About all

Is quinoa whole grain: What Is Quinoa? Nutrition Facts, Types, How to Cook It, and More

Содержание

What Is Quinoa? Nutrition Facts, Types, How to Cook It, and More

Surprisingly, there are over 120 different varieties of quinoa as defined by the Whole Grains Council. Though the grain itself can manifest in a wide variety of colors (including purple!), the most common quinoa colors found across American grocers are white (also considered ivory or yellow quinoa), red, and black. (3)

Interestingly enough, all three of these quinoa types cook and taste differently. While white quinoa has a fluffy post-cook texture, red and black quinoa are known to keep more of their shape and color after cooking. Red quinoa also has a heartier taste and chewier texture than the muted, bitter taste of white quinoa, while black quinoa tastes somewhat crunchy and slightly sweeter than either red or white.

After its popularity spike in 2014, quinoa was mainly sold in its natural seed form. But since then, many other adaptations of the product have also started to appear. Now, you can find quinoa flour for alternative baking and quinoa flakes (steamed quinoa rolled into thin, near transparent flakes for faster cooking) stocked on the shelves of every supermarket.

But that’s not all. For the truly quinoa-obsessed, quinoa chips, quinoa pasta, and yes, even quinoa chocolate exist.

What Are the Possible Health Benefits of Quinoa?

The amount of research on quinoa has grown tremendously over the years, in part because of the 2014 hype, but in larger part due to the seed’s continually recognized health benefits. The nutrient-rich pseudo-cereal is proposed to reduce the risk of a number of illnesses, and provide an ideal protein-packed substitute for gluten-free diets.

Whole grains like quinoa have been considered preventative for certain types of cancer due to their high levels of fiber. One study from The Journal of Nutrition suggests that the dietary fiber in whole grains may help lower LDL, or “bad,” levels of cholesterol, boost digestive health, and potentially lower the risk for some gastrointestinal cancers, such as colon cancer. (7)

A study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consumers of magnesium-rich foods have a reduced risk of stroke. (8) Because of its high magnesium levels (a cup of cooked quinoa contains about one-third of your daily recommended magnesium intake suggested by the USDA), eating quinoa on a regular basis has been linked to improvement in heart health. (9)

Quinoa’s magnesium also makes it a healthy food for people with or at risk for type 2 diabetes — the condition is frequently linked to magnesium deficit, according to an article published in the World Journal of Diabetes. (10)

Is Quinoa Better for You Than Rice?

Quinoa’s nutritional profile is different from rice’s. Compared with quinoa’s nutritional stats (see above), according to the USDA, 1 cup of cooked long-grain brown rice contains about:

  • 200 calories
  • 43g carbs
  • 4g protein
  • 3g fat
  • 3g fiber
  • 0g sugar (11)

So, which one is better for your health? Sharp says while it’s important to enjoy “a wide variety of foods,” she concludes that “quinoa has more fiber and protein and is also a complete protein. So head to head I would choose quinoa if it was an either-or choice.”

Quinoa is also considered a safe gluten-free, whole-grain choice for people living with celiac disease — a condition in which your body cannot tolerate gluten. One study published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics found that 44 percent of people living with celiac disease chose rice as their preferred grain. (12) When switching to naturally gluten-free grains like quinoa, the study found vast improvement in nutrients, most notably in protein levels, which skyrocketed from 11 g to 20.6 g.

Sharp also notes that quinoa isn’t just great for people following a gluten-free diet. “It’s a complete protein,” she says, “making it a great option for vegetarians and vegans.”

Can Eating Quinoa Help You Lose Weight?

Potentially.

Packed with protein and fiber, quinoa can certainly promote feelings of fullness — a notion Sharp backs up. “Quinoa is a low-glycemic-index carbohydrate since it’s very rich in fiber and protein,” she explains, “This means you’ll feel fuller longer after consuming it, which may help you eat less over time.

But while quinoa has plenty of nutritional benefits, it is hardly considered a low calorie food source (just one cup of plain, cooked quinoa is 222 calories). So yes, in small quantities, quinoa can help you lose weight, but that is contingent on your portion consumption.

Is Quinoa a Grain? – Bob’s Red Mill Blog

With its growing popularity and incredible versatility, it seems as if quinoa has taken the health industry by storm. Celebrities, nutrition experts, and food lovers alike are raving about this incredible superfood and all the health benefits it has to offer. With everyone buzzing about how great quinoa is, not many people think about exactly what it is. More often than not, quinoa is linked to the grain food group for its similar properties. Its ability to be a gluten free alternative to many wheat-filled foods makes it a desirable substitute for traditional gluten dishes such as bulgur. The truth is, quinoa is not a grain at all. To find out where exactly quinoa comes from, it’s important to look at the history behind it and how it came to be the superfood it is today.

Quinoa Around the World

Originating in the South American Andes, quinoa has been around for thousands of years and was an important part of society.

Ancient Incas deemed quinoa the “mother grain” and saw it as a sacred seed. So sacred, in fact, that traditions were built around quinoa to pay tribute to its incredible health benefits. Following these traditions, the first quinoa seed of each year was planted with a golden shovel by the Inca leader and was used as the main food source to sustain the armies for long periods of time. However, as time went on, quinoa lost popularity and became an affordable crop that was grown by peasants for sustenance.

In recent years, the benefits of quinoa have risen to the health scene once again and it is no longer seen as a cheap meal, but an incredibly nutritious part of any diet.

Quinoa’s popularity has grown tremendously in both the United States and Canada as it can now be found in natural food stores, along with most traditional grocery stores.

In Chile, Bolivia, and Peru, quinoa is a very popular source of nutrition and used in a wide variety of recipes, including soup, bread, and, even drinks. Other parts of the plant are also used for various purposes. In many places, the fruit of the quinoa plant is used as a topical medicine for cuts, sores, and bruises.

What Is Quinoa & What Food Group is Quinoa In?

Now we know where quinoa comes from and how people use it, but what exactly is it?

While quinoa is often prepared like a grain and considered by many to be in the grain food group, it’s actually a member of the spinach, chard, and beet family. Quinoa is the seed of the Chenopodium plant, a green leafy plant that sprouts numerous flowers. Occasionally, different parts of the plant are used for medicinal purposes, and the leaves are eaten as a vegetable. Still, quinoa is mostly grown for its seeds which are cooked similarly to rice and can be used in a large variety of recipes. While quinoa can grow in many different weather conditions, it prefers a cool climate at a high elevation. The quinoa seed is a pseudocereal, as opposed to a grain. Pseudocereals are plants that produce seeds and fruits that are similar to grains and used in virtually the same ways. High in protein, nutrients, and vitamins, pseudocereals are most commonly gluten free and considered whole grains, despite not being a true grain. Other common pseudocereals are amaranth and buckwheat.

What Do the Different Colors of Quinoa Mean?

Quinoa seeds vary in color and there are over 120 different species of the Chenopodium plant. Despite this wide variety, only three main species are popularly grown. The most common colors are white, red, and black.

While the seeds are all very similar, there are differences between the colors that might be helpful to know when deciding which color to purchase.

White Quinoa

White quinoa, also known as tan quinoa, ivory quinoa, or simply “quinoa,” is the most common color. Much like its color, white quinoa usually has a lighter taste than other varieties, and when cooked, offers a fluffier texture. Its light and airy texture makes it the perfect substitute for most rice dishes!

Red Quinoa

Red quinoa is similar to brown rice, as it has a nuttier flavor and richer taste than traditional white quinoa. Red quinoa is also a bit chewier than other varieties and holds its shape well during baking. This added structure makes it perfect for baked goods and salads.

Black Quinoa

Black quinoa, the darkest of the three, is the ideal quinoa to use in sweet dishes such as oatmeal and muffins. While black quinoa does provide a more earthy flavor than the other two, it is sweeter than white quinoa and holds its texture better.

How to Properly Cook Quinoa

Uncooked quinoa seeds are oval in shape and have an outer germ layer around each. When cooked the seed becomes soft, while the outer germ layer remains crunchy and twists outwards away from the seed. The “tail” created by the germ is responsible for giving the soft quinoa its signature crunch. All shades of quinoa produce a light consistency and delicate flavor, making it an incredibly versatile seed.

Before Cooking

It’s important to wash quinoa seeds before cooking, unless the package says they have been pre-rinsed. This is because quinoa seeds have a protective coating called saponin. While saponin does have a range of benefits itself, when left on the quinoa, it produces a bitter flavor.

In other parts of the world, the saponin from quinoa is used as a household detergent and for a wide variety of skin issues.

After Cooking

Cooked quinoa can be used in soups, stews, cookies, pasta, cereals, stuffings, and salads. Quinoa is relatively easy to cook and can be made in only 15 minutes. We like to call it the gateway grain because it’s so easy to cook. Quinoa flour is also commonly used to make various types of bread and muffins.

The Benefits of Quinoa

Quinoa is extremely high in protein, along with other vitamins and minerals such as calcium, and vitamin E. Deemed a complete protein, quinoa provides all nine essential amino acids. When compared to other grains, quinoa has nearly double the protein content of most, including brown rice, barley, and corn.

The dietary fiber in quinoa is also incredibly good for your gut! This fiber helps regulate the digestive system and may lower the risk of developing certain diseases and disorders. Dietary fiber also helps keep you fuller for longer periods of time, helping you fight hunger and avoid indulging in extra calories.

The iron in this complete protein plays a big role in keeping red blood cells healthy to form hemoglobin. This formation allows oxygen to be carried across cells and supplied to muscles. Our brains, metabolism, and enzymes also require large amounts of oxygen to function properly, meaning adequate amounts of iron are needed daily.

Magnesium is yet another mineral that this plant-based protein is extremely rich in. Magnesium is responsible for relaxing blood vessels, which in return help to reduce inflammation and relieve pain from common disorders such as migraines. Magnesium has also been attributed to helping reduce diabetes, control blood sugar, produce energy, detoxify the body, and form healthy teeth and bones.

Not to be confused with magnesium, manganese is also found in quinoa. This antioxidant helps prevent cell damage and keeps the body from being harmed by free radicals. Free radicals can cause damage to the mitochondria of a cell, which has been associated with serious illness and diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s disease.

Quinoa’s ability to regulate cholesterol can have tremendous effects on heart health. The dietary flavonoids also found in quinoa have been shown to help protect the body from heart disease. While other foods drastically lose their nutrient quality upon being cooked, surprisingly, the nutrients in quinoa have been shown to withhold their quality even after being steamed and boiled. When compared to other gluten free alternatives and pastas, quinoa is often the most heart healthy choice!

Quinoa’s role in diabetes has long been studied to determine if it’s more effective than grains and legumes at managing the disease. The antioxidant quercetin found in quinoa has an extremely high antioxidant count and has been associated with the successful management of both diabetes and hypertension when consumed regularly.

Quinoa can even be made into a drink. For many years, Central and South American cultures have used quinoa in a traditional beverage known as Chincha. Chincha can be both fermented and unfermented. It is widely popular and often served at social gatherings. Depending on where you drink it, the benefits and taste change drastically.

Is Quinoa Gluten Free?

Quinoa seeds are naturally gluten free, making them a healthy alternative to many gluten-containing grains, especially for those suffering from celiac disease. Quinoa seeds are also fairly easy to digest, which helps prevent stomach discomfort. Adding quinoa to gluten free products has become a very popular practice and has been found to increase a product’s polyphenol content. These polyphenols help to protect the cells against damage, and most gluten free foods are lacking in them.

Things to Consider If You Have Celiac Disease

While quinoa is more nutritionally rich than its gluten counterparts, if you have a gluten intolerance, there are still things worth considering before making quinoa your new favorite substitution.

Check where it was processed: many times, while the quinoa itself may be gluten free, that factory in which it was processed might not be. This makes it incredibly easy for cross-contamination to occur. It’s important to make sure that before purchasing quinoa, you read the labels and check that it has been processed in a gluten free facility allowing for minimal chances of gluten to enter the package.

Is Quinoa Paleo?

It’s widely known that grains are not acceptable when following a paleo diet, and now that we know that quinoa is not a grain, does that also make it paleo? While many other seeds are allowed when following a paleo diet, quinoa contains many of the same properties as grains, which leads some to question if it falls within paleo standards.

Grains are avoided on the paleo diet because, to make them edible, they must be heavily processed, and processed foods are what the paleo diet is designed to avoid.

Is Quinoa Good for You?

This question is largely open to personal interpretation. Whether quinoa is good or bad for you is based on your body’s ability to process it properly. Quinoa is loaded with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that can have incredible benefits on your physical and mental health. Your dietary needs and restrictions also play a huge role in determining if quinoa is the right choice for you.

While quinoa benefits most individuals and is a great source of plant-based protein, it is noted that those with celiac disease or digestion problems may want to slowly introduce quinoa into their diets. If you have previous digestive disorders it is smart to consult your doctor before trying any new foods. Most individuals do not have reactions when eating quinoa and are amazed by the amount of protein and nutrients it provides.

 

Sources:

Is Quinoa Paleo? A Deep Dive

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/quinoa-is-not-a-grain_n_59380558e4b0aba888ba7b44
https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/why-is-quinoa-good-for-me


Health Benefits of Quinoa | The Whole Grains Council

Quinoa Offers Antioxidants for Gluten-Free Diets

Researchers suggest that adding quinoa or buckwheat to gluten-free products significantly increases their polyphenol content, as compared to typical gluten-free products made with rice, corn, and potato flour. Products made with quinoa or buckwheat contained more antioxidants compared with both wheat products and the control gluten-free products. Also of note: antioxidant activity increased with sprouting, and decreased with breadmaking.
Food Chemistry, March 2010; 119 (2): 770-778.

Quinoa’s Excellent Nutritional and Functional Properties

Lillian Abugoch James of the University of Chile reported on the composition, chemistry, nutritional and functional properties of quinoa. She cited the pseudocereal’s “remarkable nutritional qualities” including its high protein content (15%), “great amino acid balance,” and “notable Vitamin E content.” Beyond its nutritional profile, Abugoch recommends quinoa to food manufacturers because of its useful functional properties, such as viscosity and freeze stability.
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research, October 2009; 58:1-31

More Protein, Minerals, Fiber in Quinoa

Anne Lee and colleagues at Columbia University’s Celiac Disease Center found that the nutritional profile of gluten-free diets was improved by adding oats or quinoa to meals and snacks. Most notable increases were protein (20.6g vs 11g) iron (18.4mg vs 1.4mg, calcium (182mg vs 0mg) and fiber (12.7g vs 5g
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, August 2009; 22(4):359-63. Epub 2009 Jun 10.

Quinoa Possible Dietary Aid Against Diabetes

Scientists at the Universidade de São Paulo in Brazil studied ten traditional Peruvian grains and legumes for their potential in managing the early stages of Type 2 diabetes. They found that quinoa was especially rich in an antioxidant called quercetin and that quinoa had the highest overall antioxidant activity (86%) of all ten foods studied. Coming in a close second in antioxidant activity was quinoa’s cousin, kañiwa. This in vitro study led the researchers to conclude that quinoa, kañiwa, and other traditional crops from the Peruvian Andes have potential in developing effective dietary strategies for managing type 2 diabetes and associated hypertension.
Journal of Medicinal Food, August 2009; 12 (4):704-13.

Quinoa, Oats, and Buckwheat: More Satiating

A University of Milan study compared buckwheat, oats, and, quinoa to see if any of them showed promise in helping with appetite control.  In three experiments – one for each grain – subjects’ satisfaction and subsequent calorie consumption were compared, after eating the study grain and after eating wheat or rice. All three study grains had a higher Satiating Efficiency Index (SEI) than wheat or rice; white bread was in fact lowest in appetite satisfaction. Unfortunately, even after feeling fuller from eating the study grains, the subjects did not cut their calories at the next meal!
British Journal of Nutrition, November 2005; 94 (5):850-8.

Better Lipid Effects from Quinoa

Also at the University of Milan, researchers compared the digestibility of various gluten-free foods in the lab (in vitro) and then with a group of healthy volunteers (in vivo). Their goal was to gauge the effect of the different foods on postprandial glucose and insulin response, as well as to measure triglycerides and free fatty acids after eating.  Quinoa stood out in the study, for producing lower free fatty acid levels and triglyceride concentrations than other GF pastas and breads studied.
European Journal of Nutrition, August 2004; 43 (4):198-204. Epub 2004 Jan 6.

Is Quinoa a Grain? Nutritionists Say Yes, But Botany Says No

It’s protein-rich, gluten-free, B vitamin-filled, and a whole host of other things, but when it comes to defining what quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is, things can get a little more complicated.

First domesticated in South America thousands of years ago, the Incans dubbed quinoa the “mother grain” due to its status as a staple crop, but depending on whom you ask today, you might get a different answer.

Long story short: Scientifically quinoa is not a grain, but when it comes to eating and describing this super-nutritious food, you might as well call it such.

Here’s where each camp stands on categorizing quinoa:

Botanists: No

Strictly botanically speaking, grains describe caryopses (a.k.a. the dry fruits and seeds) of the grass family scientifically classified as Poaceae. These include what commonly comes to mind when we think of cereal grains: wheat, rice, and corn.

Quinoa isn’t a grass though. It’s actually a flowering plant in the amaranth family (Amaranthaceae) and it’s more closely related to spinach than wheat. The 3- to 9-foot-tall crop grows primarily in South America, and farmers harvest the tiny seeds for consumption.

Quinoa plantations in Chimborazo, Ecuador.

pxhidalgoGetty Images

The Dictionary: Yes

Just like how we call tomatoes, avocadoes, and pumpkins “veggies” even though they’re technically fruits, sometimes it’s easier to define things as we use them rather than to get caught up in specifics.

Enter the word “pseudocereal,” which Encyclopedia Britannica uses to describe the non-grasses that we use like traditional grains.

Hence Merriam-Webster’s definition of grain: “the seeds or fruits of various food plants including the cereal grasses and in commercial and statutory usage other plants.” While quinoa isn’t a grass, it’s a plant commercially treated as grain. That’s where you’ll find it in the grocery store, after all!

Nutritionists: Yes

The Whole Grains Council recognizes quinoa’s status as a pseudocereal, but still classifies it as a whole grain due to the similar method of preparation and nutrient profile.

GH Nutrition Director Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, has the same mindset. “Quinoa is a grain rich in protein, fiber, moderate fat, and vitamins and minerals,” she says. “Plus, it’s considered a complete protein, meaning it contains all of the essential amino acids in the necessary amount. This makes it a great choice for vegetarians, vegans, and people trying to eat less meat.”

Quinoa can come in different colors like white, red, and black.

los_angelaGetty Images

Paleo Dieters: Yes

If you’re Googling this question because you’re hoping for a workaround way to sneak carby-goodness into your paleo diet, we have some bad news for you. Despite quinoa’s excellent nutritional benefits, it’s not technically paleo, according to the diet’s founder Loren Cordain. The restrictive eating plan cuts out all grains, and unlike botanists, proponents take the same wider definition of “grain” and advise avoiding quinoa entirely.

That said, you don’t need to cut out whole grains to lose weight. “There are tons of reasons to eat 100% whole grains,” London adds. “They’re fiber-full, more sustainable as a protein source than meat, and full of phytonutrients.” She advises following a Mediterranean-style eating plan that still emphasizes whole fruits and vegetables, lean protein, eggs, nuts, seeds, and plant-based oils but also adds back in nutrient-rich legumes, low-fat dairy, and of course 100% whole grains like quinoa.

Caroline Picard
Health Editor
Caroline is the Health Editor at GoodHousekeeping.com covering nutrition, fitness, wellness, and other lifestyle news.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Quinoa: Health Benefits & Nutrition Facts

Quinoa, often described as a “superfood” or a “supergrain,” has become popular among the health conscious, with good reason. Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah or ke-NO-ah) is packed with protein, fiber and various vitamins and minerals. It is also gluten-free and is recommended for people who are on a gluten-free diet.

Often used as a substitute for rice, quinoa is commonly considered to be a grain and is usually referred to as such, but it is actually a seed. “The yellowish pods are the seed of a plant called Chenopodium quinoa, native to Peru and related to beets, chard and spinach,” wrote Nicole Spiridakis in a story for NPR. When cooked, quinoa is soft and fluffy, with a slightly nutty taste. It can also be made into flour, flakes and various foods like pasta and bread, according to the Grains and Legumes Nutrition Council.

Quinoa comes from Peru, Bolivia and Chile. It grows in the Andes Mountains, and for millennia it has been a food staple for the native people there. According to a field crops article by the University of Wisconsin and the University of Minnesota, quinoa means “mother grain” in the Incan language. 

Recently, the surge in quinoa demand has pushed production beyond South America to more than 70 countries, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Today, large-scale quinoa crops grow in China, North America, France and India. Quinoa production is picking up in Africa and the Middle East, according to a 2016 assessment in Frontiers in Plant Science.

According to Spiridakis, there are 1,800 types of quinoa. Quinoa seeds can be black, red, white, purple, pink, yellow, gray, orange, green or yellow. In the United States, white (traditional) and red (Incan) quinoa are commonly available. While the white variety is more flavorful, the red contains more nutrients. 

Nutrient profile

“Quinoa is a good source of protein, fiber, iron, copper, thiamin and vitamin B6,” said Kelly Toups, a registered dietician with the Whole Grains Council. It’s also “an excellent source of magnesium, phosphorus, manganese and folate.” Toups emphasized that a “‘good source’ means that one serving provides at least 10 percent of the daily value of that nutrient, while ‘excellent source’ means that one serving provides at least 20 percent of the daily value of that nutrient.”

A 2009 article in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture stated that quinoa’s “unusual composition and exceptional balance” of protein, oil and fat, as well as its minerals, fatty acids, antioxidants and vitamins, make it a highly nutritious food. The article also noted that phytohormones are found in quinoa, unlike many other plant foods. Phytohormones help regulate plant growth. Some types, called phytoestrogens, are being studied as a treatment for menopause symptoms because they sometimes behave like estrogens in the body.

A 2017 study in the Journal of Nutraceuticals and Food Science determined that compared to other cereals, which people around the world rely upon for macronutrients, quinoa has more protein and a greater balance of essential amino acids. Nutritionally, it resembles milk protein more than cereals like wheat, corn and barley. It also surpasses cereals in amounts of dietary fiber, lipids, calcium, iron, zinc, phosphorus and vitamins B1, B2, B6, C and E. 

Here are the nutrition facts for quinoa, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which regulates food labeling through the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act:

/* info (hed, dek, source, credit) */ .rg-container { font-family: &

Amt per serving %DV Amt per serving %DV
Total Fat 2g 3% Total Carbohydrate 21g
Cholesterol 0mg 0% Dietary Fiber 3g 11%
Sodium 7mg 0% Sugars 0.9g 7%
Potassium 172mg 5% Protein 4g
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 1% Iron 8%

SOURCE: USDA

Quinoa health benefits

A complete protein

“Quinoa is most famous for being one of the only plant foods that supplies complete proteins, offering all essential amino acids in a healthy balance,” Toups told Live Science. Essential amino acids are ones that the body cannot produce on its own, and complete proteins contain all of them in roughly equal measure. There are nine essential amino acids, listed by the National Institutes of Health as the following: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan and valine. Unlike other grains, quinoa is a particularly good source of lysine, according to the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Quinoa and other whole grains also contain 25 percent more protein than refined grains, according to Toups.

Anti-inflammatory benefits

Scientists are still working to understand all the implications of chronic inflammation on the body’s health. The Mayo Clinic lists autoimmune disorders like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease and Chrohn’s disease as problems in which chronic inflammation plays a role. Less obvious disorders influenced by chronic inflammation may include cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Quinoa and other whole grains may help decrease the risk of this dangerous inflammation, according to Toups. They “help promote healthy gut microbes (the friendly bacteria in the gut), which is important for preventing obesity, inflammation and disease.” World’s Healthiest Foods notes that quinoa is known to contain many anti-inflammatory nutrients, including phenolic acids, cell wall polysaccharides and vitamin E family nutrients such as gamma-tocopherol.

Quinoa, shown here in a vegetable medley, is a nutritious “superfood.” (Image credit: naD photos Shutterstock.com)

Gluten free

Gluten-free diets are recommended for people with Celiac disease, a severe gluten intolerance. Though the scientific community is still debating the benefits of gluten-free diets for people who do not have Celiac disease, plenty of Americans have jumped on the bandwagon. Medical News Today estimates that approximately 1.6 million follow a gluten-free diet without having been diagnosed with the disease. 

People who follow gluten-free diets can have a hard time getting all of their essential nutrients. The Mayo Clinic lists iron, calcium, fiber, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and folate as nutrients especially lacking in gluten-free diets. 

“Because quinoa is naturally gluten-free, this nutritionally dense grain is the perfect pick for gluten-free diets,” said Toups. She pointed to a study published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics in which researchers at Columbia University’s Celiac Disease Center found that “the nutritional profile of gluten-free diets was improved by adding oats or quinoa to meals and snacks. Most notable increases were protein (20.6 grams vs. 11 g) iron (18.4 milligrams vs. 1.4 mg, calcium (182 mg vs. 0 mg) and fiber (12.7 g vs. 5 g).” 

“Similarly,” continued Toups, “in a study in Food Chemistry, researchers suggest that adding quinoa or buckwheat to gluten-free products significantly increases their polyphenol content, as compared to typical gluten-free products made with rice, corn and potato flour. Products made with quinoa or buckwheat contained more antioxidants compared with both wheat products and the control gluten-free products.” Polyphenols are chemicals that protect cells and body chemicals against damage caused by free radicals, which are reactive atoms that contribute to tissue damage in the body.

Lowering cholesterol 

Quinoa’s good fiber content can aid in lowering cholesterol levels, according to Toups. Fiber aids in digestion, which requires bile acids, which are made partly with cholesterol. As your digestion improves, the liver pulls cholesterol from the blood to create more bile acid, thereby reducing the amount of LDL, the bad cholesterol. A study published in the journal Plant Foods for Human Nutrition found that rats that had consumed a high level of fructose and were then fed a quinoa diet reduced their LDL cholesterol by 57 percent. 

A 2017 study published in Current Developments in Nutrition found that overweight or obese people who ate between 25 and 50 grams of quinoa per day for 12 weeks saw significantly lowered triglyceride concentrations and a 70 percent reduction in metabolic syndrome prevalence. 

Toups pointed to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that looked at the effect of whole grains on patients taking cholesterol-lowering medications called statins. Those who ate more than 16 g of whole grains like quinoa every day had lower non-HDL cholesterol levels than those who took the statins without eating the whole grains. “Whole-grain intake and statin use were also significantly linked with healthier total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratios and total cholesterol concentrations,” she added.

Heart health

Lowering LDL cholesterol is good for your heart, but quinoa can benefit your ticker in other ways as well. A study published in the Journal of Food Lipids noted that quinoa seeds possess many of the dietary flavonoids “shown to inversely correlate with mortality from heart disease.” 

Furthermore, quinoa can provide heart-healthy monounsaturated fat via its oleic acid content, as well as omega-3 fatty acids and alpha-linolenic acids, according to World’s Healthiest Foods. Most foods lose their healthy fatty acids when oxidized, but quinoa’s nutrients hold up to boiling, simmering and steaming.

Toups referred to a study in the European Journal of Nutrition that found other evidence for quinoa’s cardiovascular benefits. In this study, she said, “Italian researchers found that quinoa produced lower free fatty-acid levels and triglyceride concentrations (which are associated with a reduced risk of heart disease) than other gluten-free pastas and breads studied.”

(Image credit: Dreamstime.)

Digestion

One cup of cooked quinoa contains 21 percent of the recommended daily intake of fiber, which is great news for your gut. Quinoa is also more easily digestible than many other grains, according to World’s Healthiest Foods. Furthermore, a study in the British Journal of Nutrition found that participants reported feeling fuller after eating quinoa, buckwheat or oats than after eating wheat or rice. 

Diabetes and hypertension

“Quinoa has also been studied for its role in diabetes management and hypertension,” said Toups. Commenting on a study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, she said, “Brazilian scientists researched 10 traditional Peruvian grains and legumes for their potential in managing the early stages of Type 2 diabetes. They found that quinoa was especially rich in an antioxidant called quercetin and that quinoa had the highest overall antioxidant activity (86 percent) of all 10 foods studied.” She added that the study led researchers to conclude that quinoa, kañiwa (quinoa’s cousin) and other traditional crops from the Peruvian Andes have potential in helping researchers to develop effective dietary strategies for managing Type 2 diabetes and associated hypertension.

Longevity

According to some scientists, the fiber in quinoa could actually help people live longer. A meta-analysis of relevant studies published in the American Journal of Epidemiologyconcluded, “high dietary fiber intake may reduce the risk of total mortality.” 

Two additional recent studies linked whole-grain consumption with longevity. One large-scale study published in BioMed Central found positive results when researchers looked at whole-grain consumption and death from chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and more. They noted the fiber as being particularly beneficial. Another study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that whole-grain consumption was associated with a lowered risk of cardiovascular disease in American men and women.

Quinoa risks

There are a few health risks associated with eating quinoa. Quinoa seeds are coated with saponins, which are chemicals designed to protect plants from diseases caused by fungi, bacteria and viruses, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Saponins can have a bitter, soapy taste, so quinoa should be rinsed thoroughly in cold water before it is cooked. 

For some, saponins can do more than leave a bad taste in the mouth: They can cause stomach irritation and, according to the horticultural department at Purdue University, possibly damage the small intestine. The high fiber content in quinoa may also result in upset stomachs, according to Livestrong.com. 

Quinoa in the diet

Quinoa cooks faster than most whole grains, taking only 12 to 15 minutes, according to Toups. This makes quinoa “an easy grain for busy families and individuals to add to their weekly rotation,” she said. Furthermore, “Unlike some grains that tend to dry out when cooled, quinoa maintains a pleasant, chewy texture when served warm, chilled or at room temperature.”

This all means that quinoa can be incorporated into your diet in a variety of ways, from being prepared as a breakfast porridge to being an addition to salads or prepared like a pilaf. “Quinoa can also be used to thicken up soups or stews, and quinoa flour can be used in gluten-free baking,” said Toups. 

Quinoa production 

Quinoa’s popularity has grown rapidly in recent years. From 2011 to 2015, quinoa prices jumped 202 percent, according to The Straits Times. Exported Peruvian quinoa tripled in value between 2012 and 2017, from $34.5 million to $124 million. This demand surge has caused unforeseen consequences for the environment. Typically, farmers rotate crops, but growing quinoa year after year can result in soil erosion, water depletion and land degradation, according to The World Policy Institute.

Extreme weather can cause problems for large-scale quinoa production. In 2017, El Nino ravaged Peruvian farms, destroying quinoa and other crops. As a result, researchers as Peru’s National University of Altiplano have developed new strains of quinoa that are resistant to harsh weather, drought and plague, according to Peru Reports. These new developments will be increasingly important as climate change impacts quinoa-growing regions, such as the Bolivian highlands, which have suffered severe droughts that decimated once-valuable quinoa crops, according to Inside Climate News.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, however, quinoa is relatively stable compared to some other mass-produced crops and therefore could be instrumental to feeding the world as the effects of climate change escalate. Quinoa is adaptable, able to grow in regions with 40 percent to 88 percent humidity and temperatures from 25 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 4 to 38 degrees Celsius), according to a 2017 review in the Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry. The review’s authors posit that quinoa’s adaptiveness may help curb mass hunger, particularly in the world’s most populous country, India. 

What Is Quinoa? Everything You Need to Know About the Superfood

Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) may be the most widely recognizable of the so-called “ancient grains.” It has been a staple in the diet of people in the Andes for thousands of years; the Incas called it “the mother of all grains.” Long before Europeans colonized South America, quinoa was being cultivated and eaten throughout much of the continent.

Now touted as a modern-day “superfood,” quinoa has gained a worldwide reputation as a healthier substitute for white rice and pasta and a rare plant source of complete protein for vegetarians and vegans.

What Is Quinoa?

Quinoa acts like a whole grain, but it is actually a seed from a weed-like plant called goosefoot, which is closely related to beets and spinach. Whole grain quinoa can be prepared like brown rice or barley, and you can also purchase quinoa flour and quinoa flakes. In any form, it’s among the more expensive of the whole grains.

Watch Now: The Best Quinoa Breakfast Bowl

How to Cook Quinoa

You should rinse quinoa before cooking it to remove the outer coating, called saponin, which can leave a bitter and soapy taste. Some brands do this before packaging their quinoa, but it’s a good idea to do it again at home just to make sure you’ve washed it all away. You’ll need a fine mesh sieve so you don’t lose the tiny seeds down the drain.

To prepare quinoa, cover it with seasoned water, stock, or vegetable broth, bring it to a boil, then put a tight-fitting lid on the pot, and turn the heat down to low. Simmer it until it softens, about 15 minutes; look for the tiny spirals of the germ to appear, a sign that it’s done. Drain it with a fine mesh sieve, return it to the warm pot to rest for about 10 minutes, and then fluff it with a fork to separate the grains. Or use your rice cooker, with a 1:2 ratio of quinoa to water.

Use quinoa in just about any recipe calling for rice or another whole grain, such as rice salads, couscous recipes, or pilafs. If you keep some cooked quinoa on hand in either the fridge or freezer, you are always ready to toss it into any dish for added texture, body, and nutrition.

Westend61 / Getty Images 

Westend61 / Getty Images

Westend61 / Getty Images

Westend61 / Getty Images 

Westend61 / Getty Images

What Does It Taste Like?

This small seed has a nutty flavor and fluffy texture that’s creamy and slightly chewy at the same time. To take advantage of this, prepare it simply with a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkle of sea salt, and a splash of lemon juice; add a bit of garlic, nutritional yeast, or Parmesan cheese for a satisfying side dish. Like rice and other mild grains, quinoa absorbs the flavor of whatever sauce or dressing you choose to serve with it.

Quinoa Recipes

Add some vegetables and a dressing to make an easy quinoa salad, or swap out white rice for quinoa with any kind of stir-fry or fried rice dish. Try different ways to eat quinoa for breakfast or start with one of these recipes.

Where to Buy Quinoa

Look for quinoa near the rice or pasta or in the international foods aisle of your grocery store. It’s also readily available in the bulk bins or the baking aisle of natural foods stores and online. You may find it boxed with seasoning packets near the couscous mixes or in a medley of all three colors. Quinoa flour may be stocked with the other flours, with gluten-free products, or in the international or natural foods aisle. Look for quinoa flakes near the breakfast oats.

Storage

Similar to other dry grains, quinoa should be stored in an airtight container in a cool, dark place to prevent moisture and insects from getting into it. Once it is cooked, it will stay fresh in the refrigerator for five to seven days. You can also batch cook it and store it in the freezer in serving-size portions.

Store quinoa flour in the freezer to slow oxidation and extend its shelf life. Quinoa flakes last in the refrigerator for up to a year.

The Spruce Eats / Joshua Seong 

Nutrition and Benefits

Quinoa delivers complete protein, providing all nine essential amino acids, something rare to find in a plant product. One cup of cooked quinoa contains 222 calories and 4 grams of fat; there are 39 grams of carbohydrates, 5 grams of fiber, and 8 grams of protein. It has 15 percent of the daily value for iron and is also a good source of calcium, magnesium, and vitamin E.

Quinoa is also a gluten-free and cholesterol-free whole food, naturally kosher, and often effortlessly organic. The natural saponin coating repels bugs and birds, so growers rarely need to depend on chemical pesticides.

Varieties

Quinoa grows in many different colors, but white, red, and black seeds are the ones most commonly harvested for consumption, and they each have their own culinary nuances. White, the most common variety, takes the shortest amount of time to cook. Of the three it has the least crunchy texture and mildest flavor. Red comes on a bit stronger in both the flavor and crunch factors while also taking a little longer to cook; black, the most flavorful and crunchiest, requires the longest cooking time.

6 Things You Need to Know before Buying Quinoa

Whether you’ve bought a bag of quinoa every week since 2008 or are thinking about trying it for the very first time, STOP! There’s some important info you should know about the delicious, albeit oddly-named little grain. Before you hit the grocery store, read this. You’ll be glad you did.

1) Pick whatever color you want.

marilyna/getty images

White, red, or black? They’re pretty much all the same nutritionally—so go with what tastes best to you, says Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, owner of Nutrition Starring You, LCC. White quinoa is the least bitter of the three, while red and black have a chewier texture that holds up better in cold dishes like salads.

2) Buy pre-rinsed to make your life easier.
Raw quinoa grains are coated with saponin, a compound that acts as a natural pest repellent. (Mother Nature, always thinking!) Eating saponin won’t hurt you—but it tastes really bitter, so it might make you want to toss your perfectly fluffy bowl of quinoa in the trash. Sure, you could just rinse the saponin off your quinoa by running it under cold water before cooking. But most strainers aren’t actually fine enough to keep the grains from getting everywhere, so that can be a hassle. Do yourself a favor and buy quinoa that’s already pre-rinsed. It’s easy to find (the label will say so) and usually isn’t any more expensive.  

3) Double-check the label if you’re gluten-free.
Quinoa is touted as a gluten-free grain—and usually, it is. But get this: One study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that looked at 15 strains of quinoa found that two actually contained measurable levels of gluten. Even though the quinoa you find at the grocery store is probably free of gluten, if you have celiac disease or are gluten intolerant, it always pays to double-check. Before buying, make sure your quinoa is certified gluten-free. (Check out these gluten-free flours.)

MORE: Gluten-Free Quinoa Pancakes with Caramelized Apples and Hazelnuts

4) Don’t stress over organic and non-GMO.
Save your dough for organic apples and grass-fed beef. Because quinoa comes with built-in, nasty-tasting saponin, farmers don’t need to do much in the way of spraying to repel pests. “Unless you insist on buying all organic foods, quinoa probably isn’t the best way to spend your organic food budget,” Harris-Pincus says. And since quinoa isn’t a genetically modified grain, all quinoa in its raw form is non-GMO.

5) Don’t feel bad that it’s grown in South America.  

HUGHES Herve / hemispicture.com/getty images

You might remember the frenzy that ensued when, a few years back, news broke that quinoa was becoming so popular in the US that the South American farmers who grew it could no longer afford to actually eat the stuff themselves. (The majority of the world’s quinoa is grown in Peru and Bolivia.) Fortunately, that isn’t true: According to NPR, quinoa farmers are still eating the staple grain—and earning big bucks for selling it to us. (Plus, it’s popping up in restaurants all over America.)

6) Feel free to mix it up a little bit.  
Yes, we all know that quinoa is crazy good for you. And while eating it every day is totally fine, it’s still smart to make room for other sources of complex carbs. “I’m a believer in including many different whole grains in your diet, because they each offer a different nutritional profile,” Harris-Pincus says. (Though if you’re vegan, making quinoa a staple food makes sense, since it’s the only whole grain that’s a complete protein.) Brown rice and millet bowl, anyone? 

These quinoas are top quality: Still not sure where to find the perfect quinoa? We love Ancient Harvest, Bob’s Red Mill, and Arrowhead Mills.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

90,000 What are the healthiest whole grains and which ones to cook? • INMYROOM FOOD

Cereals are advised to be consumed on a daily basis. Cereals normalize digestion, cleanse the body and energize. However, recently there have been controversies that, in fact, cereals are not so useful and can even harm the body. Where did this talk come from and is there any truth in it? We assure you that no.

Cereals really affect health in the most favorable way, but you need to know how to choose them correctly.Contradictions have arisen due to the fact that many do not know that there are different cereals: peeled and whole grains. As a result, they choose not the most useful types for their diet. Refined cereals are processed and deprived of all nutrients and are noticeably inferior to whole grains in composition and effect on the body.

We will tell you about the beneficial properties of whole grain cereals and their effect on the body, as well as share a selection of the five most useful types of cereals that must be present in your diet.

Why Whole Grains Are Good

Whole Grains are made up of three components: the germ, bran and endosperm. Some of them are removed from the peeled cereals. They become softer and cook faster, but at the same time they are devoid of all the nutrients.

Unlike peeled cereals, whole grains retain all the nutrients in their composition. They contain a large amount of vitamins of group B, A, E, iron, copper, zinc, magnesium, antioxidants, healthy fats.Such a product strengthens health, increases the body’s defenses, speeds up metabolic processes, improves the functioning of the cardiovascular system and has a beneficial effect on mental activity.

Thus, scientific studies have shown that daily consumption of 1-2 servings of whole grain cereals reduces the risk of premature death by 20%, and the occurrence and development of cancer by 23%.

Which whole grain cereals are especially useful

There are a lot of whole grain cereals.They are all good for you, so pick whichever one you want at the supermarket, but some are high in nutrients. Let’s take a closer look at such whole grain cereals.

Millet

Millet is a cereal that is widespread in Asian countries. It is even sometimes called “the bread of the East”. The love of Eastern peoples for this grain is not at all accidental.

Millet has a high nutritional value and rich composition. The cereals contain manganese, phosphorus, magnesium, amino acids and other useful substances.So, millet contains more protein than rice – for this, vegetarians also adore cereals, since the vegetable protein contained in millet is perfectly absorbed by the body and energizes. In addition, regular consumption of this cereal normalizes blood pressure, improves digestion and increases the body’s defenses.

Millet porridge with raisins

Ingredients:

  • Millet 1 st.
  • Milk 2 tbsp.
  • Raisins 50 g
  • Cottage cheese 100 g
  • Sugar 2 tbsp.l.
  • Butter 50 g
  • Salt to taste

Preparation:

  1. Rinse the millet thoroughly, put it in a saucepan and add water. Bring to a boil and simmer for about 15 minutes. Drain the water.
  2. At this time, boil the milk and add to the porridge along with sugar, salt and butter. Cover and cook for another 15-20 minutes.
  3. Remove from heat, add raisins and cottage cheese mashed with a fork.To stir thoroughly.

Whole wheat

Whole wheat is another healthy cereal that must be present in the human diet. The substances that make up whole wheat are the main building blocks for cellular tissue. Whole wheat also contains valuable fiber, which has a positive effect on the functioning of the digestive system and cleanses the intestines. Calories from wheat are not stored on the hips, but converted into energy.

Wheat porridge with cranberries

No breakfast is more perfect than wheat porridge with cranberries. You won’t need any desserts with this dish.

Ingredients:

  • Water 3.5 cups
  • Cranberry 2 cups
  • Salt taste
  • Sugar 1/2 cup
  • Wheat grits 2/3 cup
  • Milk taste

Cooking method:

In a medium saucepan, combine water and cranberries.Bring to a boil and cook for 10-15 minutes.

  • Add salt and sugar.
  • Gradually add cereal, stirring constantly. Cook for 5-10 minutes.
  • Remove the pan from the heat and let the porridge cool to room temperature. Use a blender to whisk the porridge into the puree. Serve with milk and any filling of your choice.
  • Quinoa

    Quinoa is a famous superfood: this means that the composition of this product contains useful and nutritious substances.Quinoa is a complete source of plant protein: it energizes and supplies the body with building materials. Regular use of this product improves well-being, calms the nervous system, relieves chronic fatigue, and also normalizes the functioning of the stomach and intestines and speeds up metabolic processes.

    Quinoa with black beans

    Quinoa goes well with vegetables and legumes. Use this to make your dream dinner.

    Ingredients:

    • Quinoa 1.5 cups
    • Canned Black Beans 450 ml
    • Corn Grains
    • Chives 3 stalks
    • Zucchini 1/2 pcs.
    • Cherry tomatoes 400 g
    • Seasonings to taste 2 tbsp. l.
    • Salt 1/2 tsp
    • Olive oil 2 tbsp. l.
    • White Wine Vinegar 2 tbsp. l.

    Method of preparation:

    1. Boil the quinoa, following the instructions on the package.
    2. Chop the green onion and dice the courgettes.
    3. In a bowl, combine quinoa, zucchini, cherry tomatoes, corn, canned beans and green onions.
    4. Season. Salt.
    5. Add olive oil and white wine vinegar.
    6. Stir gently and serve.

    Brown rice

    Forget about white processed rice, because there is brown rice that is several times ahead of its brother in terms of nutrients.Yes, brown rice takes a little longer to cook, but for the sake of its beneficial properties, you can wait. The product contains large quantities of valuable minerals magnesium, selenium and manganese. They are necessary for the body for strong immunity, healthy nervous system, active brain function and fast metabolism. Brown rice is also rich in antioxidants and fiber.

    Wild Rice with Pumpkin

    Try wild rice with pumpkin – this gastronomic combination will pleasantly surprise you.

    Ingredients:

    • Brown Rice 120 g
    • Pumpkin 300 g
    • Cream 100 ml
    • Shallots 1 pc.
    • Cumin to taste
    • Salt to taste
    • Ground black pepper to taste
    • Sesame oil to taste

    Cooking method:

    1. Peel and chop the shallots. Fry it in a deep frying pan in sesame oil along with rice.
    2. Cut the pumpkin into cubes, after removing the peel.Add it to the pan at the same time as boiling water. There should be enough water to completely cover all the ingredients.
    3. Reduce heat, add cumin and simmer for 20 minutes, adding a little water if necessary. At the very end, pour the cream over the dish, season with salt and pepper.

    Oats

    Oats increases the body’s defenses and strengthens the immune system. It’s all about the rich composition of this product. It contains vitamins A and E, fatty acids, fiber, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium.Oats improve vision, cardiovascular and nervous systems, and speed up metabolism. Oats are also good for the kidneys and gallbladder, and are also indicated for diabetics, as it normalizes blood sugar levels.

    Oats with porcini mushrooms and bacon

    In fact, you can use other mushrooms in this recipe, both fresh and dried.

    Ingredients:

    • Oats in grains 500 g
    • Shallots 8 pcs.
    • Ham 175 g
    • Olive oil 8 tbsp. l.
    • Chicken or vegetable broth 2 l
    • Porcini mushrooms 500 g
    • Grated cheese 75 g
    • Salt to taste
    • Black pepper to taste

    Cooking method:

    1. Soak oats overnight and rinse thoroughly before cooking.
    2. Peel the shallots, finely chop and mix with the diced ham.
    3. Cut the mushrooms into slices and fry in olive oil over low heat with ham and onion until tender.If you are using frozen mushrooms, boil them in a separate saucepan.
    4. Add oats and broth, season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and simmer for 50 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    5. At the end of this time, the food is still quite runny, this is normal. Cover the pan with a lid and let the dish steep for 30 minutes. The remaining moisture will be absorbed. Sprinkle with grated cheese before serving.

    7 healthy breakfasts + recipes

    Whole grains are cereal seeds that have not been peeled and germless.Should I have breakfast with them instead of crisp bread or quick porridge-minutes? If you know the results of medical research, the answer will be clear immediately.

    In 2015, the Americans conducted an experiment with 800 thousand volunteers. Those who ate whole-grain cereals reduced the number of heart attacks by 2% – and the risk of cancer in the group decreased by 21%.

    What applies to whole grain cereals

    To easily switch to proper nutrition (PP), it is worth remembering which cereals are considered whole grains.It’s not difficult – even if you don’t feel like studying the small labels on the packaging.

    Whole grains include virtually all cereals that have not been peeled off. Here is an incomplete list of such cereals:

    • wheat;
    • buckwheat; 90,043 90,042 rice;
    • lentils;
    • oats;
    • rye;
    • barley;
    • millet;
    • corn;
    • spelled;
    • quinoa;
    • amaranth.

    It is important not to believe by sight here.The groats may look whole or crushed. The second is not worse than the first. The main thing to look at is the preservation of the coarse layers of grain – the shell and the germ.

    Recipes for delicious morning cereals

    Unrefined cereals are rich in fiber and not dangerous for diabetics, they can be eaten by office workers and professional athletes. It all depends on the cooking method. On the same croup, you can gain muscle and lose weight, dry out or add roundness.

    So that grains and legumes do not lose nutrients during storage, nature has supplied them with phytic acid.It does not allow the grains to be fully assimilated. To get the maximum of nutrients – and to eat faster – soak the cereals overnight before cooking, preferably with the addition of lemon juice.

    Phytic acid also dissolves at high temperatures (baking in an oven or long boiling), but long heat treatment has its drawbacks. Not only acid is destroyed, but also starch. It captures more water molecules and is absorbed faster – which means it adds fast carbs to you.

    Prolonged cooking increases the glycemic index of cereals by up to 30%.Therefore, before deciding how to cook whole grain porridge, decide what effect you want to achieve – lose weight or gain muscle mass.

    Each porridge has its own time for soaking.

    renia

    Kind of cereal

    Soaking time

    Amaranth

    8 hours 351

    0 9359000 934 9034

    Quinoa

    2 hours

    Corn

    12 hours

    Chickpeas

    9035 9035 9034 9034 9034 9034 935 9034

    Polba

    8 hours

    Wheat

    7 hours

    Millet

    8 hours

    0003

    Rye

    8 hours

    Lentil

    8 hours

    Barley

    8 hours

    insulin, so diabetics should not abuse such breakfasts.

    Oatmeal

    Some ten to fifteen years ago it was believed that the correct oatmeal is not peeled from the shell, otherwise it turns into empty carbohydrates. But now manufacturers have learned how to make whole flakes. They saturate no worse than unpolished oats, and cook much faster.

    Recipe for cooking whole grain oatmeal

    Ingredients:

    • Large oatmeal – 250 grams;
    • Milk – 400 ml;
    • Butter – 20 gr.

    Fill the oats with milk, add sugar and salt and place on the stove. The flakes are boiled for 5-10 minutes. Once the porridge is ready, add the butter so that it has time to melt. This whole grain porridge in water or milk is perfect for breakfast.

    Would you like to follow the cooking? Then you will love the recipe for oatmeal in a slow cooker. Take one part cereal in 4 parts water and turn on the simmering mode for 20 minutes.

    If there is no time for a long soaking, buy small oatmeal flakes – the number of grams for breakfast for such porridge, take 3 tablespoons per person.You do not need to cook it. Enough to bring to a boil and leave. By the time you finish your morning procedures, you will have a delicious porridge prepared.

    Spelled

    Spelled porridge provides more satiety than processed wheat porridge. Its glycemic index is lower and is often recommended for diabetics – and those who want to switch to three meals a day without snacking.

    The simplest recipe for spelled porridge – traditional:

    Ingredients:

    • Whole grain spelled cereal – 500 gr;
    • Water – 1 liter;
    • Sunflower oil – 50 ml.

    Soak the groats in water for several hours (it is better to leave them overnight or pour them before going to work).

    Before cooking, drain the water and pour in boiling water. We put the pan on the stove, add butter or vegetable oil, salt and cook until the water is completely absorbed. Turn off and leave for another hour. The porridge is ready.

    Brown rice

    Brown rice is rice with preserved shell. It is rich in potassium, so it is good for people with high blood pressure. Rice porridges are advised not to salt, but they do not have to be lean and tasteless.You can sweeten it and add spice.

    Recipe for rice with vegetables

    Ingredients (for 4 servings):

    • Brown rice – 500 gr;
    • Bell pepper – 2 pcs;
    • Carrots – 2 pcs;
    • Corn – 100 gr;
    • Vegetable oil – 100 ml (for frying).

    Soak the rice (so that the extra husk pops up) and proceed to the vegetables. We clean them and cut them into cubes. Pour oil into a preheated cauldron and send the carrots there.Simmer for a few more minutes and only now add the bell pepper. If you put it right away, it will dissolve. Salt and pepper to taste.

    After stewing vegetables for a total of 15 minutes, add rice (without water) and corn. Spread the rice over the vegetables and pour in a liter of water. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 30-40 minutes.

    Bulgur and wheat

    Sometimes you want to pamper yourself with porridge from childhood, but semolina is too high in calories. Do not despair, there is an equally tasty analogue that will not affect the waist – bulgur.It is whole grain wheat harvested during dairy maturity. Such porridge is cooked easier than semolina, therefore it is ideal for breakfast.

    Bulgur porridge recipe

    Ingredients:

    • bulgur groats – 1 glass;
    • water – 2 glasses;
    • olive oil – 50 ml.

    How to cook bulgur: lightly fry the cereals in oil and add water and salt. Leave to simmer for 15 minutes. That’s it, healthy whole grain wheat porridge is ready.

    Green buckwheat

    It is more convenient to cook it in a multicooker: green buckwheat is more tender than the usual brown one, and constant stirring will turn it into puree.

    Ingredients:

    • buckwheat – 1 glass;
    • water – 750 ml;
    • butter – 40 gr.

    Place the oil on the bottom of the multicooker. Put buckwheat on top and pour water. We select the “double boiler” mode and leave for 15 minutes. Do not rush to open the lid after the beep. When reheated, the porridge should “reach” – 10 minutes, and you can eat.

    Quinoa

    Rare for chain stores, but very useful cereal. Cooking lovers replace her rice in homemade rolls. The only negative is the high calorie content: 368 kcal per 100 g or 130 – 150 kcal per plate of ready-made porridge. The calorie content of rice is lower – about 100 kcal per serving.

    This makes cooking quinoa much easier. The cereals are briefly soaked in water so that it does not taste bitter. Then they die out and pour into boiling water (or milk) in a ratio of one to two (a glass of cereal for 2 glasses of water).Cook for 15 minutes without a lid and simmer for 10 minutes under a lid over low heat.

    Amaranth

    Prepared in the same way as quinoa, but you can do without preliminary soaking. Start boiling cereals in water, and if you want to add milk, pour it in only after it has evaporated.

    Important! During cooking, amaranth “shoots” and escapes from the pan. Reduce heat and simmer, covered.

    Recipe for tender amaranth porridge:

    • amaranth – 250 gr;
    • water – 250 ml;
    • milk – 300 ml;
    • butter – 1 tbsp.Spoon

    Which Whole Grains Should Be In Your Diet

    Oats

    Oats are rich in minerals and antioxidants that help prevent heart failure. Avoid instant oatmeal, which is usually high in starch and corn syrup. The best solution would be the classic oatmeal, which can be mixed with almond milk and fruit.

    Brown rice

    During the production process, white rice is cleaned not only from the dark shell, but also from about 75% of all its nutrients (including magnesium, phosphorus, antioxidants and B vitamins).Choose red, brown and black rice for your meals. It is rich in various microelements and will also add a sophisticated flavor to your dish.

    Rye

    Rye is the most nutritious of all cereals, you will not find such amount of macro- and microelements anywhere else. Rye grains contain 4 times more fiber than wheat, and a standard serving will provide you with half your daily iron requirement. The only drawback is that it is extremely difficult to find real rye bread.

    Barley

    Barley is less popular than wheat or rice, although it deserves just as much attention. Grains contain fiber, B vitamins and help lower cholesterol levels. Prepare barley porridge with dried apricots or prunes, or serve as a side dish.

    Buckwheat

    Buckwheat is an ideal product for people with gluten intolerance. Buckwheat grains are one of the most important sources of magnesium and manganese, which contribute to the normalization of the nervous system.

    Bulgur

    Bulgur contains an impressive amount of iron and magnesium, and is also an important source of fiber and vegetable protein. The grains can be added to salads or served as a side dish.

    Quinoa

    Quinoa is technically seeds, not grains, but it contains more protein than any other grain crop. It is also an excellent source of omega-3 acids, making quinoa a must have for vegetarians.Try adding it to a salad or preparing it on its own with dried herbs and garlic.

    Couscous

    Most of the couscous that you can find on supermarket shelves is a type of pasta made from processed wheat that does not provide any benefit to the body. Whole grain couscous is not only lower in calories, it also provides you with an impressive amount of fiber.

    Whole cereals list. Healthy Whole Grains

    Vegetable soups and whole grain cereals are truly the healthiest dishes and should form the basis of our diet.But not all cereals are useful, although they seem to be. We present to you a top list of the healthiest cereals and pseudo-grains that can heal the body, improve skin condition and help normalize weight.

    Whole grain cereals

    To begin with, it is important to understand why the same cereal can be a dietary product, or it can carry only calories without health benefits. It’s all about processing. Whole grains contain a shell, which means they are rich in fiber, vitamins and minerals.But most cereals on store shelves are polished, that is, devoid of a shell, and therefore of useful properties. At best, they will not benefit the body, and at worst, they can become one of the reasons for weight gain, poor digestion and other problems. Therefore, if you decide to take the path of a healthy lifestyle, then learn to find the word “whole grain” on any label.

    We are used to rye flour, but in some health food stores you can find whole grain rye porridge.It contains gluten, so it is not suitable for people with intolerance to this protein, but if you do not have such problems, then be sure to try this dish. Rye is richer in nutrients than other cereals, contains 4 times more fiber than whole grain wheat, and covers the daily norm of an adult in iron. Do not rush to the store for rye bread, because processed and polished grains are used for baking it. You can buy whole grain rye flour for home baking.

    This is not the most popular cereal, and in vain.Pearl barley and barley groats are made from barley. Pearl barley is polished grains, and barley is most often whole grain. The egg contains B vitamins, vitamin A, calcium, phosphorus, iodine and fiber. This cereal helps to reduce blood cholesterol levels, is used for diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, and helps to cope with internal inflammation.

    This cereal is made from millet and contains B vitamins, iron, magnesium, manganese. Millet helps in the prevention of several cancers, including breast cancer, the development of gallstones, and also promotes the regeneration of body tissues.

    Brown rice
    Many people who lose weight consider rice to be a dietary product. But white polished rice contains practically no nutrients, only starch, which, on the contrary, can lead to a set of extra pounds. Grinding takes about 75% of the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants from rice. Only brown or wild rice is healthy. It is a source of not only fiber, but also magnesium, manganese, selenium, phosphorus, B vitamins and fiber. Red and black rice are also whole grains.

    If you do not eat oatmeal every day, then even this simple porridge can be beneficial. You should only buy regular cereals, not instant ones. Oatmeal normalizes blood sugar levels and strengthens the immune system. Problems with this cereal arise in cases where it is abused. In this case, the body will have problems with the absorption of certain vitamins and minerals. It is better to alternate cereals during the week.

    Buckwheat, quinoa, amaranth

    These are three related pseudo-grains (they are seeds) that are real superfoods.They are rich in vitamins, minerals, improve bowel function, normalize many blood parameters. Quinoa contains omega-3 fatty acids and a complete protein, amaranth is also a good source of protein, and buckwheat normalizes the intestinal microflora.

    How to use cereals

    In order to use different types of cereals, but not get bored of the same dishes, experiment. You can make cereals from cereals in water or milk and add fruits, berries, dried fruits and nuts to them.It can be a side dish for meat or fish dishes. Cereals can be combined with vegetables in hot vegetarian dishes or added to soups and salads. Alternatively, you can use whole grain flour for homemade healthy baked goods. An unusual option is to soak the cereals overnight, and in the morning mix in a blender with fruits or vegetables for a healthy smoothie.

    Grain consists of three parts: bran, germ and endosperm. Each portion contains healthy nutrients. Bran is a fiber-rich outer layer, a source of B vitamins, iron, copper, zinc, magnesium, antioxidants and phytochemicals *.

    The embryo is the nucleus of the seeds. The fetus is rich in healthy fats, vitamin E, B vitamins, phytochemicals, and antioxidants.

    Endosperm is the inner layer, which contains carbohydrates, proteins and a small amount of vitamins and minerals of the B group.

    * Phytochemicals are natural chemical compounds in plants that have been investigated for their role in disease prevention.

    Components of grain have a different effect on our body:

    Bran and fiber slow down the breakdown of starch to glucose – thus maintaining a constant blood sugar level, without sudden surges.

    Fiber helps to lower cholesterol levels, reduce the risk of blood clots, and improve motility.

    Phytochemicals and essential minerals such as magnesium, selenium and copper found in whole grains may protect against certain types of cancer.

    When processing grain, the bran and germ are usually removed. The germ is removed due to its high fat content, which can shorten the shelf life of processed wheat products. The remaining endosperm of the grain is soft, easily digestible, and has good culinary properties.However, such highly processed grain is much lower in terms of nutritional value.

    Refined wheat produces fluffy flour, the baking of which is light and airy. At the same time, in the process of purification, more than half of the B vitamins in wheat, 90 percent of vitamin E and almost all fibers are lost. While some nutrients can be added back through fortification, other health benefits of whole grains, such as phytochemicals, cannot be replaced.

    How many carbohydrates do you need and how to choose them?

    The 2015-2020 American Diet Guidelines recommends eating about 170 grams of grains per day for a 2,000 calorie diet. At least half of this serving should be 100% whole grains.

    Preferred cereals for a healthy diet include: amaranth, barley, millet, quinoa, brown rice, (processing maintains a relatively low glycemic index), unground buckwheat, rye, wheat, bulgur (processing maintains a relatively low glycemic index).

    Look for wholegrain bread, from wallpaper or peeled flour, but bran bread will not be as good as it seems. The latter can be regular white bread with a slight addition of bran mixture.

    Be careful when choosing foods labeled “Whole Grains”. This label does not always mean that the product is healthier. The whole grain grade is widely used in food products. It is designed to make it easy for consumers to find foods that are high in fiber and lower in salt and trans fat.However, on packages with cereals you rarely find such a mark, but on cereals – quite often. Agree, following the labeling in this case is not rational, since breakfast cereals contain clearly more sugar and calories than regular cereals.

    It’s actually not that hard to choose whole grains. If you cook at home and are ready to eat simple food, just grab regular cereal packages from the shelves (not for quick boiling).

    Let’s start with utility.Research on these products is endless, and there is no doubt that they protect us from many diseases. They have been shown in serious studies to reduce mortality. Observation of a group of people (more than 15 thousand people aged 45-65 years) showed that among those who ate more whole grains, the overall mortality rate was significantly lower. And if you include such foods in your diet whenever possible, replacing the usual ones, the risk of mortality can be reduced by 15%.More specifically, there are three factors to the benefits of whole grains.

    1. Effects on metabolism

    Whole grains have an excellent effect on the metabolism (metabolism) and prevent weight gain. And this brings along other beneficial effects. It all starts with the fact that they are slowly digested. Carbohydrates in them are slow. They break down to sugars slowly and are absorbed gradually. Therefore, blood glucose does not rise high and there is no need to produce a lot of insulin.And this prevents the development of obesity, and then type II diabetes mellitus. And it’s all proven in research.

    For example, women who ate three or more servings of whole grains daily had a significantly lower body mass index (BMI) than those who consumed one serving. Men also showed a difference in BMI, but slightly less severe. In another 12-year US study, women who ate more whole-grain foods had half the risk of weight gain than those who ate few.The same trend was found in adolescents.

    Women who had a diet low in whole grains and high in sugar had a 2-fold increase in the risk of type II diabetes. Another huge Nurses’ Health Study evaluated fiber intake in whole grains. If women consumed more than 5 grams of it per day (this indicated a high intake of whole grains), then their risk of type II diabetes was 30% lower than for those who consumed no more than 2.5 grams of fiber daily.

    Finally, metabolic syndrome, which combines diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease, was much less common in people who ate more whole grains than those who ate few.

    We emphasize once again that all these facts have been revealed in serious scientific research.

    2. Effect on blood vessels and heart

    A study by scientists in Chicago reports that adding just one serving of oatmeal (a classic whole grain product) to a low-fat diet reduced additional blood cholesterol by 8-9 mg / dL.And this despite the fact that the very low-fat diet itself already reduced it by 12 mg / dL. This reduces the risk of developing vascular atherosclerosis.

    Adding barley to the diet (another whole grain product) lowered blood pressure and influenced several other risk factors for heart disease.

    The association of whole grains with heart disease has been studied extensively and frequently. There are at least 25 studies in which it was found that people who regularly consume foods from whole grains have a significantly lower risk of heart and vascular disease.The evidence is unbreakable, and the benefits start with just one serving of whole grains a day (just switch from high-grade bread to whole grain bread).

    A huge and famous study of male doctors (this is such an analogue of the already mentioned The Nurses’ Health Study, only for males), showed that 10 grams of fiber per day, obtained from whole grains, reduced the risk of heart attack by almost 30%. A similar relationship was later found for women, but the effect was even stronger.There are the same observations regarding stroke. For example, a recent study by scientists from Harvard has convincingly shown this.

    3. Influence on the development of cancer

    There are over 40 studies of whole grains in relation to 20 types of cancer. Almost always, they reduced the risk of developing this terrible disease. Among the studied types of cancer, there are many tumors of the digestive tract: stomach, colon and rectum, oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus and larynx.

    The mechanism of anticancer action is also understood: it is protection of DNA from damage, suppression of the growth of cancer cells, antioxidant protection and prevention of the formation of carcinogens.Similar effects are provided by the dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamins (especially vitamin E), minerals (primarily selenium) and other bioactive substances contained in whole grains. All of this represents the main wealth of foods made from whole grains.

    Flour with flour

    Which flour can be considered whole grain and which is not? To understand this, you need to understand the internal structure of the grain. Most of it is the so-called endosperm. Essentially, these are food reserves required for grain germination.The overwhelming majority of them are starch (this substance is the least useful) and much less – proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals. Most of the useful components are found in a smaller part of the grain: in the germ and shells. A germ is a small formation at the edge of a grain, very rich in quality proteins, vitamins, fats, minerals and devoid of starch. Grains have multiple shells and are rich in fiber, dietary fiber and minerals. Traditionally, in the manufacture of flour and many cereals, the shells and embryos are disposed of.As a result, often only polished endosperm remains, containing almost one starch. This is how both rice groats and wheat flour of the highest grade are obtained.

    Therefore, the latter contains almost one starch and gluten (gluten), which are needed to make puffed bread.

    Wheat flour of the first grade may contain a small admixture of crushed grain hulls, so it is darker. But it cannot be considered healthy and whole grain.

    Grade II wheat flour has even more shells, but it is not whole grain either.

    Whole grain wheat flour (third grade). This is almost entirely crushed grain, it contains shells and an embryo. Bread only from it turns out to be coarse, so flour of higher grades is usually added. If wallpaper flour is in the first positions in the composition of bread, then it can be considered whole grain. If, on the other hand, premium flour comes first, and wallpaper at the end, this is not whole grain bread.

    Whole grain rye flour, but other types of rye flour – peeled bakery, seeded and special rye flour – are not.They are more refined, and there are few shells in them.

    There are two types of barley flour: wallpaper or seeded. The first is whole grain, like other types of wallpaper flour, but seeded is not. During its production, bran (grain shell) is removed.

    About cereals on a grand scale

    Not all cereals are whole grains. Accordingly, not all cereals and other dishes that you cook from them will be healthy. Here’s what you need to know about cereals.

    Any whole grain buckwheat, including whole grains (kernel), and their fragments (done).

    All oatmeal cereals are also whole grains, regardless of whether they are cooked from whole grains or from rolled and cut grains (rolled oats, etc.).

    Brown (korchinovy) rice, not subjected to polishing, whole grain, and white polished – not.

    Barley groats are of two types. Pearl barley is partially polished barley grains, on which the remains of shells and embryos have been preserved. Barley groats are crushed barley grains, freed from a number of shells (its value is lower than that of pearl barley, and it can only be conditionally considered whole grain).

    Wheat groats. Bulgur whole grain, as these are fragments of wheat grains with remnants of the germ and shells. But semolina is not. This is, in fact, wheat flour, but very coarsely ground.

    Millet porridge is not whole grain. It is polished, devoid of shells and embryos.

    Whole grain corn grits: these are grains of grains with remnants of the embryo and shells.

    Quinoa, which has become popular recently, is also a whole grain cereal.

    Correct breakfast is a guarantee that all goals will be achieved today.It consists of a mix of slow and fast carbohydrates, complete proteins, and the right fats. Such a mix is ​​given to us with whole grains, nuts, eggs or cheese, a slice of rye bread with butter, fruit or dark chocolate for dessert.

    Very often there is no time left for a full breakfast. I would like to have a quick and easy snack and hurry to the road. Therefore, we drink a glass of coffee on the go, eat a cookie and run to work. And after 1-2 hours you want to pounce on chocolates and buns.Sound familiar?

    But getting the right breakfast is just a matter of habit, and if you think about it, it doesn’t take too long to prepare.

    In order for everything to work out, you need:

    • Stock up on the right helpers
      – that is, healthy products that do not require long cooking.
    • Select time
      and make an approximate list of dishes familiar to you, which are spent no more than 15 minutes.
    • Plan ahead
      in the evening than you will have breakfast in the morning.

    Well, we will help you with this 🙂

    Not all cereals are equally useful

    The first thing that comes to mind when it comes to breakfast is morning porridge. But not all cereals are created equal.

    And this is the problem faced by those who want to eat right, but there is not enough time at all:

    1. Instant porridge
      are made from processed grains, in which, except for starch, nothing is left. We only get fast carbohydrates, as a result, very soon we will want to eat again.
    2. Whole grain porridge
      with shell, starchy part and germ – much more nutritious, healthy and rich in vitamins. These are slow carbohydrates that fill you up for a long time! There is one “but” – they require long cooking, which does not always have time. What to do?

    “Lifestyle” cut cereals are able to solve these problems They retain all parts of the whole grain, unlike processed industrial cereals. Due to the fact that the grain is cut into uniform plates, it quickly absorbs water, does not require pre-soaking and cooks in half the time.All the nutrients, vitamins, useful elements, the fiber we need, and slow carbohydrates remain in cereals from chopped grains. Convenient and useful!

    Cereals are already packaged in portioned packages: one package – one breakfast, so you don’t need to calculate your portion for a long time. If you, for example, keep a food diary, this is very convenient.

    Breakfast Ideas

    For the preparation of breakfasts, we took seven “Lifestyle” cereals as a basis. You can delight yourself with nutritious and healthy yummy for a whole week!

    Green buckwheat is a source of vitamins of group B, C, E, as well as iron, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc and, which is important, complete vegetable protein.Thanks to the content of organic acids, buckwheat helps the body to better absorb the iron, which it is rich in, which is why plant-based nutritionists love it so much.

    We are all accustomed to the taste of buckwheat porridge since childhood. Maybe we can cook it in a new way?

    Prepare green buckwheat in boiling lightly salted water. Pour the prepared porridge into a cup, add a little coconut milk, chia seeds and syrup instead of sugar to taste. Cover and let it brew for 10 minutes. At this time, cut your favorite fruit.Then garnish the porridge with them and enjoy a delicious breakfast!

    Green buckwheat in this breakfast is our slow carbohydrates, fruits are a mix of fast carbohydrates and fiber, and chia seeds are vegetable protein and healthy fats.

    Porridge made from chopped naked oats retained all the useful properties – B vitamins, zinc, potassium, phosphorus and other elements.

    Such porridge helps the gastrointestinal tract work, perfectly saturates and nourishes, and it is also a good base for making a delicious breakfast.

    Delicious oatmeal can be prepared without adding milk. But still it is worth adding protein to it – it will be more satisfying. So don’t forget to garnish your meal with a handful of your favorite nuts.

    Boil one bag of oatmeal in salted water. Now it remains to mix it with different seasonings: add some nuts, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and cardamom to taste, stir and place the apple slices on top. If you wish, you can add coconut flakes – it will be even tastier!

    If you like sweeter porridge – add a little ginger syrup.Healthy nuts are a source of protein in our breakfast.

    We hope you already know about the spelled? This is the grandmother of modern wheat. It has the same properties, and in some ways even surpasses it.

    Spelled contains a large amount of vegetable protein, B vitamins, folic acid, selenium, calcium and other important substances.

    Usually it takes time to cook spelled porridge, but chopped spelled grains will boil down in a matter of minutes.

    Fill a bag of chopped spelled with a glass of hot water, add a little lemon juice and leave overnight. In the morning, we send the contents to a blender along with a spoonful of honey and cocoa. Puree everything well and pour into a plate. Decorate the porridge with apple slices.

    To make the porridge more creamy and rich, you can add a little nut butter – this will provide breakfast with an additional source of protein.

    Wheat grains are another important source of slow carbohydrates, and with them energy and strength.If all the components remain in the wheat grain, then it perfectly saturates and nourishes with useful elements. Wheat porridge has a mild sweet taste – you can even do without sugar.

    Yes, to cook pumpkin porridge quickly, the pumpkin will have to be cooked in advance, in the evening. Then puree the soft pieces and leave overnight. In the morning, mix pumpkin puree with milk – here coconut is very suitable for us – and bring to a boil. Then add a bag of chopped wheat grains and let the porridge simmer under the lid for a few minutes.Delicious pumpkin porridge is ready!

    Add grated cheese or some nuts to the porridge to complement our breakfast with protein and healthy fats.

    For the preparation of porridge, it is very important to use brown rice, which, unlike its white counterpart, has not been polished. Rice helps to better assimilate proteins from food, normalizes digestion and is suitable for preparing a variety of dishes, from soups to desserts. Let’s try to cook a quick savory porridge with it.

    For this dish, we need a couple of minutes more than usual. We put the eggs to boil. In the meantime, cut the onion into slices and put in the pan. After that, add your favorite spices to the onion – for example, turmeric, and fry for a couple of minutes. Put the contents of the bag of chopped rice grains into the pan and season with half a glass of unsweetened yogurt. After a couple of minutes, the porridge can be removed from the heat.

    Garnish with chopped herbs and grated egg. If there is no time at all, you can simply cut the eggs into halves and put them next to the porridge.

    Rye is a source of complete vegetable protein. It helps to strengthen the immune system and takes care of our health. This cereal contains a lot of vitamins and useful elements: B vitamins, folic acid, calcium, iron, magnesium and others. And you can cook from it not only delicious bread, but also no less tasty porridge.

    Cereals are advised to be consumed on a daily basis. Cereals normalize digestion, cleanse the body and energize. However, recently there have been controversies that, in fact, cereals are not so useful and can even harm the body.Where did this talk come from and is there any truth in it? We assure you that no.

    Cereals really affect health in the most favorable way, but you need to know how to choose them correctly. Contradictions have arisen due to the fact that many do not know that there are different cereals: peeled and whole grains. As a result, they choose not the most useful types for their diet. Refined cereals are processed and deprived of all nutrients and are noticeably inferior to whole grains in composition and effect on the body.

    We will tell you about the beneficial properties of whole grain cereals and their effect on the body, as well as share a selection of the five most useful types of cereals that must be present in your diet.

    Why Whole Grains Are Good

    Whole Grains are made up of three components: the germ, the bran and the endosperm. Some of them are removed from the peeled cereals. They become softer and cook faster, but at the same time they are devoid of all the nutrients.

    Unlike peeled cereals, whole grains retain all the nutrients in their composition. They contain a large amount of vitamins of group B, A, E, iron, copper, zinc, magnesium, antioxidants, healthy fats. Such a product strengthens health, increases the body’s defenses, speeds up metabolic processes, improves the functioning of the cardiovascular system and has a beneficial effect on mental activity.

    Thus, scientific studies have shown that daily consumption of 1-2 servings of whole grain cereals reduces the risk of premature death by 20%, and the occurrence and development of cancer by 23%.

    Which whole grains are especially useful

    There are a lot of whole grains. They are all good for you, so pick whichever one you want at the supermarket, but some are high in nutrients. Let’s take a closer look at such whole grain cereals.

    Millet

    Millet is a cereal that is widespread in Asian countries.It is even sometimes called “the bread of the East”. The love of Eastern peoples for this grain is not at all accidental.

    Millet has a high nutritional value and rich composition. The cereals contain manganese, phosphorus, magnesium, amino acids and other useful substances. So, millet contains more protein than rice – for this, vegetarians also adore cereals, since the vegetable protein contained in millet is perfectly absorbed by the body and energizes. In addition, regular consumption of this cereal normalizes blood pressure, improves digestion and increases the body’s defenses.

    Millet porridge with raisins

    Ingredients:

    • Millet
      1 tbsp.
    • Milk
      2 tbsp.
    • Raisins
      50 g
    • Curd
      100 g
    • Sugar
      2 tbsp. l.
    • Butter
      50 g
    • Salt
      taste

    Method of preparation:

    1. Rinse the millet thoroughly, put it in a saucepan and add water. Bring to a boil and simmer for about 15 minutes. Drain the water.
    2. At this time, boil the milk and add to the porridge along with sugar, salt and butter.Cover and cook for another 15-20 minutes.
    3. Remove from heat, add raisins and cottage cheese mashed with a fork. To stir thoroughly.

    Whole Wheat

    Whole Wheat is another healthy cereal that must be present in the human diet. The substances that make up whole wheat are the main building blocks for cellular tissue. Whole wheat also contains valuable fiber, which has a positive effect on the functioning of the digestive system and cleanses the intestines.Calories from wheat are not stored on the hips, but converted into energy.

    Wheat porridge with cranberries

    No breakfast is more perfect than wheat porridge with cranberries. You won’t need any desserts with this dish.

    Ingredients:

    • Water
      3.5 cups
    • Cranberry
      2 cups
    • Salt
      taste
    • Sugar
      1/2 cup
    • Wheat groats
      2/3 cup
    • Milk
      taste

    Preparation:

    1. In a medium saucepan, combine water and cranberries.Bring to a boil and cook for 10-15 minutes.
    2. Add salt and sugar.
    3. Gradually add cereal, stirring constantly. Cook for 5-10 minutes.
    4. Remove the pan from the heat and let the porridge cool to room temperature. Use a blender to whisk the porridge into the puree. Serve with milk and any filling of your choice.

    Quinoa

    Quinoa is a well-known superfood: this means that the composition of this product contains useful and nutritious substances. Quinoa is a complete source of plant protein: it energizes and supplies the body with building materials.Regular use of this product improves well-being, calms the nervous system, relieves chronic fatigue, and also normalizes the functioning of the stomach and intestines and speeds up metabolic processes.

    Quinoa with black beans

    Quinoa goes well with vegetables and legumes. Use this to make your dream dinner.

    Ingredients:

    • Quinoa
      1.5 cups
    • Canned Black Beans
      450 ml
    • Corn
      a handful of
    • Chives
      3 stems
    • Zucchini
      1/2 pcs.
    • Cherry Tomatoes
      400 g
    • Seasonings to taste
      2 tbsp. l.
    • Salt
      1/2 tsp
    • Olive oil
      2 tbsp. l.
    • White Wine Vinegar
      2 tbsp. l.

    Preparation:

    1. Boil the quinoa following the instructions on the package.
    2. Chop the green onion and dice the courgettes.
    3. In a bowl, combine quinoa, zucchini, cherry tomatoes, corn, canned beans and green onions.
    4. Season. Salt.
    5. Add olive oil and white wine vinegar.
    6. Stir gently and serve.

    Brown rice

    Forget about white processed rice, because there is brown rice that is several times ahead of its brother in terms of nutrients. Yes, brown rice takes a little longer to cook, but for the sake of its beneficial properties, you can wait. The product contains large quantities of valuable minerals magnesium, selenium and manganese. They are necessary for the body for strong immunity, healthy nervous system, active brain function and fast metabolism.Brown rice is also rich in antioxidants and fiber.

    Wild Rice with Pumpkin

    Try wild rice with pumpkin – this gastronomic combination will pleasantly surprise you.

    Ingredients:

    • Brown Rice
      120 g
    • Pumpkin
      300 g
    • Cream
      100 ml
    • Shallots
      1 PC.
    • Cumin
      taste
    • Salt
      taste
    • Ground black pepper
      taste
    • Sesame oil
      taste

    Method of preparation:

  • Peel the shallots, finely chop and mix with the diced ham.
  • Cut the mushrooms into slices and fry in olive oil over low heat with ham and onion until tender. If you are using frozen mushrooms, boil them in a separate saucepan.
  • Add oats and broth, season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and simmer for 50 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • At the end of this time, the food is still quite runny, this is normal. Cover the pan with a lid and let the dish steep for 30 minutes.The remaining moisture will be absorbed. Sprinkle with grated cheese before serving.
  • 90,000 10 most useful cereals :: Health :: RBK Style

    1. Buckwheat

    Buckwheat contains proteins, unsaturated fatty acids, calcium and zinc, as well as vitamins of groups A, B, E and PP. There are two types of buckwheat groats: unground (whole grains) and prodel (fine grain fraction).Buckwheat is often advised by nutritionists: it contains only about 3% fat for 12% of proteins, and 100 grams of the product contains 313 Kcal.

    Due to the high content of phenolic compounds, groats have antioxidant properties. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (Maryland, USA) [1], buckwheat stimulates intestinal motility, helps to reduce cholesterol, the risk of diabetes and hypertension. Buckwheat is stored longer than other cereals and does not grow moldy even at high humidity.

    2. Oat groats

    Oatmeal is made from unrefined oat kernels and oat kernels consisting of germs and bran. They contain vitamins A, B, E, potassium, magnesium, zinc and beta-glucan. Research cited in a 2016 British Journal of Nutrition article [2] shows that beta glucan clears excess cholesterol from the blood.

    Whole grain oats – an immunomodulator that improves the condition of the skin and hair; cereals regulate blood sugar levels and speed up digestion.The second type of cereal is peeled from the top layer, steamed and pressed oat flakes. With such processing, some of the nutrients are lost, but porridge remains a dietary product and has a positive effect on the digestive tract. The third type is instant porridge, from which there is more harm than good, since they often contain a lot of sugar and flavorings.

    3. Bulgur

    This cereal is not as common in the diet of modern people as the two previous ones, but no less useful.Bulgur is young wheat, the grains of which are dried and refined, while containing 12.3 grams of protein per 100 grams of product. They store vitamins B, E, K and beta-carotene, magnesium, copper, calcium, potassium and iron.

    Groats are distinguished by a large amount of dietary fiber, cleanses the intestines well, accelerates the absorption of vitamins and increases metabolism. Bulgur promotes the outflow of bile, which is good for the liver.

    4. Barley groats

    Grits familiar from childhood are the basis of barley porridge and are made from crushed unpolished barley kernels.Barley is distinguished by a large amount of fiber, contains vitamins A, E, B, PP, iron, iodine, potassium and phosphorus.

    Barley porridge has anti-inflammatory and diuretic effects, cleanses the body of toxins. Please note that with all the beneficial properties, you should not include barley in the diet of children under two years of age, as it is a difficult product to digest.

    5. Rye groats

    Rye groats are non-crushed groats made from rye grains.In cooking, rye is added to bread. Rye is a traditional cereal, similar in properties to wheat, but it is much more suitable for building a healthy diet. According to the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Grain and its Processed Products (VNIIZ) [3], amino acids and more dietary fiber are optimally balanced in this culture, which helps to strengthen the immune system and reduce the risk of blood diseases. Unlike wheat, rye has less gluten.

    Rye cereals and flour contain vitamins E, A and PP, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium and iron.Rye bread can be used as a mild laxative, but the rye cereal decoction has the opposite effect.

    6. Corn grits

    Canned corn or boiled cobs are most often used in cooking. But corn porridge is no less useful: it contains antioxidants and it helps to restore the correct intestinal microflora, gently cleansing the body thanks to fiber.Corn grits do not contain gluten, but they contain vitamins B, E, A, H, tryptophan and lysine, iron, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus. Cornmeal meals reduce cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of stomach, gallbladder and liver diseases. By the way, corn and corn grits retain their maximum useful properties even at high temperatures.

    7. Quinoa

    Quinoa is a cereal from a plant of the amaranth family.It contains up to 14% protein and 64% healthy carbohydrates. The cereal contains B vitamins, folic acid, phosphorus, manganese, potassium, sodium, selenium and magnesium. Quinoa is a high-quality protein and source of dietary fiber with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, according to 2018 information posted on the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization [4]. Groats can be cooked as a separate side dish, added to salads and soups.

    8. Brown rice

    Brown is brown rice.Rice bran contains a maximum of useful substances: phosphorus, magnesium, antioxidants and vitamins of the B and PP groups, which have a positive effect on the nervous system. Brown rice improves digestion, removes radionuclides from the body, and helps to cope with neurocirculatory dystonia. Rice saturates for a long time and helps to maintain youthfulness and beauty of the skin, strengthen immunity and reduce the risk of arthritis, dermatitis and arthrosis.

    9. Frike

    Groats are made from roasted young wheat with still soft seeds.According to the United States Department of Agriculture [5], fricke (aka farik) contains up to 12% protein and 72% carbohydrates. It acts as a probiotic in the stomach, helping the growth of healthy bacteria. Groats are characterized by a low glycemic index and high nutritional value. Frike is rich in iron, sodium and calcium, vitamins C, B, A, E.

    10. Couscous

    Couscous is made from crushed durum wheat and is close to pasta in nutritional value, only pasta is boiled, and couscous is steamed or simply poured with boiling water and allowed to brew.Like other whole grain cereals, couscous reduces the risk of chronic heart disease as well as diabetes and cancer, writes Joanne Slavin, author of “Whole Grains and Human Health,” published in Cambridge University Press [6]. These cereals are high in selenium, which makes them a powerful antioxidant. In addition, couscous strengthens the immune system and normalizes hormonal balance.

    Quinoa groats

    The homeland of pseudo-grain cereals is South America, or rather, it grew near Lake Titicaca.The locals (Indians) were actively used for cooking, along with potatoes and corn. Outwardly, the grains resemble buckwheat, but differ in color. Quinoa grits, depending on the variety, can be red, black, purple and beige. Easy to grow (seed germination takes only 2.5-3 hours), does not require special care, is not susceptible to pests.

    Quinoa groats do not contain gluten, therefore it is the most valuable product for people suffering from its intolerance. Included in the “menu” of vegetarians.It is rich in trace elements (calcium, phosphorus, iron, zinc) and vitamins (group B). Contains fiber, which removes toxins from the body, helps to remove excess water. There is a high, in comparison with other cereals, protein content. Vegetable fat makes up more than 5% of the weight, which is a significant indicator. Caloric content is 368 kcal per 100 g.

    Contraindications for quinoa groats

    There are no contraindications for the use of this product, but people prone to allergies are advised to be careful, this also applies to children and pregnant women.

    Preparation.

    The groats must be pre-washed and dried before use, otherwise they will be bitter. It is prepared in the same way as ordinary buckwheat porridge. 1 tbsp cereal / 2 tbsp. water, salt, cook until the water evaporates, add oil. Its unusual taste and nutritional value allow it to be used in various salads, fillings, side dishes, even as a base for burgers.


    15255075100


    Default By Name (A – Z) By Name (Z – A) Price (ascending) Price (descending) Rating (descending) Rating (ascending) Model (A – Z) Model (Z – A)

    Hot Sales






    1

    White quinoa is a modern exotic product.White quinoa groats are gaining momentum at the present ..

    250g

    250.00 p.

    Hot Sales

    Red Quinoa has incredibly nutritious seeds. This plant is native to South America. Ancient ..

    250g

    250.00 p.

    Hot Sales

    Black quinoa groats outwardly resembles something between buckwheat and lupine.It tastes like ore ..

    250g

    250.00 p.

    Hot Sales

    Ingredients: white quinoa. Quinoa is a grain crop native to South America. This type of grain ..

    250g

    250.00 p.

    Showing 1 to 4 of 4 (1 pages total)

    Our whole grain flour

    From organic grain

    Without chemical fertilizers

    With a high protein content

    Made on stone millstones in our own mills

    Own production of whole grain and nut flour

    90,000 Cereals – Recipes with photos on malosoli.ru

      Numerous studies show the benefits of a high fiber diet. What’s better than wholesome whole grains? Here is a list of the different types of whole grains that you can include in your diet.

  • Teff
  • Teff is considered to be an “ancient grain” that has been eaten in different parts of the world for several hundred years, and recently it found its way into Russian grocery supermarkets. Like quinoa, teff is gluten-free but tends to be less versatile due to its small size.

  • Quinoa
  • Quinoa is a popular favorite of whole grains for several reasons. First, it cooks much faster than other whole grains. Quinoa takes about 15 minutes to cook, and its cereal takes just a few minutes. Secondly, it is rich in protein – 18 grams per cup, cooked, making it ideal for vegetarians and vegans.

    It has a chewy, slightly nutty flavor similar to a paste, making it ideal for stir-fry or salad dressings.If you know how it tastes, try this popular whole grain. It may be the first on your list of your favorite grains!

  • Farro
  • This grain looks like barley, tastes like barley, cooks like barley, but it’s not barley – it’s farro! Farro is an ancient grain that has long been a part of traditional Italian dishes.

  • Kaniva
  • Kaniwa is a close relative of quinoa. It contains almost as much protein as quinoa and is an excellent source of iron and is the best choice for vegetarians and vegans.

  • Wheat Bulgur
  • Most people have heard of bulgur wheat as it is the main ingredient in the traditional Middle Eastern tabbouleh salad. Bulgur wheat is rich in fiber that is good for the heart. Instant Bulgur, also called fine-grained, cooks in just five minutes. Use it in place of rice in a salad or rice pilaf recipe and you’ll probably never go back to regular white rice again.

  • Millet
  • If you enjoy cooking with whole grains, try millet! Millet is the most widely used poultry feed, but it is a whole grain that can be used as rice in vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free meals.

  • Frike
  • The last of the grains belonging to the “ancient grain” trend is freake, which is gaining popularity. Frike has long been eaten in the Middle East. It is a whole grain wheat that is harvested while still young and green, then roasted and then refined. It’s incredibly high in fiber and because it’s high in protein, it’s an ideal choice for vegetarians and vegans. Try adding a little to a salad or soup for a varied diet.It could be your new favorite whole grain variety.

  • Barley
  • Nut barley is arguably more widely used as a beer ingredient than whole grain, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try it! Like many grains, barley has been shown to be effective in lowering cholesterol, especially in men, in as little as five weeks. If you want to eat more whole grains to lower your cholesterol levels, it is best to try barley.

  • Israeli Couscous
  • If you haven’t added Israeli couscous to your list of whole grains yet, you may have a new favorite.Israeli couscous is larger than barley but rounder in shape with a light nutty pungent flavor and chewy texture. Israeli couscous is made from crushed grains, so it is technically not a whole grain.

  • Wheat berries
  • Very few people have ever eaten whole wheat grains. They take quite a long time to cook, but they are high in fiber and well worth the effort if you have the time to stew them a little on the stove.Try adding a handful to your favorite soup or chili recipe for more fiber and nutrients. You can also pair this with a vegetable stir-fry or rice.

  • Buckwheat
  • Buckwheat is not technically a whole grain, but it is used in the same way as other grains and is just as healthy. In fact, buckwheat is a healthy, gluten-free, high-protein food. If you’ve ever eaten Japanese soba noodles, you’ve probably eaten buckwheat, as these noodles are usually made with buckwheat flour.The health benefits of including buckwheat in the diet have been proven. It strengthens capillary walls, relieves some of the symptoms of type 2 diabetes and even high blood pressure.

    Types of cereals

    Please rate how useful the article was (your recommendations can be taken into account when forming google search results)


    .