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Folliculitis in Dogs & Cats

Summary

Folliculitis is a term that refers to the inflammation of one or more hair follicles. In veterinary medicine, it’s most commonly discussed as bacterial folliculitis, a condition which involves the infection of hair follicles with bacteria and is widely considered the most common kind of canine skin infection.

The bacteria that infects the hair follicles of pets who suffer this condition typically resides on the surface of normal dog and cat skin. As such, bacterial folliculitis tends to occur when a healthy hair follicle is compromised, either by an underlying systemic disease, local trauma, or a specific disorder of the skin.

Systemic diseases that can lead to bacterial folliculitis include endocrine disorders (such as hypothyroidism and Cushing’s disease in dogs) and disorders of the immune system.

Skin disorders causing bacterial folliculitis in dogs include: canine acne, acral lick granuloma, skin fold pyoderma, interdigital pododermatitis (interdigital cysts), idiopathic furunculosis of German Shepherd Dogs, pyotraumatic folliculitis, and callus dermatitis, among others. In both dogs and cats, allergic skin disease is perhaps the most common cause of bacterial folliculitis. Parasitism and fungal infection of the skin are also common causes.

Symptoms and Identification

Regardless of the cause, the upshot of bacterial folliculitis is the same. Swelling, redness, itching, pustules (pimples) and hair loss are the most common symptoms, but the following may also be in evidence:

  •  Papules (reddish swellings on the skin)

  • Hyperpigmentation (darkening of the skin)

  • Epidermal collarettes (circular areas of hair loss with crusting or scaling around their borders)

  • Superficial erosions

  • Draining tracts

  • Pain around the affected areas

The diagnosis of bacterial folliculitis is typically made upon visual inspection and often after undertaking one or more of the following diagnostic tests:

  •  Skin scrapings for mites

  • Skin cytology

  • Fungal culture

  • Wood’s lamp examination for fungus (ringworm)

  • Bacterial culture and sensitivity

  • Skin biopsy and histopathology

Affected Breeds

No breed predisposition has been specifically identified for bacterial folliculitis in general. Certain conditions predisposing pets to bacterial folliculitis (such as allergic skin disease), however, are considered hereditary and are therefore more prevalent in certain breeds.

Treatment

Treatment of bacterial folliculitis requires a three-pronged approach: topical therapy, systemic therapy, and treatment of any underlying disorder. Antimicrobial drugs are almost always employed.

Topical therapy most often involves the use of antimicrobial shampoos, whereas systemic therapy usually includes oral antibiotic medications. In the case of bacterial folliculitis, long-term use of both topical and systemic antimicrobials is typically required (three to twelve weeks).

Treatment of underlying conditions is highly specific to the individual disorder.

Veterinary Cost

Due to the relative ease of diagnosis in most cases, the initial costs involved in diagnosing bacterial folliculitis –– often less than $100-$200 –– are typically considered affordable. In complicated cases for which hard-to-diagnose underlying diseases are a possibility, however, diagnostic costs can climb to $500 – $1,000 or more, especially if systemic diseases are in play.

Despite the relatively low cost of diagnosis, treatment may prove expensive for many pets with bacterial folliculitis. That’s because of the long term nature of the typical treatment protocol and the high price of some of the antibiotics and topical agents required to treat these infections. In large dogs, for example, antibiotic therapy can easily cost many hundreds of dollars. What’s more, treatment of any underlying conditions may also prove expensive.

Prevention

The possibility of preventing bacterial folliculitis depends on whether or not its underlying cause can be prevented. For example, pets with flea allergy as an underlying cause are often highly manageable via strict flea prevention. Otherwise, this condition isn’t generally considered preventable.

References

Curtis CF, Bond R, Blunden AS, Thomson DG, McNeil PE, Whitbread TW. Canine eosinophilic folliculitis and furunculosis in three cases. J Small Anim Pract. 1995 Mar;36(3):119-23.

Fraser M. What is your diagnosis? Eosinophilic folliculitis and furunculosis. J Small Anim Pract. 2002 Apr;43(4):150, 187.

Mason IS, Mason KV, Lloyd DH. A review of the biology of canine skin with respect to the commensals Staphylococcus intermedius, Demodex canis and Malassezia pachydermatis. Vet Dermatol. 1996;7:119–132.

Sasaki A, Shimizu A, Kawano J, et al. Characteristics of Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from diseased and healthy dogs. J Vet Med Sci. 2005;67:103–106.

White SD, Brown AE, Chapman PL, et al.. Evaluation of aerobic bacteriologic culture of epidermal collarette specimens in dogs with superficial pyoderma. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2005;226:904–908.

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8 Types Of Scalp Folliculitis & Ways To Get Rid Of Them – SkinKraft

Have you ever noticed small red bumps on your scalp that resemble an acne breakout? If yes, it could be the cause of a common skin condition called scalp folliculitis.

In this article, we discuss everything you need to know about scalp folliculitis and how you can help treat and manage it effectively. Read on to find out more.

Highlights:

What Is Scalp Folliculitis?

This is an inflammatory disorder that affects the hair follicles in the scalp. It is characterized by small and itchy pustules on the scalp, often most bothersome on the frontal hairline. These bumps may vary in size and severity from person to person.

While the condition isn’t life-threatening, it can be itchy, painful and embarrassing. However, with your doctor’s timely intervention, you can get rid of it.

What Does Scalp Folliculitis Look Like?

Scalp folliculitis usually looks like clusters of small red bumps and can initially be mistaken for an acne breakout.

If left untreated, folliculitis can spread to other hair follicles, and the bumps may get more inflamed. You may also get blisters that break open, ooze pus and turn crusty.

Symptoms Of Scalp Folliculitis

  • Clusters of small red bumps
  • White heads on some of the bumps
  • Burning or stinging sensation
  • Pain or tenderness
  • Itchiness
  • Sores
  • Pus-filled blisters

Types Of Scalp Folliculitis

Folliculitis is broadly classified as superficial and deep. While superficial folliculitis is mild and easily treatable, deep folliculitis penetrates deeper into the hair follicle.

1. Superficial Folliculitis

A. Bacterial Folliculitis

This is a common bacterial infection of the follicles. The bacteria that live on the skin, enter the follicles through a cut or wound.

This is characterised by itchy, pus-filled bumps.

B. Pseudofolliculitis Barbae (PFB)

This is commonly known as razor bump and affects almost 60 [1] percent African American men and people with curly hair.

It is caused due to ingrown hair. A 100 [2] percent effective treatment is to allow the hair to grow before shaving them. Avoiding a shave for 3-4 weeks is often helpful.

C. Pseudomonas Folliculitis

This is also known as hot tub folliculitis. It occurs due to using unclean pools or hot tubs and usually affects the areas covered with a swimsuit or at the back of the legs.

You can notice symptoms within 72 hours of exposure.

D. Pityrosporum Folliculitis

This is a yeast infection of the skin that leads to redness and itchiness. It usually occurs in the face and upper body. This type of folliculitis is more prevalent in young adults.

2. Deep Folliculitis

A. Boils

A bacterial infection that occurs deep inside the follicles can lead to painful, pus-filled boils.

They grow in size due to pus accumulation until they rupture and drain. Scarring may develop as an aftereffect of boils.

B. Sycosis Barbae

This is similar to a razor bump but is deeper.

C. Eosinophilic Folliculitis

This is an intense and repetitive occurrence of folliculitis, often leading to dark patches of skin.

People who have weak immunity are more prone to develop this.

D. Gram-Negative Folliculitis

People on antibiotics for long durations are at risk of developing this form of folliculitis.

Long-acting antibiotics disrupt the normal bacterial balance of the skin.

How Is Scalp Folliculitis Diagnosed?

Your doctor can diagnose folliculitis by examining your skin and asking you a few questions about your medical history.

In most cases, a lab test is not required to diagnose folliculitis. However, if needed, your doctor might take a swab of the affected area to analyze its root cause.

What Causes Folliculitis On The Scalp?

Folliculitis on the scalp may develop if hair follicles are damaged. This can happen due to several factors, such as:

  • Wearing helmets for a long time
  • Shaving your head
  • Wearing your hair too tight in ponytails or braids
  • Frequently scratching your scalp
  • Using too many hair products, which can clog your follicles over time

How Do You Treat Scalp Folliculitis?

1.

Topical Antibiotics

You can clean the affected area with an antibacterial cleanser [3] to limit the spread of folliculitis. The topical application of antibiotics can also help reduce the itch.

Common topical antibiotics that work for scalp folliculitis include fusidic acid gel, clindamycin, and erythromycin

2. Steroid Lotions, Creams, Soaps

For mild infections, your doctor may prescribe steroid lotions, creams, and soaps. A medicated shampoo [4] may also be prescribed to treat folliculitis of the scalp or beard.

While choosing a shampoo, it is advisable to pick an anti-dandruff formula that contains ingredients such as tea tree oil, ketoconazole, or ciclopirox.

Applying Cortisone cream or Neosporin ointment may also provide some relief.

3. Oral Medications

Oral medications are not necessarily prescribed by doctors for routine treatments. However, if your case is severe, or if your infection is recurring, your doctor might prescribe oral antibiotics.

4. Home Remedies

The first step to treat folliculitis at home is to find its root cause. Be mindful of your habits. For instance, if you shave your head frequently, try to maintain a gap of at least three to four weeks between each shave.

Other home remedies that may offer relief include:

A. Warm Compress

Wet a washcloth in warm water and place it on the affected area for a few minutes. Do this a few times in the day to soothe the area and reduce itching.

B. Herbs

Apply oatmeal on your scalp to reduce inflammation. A research study [5] reports that oatmeal has anti-inflammatory properties and can offer relief from various skin conditions.

Another study [6] revealed that the usage of traditional herbs helps reduce the symptoms of folliculitis in many cases.

C. Oils

Certain essential oils like lemon oil, eucalyptus oil, clove oil, tea tree oil, cinnamon oil, and chamomile oil have antibacterial and antifungal properties that can be effective in controlling folliculitis.

Dilute a few drops of essential oil of your choice with a carrier oil or moisturizer and apply locally to soothe itchiness.

How Long Does Scalp Folliculitis Last?

Folliculitis gets cured within 7-10 days without treatment. However, in some severe cases, it may cause permanent hair loss or scarring.

In general, folliculitis can be treated easily by a timely intervention by your doctor.

Who’s At Risk Of Scalp Folliculitis?

Although anyone can develop folliculitis, certain pre-existing medical conditions may add to the risk factor. These include:

  • Conditions like AIDS, leukemia, and diabetes reduce the body’s immunity
  • Acne
  • Pre-existing dermatitis
  • Men with curly hair who shave frequently
  • Wearing tight clothes or waxing can damage the
  • Using public hot tubs and pools
  • Taking long-term antibiotics

Prevention Tips For Scalp Folliculitis

You can prevent scalp folliculitis by following these simple guidelines:

  • Bathe daily, especially after workouts
  • Use a mild soap
  • Don’t scratch the bumps
  • Avoid shaving too frequently
  • Avoid tying your hair too tight
  • Avoid using too much oil as this can clog the follicles and trap bacteria
  • Maintain personal hygiene. Do not share your towel, comb, or any other personal items
  • Use only clean pools or hot tubs

Note:

You should consult your doctor to treat underlying medical conditions. Also, if you take any medication, find out whether the drugs could be further aggravating your folliculitis.

How Can You Tell If Folliculitis Is Bacterial Or Fungal?

Apart from examining your skin, your doctor may take a swab from the affected area to conclude whether it is a bacterial or fungal infection.

Performing a skin biopsy is a rare case. However, the doctor may perform one to rule out other probable causes.

What Happens If Folliculitis Goes Untreated?

A mild case of folliculitis usually heals on its own when left untreated.

Hot tub folliculitis may settle down within ten days [7] if left untreated.

Folliculitis barbae, when left untreated, can gradually progress and spread, causing a deep-seated infection known as sycosis barbae [8].

Wrapping Up

Folliculitis is a relatively common skin condition caused by inflammation and infection in the hair follicles.

Although a mild infection usually cures itself and can be treated at home, it is essential to consult with your doctor before deciding to use medication. Depending on your situation and frequency of recurrences, your doctor can suggest the right course of action.

Begin By Knowing Your Skin

Skin Abscess | Dermatology | JAMA

A skin abscess is a pocket of pus.

It is similar to a pimple, but larger and deeper under the skin. It forms when the body tries to protect itself from an infection by creating a wall around it. The pus contains bacteria, white blood cells, and dead skin. The most common bacteria are Staphylococcus aureus (known as “staph”) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (known as MRSA). Most people carry these bacteria on their skin yet never develop an infection. However, when the bacteria penetrate the skin (through a cut, along a hair follicle, or under the edges of a wound), they may lead to an abscess.

A skin abscess is round and feels firm and squishy due to the thick membrane around it and the liquid pus inside. It is usually painful, and the overlying skin is often red. Sometimes there is a pinpoint opening in the center (a punctum). This is the weakest part of the wall and pus might spontaneously drain through it.

The only certain way to treat an abscess is to open the pocket and drain the pus. This is known as an “incision and drainage.” It is a simple procedure that can be done with local anesthesia. A surgical knife is used to cut a hole in the wall of the abscess and empty it of pus.

Sometimes the doctor will pack the wound or leave a wick, which means stuffing the empty pocket with a ribbon of gauze. This allows the pus to continue draining and prevents the abscess from returning. Your doctor will instruct you to gently pull out a small part of the wick every day until it all comes out. Eventually, the entire gauze will be removed and the wound will heal from inside out. If the cavity is large, you may be asked to come back to the office so the gauze can be replaced entirely. Warm, moist compresses or baths are also recommended to keep the wound open and draining.

  • If the area around the abscess is red and warm to touch it could be a sign of cellulitis, an infection of the superficial layer of the skin. In this case, antibiotics may be prescribed.

  • Recurrent abscesses could be a sign of MRSA infection. Your doctor may test for MRSA and prescribe antibiotics directed at treating these particular bacteria.

  • Sometimes an abscess is not ready to be drained, which means that it is not yet organized into a defined pocket. Antibiotics may be effective at treating this infection and prevent it from becoming an abscess.

  • Fever is a sign that the infection may be deeper than can be seen with the naked eye and may be another reason to use antibiotics.

  • If antibiotics are given, it is crucial to finish all of them as instructed, even if the infection looks better. This prevents bacteria from becoming resistant to antibiotics.

  • Left untreated, an abscess can lead to serious complications and may become life-threatening.

Box Section Ref ID

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: The authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none were reported.

Source: Raff AB, Kroshinsky D. Cellulitis: a review. JAMA. 2016;316(3):325-337.

Staph Infection (Staphylococcus Infection)

Overview

What is a staph infection?

Staphylococcal infection, commonly called staph infection, are caused by a genus of bacteria called Staphylococcus. There are more than 30 strains (types) of Staphylococcus bacteria and the most common human pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus. Doctors prescribe antibiotics to treat staphylococcal infection. In severe cases, staph infection can cause serious health complications and death.

What parts of the body are affected by staph infection?

Different types of staph bacteria cause problems in various parts of the body. Staphylococcal infection can affect the:

  • Skin: Most commonly, Staphylococcus aureus bacteria cause skin infection. This can produce boils, blisters, and redness on the skin.
  • Breasts: Breastfeeding women can develop mastitis, which causes inflammation (swelling) and abscesses (collections of pus) in the breast.
  • Digestive system: When ingested (eaten), the staph bacteria cause food poisoning, leading to vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Bones: The bacteria can infect the bones, causing inflammation and pain. This infection is called osteomyelitis.
  • Lungs and heart: If the bacteria get into the lungs, abscesses can form, causing pneumonia and breathing problems. Staph bacteria can also damage the heart valves and lead to heart failure.
  • Bloodstream: When bacteria release toxins into the body, a serious infection called septicemia (blood poisoning) can occur.

How common is staph infection?

There are millions of skin staph infections in the United States every year. Most of these cases are mild and treated with antibiotics. It is common for the Staphylococcus bacteria to live on the skin or in the nose of healthy people. The bacteria only cause problems when they make their way inside the body. However, there are many thousands of serious cases of S. aureus infection in the United States every year.

Who is affected by staph infection?

While anyone can get a staph infection, certain groups of people are at higher risk than others. People who work in hospitals are more likely to have the bacteria on their skin. Staph infections occur most often in people who:

  • Inject drugs
  • Are hospitalized, have recently had surgery, or have catheters or medical devices in their body
  • Manage a chronic condition like diabetes or vascular disease
  • Have a weakened immune system
  • Are breastfeeding
  • Have worn a tampon for an extended time
  • Have congenital heart defects
  • Have had other surgeries on heart valves

Symptoms and Causes

What are the symptoms of staph infection on the skin?

Symptoms of a staph infection vary depending on the area of the body where the infection occurs. Staph infection occur most often on the skin. Symptoms of staph infection on the skin include:

  • Abscesses and boils: These painful sores form under the skin, causing redness and pain.
  • Cellulitis: This type of infection causes swollen, red, painful skin and tissue just under the skin.
  • Folliculitis: A small pimple-like blister forms under the hair follicle and causes pain.
  • Impetigo: Fluid-filled blisters or sores form and rupture, leaving a yellow or brown crust.
  • Staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS): This serious infection causes skin to peel off all over the body. It usually affects infants and small children.

What are the symptoms of staph infection in the body?

When a staph infection occurs in areas of the body other than the skin, symptoms include:

  • Food poisoning: Symptoms can be severe and include vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Mastitis: Occurring mostly in breastfeeding women, mastitis leads to inflammation, pain, and abscesses in the breast.
  • Septicemia: Staph bacteria in the bloodstream can cause blood poisoning, also called sepsis. Symptoms include fever and dangerously low blood pressure (hypotension).
  • Toxic shock syndrome: A severe form of septicemia, toxic shock syndrome (TSS) symptoms include fever, muscle aches, and a rash that looks like sunburn.
  • Endocarditis: This infection of the lining of the heart muscle is often caused by staph infection. The heart valves and the heart muscle may also be affected. Symptoms include fever, sweating, weight loss, and fast heart rate.

How do people get staph infection?

Staph infection spread in a variety of ways, including:

  • Skin infection: Staph infection on the skin occur when someone comes into contact with the Staphylococcus bacteria. The bacteria are contagious and usually enter into the skin through a cut.
  • Food poisoning: The staph bacteria are ingested (eaten), usually due to cross-contamination when handling food.
  • Toxic shock syndrome: When a woman wears a tampon for an extended time, blood collects on the tampon and creates the ideal environment for bacteria from the woman’s vagina to grow. The bacteria enter into the body through tiny cuts in the lining of the vagina.
  • Mastitis: In breastfeeding women, bacteria from the baby’s mouth enter the breast through a crack in the nipple. When the breast isn’t emptied often, bacteria get trapped in the breast and cause infection.
  • Endocarditis: The bacteria enter the heart through the bloodstream, sometimes through the mouth. People with poor dental health or who bleed when brushing their teeth might be more at risk for this happening.

Diagnosis and Tests

How is staph infection diagnosed?

Your doctor’s diagnosis of a staph infection depends on what area of the body is affected.

  • Skin: Usually, doctors diagnose a staph infection on the skin by examining the affected area. Your doctor may choose to take a sample of the skin to test for the bacteria.
  • Food poisoning: Your doctor will ask about the length and severity of your symptoms and may take a stool sample.
  • Mastitis: After considering your symptoms, your doctor may send a sample of your breast milk to a lab to test for the presence of bacteria.
  • Toxic shock syndrome: Your doctor may take a urine or blood sample to check for bacteria. Sometimes, doctors will also order a CT scan to see if the infection is affecting the organs.
  • Endocarditis: Diagnosis is based on symptoms, blood tests, and an echocardiogram.

How do I know if I have staph infection?

If you have symptoms of a staph infection, you should contact your doctor for diagnosis and treatment. See your doctor if you or your child has an area of skin that is blistered, irritated, or red, especially if a fever accompanies these symptoms. Only a doctor can diagnose and treat a staph infection.

Management and Treatment

What are the treatments for staph infection?

Most staph infection on the skin can be treated with a topical antibiotic (applied to the skin). Your doctor may also drain a boil or abscess by making a small incision to let the pus out.

Doctors also prescribe oral antibiotics (taken by mouth) to treat staph infection in the body and on the skin. The antibiotic will vary depending on the type of infection. In severe cases of staph infection, doctors use IV (intravenous) antibiotics to kill the bacteria.

What are the side effects of the treatment for staph infection?

Side effects vary depending on the type of antibiotic used to treat the staph infection. Side effects from topical ointments can include stinging, itching, and redness in the affected area. Common side effects of oral antibiotics include nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

What are the complications associated with staph infection?

If left untreated, staph infection can be deadly. Rarely, staph infection are resistant to the antibiotics commonly used to treat them. This infection, called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), cause severe infection and death.

What can I do to help relieve symptoms of staph infection?

It is important to see your doctor if you think you might have a staph infection. To relieve the symptoms of staph infection on the skin, you should clean the affected area with soap and water. Cold compresses and over-the-counter pain relievers may ease the discomfort of skin infection.

In cases of food poisoning, drink plenty of liquids while you are recovering to reduce your risk of dehydration. Massage and warm compresses can relieve the symptoms of mastitis.

Prevention

How can I prevent staph infection?

Prevention depends on the type of infection. To reduce your risk of a staph infection, you should follow these tips:

  • Skin: To prevent a staph infection of the skin, you should practice good hygiene, keep cuts clean, and wash your hands and body often. Avoid sharing towels and personal items with others.
  • Food poisoning: You can reduce your risk of food poisoning by handling food safely, ensuring that it is cooked properly, and refrigerating perishable food within 2 hours.
  • Toxic shock syndrome: You should change tampons every 4 to 8 hours and use tampons with the lowest effective absorbency.
  • Mastitis: Breastfeeding women should try to empty the breast completely during every feeding. Whenever possible, let nipples air dry.

Outlook / Prognosis

What is the outlook for people who have staph infection?

Most staph infections of the skin are mild. They can be treated with antibiotics and have no lasting effects.

When staph infections are left untreated, they can lead to organ failure and death. In rare cases, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection can be deadly if the infection isn’t controlled.

Living With

When should I call my doctor about staph infection?

Since staph infection can become serious very quickly, you should contact your doctor right away if you have signs of a staph infection. Only a doctor can diagnose and treat a staph infection.

What Are Chalazia and Styes?

What is a stye?

A stye is a red, sore lump near the edge of the eyelid.

A stye (also called a hordeolum) is a small, red, painful lump that grows from the base of your eyelash or under the eyelid. Most styes are caused by a bacterial infection.

There are two kinds of styes:

  • External hordeolum: A stye that begins at the base of your eyelash. Most are caused by an infection in the hair follicle. It might look like a pimple.
  • Internal hordeolum: A stye inside your eyelid. Most are caused by an infection in an oil-producing gland in your eyelid.

You can also get a stye if you have blepharitis. This is a condition that makes your eyelids at the base of the eyelashes red and swollen.

When you first get a stye, your eyelid is probably red and tender to the touch. Your eye may also feel sore and scratchy.

What is a chalazion?

A chalazion is an enlargement of an oil-producing gland in the eyelid.

A chalazion is a swollen bump on the eyelid. It happens when the eyelid’s oil gland clogs up. It may start as an internal hordeolum (stye). At first, you might not know you have a chalazion as there is little or no pain. But as it grows, your eyelid may get red, swollen, and sometimes tender to touch. If the chalazion gets large, it can press on your eye and cause blurry vision. Rarely, the whole eyelid might swell.

What is the difference between a stye and a chalazion?

Sometimes it can be difficult to tell the difference between a stye and a chalazion.

A stye is very painful. It often appears at the eyelid’s edge, usually caused by an infected eyelash root. It often swells, sometimes affecting the entire eyelid.

A chalazion is not usually painful. It is a bump that usually develops farther back on the eyelid than a stye. It is caused by a clogged oil gland. Rarely does it make the entire eyelid swell.

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  • 90,000 Folliculitis. Symptoms, diagnosis, treatment

    Hair follicles are tiny sacs with hair-generating cells at the bottom.

    Folliculitis is an inflammation of one or more hair follicles.

    This phenomenon is most often observed in the area of ​​

    • beard (so called “barber itch”),
    • hands,
    • back,
    • buttocks
    • and feet.

    This is usually due to a bacterial infection.

    However, viruses such as

    • shingles,
    • mushrooms
    • or yeast organisms

    can also cause folliculitis.

    Folliculitis is also common when the pores of the skin are blocked, allowing sebum to build up. Another predisposing factor is skin irritation or the presence of another skin condition.The non-infectious type of folliculitis occurs when hair regrowth after hair removal, plucking, electrolysis, or shaving.

    See also: Fungal diseases: more dangerous than thought

    The following factors can influence the development of folliculitis:

    • Using a blunt razor blade
    • Use of prickly fabrics
    • Use of tight clothing
    • Excessive sweating
    • Heavy makeup use
    • Contact with machine oils
    • Presence of infection on the skin
    • Presence of immunosuppression, as in HIV or diabetes

    All this causes irritation of the follicles, which makes them prone to inflammation.

    See also: Heat ahead. Attention to the skin!

    Folliculitis symptoms

    The main symptoms of folliculitis are the appearance of small swelling on the skin, which looks more like acne. Each edema is focused on a hair. They are red and painful, often crusty or pusty, and may be itchy or burning. They may eventually explode, releasing some pus or some blood-stained fluid.Hot bath folliculitis is a series of small, reddish swellings on the abdomen, arms, or legs. Some people also experience fever or stomach upset.

    Diagnosis and treatment of folliculitis

    Folliculitis is diagnosed by the location of the swelling around the hair on the skin and by the presence of risk factors in your history. Folliculitis is most often treated with special antibiotic creams. Folliculitis can sometimes mimic other skin conditions such as heat rash, but special tests can help establish the diagnosis.

    See also: Vitiligo – “dog” or “royal disease”?

    In most cases, folliculitis only needs symptomatic treatment, as the inflammation often goes away after a week or 10 days without any specific treatment. Applying warm compresses to the affected area provides relief from burning or itching. Adding salt to warm water may help. Antifungal or antiseptic shampoos can help treat scalp or facial folliculitis.Shaving and hair removal in the irritated area should be avoided until symptoms disappear completely.

    Indications for antibiotic treatment for folliculitis include:

    • Folliculitis persistence
    • Worsening condition with symptomatic treatment
    • Frequent relapses of the condition
    • Onset of infectious symptoms such as pervasive redness, warmth and pain, especially with fever

    However, if folliculitis is caused by a fungal infection, antibiotics and moisturizers should be avoided and replaced with antifungal agents.

    Chronic folliculitis often occurs due to constant bacterial colonization of the skin on a part of the body, such as the nose. This requires both systemic and topical antibiotics for a period long enough to destroy the organism causing folliculitis. In addition, an antiseptic body wash and disinfection of all bedding and clothing can help relieve symptoms.

    How folliculitis is treated

    External therapy includes lubrication of the skin integument with antiseptic solutions.

    The following formulations are used:

    • Chloramphenicol
    • Boric acid
    • Hydrogen peroxide
    • Potassium permanganate solution

    Ointments for folliculitis, which have an antimicrobial effect, can be applied locally.

    For treatment you can use:

    • lincomycin ointment,
    • erythromycin ointment,
    • Zenerite.

    Medicines to be taken, prescribed in the idea of ​​tablets or capsules.

    Ciprolet tablets are an antibacterial agent, the active ingredient is ciprofloxacin.

    This is an antibiotic-cephalosporin, it has a wide spectrum of action against bacterial pathogens.

    Adults and children over 15 years of age are allowed to use.

    Recommended to be taken orally before meals, while drinking plenty of water.

    The dose is set by the doctor, taking into account the individual characteristics of each patient.

    The course of taking the drug can be from 5 days to a week.

    Acnecutan capsules: Isotretinoin is the active ingredient of the drug.

    It allows you to reduce the action of the sebaceous glands, reduces the size of the formations.

    Has anti-inflammatory effect.

    Recommended to be taken with food with water.

    Capsules should be taken once or twice a day.

    Selection of the dosage of the drug is carried out individually for each patient.

    The dosage may be 0.4 – 0.8 mg / day.

    If folliculitis is severe, appoint up to 2 mg per day.

    In the event that folliculitis reappears, you should undergo a second course of therapy.

    It is recommended to repeat the treatment no earlier than 8 weeks after the completion of the first course.

    During pregnancy, treatment with this drug is strictly prohibited.

    To eliminate folliculitis, it is recommended to use a medicated shampoo.

    Treatment with folk remedies is possible after consulting a doctor.

    See also: The door in front of the boil – on the lock

    Photo preview: med-look.ru

    What is FOLLICULITIS

    90,000 Doctors gave recommendations due to hair loss after COVID-19 :: Society :: RBK

    Photo: Mikhail Tereshchenko / TASS

    Hair loss against the background of coronavirus occurs due to high intoxication and various metabolic disorders, as during any infections accompanied by high fever. Inna Petrosova, a dermatologist, a trichologist at the Be Zdorov clinic, told RBC about this.

    “It is necessary to expect hair loss after a coronavirus infection in about three months. This is a reactive process that cannot be prevented. It is advisable to consult a specialist in order to determine the real reason why hair began to fall out, ”she said.

    According to Petrosova, it is necessary to remain calm in this situation and understand that, despite the profuse hair loss, the person will not go bald.“The hair will be restored, it will take several months. In this situation, volume is usually lost, first of all long hair leaves, but new ones will grow in their place, ”the doctor said.

    Japanese scientists study the link between coronavirus and hair loss

    “The first thing that responds to stress and toxins is the rapidly dividing cells, which are the tissues of the hair follicles. This cannot be counteracted, it is just necessary to treat the virus, and the hair will recover later, ”Tatyana Egorova, a dermatologist and trichologist at the Lumirens Center for Hardware Cosmetology, also said in a conversation with RBC.

    Folliculitis provoking inflammation of hair follicles: description and photo of the disease

    Rashes and abscesses that appear on the skin can be triggered by a huge number of diseases. One of these diseases is hair folliculitis.

    The presented disease is mainly expressed by inflammation of the hair follicle. Inflammation, in turn, can be caused by bacteria or viruses that have entered through damaged skin areas.

    Photos of folliculitis presented on the Internet and medical textbooks look quite frightening. Outwardly, the disease manifests itself in the form of reddening of the skin and the appearance of a small sore at the site of infection, filled with pus.

    The vast majority of people with hair folliculitis are found in the so-called unprotected population. People living in unsanitary conditions and neglecting basic hygiene rules are more prone to inflammation of the follicles. An additional factor for the development of the disease is the hot climate, which contributes to the successful flourishing of the infection.

    Reasons for the appearance of

    Perhaps the main cause of hair follicle inflammation is unsanitary conditions or lack of hygiene . In addition, the following factors can influence the occurrence of infection:

    • Violation of the integrity of the skin;
    • Diabetes mellitus disease;
    • All sorts of disorders in the liver;
    • Increased activity of sweat glands.

    In addition, a general weakening of the immune system caused by any diseases can lead to inflammation of the follicles. In addition, skin inflammation and hair folliculitis are considered occupational diseases that often occur in people whose daily work involves the use of solvents, industrial oils and other chemically harmful substances.

    List of pathogens

    In addition to various external factors that contribute to the inflammation of the follicles, the disease and are also distinguished by the type of infections , which lead to the appearance of folliculitis:

    1. Staphylococcus bacillus infection.It is observed in men in the chin area. Infection occurs through cuts while shaving, in the case of using a dirty razor;
    2. Pseudomonas infection occurs as a result of heavy antibiotic use and is expressed by inflammation and the appearance of a rash on the face, back or chest;
    3. The so-called syphilitic folliculitis occurs in those infected with syphilis infection. A deeper stage is characteristic of this type of disease, a disease accompanied by hair loss;
    4. The type of disease caused by gonorrhea is observed in people suffering from the same disease, with this type of inflammation observed in the perineal areas;
    5. Folliculitis caused by fungi occurs as a result of frequent dressings in patients who observe strict bed rest;
    6. Herpes type is the most common, rashes in this case are often observed in the area of ​​the nasolabial part and chin;
    7. The parasitic type is caused by mites under the skin;
    8. Another rather rare type of disease occurs when a person is in the water for a long time.

    Grades of follicle damage

    By the way the disease proceeds, there are superficial and deep forms . The superficial form of folliculitis often proceeds easily and without any negative consequences. It is expressed in the form of a small sore, which is quite difficult to see with the naked eye. With this form, there is no pain. After a few days, the sore opens up on its own, removing pus. A crust subsequently forms in place and slight skin pigmentation is observed at the site of the abscess.

    In the case of deep folliculitis, large ulcers appear, the size of which reaches 10 centimeters . The center of the ulcer is the hair follicle, and suppuration is on the top of the skin. An abscess is accompanied by tangible pain sensations. After some time, the abscess independently secretes pus, after which it is tightened with a yellowish crust. Depending on the individual characteristics of each person’s body, abscesses caused by folliculitis can be a completely different amount.

    Occurrence of complications

    Fortunately, the folliculitis disease, despite the frightening photos, does not pose a threat to health, but it can cause the appearance of hydrodenitis, carbuncles, lymphadenitis, and it is also possible the formation of scars at the site of infection.

    Methods of diagnosis and treatment

    In order to diagnose folliculitis, an external examination of the affected skin areas is performed, as well as a blood test. Additionally, to determine which specific infection provoked hair folliculitis and inflammation, studies such as are prescribed:

    • Blood donation for blood sugar level;
    • Skin biopsy;
    • Bacteriological examination of hair papules.

    Also, in order to exclude diseases that have similar symptoms, for example, such as acne, which are difficult to distinguish even from a photo, differential diagnosis is performed.

    Treatment of folliculitis is most effective when applied early. Treatment of the affected areas is carried out with a 2% salicylic alcohol solution. If you don’t have one at hand, greenery can serve as a quality alternative. For treatment, compresses soaked in ointments that contain salicylic acid are very often applied to the affected area.

    It is strictly forbidden to squeeze them out of the skin during the formation of abscesses. This can lead to complications in the form of even more infection and the occurrence of diseases such as boils.

    Disease folliculitis

    Komarovsky explained how to properly get rid of the boil

    https://ria.ru/20210208/furunkul-1596438689.html

    Komarovsky explained how to get rid of the boil

    Komarovsky explained how to get rid of the boil – RIA Novosti. 08.02.2021

    Komarovsky explained how to properly get rid of the boil

    Ukrainian pediatrician, writer and TV presenter Yevgeny Komarovsky told what to do if a boil appears so that it does not become a chronic problem . .. RIA Novosti, 08.02.2021

    2021 -02-08T02: 07

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    Society

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    Evgeniy Komarovskiy

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    MOSCOW, Feb 8 – RIA Novosti. Ukrainian pediatrician, writer and TV presenter Yevgeny Komarovsky told what to do in case of a boil so that it does not become a chronic problem. He posted a corresponding post on his Instagram page. The doctor notes that the boil in 100 percent of cases is an infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and there are a number of factors predisposing to their occurrence.Among these are the characteristic of immunity, the environment and the hormonal background. For the treatment of boils, Komarovsky noted, two types of drugs are used: topical antibacterial drugs for application to the skin and general-action antistaphylococcal drugs for oral administration. If drug therapy does not help, and boils, especially those merging together and are called carbuncles, interfere with a normal life, then surgical treatment is used, the physician summed up. Furuncle is an acute purulent-necrotic inflammation of the hair follicle, sebaceous gland and surrounding connective tissue caused by pyogenic bacteria.A boil is characterized by the appearance on the skin of a painful follicular pustule against a background of red erythema with necrosis in the center. After rejection of necrotic tissue, healing occurs by scarring. Most often, a boil occurs on the skin of the neck, back of the head, face, back, thighs. The appearance of boils at different stages of development is called furunculosis, and purulent-necrotic inflammation of the skin and subcutaneous tissue around a group of hair follicles and sebaceous glands is called a carbuncle. When a boil is found on the face, severe complications (purulent meningitis, sepsis) are possible.

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    society, Ukraine, the whole world , Evgeny Komarovsky

    MOSCOW, 8 Feb – RIA Novosti. Ukrainian pediatrician, writer and TV presenter Yevgeny Komarovsky told what to do in case of a boil so that it does not become a chronic problem. He posted the corresponding post on his Instagram page.

    The doctor notes that a boil in 100 percent of cases is an infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and there are a number of factors predisposing to their occurrence. Among these are the characteristic of immunity, the environment and the hormonal background.

    February 3, 02:54

    A dermatologist spoke about the problem indicated by red moles

    For the treatment of boils, Komarovsky noted, two types of drugs are used: topical antibacterial drugs for application to the skin and general anti-staphylococcal drugs for oral administration.

    If drug therapy does not help, and boils, especially those that merge together and are called carbuncles, interfere with a normal life, then surgical treatment is used, the doctor summed up.

    January 22, 4:46 pm Spread of coronavirus Three “skin” signs of COVID-19 are named

    Furuncle is an acute purulent-necrotic inflammation of the hair follicle, sebaceous gland and surrounding connective tissue caused by pyogenic bacteria.

    A boil is characterized by the appearance of a painful follicular pustule on the skin against the background of erythema red with necrosis in the center.After rejection of necrotic tissue, healing occurs by scarring. Most often, a boil occurs on the skin of the neck, back of the head, face, back, and thighs.

    The appearance of boils in different stages of development is called furunculosis, and purulent-necrotic inflammation of the skin and subcutaneous tissue around a group of hair follicles and sebaceous glands is called a carbuncle. When a boil is found on the face, severe complications (purulent meningitis, sepsis) are possible.

    Treatment of nasal furuncle – ENT clinic No. 1

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    Furuncle is an acute inflammation of the hair follicle (bulb) together with the sebaceous gland, adjacent areas of the skin and subcutaneous fat.The initial parts of the nose, called the vestibule of the nose, have a large number of hair follicles, which is why boils most often develop there. Less commonly, they are found in the area of ​​the tip of the nose, wings and slope of the nose, nasolabial fold.

    Reasons for the development of the disease

    The local decrease in the protective properties of the mucous membrane and the skin of the nose is of leading importance in the development of the disease. General hypothermia, vitamin deficiencies, chronic fatigue, the presence of diabetes mellitus, HIV infection, oncology and other diseases that reduce the local and general immunity of the body contribute to the emergence of a boil of the nose.

    Stages of development

    The first stage in the development of the disease is traumatic damage to the skin and nasal mucosa (such as an abrasion, scratch or cut), through which the infection gets deep into the tissue. The causative agent of the disease is usually pathogenic staphylococci and streptococci. The infectious agent then spreads along the hair root into the follicle. This process is accompanied by local inflammation and the formation of a painful infiltrate. This stage of the boil is called the infiltration stage.After this, necrosis develops and a necrotic core is formed. The surrounding tissues are melted and transformed into purulent masses, after which they begin to accumulate under the layer of the epidermis surrounding the follicle mouth, which causes a subcutaneous abscess to develop. This stage of the boil is called the stage of abscess formation.

    Symptoms of the nasal boil

    • Pain at the site of development of the boil
    • Redness and swelling of surrounding tissues
    • Increase in body temperature to 38C and above
    • General weakness and malaise

    Possible complications of nasal furuncle

    A boil of the nose is not at all such a harmless disease as boils of other localizations.The fact is that it is located in the nasolabial triangle (otherwise it is called the “triangle of death”). Its peculiarity and danger as a focus of inflammation lies in the extremely developed blood supply: there are many vessels of the venous and arterial network. In addition, these veins do not have valves inherent in the veins of other areas, and therefore the formed blood clots, bacteria and their toxins can spread along the venous pathways into the orbit and venous sinuses of the brain. This can cause phlegmon of the nasolabial, buccal region and orbit, thrombophlebitis of the cavernous sinus and other formidable complications – meningitis, encephalitis, brain abscess.Less common is the generalization of infection – sepsis. Of the local complications, the most common are sinusitis, frontal sinusitis and abscesses of the nasal septum.

    Treatment of a furuncle of a nose

    First of all, it is strictly forbidden to try to treat the furuncle of the nose on your own, and even more so to squeeze it out. Due to the high risk of developing complications with this disease, at the first symptoms it is necessary to consult an otorhinolaryngologist.

    With a small localization of the boil, finding it in the stage of infiltration and unexpressed symptoms, outpatient treatment is possible.With the timely treatment of the patient, the therapeutic program consists of conservative measures: local and general antibacterial therapy, treatment of the boil with antiseptic ointments and solutions, anti-inflammatory and detoxification therapy, etc.

    If the nasal furuncle at the time of examination is in an abscessed form, local and general inflammatory signs are pronounced, there is a risk of complications, then it is necessary to carry out surgical treatment of the nasal furuncle (opening the furuncle), and only in a hospital under the round-the-clock supervision of a doctor.

    Nasal sycosis

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    90,000 Hair loss problem

    On average, there are 150,000 hair follicles on the scalp of a person, in which hairs are in different phases of their development (anagen – growth phase; catagen – resting phase; and telogen – hair loss phase). If the ratio of these phases is disturbed under the influence of certain reasons, hair loss is observed. It is normal to have a daily loss of 50-80 hairs per day, depending on their original volume. Hair loss over this figure, lasting more than 6 months, is a chronic form of alopecia.

    Most often we are faced with acute diffuse (telogen) hair loss. It can be based on many factors: stress, acute (ARVI, flu) illnesses, operations with anesthesia, taking certain medications, for example, for the treatment of acne or hypertension.Such hair loss does not begin immediately, but 60-90 days after exposure to the causative factor, when the true cause of hair loss has already been forgotten. Chronic diffuse (telogen) loss can be caused by thyroid disease, diabetes mellitus, long-term deficiencies of certain substances due to dietary habits, lifestyle and place of residence (for example, various types of anemia, deficiency of iron, vitamin D, sex hormones).

    Androgenetic alopecia is the most common cause of chronic hair loss with thinning in the fronto-parietal areas in genetically susceptible individuals.In 80-90% of cases, the disease is based on the increased activity of a special enzyme in the cells of the hair follicle (5-alpha reductase), which promotes the enhanced conversion of the testosterone hormone into a more active form – dihydrotestosterone, the action of which is manifested in the spasm of the vessels that feed the hair follicles. In some cases (10-20%), the cause of androgenetic alopecia is endocrine pathology (diseases of the pituitary gland, ovaries, adrenal glands). Some visible signs, such as excessive growth of hair on the body and face, increased sebum production of the skin and hair, stretch marks, signs of obesity, as well as complaints of menstrual irregularities and reproductive function, allow suspecting hormonal disorders.The onset of the disease can be at any age, but not earlier than puberty (15-17 years), after exposure to a provoking factor. This disease has sex differences, in women due to the “protective” action of female hormones (estrogens), the disease proceeds with less activity, however, with a long course of the disease, thinning can be significant and irreversible. Treatment involves an integrated approach with examination by an endocrinologist and gynecologist.

    A completely different cause of a disease such as alopecia areata (or patchy hair loss).In this case, hair can fall out both as lesions, with the involvement of eyebrows and eyelashes, and completely throughout the body (universal alopecia). Such a loss is based on a hereditary predisposition, while the provoking factors can be past infections, stress, thyroid diseases, the appearance or exacerbation of other skin diseases such as vitiligo, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis (20%). These factors trigger immune disorders in the body that cause autoimmune inflammation of the hair follicles.

    Sometimes hair loss is a manifestation of serious systemic diseases, such as lupus erythematosus, scleroderma and even cancer, or a manifestation of infectious diseases, such as syphilis.

    It should be understood that early treatment of the problem of hair loss or disturbance in the appearance of hair to a specialist trichologist will help to solve the problem more effectively.