of the hair follicles. So if a young man has graying, he needs to check the level of cholesterol in the blood.

Causes of increased blood cholesterol? Typically LDL growth factors include:

  • overweight;
  • poor physical activity, sedentary work;
  • overeating, malnutrition, non-compliance with the diet;
  • 90,017 smoking and alcohol abuse;

  • diseases of a general nature: diseases of the kidneys, liver, diabetes and other conditions, which are accompanied by disturbances in the balance of good and bad cholesterol;
  • endocrine disorders.

The causes of high cholesterol in women may be related to pregnancy. So, during this period, the fetus is formed and for its proper development, including cholesterol, is required. Over time, after the birth of a child, the level of lipoproteins returns to normal.

Correction of cholesterol levels.

Elevated blood cholesterol levels, the causes of which have been identified, require appropriate measures to normalize it. So, many doctors prescribe special drugs for their patients – statins, which are taken for a long time and, like all drugs, have their own side effects.But there are doctors who have a different opinion on this matter. They believe, and this is confirmed by relevant research, that it is enough to eat right and subordinate your food intake to a clear schedule.

What should such a diet be like? First of all – fiber: there should be enough products containing it: this is bread with bran, legumes, vegetables, whole grain cereals. Vitamins and microelements are also required: they must be obtained from vegetable oils – avocado, olive, flaxseed, nut, sunflower, fish oil.Instead of regular milk, it is better to use its fat-free analogue, and instead of red meat, use poultry and fish. Nuts are an extremely useful product in the fight against cholesterol, but overweight people need to eat them with extreme caution.

Physical activity, sports, morning jogging or just walking at a fast pace, yoga, gymnastics, in a word – everything that gives the body moderate stress – plays an important role in the normalization of lipoprotein levels. Give your body a moderate load, give up alcohol, smoking.Experts advise not to wait until any symptoms of high cholesterol begin to appear, but regularly, at least annually, undergo a blood test.

Head of Therapeutic Department No. 2 Prashkovich NV

On the dangers of running and the benefits of cholesterol. Eight myths about healthy lifestyles debunked by scientists

Cholesterol should be low

Today experts talk about the levels of “good” and “bad” cholesterol in the blood. Of course, it’s good when you have a lot of “good” cholesterol.“Bad” cholesterol is bad because it builds up on the walls of arteries, disrupting blood flow and forming blood clots that can lead to heart attack. We consume bad cholesterol with saturated fat, which is found in red meat and non-fat dairy products. “Good” cholesterol helps remove “bad” cholesterol from the blood, and levels can be increased by eating unsaturated fats such as olive oil, dark chocolate, seeds and nuts.

Conclusion: is a myth. In fact, one should check the cholesterol level and ask the doctor to explain the ratio of “bad” and “good”.

Drink eight glasses of water a day

Despite numerous claims that drinking eight glasses of water a day improves skin health and helps kidney function, scientists today recognize this statement as an “urban legend”. Keep in mind that drinking too much water can be dangerous and, in extreme cases, fatal, as it lowers the sodium concentration in the body.

Conclusion: is a myth. The human body regulates fluid levels on its own, so if you feel thirsty, drink a glass of water.If you are not thirsty, then, for sure, you do not need to drink.

Body mass index in a healthy person from 18 to 25

Body mass index (BMI) is a value equal to the quotient of body mass in kilograms and the square of growth in meters and showing whether your weight corresponds to your height and build. Now it is believed that a BMI below 25 corresponds to a healthy person, 25-30 – overweight, more than 30 – obesity. However, many experts point out that waist circumference is a much more important indicator of health status than BMI.The reason is that it is abdominal fat that “wraps” internal organs, increasing the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer.

Conclusion: is partly a myth. Better take a centimeter. If the waist circumference turns out to be more than 94 cm (men) and 80 cm (women), it is time to take measures to combat the “tummy”, even if the BMI is in order.

Pressure = age + 100

120/80 is the optimal pressure at any age, although you need to strive for 110/70, experts say.The reason is that high blood pressure (the pressure with which blood is pumped through the body) puts additional stress on the arteries and heart, which is one of the main causes of heart attacks and a key cause of strokes.

Conclusion: is a myth. Check your blood pressure regularly from age 40. If it is high, it is easy to lower it.

Vitamin C helps against colds

Twice Nobel laureate Linus Pauling thought so, but he received prizes (in chemistry and peace) even before his passion for ascorbic acid and for completely different achievements.And vitamin C does not help in any way for colds, found out at the Pauling Institute. Caution is also needed when taking other vitamins, especially multivitamins, because in this case it is easy to get an overdose of one of them, because you do not know which vitamins you lack and which you have in excess.

Conclusion: is a myth. For taking vitamins, you should consult your doctor and under no circumstances exceed the prescribed doses.

Running from a heart attack

Running is not a panacea, running too intensively is just as harmful as not exercising at all, experts from Denmark have found out, where many people actively run and ride a bike.It turned out that those who jog or walk in moderation live the longest, and active runners lived as long as completely physically inactive people (although the cause of death of athletes is not specified). For people who have been sedentary for a long time, sudden intense physical activity can pose a serious danger.

Conclusion: is partly a myth. Exercise is still good and healthy, but you don’t need to overexert yourself and train for wear and tear.

Sweating = detoxification

Then toxins come out, we are told. Yes, it is true, small amounts of toxins are released, but the main function of sweating is thermoregulation, and “garbage” is excreted from the body through the gastrointestinal tract, experts explain.

Conclusion: is partly a myth. Work and exercise while sweating to feel refreshed and healthier, not to detoxify.

Gluten-free foods are healthier

Recently, the fashion for gluten-free food has reached Russia, but this problem concerns very, very few of us.There are people who have trouble digesting gluten, and a gluten-free diet can significantly improve their quality of life. But most people calmly process it, so there is no point in limiting its consumption.

Conclusion: is a myth. Check with your doctor and, if you personally have no gluten problems, continue to eat your regular food.

Alexandra Borisova

Cholesterol

BAD AND GOOD CHOLESTEROL

Well, let’s figure it out: what is bad and good cholesterol?

You need to understand that cholesterol is vital for a person, if it is not enough, then it is no less harmful than an excess.The body stores one to five grams of cholesterol every day. And only 20 percent out of 100 comes to us with food.

The benefits of bad and good cholesterol

The benefits of cholesterol.

  1. Cholesterol enters the membranes of all cells and is an important building material.
  2. Participates in the production of sex hormones.
  3. Actively involved in metabolism.
  4. Essential for the nervous and immune systems.
  5. It affects the strength of each cell.
  6. Thanks to it, adrenal hormones and sex hormones, vitamin D and serotonin, necessary for a good mood, are formed.
  7. Supplier of antioxidants, protective cells.
  8. Participates in the production of bile acid, which is necessary for the absorption of fats.

A huge part of cholesterol is spent on:

  • mineral exchange;
  • synthesis of sex hormones;
  • development of the musculoskeletal and nervous system.

Excess cholesterol is removed from the body or partially deposited on the vessels. But over the years, the exchange of cholesterol is disrupted and then the accumulation in the vessels can be dangerous and cause various diseases.

The norm of bad and good cholesterol

What is cholesterol?

  1. “Good cholesterol” is high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
  2. “Bad cholesterol” is low density lipoprotein cholesterol, which is one third of harmful impurities and is deposited on the walls of blood vessels.

“Bad” cholesterol results in:

  • the appearance of cholesterol plaques;
  • atherosclerosis;
  • 90,017 heart attacks, strokes;

  • the formation of gallstones.

You can check your cholesterol level at any clinic. Blood is donated on an empty stomach, but for 12 hours it is better not to eat anything and refrain from alcohol for three days. Only then will the results be reliable.

Blood test of a healthy person.

  1. Total cholesterol (OH) – no more than 5.2 mmol / l
  2. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL cholesterol), “bad cholesterol” less than 3.5 mmol / L
  3. High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL cholesterol) “good cholesterol” is more than 1 mmol / l for males and more than 1.2 mmol / l for females.
  4. Triglycerides are the main source of cell energy (TG) less than 1.7 mmol / L.

Causes of high total cholesterol:

  • Biliary cirrhosis
  • Familial hyperlipidemia
  • High fat food
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Nephrotic syndrome
  • Uncontrolled diabetes
  • Diseases of the liver, intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis
  • Malignant tumors of the pancreas and prostate
  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Alcoholism
  • Isolated growth hormone deficiency
  • Idiopathic hypercalcemia
  • Acute intermittent porphyria
  • Hypertension, coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Thalassemia major
  • Pregnancy
  • Removal of ovaries

Any acute illness can raise or lower the total amount of cholesterol in the blood.If you had an acute illness 3 months before the cholesterol test, you should repeat this test after 2 or 3 months. Even an outbreak of arthritis can affect your cholesterol levels.

Causes of low cholesterol:

  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Liver disease
  • Malabsorption (insufficient absorption of nutrients from the gastrointestinal tract)
  • Malnutrition
  • Pernicious anemia
  • Sepsis
  • Tangier’s disease (alpha-lipoprotein deficiency)
  • Hypoproteinemia
  • Cirrhosis of the liver
  • Malignant liver tumors
  • Sideroblastic and megaloblastic anemias
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

Should I lower my blood cholesterol?

Lowering cholesterol levels is currently the most important factor in the prevention of atherosclerosis and heart attacks.

Benefits from lowering “bad” LDL cholesterol are:

  • Reduction or arrest of the formation of new cholesterol plaques on the walls of arteries
  • Reduction of existing plaques of cholesterol on the walls of arteries and dilation of the lumen of arteries
  • Prevention of rupture of cholesterol plaques that initiate the formation of blood clots that block blood vessels
  • Reduced risk of heart attacks
  • Reduced risk of stroke
  • Reducing the risk of peripheral arterial disease
  • Reducing narrowing of the coronary arteries, carotid and cerebral arteries (arteries that supply blood to the brain), and the femoral artery, which supplies blood to the legs.

How to lower high blood cholesterol?

  • Limit total fat intake to 25 – 35% of total daily calorie intake. Less than 7% of daily calories should be from saturated fat, no more than 90,018
  • 10% should be from polyunsaturated fat, and not more than 20% from monounsaturated fat. The daily intake of cholesterol should be no more than 300 mg for healthy people and 200 mg for those at higher risk of high blood cholesterol.
  • Introduction of large quantities to
  • fiber in the diet. Maintaining a healthy weight.
  • Increase in physical activity.

The nutritional recommendations for children are the same. It is very important that children get enough calories to maintain their growth and activity level. It is equally important that the child reaches and maintains the desired body weight.

Diet with bad and good cholesterol

If cholesterol is higher than normal, you should be alert, this may indicate not only atherosclerosis and heart disease, but also talk about a serious illness, such as diabetes, kidney, liver, immune diseases, cholelithiasis.

To bring cholesterol levels back to normal, many immediately go on a diet, start eating only cholesterol-lowering foods. But it’s not right. The diet lowers cholesterol by only 10%. It is imperative to eat in a balanced way.

80% of cholesterol is produced by our liver and only 20% comes from food. You do not need to completely refuse food containing cholesterol, this will only harm yourself. Since the body may not have enough essential nutrients, the cholesterol level will decrease by quite a bit, and the liver will increase the production of cholesterol.

Foods to include in your meals:

  1. Crude oil, olive, linseed.
  2. Berries.
  3. Vegetables – carrots, broccoli and other types of cabbage.
  4. Fruit.
  5. Greens – celery, dill, parsley, lettuce.
  6. Nuts.
  7. Cereals.
  8. Legumes – peas, lentils, beans, beans, soybeans.
  9. Onion garlic.
  10. Oatmeal, oat bran, oatmeal.
  11. Replace meat with fatty fish tuna, salmon, mackerel.
  12. Sunflower seeds of sesame and flax.
  13. Grain bread or bran.
  14. Green tea.
  15. Products containing pectin that remove excess cholesterol – apples, citrus fruits.
  16. Non-fat fermented milk products containing beneficial bacteria that normalize cholesterol.

Better to refuse:

  • coffee;
  • 90,017 sweet pastries;

  • muffins with cream;
  • 90,017 fatty foods;

  • sauces, broths;
  • spicy, smoked, fried.

We all know that there is a lot of cholesterol in eggs, but no more than one egg a day will not harm our body.

What to do if bad cholesterol is high

If the analysis shows a low cholesterol content, then you should also be alert if there is a serious disease in the body. Bad cholesterol is not so bad, it is necessary for the body in its own way.

Of course, there should be a lot of cholesterol in the body, and not too much.

To maintain the golden mean:

  • Get rid of excess weight, bad habits;
  • Be physically active;
  • Give up the most harmful products: fast foods, semi-finished products, preservatives, get rid of products with trans fats: mayonnaise, various sauces, industrial baked goods;
  • Drink plenty of pure water;
  • walk more often;
  • Be cheerful and positive.

If cholesterol in the body is higher than 6 mmol / l, then cholesterol-lowering drugs are prescribed.They can be drunk for a long time and are usually well tolerated. They are not recommended for serious liver diseases. Any medications must be prescribed by a doctor.

Conclusion: a lot of bad cholesterol is harmful, but a lack of good cholesterol leads to depression, cell membranes are quickly destroyed, women can experience serious hormonal problems and even lead to infertility.

5 dangers of high cholesterol – MAUZ OZP GKB №8

Cholesterol is an interesting substance.On the one hand, this lipid (fat) is necessary for the body: it is part of the cell membrane and gives it strength, participates in the production of hormones, helps the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and contributes to the normal functioning of the brain. On the other hand, high cholesterol is really dangerous for your health. And that’s why.

Danger 1. Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is a condition in which excess cholesterol is gradually deposited on the inner wall of blood vessels, forming cholesterol (atherosclerotic) plaques.Plaques narrow the lumen of blood vessels, disrupt normal blood flow and blood supply to internal organs, including the heart and brain.

Danger № 2. Hypertensive disease

With impaired blood flow due to narrowing of the lumen of blood vessels is associated with the development of perhaps the most common disease among people over 40 years of age – hypertension. Both men and women suffer from high blood pressure.

Danger No. 3. Strokes / heart attacks

Disruption of the blood supply to the heart can lead to myocardial infarction – a dangerous and serious illness.No less terrible ischemic strokes, in which part of the brain cells die, which can lead to paralysis, speech impairment, serious “failures” of the higher brain functions – memory, concentration, logical thinking.

Danger № 4. Cholelithiasis

Excess cholesterol is normally “utilized” by the liver, but if the body does not have enough enzymes that convert cholesterol into bile acids important for the body, it precipitates in the gallbladder. The fatty sediment gradually thickens and turns into stones.A person can suffer from bouts of pain, from cholecystitis, and in severe cases, the gallbladder simply has to be removed.

Danger No. 5. Obesity

Elevated cholesterol levels disrupt fat metabolism in the body and contribute to a more rapid accumulation of excess body weight. If excess cholesterol is combined with a sedentary lifestyle, real obesity is not far off.