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Purine in salmon: Ease a Gout Attack in 10 Steps

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Ease a Gout Attack in 10 Steps

Many Risk Factors May Contribute to Gout and Gout Flare-Ups

Women can develop gout too, especially later in life after menopause.

Other risk factors and conditions for developing gout include:

RELATED: Gout Complications and Related Conditions

Your 10-Point Plan: Easing a Gout Attack

During a gout attack, the affected joint becomes swollen, warm to the touch, and appears very red. Even the slightest pressure on the joint can be very painful. The attacks more often occur in the middle of the night; about 50 percent start in the big toe, according to the Alliance for Gout Awareness.

Want to get ahead of the intense pain? Make sure you have a plan:

1. Get a Diagnosis

If this is the first time you have had an attack, see your doctor immediately. “Gout is one of the most underdiagnosed diseases because data on how to treat high uric acid has been lacking. We have better information now. If you are experiencing a flare, you should have an action plan in place, created with your doctor,” says Payam Shakouri, MD, nephrologist with Advanced Kidney Care of Hudson Valley in New York, and medical advisor for gout to CreakyJoints. The sooner you start treatment and pain management, the more quickly you will be back on your feet.

RELATED: Gout Symptoms and Diagnosis

2. Take the Right Anti-Inflammatory Medications

There are three different kinds that are effective: over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, aspirin, or naproxen sodium; prescription steroids; or a prescription anti-inflammatory called colchicine, which influences the way your body reacts to uric acid crystals. “Your doctor will figure out which is the best for your unique needs. NSAIDs, for example, are not appropriate if you have renal disease, and steroids could make your blood sugars worse if you have diabetes,” points out Dr. Fitzgerald.

3. Free the Joint! 

The least pressure on the affected area can be very painful. People report they can’t even bear to be under a bedsheet. Make sure there are no constraints on the joint when it is flaring up.

4. Rest and Elevate

Stay off the affected joint and keep it elevated as much as possible.

RELATED: The Importance of Resting Joints

5. Apply Ice — if You Can Bear It

“Apply ice if you can do so comfortably without creating pain,” says Fitzgerald.

6. Watch Your Diet

You can lower uric acid levels by limiting foods high in purines (like red meat, organ meat, and seafood), and alcohol intake (particularly beer and hard liquor).

7. Stay Hydrated

Drinking water can help flush the uric acid crystals that cause gout out of your system. “A well-hydrated patient should drink enough to urinate every two to three hours,” says Dr. Shakouri.

RELATED: 6 Unusual Signs of Dehydration You Should Know About

8. Practice Mindfulness and Meditation

The good news: A gout attack is self-limited and will clear in time. In the meantime, according to the Arthritis Foundation, meditation, yoga breathing, mindfulness, and guided imagery can help you deal with the pain.

RELATED: Why You Want to Elicit the Relaxation Response If You Have Rheumatoid Arthritis

9. Create a Support Network

Many patients suffer in silence because of the stigma around gout. Let trusted friends and family know that you have this disease, and reach out for support when you are having a flare.

RELATED: 6 Ways to Stop Rheumatoid Arthritis Isolation and Loneliness

10. If You Are Having Repeated Attacks, See Your Doctor

Some patients can go a long time between attacks. In fact, for 62 percent of patients the next attack will be more than a year away, and some won’t have another attack in the next 10 years. However, if you begin to have more frequent attacks, talk to your doctor about escalating treatment. “People think it’s normal to have flares every now and then, but it’s not. The gout can be doing damage to your joints. It means you still have too much uric acid,” says Shakouri. In particular, ask about allpurinol. It won’t help with an acute attack but will help prevent future attacks by reducing uric acid production.

RELATED: Sleep Apnea Increases the Risk for Gout, Research Suggests

Gout Treatment Recommendations Change Slightly

In May 2020, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) updated its guideline for gout treatment for the first time since 2012. Affecting about 4 percent of all adults in the United States, according to the Arthritis Foundation, gout is a painful form of crystal arthritis that most commonly attacks the big toe, but can also affect surrounding joints in the foot, ankle, and knee. Men are three times more likely to be affected by gout than women.

The new guideline was published online in Arthritis Care & Research on May 11, 2020.

Why Update the Gout Care Guideline Now?

According to the ACR, the guideline has been updated because new clinical research has become available since 2012 that will impact management and treatment.

RELATED: Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gout: What’s the Difference?

There’s More Scientific Evidence Supporting Earlier Recommendations

“These guidelines provide a stronger level of evidence for many prior and familiar recommendations, including reinforcing a treat-to-target strategy to achieve optimal outcomes for patients with gout. There has been better evidence in the last eight years to support our recommendations with greater certainty,” says John FitzGerald, MD, a rheumatologist at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles and a coauthor of the guideline update. The most important changes are outlined below.

Treat-to-Target Protocol Emphasized

Treat-to-target (T2T) is an approach to disease management in which doctor and patient work together to outline goals. “We recommended this in the 2012 guideline but, at the time, this was based on a lot of observational data. Since the 2012 guideline, there have been randomized controlled trials looking at this strategy that have had good results. The 2020 guideline reinforces the T2T recommendation, with more rigorous data to back it up,” says Dr. FitzGerald. In addition, the guideline defines a clear goal for serum urate levels as less than 6 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL).

Early Diagnosis Is Stressed, Especially for People With Kidney Disease and Other Comorbidities

The guideline urges physicians to treat patients with gout early on, particularly those who have other medical conditions that might make their gout worse, such as extremely high uric acid levels, kidney disease, or gouty kidney stones. “This is important because getting treatment sooner could reduce the risk for long-term damage,” says Daniel Hernandez, MD, the director of medical affairs and Hispanic outreach for CreakyJoints.

RELATED: Is Your Doctor Using Treat-to-Target Protocols?

Stronger Emphasis on Early Use, Proper Dosing With Allopurinol

The drug Zyloprim (allopurinol) was recommended in the 2012 guideline. The new version strongly recommends this drug as the first-line agent and to start it earlier rather than later, especially if patients have comorbidities. Allopurinol is much less expensive, while Uloric (febuxostat) has possible cardiovascular safety concerns. “In order to limit side effects, such as drug rash or a gout flare when starting urate-lowering treatment, it’s important to start any urate-lowering therapy at a low dose and increase to a dose that gets the right urate level, down to target,” says FitzGerald.

Test to Limit the Risk of an Allergic Reaction to Medication

Some people have a genetic marker (HLA-B*5801) that can predict a severe drug rash called allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome. In the 2012 guideline, Asian groups were recommended to be tested prior to starting allopurinol. Based on newer data, the 2020 guideline has added African American patients to that group.

Use Anti-Inflammatories for 3 to 6 Months When Starting Allopurinol

When starting any urate-lowering therapy, there is a three- to six-month period when gout flares may increase. “The way I describe it to patients is that when you start treating the gout, it can get angry, and you can have increased flares before you have fewer flares,” says FitzGerald.

The new recommendation is to take anti-inflammatory drugs for three to six months; the old recommendation was for six or more months. The risk of gout flares with the initiation of urate-lowering treatment becomes less after each month, so shorter courses of anti-inflammatory prophylaxis are likely sufficient.

“By following the guideline recommendations, starting with the lower dose and using the anti-inflammatory as a preventive, side effects of urate-lowering therapy (including the risk of gout flare) can be lowered. The hope is that by following the recommendations, patients won’t abandon their treatment and will have more successful outcomes,” he says.

No More Patient Blame Game

“For the first time, the ACR has acknowledged that the onset of gout is not the patient’s fault (based on lifestyle and dietary choices) and that there should be no ‘patient-blaming’ for its onset, given its strong genetic determinants,” says Dr. Hernandez.

Atlantic Salmon & Gout | Healthfully

A form of arthritis characterized by intense, sudden pain in the joints, gout was once considered a “rich man’s disease” resulting from a heavy diet and inactivity. Today researchers know that a high level of uric acid crystals in the joints causes gout’s symptoms — redness, swelling, tenderness and acute pain — and that uric acid is created when the body breaks down chemicals called purines 1. Certain seafoods are high in purines, while others, like Atlantic salmon, have nutritional benefits that may outweigh their risk to gout sufferers. Carefully managing your consumption of Atlantic salmon may help reduce your risk of developing gout or experiencing recurring outbreaks.

Is This an Emergency?

If you are experiencing serious medical symptoms, seek emergency treatment immediately.

Atlantic Salmon and Purines

Some fish and shellfish are very high in purines, such as:

  • anchovies
  • mackerel
  • sardines
  • scallops
  • mussels
  • lobster

Gout sufferers should avoid consuming high-purine species whenever possible, but lower-purine fish — such as Atlantic salmon — is suitable for a gout-friendly diet. To reduce the chance of flare-ups, it’s best to eat seafood rarely. A 2004 study in the “New England Journal of Medicine” found that each additional weekly serving of fish or shellfish increased middle-aged men’s risk of developing gout by 7 percent 2.

Suggested Serving

Tuna & Gout

Don’t eliminate heart-healthy Atlantic salmon from your diet completely. The USDA’s dietary guidelines encourage Americans to increase their overall consumption of seafood from the current average of just 3.5 ounces a week. For an active adult on a 2,000 calorie-per-day plan, the USDA recommends eating 6 ounces of lean protein per day. To reduce the chance of gout attacks, limit your consumption of meat, poultry or seafood to 4 to 6 ounces daily.

  • Don’t eliminate heart-healthy Atlantic salmon from your diet completely.
  • To reduce the chance of gout attacks, limit your consumption of meat, poultry or seafood to 4 to 6 ounces daily.

Nutritional Benefits

Atlantic salmon is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, a polyunsaturated fat that is essential for overall health. Researchers believe omega-3s may help lower blood pressure or high triglycerides, reduce your chance of heart attack and stroke, and slow the progress of age-related conditions like macular generation. A 3.5 ounce serving of salmon contains about 1 gram of omega-3s. In addition, salmon provides a source of lean protein that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol.

  • Atlantic salmon is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, a polyunsaturated fat that is essential for overall health.
  • In addition, salmon provides a source of lean protein that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol.

Other Concerns

Catfish and Omega 3

Atlantic salmon is relatively low in mercury and PCBs, so it does not pose a health risk to gout sufferers who choose to eat it frequently. The Seafood Watch program of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, however, urges consumers to avoid farmed Atlantic salmon. The methods used to manage and harvest salmon in ocean-based net pens have a deleterious effect on the surrounding marine environment. As an alternative, consumers may choose wild-caught Alaskan or Pacific salmon.

  • Atlantic salmon is relatively low in mercury and PCBs, so it does not pose a health risk to gout sufferers who choose to eat it frequently.
  • The Seafood Watch program of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, however, urges consumers to avoid farmed Atlantic salmon.

Purine table

224 Foods
(alphabetically)

Total Purines
in mg uric acid/100 g (Average)

Min

Max

Nutr. Density
in mg/MJ


HIGHEST IN PURINES (400 mg. uric
acid/100 g and higher)

Fish, sardines in oil

480

399

560

519. 5

Liver, Calf’s

460

 

 

837.5

Mushroom, flat, edible Boletus, dried

488

 

 

932.8

Neck sweet bread, Calf’s

1260

 

 

3012. 9

Ox liver

554

 

 

1013.3

Ox spleen

444

 

 

1052.6

Pig’s heart

530

 

 

1382

Pig’s liver

515

 

 

937. 9

Pig’s lungs (lights)

434

 

 

911.2

Pig’s spleen

516

 

 

1208.2

Sheep’s spleen

773

 

 

1702. 6

Sprat, smoked

804

 

 

795.6

Theobromine

2300

 

 

1611.3

Yeast, Baker’s

680

 

 

2071. 3

Yeast, Brewer’s

1810

 

 

1866.6


MODERATELY HIGH IN PURINES (100 to
400 mg. uric acid/100g)

Bean, seed, white, dry

128

 

 

127.1

Bean, Soya, seed, dry

190

 

 

139. 1

Beef, chuck

120

 

 

192

Beef, fillet

110

 

 

216.4

Beef, fore rib, entrecote

120

 

 

185. 4

Beef, muscles only

133

 

 

292.1

Beef, roast beef, sirloin

110

110

120

201.4

Beef, shoulder

110

 

 

203. 9

Black gram (mungo bean), seed, dry

222

 

 

194.3

Caviar (real)

144

 

 

141.6

Chicken (breast with skin)

175

 

 

288. 4

Chicken (chicken for roasting), average

115

 

 

165.8

Chicken, boiling fowl, average

159

 

 

149.2

Chicken, leg with skin, without bone

110

 

 

152. 2

Duck, average

138

 

 

146.2

Fish, Anchovy

239

 

 

560

Fish, Carp

160

 

 

330. 9

Fish, Cod

109

 

 

335.9

Fish, Haddock

139

 

 

425.2

Fish, Halibut

178

 

 

439. 9

Fish, Herring roe

190

 

 

342.4

Fish, Herring, Atlantic

210

 

 

216.9

Fish, Herring, Matje cured

219

 

 

197. 6

Fish, Mackerel

145

95

194

191.2

Fish, Pike-perch

110

 

 

311.3

Fish, Redfish (ocean perch)

241

 

 

544. 1

Fish, Saithe (coalfish)

163

 

 

473.4

Fish, salmon

170

110

250

202

Fish, sardine, pilchard

345

 

 

693. 2

Fish, Sole

131

125

137

376.2

Fish, trout

297

 

 

686.7

Fish, Tuna

257

 

 

273. 7

Fish, Tuna in oil

290

 

 

246.2

Goose

165

 

 

116.7

Grape, dried, raisin, sultana

107

 

 

86. 4

Ham, cooked

131

 

 

248.1

Heart, Sheep’s

241

 

 

367.6

Horse meat

200

 

 

438. 8

Kidney, Calf’s

218

 

 

419.6

Lamb (muscles only)

182

 

 

371

Lentil, seed, dry

127

114. 45

164.65

93.8

Linseed

105

 

 

67.4

Liver, chicken

243

 

 

426.3

Lobster

118

60

175

346. 4

Lungs, Calf’s

147

 

 

389.1

Mussel

112

 

 

391.5

Ox heart

256

 

 

504. 3

Ox kidney

269

 

 

569.5

Ox lungs (lights)

399

 

 

961.4

Ox tongue

160

 

 

186

Peas, chick (garbanzo), seed, dry

109

 

 

84. 2

Pig’s kidney

334

 

 

784.5

Pig’s tongue

136

 

 

208.2

Pike

140

 

 

406. 7

Poppy seed, seed, dry

170

 

 

86

Pork belly

100

80

110

92.3

Pork belly, raw, smoked dried

127

 

 

82. 6

Pork chop with bone

145

140

150

260

Pork chuck

140

135

145

170.4

Pork fillet

150

145

150

334. 8

Pork hip bone (hind leg)

120

115

130

155

Pork leg (hind leg)

160

150

160

357.4

Pork muscles only

166

 

 

374. 9

Pork shoulder with skin (blade of shoulder)

150

145

150

165.2

Rabbit meat, average with bone

132

95

150

207.7

Rabbit/Hare (average)

105

 

 

219. 4

Sausage “Jagdwurst”

112

 

 

127.8

Sausage salami, German

104

 

 

65.9

Sausage, liver (liverwurst)

165

 

 

122. 2

Sausages, frying, from pork

101

 

 

80.2

Scallop

136

 

 

505.8

Shrimp, brown

147

60

234

397. 9

Spleen, Calf’s

343

 

 

815.9

Sunflower seed, dry

143

 

 

59.5

Turkey, young animal, average, with skin

150

 

 

237. 3

Veal chop, cutlet with bone

140

 

 

309.6

Veal fillet

140

 

 

347.3

Veal knuckle with bone

150

140

160

353. 2

Veal, leg of veal with bone

150

140

150

310.2

Veal, muscles only

172

 

 

438.7

Veal, neck with bone

150

 

 

326.9

Veal, shoulder

140

 

 

309.3

Venison back

105

 

 

205

Venison haunch (leg)

138

105

154

336.5


LOWEST IN PURINES (100 mg. uric
acid/100 g and less)

Almond, sweet

37

 

 

15.7

Apple

14

 

 

60.1

Apricot

73

 

 

71.6

Artichoke

78

 

 

834.6

Asparagus

23

19.71

29.57

310.9

Aubergine

21

 

 

290

Avocado

19

 

 

20.9

Bamboo Shoots

29

 

 

402.1

Banana

57

 

 

152.4

Barley without husk, whole grain

96

 

 

71.1

Bean sprouts, Soya

80

 

 

378.3

Beans, French (string beans, haricot)

37

20

43

266.9

Beans, French, dried

45

40

50

39.4

Beef, corned (German)

57

 

 

96.5

Beer, alcohol free

8.1

 

 

75.4

Beer, Pilsner lager beer, regular beer, German

13

 

 

75.2

Beer, real, light

14

 

 

86

Beet root

19

15

21

108.5

Bilberry, blueberry, huckleberry

22

 

 

143.7

Brain, Calf’s

92

 

 

203.1

Bread, wheat (flour) or (white bread)

14

 

 

13.9

Broccoli

81

 

 

691.6

Brussel sprouts

69

 

 

456

Cabbage, red

32

19.79

36.62

350.2

Cabbage, savoy

37

19.87

42.71

342.6

Cabbage, white

22

 

 

210.3

Carrot

17

14

25

155.9

Cauliflower

51

 

 

537.9

Caviar substitute

18

 

 

37.8

Celeriac

30

 

 

390.6

Cheese, Brie

7.1

 

 

5

Cheese, Cheddar/Cheshire cheese, 50% fat content
in dry matter

6

 

 

4.3

Cheese, cottage

9.4

 

 

22

Cheese, edam, 30% fat content in dry matter

7.1

 

 

6.8

Cheese, edam, 40% fat content in dry matter

7.1

 

 

5.4

Cheese, edam, 45% fat content in dry matter

7.1

 

 

4.8

Cheese, Limburger, 20% fat content in dry matter

32

 

 

41.7

Cherry, Morello

17

 

 

75.5

Cherry, sweet

7.1

 

 

64.2

Chicory

12

 

 

171.8

Chinese leaves

21

 

 

412.4

Chives

67

 

 

581.2

Cocoa powder, oil partially removed, not including
theobromine

71

 

 

49.7

Corn, sweet

52

 

 

140.9

Fish, Crayfish

60

 

 

220.3

Cress

28

 

 

200.8

Crispbread

60

 

 

44.9

Cucumber

7.3

 

 

141.7

Currant, red

17

 

 

122.6

Date, dried

35

 

 

29.9

Elderberry, black

33

 

 

144.4

Endive

17

 

 

297.7

Fennel leaves

14

10

16

139

Fig (dried)

64

 

 

60.4

Fish, eel (smoked)

78

45

110

57.2

Frankfurter sausages

89

68.74

129.52

80.2

Gooseberry

16

 

 

101.3

Grape

27

 

 

94.6

Grass, Viper’s (black salsify)

71

 

 

939.4

Kale

48

 

 

309.1

Kiwi fruit (Chinese gooseberry, strawberry peach)

19

 

 

88.5

Kohlrabi

25

10.86

29.61

243.9

Leek

74

 

 

714.1

Lettuce

13

9.75

29.25

274.4

Lettuce, Lamb’s

38

 

 

645.3

Meat, luncheon

70

 

 

58.8

Melon, Cantelope

33

 

 

143

Millet, shucked corn

62

 

 

41.9

Morel

30

 

 

748.9

Mushroom

58

55.48

60.52

858.2

Mushroom, flat, edible Boletus, cep

92

 

 

1011.6

Mushrooms, canned, solid and liquid

29

 

 

488.5

Mushrooms, Chanterelle

17

 

 

356.2

Mushrooms, Chanterelles, canned, solids & liquids

17

 

 

114.2

Nuts, Brazil

23

 

 

8.3

Nuts, hazelnut (cobnut)

37

27

42

13.9

Nuts, peanut

79

 

 

33.8

Oats, without husk, whole grain

94

 

 

63.6

Olive, green, marinated

29

 

 

51.1

Onion

13

 

 

112.4

Orange

19

 

 

105.9

Ox brain

75

 

 

140.7

Oyster

90

 

 

322.6

Oyster, mushroom

50

 

 

1054.6

Parsley, leaf

57

 

 

266.2

Pasta made with egg (noodles, macaroni, spaghetti,
etc.

40

 

 

26.6

Pea, pod and seed, green

84

 

 

245.7

Pea, seed, dry

95

84.78

166.56

82.7

Peach

21

 

 

119.6

Pear

12

2

17

51.5

Peppers, green

55

 

 

681

Pig’s brain

83

 

 

161.71

Pineapple

19

 

 

81.4

Plaice

93

 

 

257.6

Plum

24

 

 

116.8

Plum, dried

64

 

 

67.9

Potato

16

 

 

53.6

Potato, cooked with skin

18

 

 

60.3

Pudding, black

55

37.23

90.55

42.8

Pumpkin

44

 

 

422

Quince

30

 

 

185

Radish

15

 

 

234.3

Radishes

13

 

 

210.6

Raspberry

18

 

 

126.3

Rhubarb

12

 

 

212.6

Rolls, bread

21

 

 

18.2

Rye, whole grain

51

47

63

41

Sauerkraut, dripped off

16

12

20

224.7

Sausage “Bierschincken”

85

 

 

117.3

Sausage “Fleischwurst”

78

 

 

66.8

Sausage “Mortadella”

96

79

130

67.4

Sausage “Munich Weisswurst”

73

 

 

65.7

Sausage, Vienna

78

 

 

65.7

Sausages, frying, from veal

91

 

 

81.5

Sausages, German (Mettwurst)

74

 

 

45.9

Sesame (gingelly) seed, Oriental, dry

62

 

 

26.5

Spinach

57

 

 

844.7

Squash, summer

24

 

 

296.2

Strawberry

21

11.81

25.59

156.8

Tench

80

 

 

243.8

Tofu

68

 

 

196.4

Tomato

11

 

 

145.7

Nuts, Walnut

25

 

 

9.1

Wheat, whole grain

51

40.2

83.41

39.4

Yogurt, min. 3.5% fat content

8.1

 

 

27.7

Mussels And Gout – How To Discuss

Mussels And Gout

Are clams bad for gout?

Cutting down on seafood during gout attacks can help. Previous studies have suggested that gout sufferers should avoid shellfish, anchovies, sardines, herring, clams, scallops, cod, trout, tuna and haddock. Shrimp, lobster, eel, and crab are safer seafood for gout sufferers.

Do mussels have a lot of purines?

Rich in purines: anchovies, cod, haddock, herring, mackerel, mussels, sardines, scallops, trout. Average purine content: crabs, lobsters, oysters, shrimp. Meat: Although no longer part of a normal diet in the United States, offal, such as liver, sweet bread, and brain, are the most dangerous for people with gout.

Which vegetables are also bad for gout?

Eat lots of vegetables like kailan, kale, squash, peppers, and beets, but limit your intake of moderately purine-rich vegetables like asparagus, spinach, cauliflower, and mushrooms. Eat fruits rich in vitamin C such as oranges, tangerines, papayas, and cherries.

Also, are you wondering which fish is bad for gout?

Goodbye (some) fish Some seafood contains more purines than others. The worst ones for people with gout are anchovies, cod, haddock, herring, mackerel, clams, roe (fish roe), sardines, scallops, and trout. Salmon appears to be an exception and a better seafood choice for gout sufferers, Sandon says.

Can you eat squid if you have gout?

DON’T: Eat Some Seafood Cold-water fish like tuna, salmon, and trout can raise uric acid levels, but the heart benefits of eating them in moderation may outweigh the risk of gout. Mussels, scallops, squid, shrimp, oysters, crabs and lobsters are only allowed occasionally.

Is bacon bad for gout?

Some purine compounds can raise uric acid levels, which then build up in the joints and cause painful gout symptoms. Examples of processed meats that gout patients should avoid include bacon, turkey, goose, veal, game, and offal such as liver, kidney, or sweet bread.

Is peanut butter bad for gout?

Best Foods for the Gout Diet Fresh Fruits and Vegetables. Nuts, peanut butter and cereals. Fat and oil. Vegetables: Vegetables like spinach and asparagus are on the purple list, but studies show they don’t increase the risk of gout or gout.

Is canned tuna bad for gout?

Seafood: Some types of seafood such as anchovies, shellfish, sardines and tuna contain more purines than others. However, the overall health benefits of eating fish may outweigh the risks for people with gout. Moderate portions of fish can be part of a gout diet.

Are blueberries good for gout?

Cherries lower uric acid levels and can help prevent gout attacks. Blueberries, blackberries, and other deeply pigmented berries are also helpful.

Are beans bad for gout?

These are peas, beans, lentils, tofu and green, starchy vegetables. They don’t raise uric acid levels and can even protect you from gout attacks.

Is onion bad for gout?

If you have gout, avoid dishes like sliced ​​liver and liver and onions, as well as other offal like kidneys, hearts, sweet bread, and tripe because they are high in purines.

Are kidney beans bad for gout?

Foods considered moderate purines include: crab, lobster, oysters, and shrimp. Vegetables such as asparagus, spinach, peas, mushrooms, and cauliflower. Red beans, lentils and lima beans.

Is broccoli good for gout?

Study authors place broccoli in the low-purine group: Foods very high in purines contain more than 300mg per 100g. This means broccoli is a great choice for people with gout (and most people looking to eat healthy). Rich in Vitamin C. Vitamin C helps reduce uric acid levels in the body.

Is chicken good for gout?

Turkey and goose have more purines than other foods, so it’s best to avoid them. People with gout should also limit the consumption of games. Chicken and duck are, according to Dr. Zashin, the safest alternatives.

Does oatmeal cause gout?

Oatmeal contains 50 to 150 milligrams of purines per 100 grams of food. This means that oatmeal is in the mid-milligram range for purine-containing foods. While it doesn’t contain as many purines as organic meat, scallops, or fish, it is still high enough to increase the risk of gout when consumed in excess.

Are bananas good for gout?

Bananas are low in purines and high in vitamin C, which makes them great if you have gout. Changing your diet to include more low-purine foods like bananas can reduce the amount of uric acid in your blood and reduce the risk of recurring gout attacks.

Is ibuprofen good for gout?

Take pain medication. Ibuprofen (Motrin) is a typical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat acute pain associated with gout. If you don’t have kidney disease, NSAIDs are the best pain relief medications, Leisen says.

Is pineapple good for gout?

Pineapple contains an enzyme called bromelain, which is known to reduce inflammation and aid digestion. Although no studies have linked bromelain directly to gout, research suggests that bromelain supplements can reduce the inflammatory symptoms of gout.

Are blueberries good for gout?

Cranberry juice or extract helps increase uric acid excretion from the body. Uric acid causes gout. It is a waste product in the blood that gets stuck in the joints and forms painful uric acid crystals. Avoiding certain foods can help reduce uric acid buildup in the first place.

Mussels And Gout

Purine-induced expression of urate oxidase and enzyme activity in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Cloning of urate oxidase liver cDNA from three teleost species and the African lungfish Protopterus annectens

The peroxisomal enzyme urate oxidase plays a pivotal role in the degradation of purines in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, knowledge about the purine-induced expression of the encoding gene is lacking in vertebrates. These are the first published sequences of fish urate oxidase, which were predicted from PCR amplified liver cDNAs of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) and African lungfish (Protopterus annectens). Sequence alignment of different vertebrate urate oxidases revealed amino acid substitutions of putative functional importance in the enzyme of chicken and lungfish. In the adult salmon, expression of urate oxidase mRNA predominated in liver, but was also identified in several nonhepatic organs including brain, but not in skeletal muscle and kidney. Juvenile salmon fed diets containing bacterial protein meal (BPM) rich in nucleic acids showed a significant increase in liver urate oxidase enzyme activity, and urea concentrations in plasma, muscle and liver were elevated. Whereas salmon fed the 18% BPM diet showed a nonsignificant increase in liver mRNA levels of urate oxidase compared with the 0% BPM-fed fish, no further increase in mRNA levels was found in fish receiving 36% BPM. The discrepancy between urate oxidase mRNA and enzyme activity was explained by rapid mRNA degradation or alternatively, post-translational control of the activity. Although variable plasma and liver levels of urate were detected, the substrate increased only slightly in 36% BPM-fed fish, indicating that the uricolytic pathway of Atlantic salmon is intimately regulated to handle high dietary purine levels.

Dalmatian Welfare » Feeding

Purine is a type of protein found in certain red meats, some poultry, game, offal and yeast products all of these foods contain very high of levels of Purine. These purines can cause problems for some Dalmatians so are best avoided. There are complete low purine foods available without prescription.   Royal Canin make a food specifically for Dalmatians it is based on egg protein and is very low in Purines.  Other prepared foods available are on prescription only, made by Hills and Royal Canin and are generally only used once a stone forming Dalmatian has been diagnosed and treated by a Vet.

For most Dalmatians that have not been diagnosed as stone forming  there are cheaper alternatives and anecdotally we have had success with lower protein diets such as Chappie, James Wellbeloved (Chicken or Fish) and Pets at home own brand Wainwrights. They do not contain additives and colourings which may make a dalmatian hyperactive.  This applies to dog treats as well see below.

We have a list of foods and their purine content. This indicates which foods are safe to feed a Dalmatian,and which should be avoided. We can provide details of diets specially formulated from these lists that have been successfully fed to stone forming Dalmatians and kept them free of the recurrence of stones and are cheap  to feed although they do require work and, probably freezer space. Please click here to view our Heath page for more information

Dalmatians should always have fresh clean water to drink and have access to outdoors so that they can regularly urinate.

Please get in touch with the website or our central coordinator if you would like more information.

Diet, behaviour and snacks and treats

Many pre-made dog snacks and treats are made from offal and cheap cuts of meats that contain the highest amounts of Purines. We have seen behavioural problems and hyperactivity reduced by changing a dogs diet to a lower purine food free from bright colours. The more simple the food the better it seems to suit Dalmatians. Highly coloured dog treats filled with colouring and additives should be avoided, dogs don’t see in colour so these are purely aimed at attracting humans rather than your dog. Apple, Carrot, Hard Cheese (Cheddar) and hard boiled eggs make great low Purine treats and are great for titbits while training your Dalmatian. There are many recipes for making your own purine free dog treats available online.

PLEASE NOTE THE CHART BELOW IS FOR HUMAN USE WE ARE NOT SUGGESTING THAT ALL OF THE ITEMS LISTED SHOULD BE FED TO DOGS

There are many common human foods that are toxic to all dogs and should be avoided

These include grapes, currants and sultanas, cherries, the stones are toxic to dogs, apricot stones are also toxic. Red, white and Black currants have the same toxin that is contained within grapes so are best avoided. Rhubarb is toxic and so are Apple pips (so avoid the core) and unripened tomatoes can also be toxic. Macadamia nuts, Onions and Garlic, Mushrooms, raw and green Potatoes and artificial sweeteners should not be fed. Oh and of course chocolate!

Foods (alphabetically)

Total Purines in mg uric acid/100 g (Average)

Min Max

Nutr. Density in mg/MJ

HIGHEST IN PURINES (400 mg. uric acid/100 g and higher)
Fish, sardines in oil 480 399 560 519.5
Liver, Calf’s 460     837.5
Mushroom, flat, edible Boletus, dried 488     932.8
Neck sweet bread, Calf’s 1260     3012.9
Ox liver 554     1013.3
Ox spleen 444     1052.6
Pig’s heart 530     1382
Pig’s liver 515     937.9
Pig’s lungs (lights) 434     911.2
Pig’s spleen 516     1208.2
Sheep’s spleen 773     1702.6
Sprat, smoked 804     795.6
Yeast, Baker’s 680     2071.3
Yeast, Brewer’s 1810     1866.6
MODERATELY HIGH IN PURINES (100 to 400 mg. uric acid/100g)
Bean, seed, white, dry 128     127.1
Bean, Soya, seed, dry 190     139.1
Beef, chuck 120     192
Beef, fillet 110     216.4
Beef, fore rib, entrecote 120     185.4
Beef, muscles only 133     292.1
Beef, roast beef, sirloin 110 110 120 201.4
Beef, shoulder 110     203.9
Black gram (mungo bean), seed, dry 222     194.3
Caviar (real) 144     141.6
Chicken (breast with skin) 175     288.4
Chicken (chicken for roasting), average 115     165.8
Chicken, boiling fowl, average 159     149.2
Chicken, leg with skin, without bone 110     152.2
Duck, average 138     146.2
Fish, Anchovy 239     560
Fish, Carp 160     330.9
Fish, Cod 109     335.9
Fish, Haddock 139     425.2
Fish, Halibut 178     439.9
Fish, Herring, Atlantic 210     216.9
Fish, Herring, Matje cured 219     197.6
Fish, Mackerel 145 95 194 191.2
Fish, Pike-perch 110     311.3
Fish, Redfish (ocean perch) 241     544.1
Fish, Saithe (coalfish) 163     473.4
Fish, salmon 170 110 250 202
Fish, sardine, pilchard 345     693.2
Fish, Sole 131 125 137 376.2
Fish, trout 297     686.7
Fish, Tuna 257     273.7
Fish, Tuna in oil 290     246.2
Goose 165     116.7
Ham, cooked 131     248.1
Heart, Sheep’s 241     367.6
Horse meat 200     438.8
Kidney, Calf’s 218     419.6
Lamb (muscles only) 182     371
Lentil, seed, dry 127 114.45 164.65 93.8
Linseed 105     67.4
Liver, chicken 243     426.3
Lobster 118 60 175 346.4
Lungs, Calf’s 147     389.1
Mussel 112     391.5
Ox heart 256     504.3
Ox kidney 269     569.5
Ox lungs (lights) 399     961.4
Ox tongue 160     186
Peas, chick (garbanzo), seed, dry 109     84.2
Pig’s kidney 334     784.5
Pig’s tongue 136     208.2
Pike 140     406.7
Poppy seed, seed, dry 170     86
Pork belly 100 80 110 92.3
Pork belly, raw, smoked dried 127     82.6
Pork chop with bone 145 140 150 260
Pork chuck 140 135 145 170.4
Pork fillet 150 145 150 334.8
Pork hip bone (hind leg) 120 115 130 155
Pork leg (hind leg) 160 150 160 357.4
Pork muscles only 166     374.9
Pork shoulder with skin (blade of shoulder) 150 145 150 165.2
Rabbit meat, average with bone 132 95 150 207.7
Rabbit/Hare (average) 105     219.4
Sausage “Jagdwurst” 112     127.8
Sausage salami, German 104     65.9
Sausage, liver (liverwurst) 165     122.2
Sausages, frying, from pork 101     80.2
Scallop 136     505.8
Shrimp, brown 147 60 234 397.9
Spleen, Calf’s 343     815.9
Sunflower seed, dry 143     59.5
Turkey, young animal, average, with skin 150     237.3
Veal chop, cutlet with bone 140     309.6
Veal fillet 140     347.3
Veal knuckle with bone 150 140 160 353.2
Veal, leg of veal with bone 150 140 150 310.2
Veal, muscles only 172     438.7
Veal, neck with bone 150     326.9
Veal, shoulder 140     309.3
Venison back 105     205
Venison haunch (leg) 138 105 154 336.5
LOWEST IN PURINES (100 mg. uric acid/100 g and less)
Almond, sweet 37     15.7
Apple 14     60.1
Apricot 73     71.6
Artichoke 78     834.6
Asparagus 23 19.71 29.57 310.9
Aubergine 21     290
Avocado 19     20.9
Bamboo Shoots 29     402.1
Banana 57     152.4
Barley without husk, whole grain 96     71.1
Bean sprouts, Soya 80     378.3
Beans, French (string beans, haricot) 37 20 43 266.9
Beans, French, dried 45 40 50 39.4
Beef, corned (German) 57     96.5
Beet root 19 15 21 108.5
Bilberry, blueberry, huckleberry 22     143.7
Brain, Calf’s 92     203.1
Bread, wheat (flour) or (white bread) 14     13.9
Broccoli 81     691.6
Brussel sprouts 69     456
Cabbage, red 32 19.79 36.62 350.2
Cabbage, savoy 37 19.87 42.71 342.6
Cabbage, white 22     210.3
Carrot 17 14 25 155.9
Cauliflower 51     537.9
Celeriac 30     390.6
Cheese, Brie 7.1     5
Cheese, Cheddar/Cheshire cheese, 50% fat cont 6     4.3
Cheese, cottage 9.4     22
Cheese, edam, 30% fat content in dry matter 7.1     6.8
Cheese, edam, 40% fat content in dry matter 7.1     5.4
Cheese, edam, 45% fat content in dry matter 7.1     4.8
Cheese, Limburger, 20% fat content in dry matter 32     41.7
Cherry, Morello 17     75.5
Cherry, sweet 7.1     64.2
Chicory 12     171.8
Chinese leaves 21     412.4
Chives 67     581.2
Corn, sweet 52     140.9
Fish, Crayfish 60     220.3
Cress 28     200.8
Crispbread 60     44.9
Cucumber 7.3     141.7
Currant, red 17     122.6
Date, dried 35     29.9
Elderberry, black 33     144.4
Endive 17     297.7
Fennel leaves 14 10 16 139
Fig (dried) 64     60.4
Fish, eel (smoked) 78 45 110 57.2
Frankfurter sausages 89 68.74 129.52 80.2
Gooseberry 16     101.3
Grass, Viper’s (black salsify) 71     939.4
Kale 48     309.1
Kiwi fruit (Chinese gooseberry, strawberry peach 19     88.5
Kohlrabi 25 10.86 29.61 243.9
Leek 74     714.1
Lettuce 13 9.75 29.25 274.4
Lettuce, Lamb’s 38     645.3
Meat, luncheon 70     58.8
Melon, Cantelope 33     143
Millet, shucked corn 62     41.9
Morel 30     748.9
Mushroom 58 55.48 60.52 858.2
Mushroom, flat, edible Boletus, cep 92     1011.6
Mushrooms, canned, solid and liquid 29     488.5
Mushrooms, Chanterelle 17     356.2
Mushrooms, Chanterelles, canned, solids & liqui 17     114.2
Nuts, Brazil 23     8.3
Nuts, hazelnut (cobnut) 37 27 42 13.9
Nuts, peanut 79     33.8
Oats, without husk, whole grain 94     63.6
Olive, green, marinated 29     51.1
Onion 13     112.4
Orange 19     105.9
Ox brain 75     140.7
Oyster 90     322.6
Oyster, mushroom 50     1054.6
Parsley, leaf 57     266.2
Pasta made with egg (noodles, macaroni, spagh 40     26.6
Pea, pod and seed, green 84     245.7
Pea, seed, dry 95 84.78 166.56 82.7
Peach 21     119.6
Pear 12 2 17 51.5
Peppers, green 55     681
Pig’s brain 83     161.71
Pineapple 19     81.4
Plaice 93     257.6
Plum 24     116.8
Plum, dried 64     67.9
Potato 16     53.6
Potato, cooked with skin 18     60.3
Pudding, black 55 37.23 90.55 42.8
Pumpkin 44     422
Quince 30     185
Radish 15     234.3
Radishes 13     210.6
Raspberry 18     126.3
Rhubarb 12     212.6
Rolls, bread 21     18.2
Rye, whole grain 51 47 63 41
Sauerkraut, dripped off 16 12 20 224.7
Sausage “Bierschincken” 85     117.3
Sausage “Fleischwurst” 78     66.8
Sausage “Mortadella” 96 79 130 67.4
Sausage “Munich Weisswurst” 73     65.7
Sausage, Vienna 78     65.7
Sausages, frying, from veal 91     81.5
Sausages, German (Mettwurst) 74     45.9
Sesame (gingelly) seed, Oriental, dry 62     26.5
Spinach 57     844.7
Squash, summer 24     296.2
Strawberry 21 11.81 25.59 156.8
Tench 80     243.8
Tofu 68     196.4
Tomato 11     145.7
Nuts, Walnut 25     9.1
Wheat, whole grain 51 40.2 83.41 39.4
Yogurt, min. 3.5% fat content 8.1     27.7

90,000 Can you eat fish for gout and what kind of fish?

Proper and healthy nutrition is a topic that more and more people are paying attention to, since our health depends to a large extent on it, but when we suffer from some kind of disease and this can alleviate our condition, healthy nutrition and proper diet – more more important. This applies in full force for people who suffer from gout .

People with gout should avoid foods high in purines, natural ingredients that break down into uric acid.When uric acid is too high in a person’s blood, it can build up in the joints and cause the bloating, inflammation, and pain that are characteristic of gout.

This disease in most cases is completely treatable, and proper nutrition is of great importance for this, in addition to drugs. First of all, you need to limit the intake of foods that contain purines. We will focus on fish, however.

Types of fish you should avoid if you suffer from gout

Sufferers of gout should avoid seafood such as shrimp, anchovies, herring, mussels, tuna, lobster, trout.They all contain beneficial trace minerals, but they also increase uric acid levels.

Foods that contain 150 to 825 milligrams of purine compounds per 100 grams are considered high purine foods and should therefore be avoided. Canned versions of these foods are also not suitable for gout. Canned sardines contain 480 milligrams of purines per 100 grams, while canned herring contains 378 milligrams.

Fish species that can be eaten by gout sufferers

Species fish , which contain a moderate amount of purine compounds – from 50 to 150 milligrams of purines for every 100 grams – salmon, catfish, tilapia, river flounder, white fish and others.

People who are on a gout diet can include these types of fish in their diet, but only in moderation. In addition, fish should be cooked with the least amount of fat, preferably boiled or baked.

Tips for preparing fish

Always eat fish fresh. Avoid strong condiments or fish sauces that are high in sugar.

Very important – a person who suffers from gout should eat as little food as possible with a high level of fat. Excess fat can stimulate kidney retention of uric acid, making your condition worse.

Instead of fried fish bread, try grilled or oven baked fish.For low sodium levels, season the fish with herbs, spices, or freshly squeezed lemon juice instead of salt or a high potassium seasoning mixture.

In conclusion, many nutritionists and health experts believe that fish should not be eaten more than one or two days a week. However, it is not. Fish is a much healthier food product than beef, lamb and pork.

If you feel like eating fish , you can do it every day, but you need to make sure that this is your only meat intake for the day, as people who suffer from gout should not eat more than 170-180 grams of meat per day to avoid higher blood uric acid levels.

What foods should not be eaten with gout | Health Harmony

Gout is a type of arthritis that causes uric acid crystals to form around the joints. This painful condition is usually associated with the consumption of excessive amounts of certain foods, such as seafood, meat, or alcohol.

A combination of dietary restrictions and medications may help lower uric acid levels and minimize gout symptoms.

A list of foods to eat for gout

A chemical called purines is found in a variety of foods.But their number is different.

Source: https://www.google.ru/imgres

Source: https://www.google.ru/imgres

In the process of digestion, the same uric acid is formed from them, which can accumulate in the body and be deposited on the joints causing gout attacks.

Therefore, people with this diagnosis should adhere to a specific diet and avoid eating foods high in purines.

1. Cauliflower, spinach and asparagus

Although purines from these vegetables do not cause as much harm as from meat, it is better to exclude them or at least limit them in your diet with diagnosed gout.

2. Peas, beans and other legumes

Beans, peas and other legumes with a high purine content. For example, 100 grams of peas can contain 5 to 100 mg of purines.

3. Mushrooms

Mushrooms also have moderately high or high purine counts. Therefore, food for this disease is also excluded.

4. Fish

Fish, including cod, carp, herring, sardines, trout, tuna, haddock, salmon and others, have a very high level of purines.

Although a small portion of these fish should not cause a serious reaction, consuming large amounts of fish regularly can cause a negative reaction.

5. Alcohol

Alcohol causes particularly painful attacks of gout. Moreover, beer is the most dangerous for people with this disease.

A study of 47,000 men over 12 years of age found that those who had a high alcohol intake were significantly more likely to develop gout during their lifetime.

A daily serving of beer increases the risk of developing gout by up to 50 percent. Drinking wine and spirits should be avoided for those who already have this diagnosis.

6. Caffeine

Caffeine acts as a diuretic, reducing the water content in the body. As a result, uric acid crystals can remain in the blood and crystallize in the joints.

Therefore, patients with gout should drink no more than 1 cup of the drink per day.

7. Meat by-products

The organs of animals, as a rule, contain a particularly high amount of purines. Eating such meat can be especially dangerous for people with gout.

The most dangerous beef liver contains 460 mg of purines in each serving. Slightly less in the heart, liver and lungs of other animals, but still high.

8. Fried foods

Foods high in fat may worsen gout symptoms. People with a high body mass index are more likely to suffer from gout attacks than those on a diet that eliminates fatty fried foods.

Regular consumption of fried foods may increase your risk of developing chronic gout.

Avoid prepackaged foods, ready-made foods and foods cooked with a lot of oil.

9. Beef and other meats

All forms of beef have moderate to high purine levels. Moreover, most of all in the tenderloin, the scapula, with ribs.

Red meat such as pork or lamb is also harmful to people with gout.Therefore, it is very important to limit their use.

10. Carbonated and sugary drinks

Carbonated drinks are high in sugar and increase the risk of disease. Studies show that those people who drink soda often are more prone to getting sick.

Many of these drinks contain caffeine, which contributes to dehydration and increases blood uric acid levels.

Attention! The article is for informational purposes only.Be sure to check with your doctor or specialist.

What else to read:

What is gout and what are its causes

How is gout treated and how dangerous it is without treatment

Preventing gout with home remedies

What should be a diet for gout. Do’s and Don’ts

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Which foods contain purines 🚩 which foods contain a lot of uric acid 🚩 Diets

Why are purines dangerous

When, in the event of impaired renal function, uric acid formed after the natural breakdown of cells and purines begins to accumulate in the body, hyperuricemia occurs. It becomes the cause of metabolic disorders and, if left untreated, can lead to such a dangerous disease as gout, when uric acid crystals formed under the skin, in the joints and kidneys cause unbearable pain to a person.

The level of uric acid must be controlled in order to stop the development of this disease in time by taking measures. Normally, the content of uric acid in the blood of men should be from 3.5 to 7 mg per 100 g of blood, in women – from 2.5 to 5.7 mg. With an increase in this level, you can reduce the amount of purines and, therefore, uric acid by adhering to a certain diet that excludes foods high in purines.

Purine content in food

The daily intake of purine from food should be 600-1000 mg.But at the same time, it should be taken into account which products are their suppliers. It has been found that purines from meat and fish are more dangerous than those from milk, and purines from vegetables have no negative effects at all and do not increase the risk of developing gout.

For gout, eat more cherries, grapes, strawberries and cherries, tofu cheese, lettuce, nuts, and low-fat dairy products.

The highest content of “harmful” purines in brains, anchovies, meat sauces, kidneys and liver, meat broth, veal tongue, sardines, mussels, herring and cocoa.These foods can contain up to 1000 mg of purines in 3 servings of food. Much less, up to 100 mg in 3 servings of the product, is found in pork bacon, ham, veal, beef, lamb, pork, chicken soup, poultry, rabbit meat. The same amount of purines is found in shellfish, lobster, oysters and crabs, cod, halibut, pike, sprats and lentils. Least of all purines are found in asparagus, cauliflower, beans, peas, mushrooms, salmon, oatmeal, spinach, sorrel, tuna, cottage cheese, beer, green tea, cheese and eggs.

To reduce the purine content of soups, cook them in the second broth, draining the first.

Purine content also depends on how the food is processed. It rises during prolonged cooking of meat and fish broths, while almost all purines turn into liquid, and boiled meat and fish contain harmful purines in small amounts.

Fish and Seafood Calorie Table

Product Number Energy value (kcal) Proteins (g) Fat (g) Carbohydrates (g)
Sturgeon balyk 100 g 194 20.4 12.5 0.0
Blanched Beluga 100 g 234 23.3 15.6 0.0
Fresh beluga 100 g 147 21.0 0.7 0.0
Cured roach 100 g 235 46.4 5.5 0.0
Cold smoked roach 100 g 181 31.1 6.3 0.0
Pink salmon in tomato sauce 100 g 132 14.5 5.1 6.9
Boiled pink salmon 100 g 168 22.9 7.8 0.0
Fresh pink salmon 100 g 147 21.0 7.0 0.0
Salted pink salmon 100 g 169 22.1 9.0 0.0
Pink salmon, canned 100 g 136 20.9 5.8 0.0
Zrazy from pike perch 100 g 164 12.1 7.4 12.1
Zrazy from hake 100 g 140 13.1 5.6 9.3
Fried catfish 100 g 209 22.2 11.5 4.1
Boiled catfish 100 g 114 15.5 5.8 0.0
Catfish baked in sour cream sauce 100 g 137 7.4 8.8 6.8
Granular Beluga Caviar 100 g 237 27.2 14.2 0.0
Pink salmon caviar 100 g 230 31.2 11.7 0.0
Chum salmon caviar 100 g 251 31.6 13.8 0.0
Alaska pollock caviar 100 g 131 28.4 1.9 0.0
Granular sturgeon caviar 100 g 203 28.0 9.7 0.0
Sturgeon caviar 100 g 236 36.0 10.2 0.0
Sevruga granular caviar 100 g 221 28.4 11.9 0.0
Cod caviar 100 g 115 24.0 0.2 0.0
Boiled squid 100 g 110 18.0 4.2 0.0
Fresh squid 100 g 74 18.0 0.3 0.0
Flounder in oil 100 g 249 14.4 21.3 0.0
Flounder in tomato sauce 100 g 125 12.6 5.4 6.3
Hot-smoked flounder 100 g 192 22.0 11.6 0.0
Boiled flounder 100 g 103 18.3 3.3 0.0
Fresh flounder 100 g 83 16.5 1.8 0.0
Boiled crucian carp 100 g 102 20.7 2.1 0.0
Fresh crucian carp 100 g 87 17.7 1.8 0.0
Carp in tomato sauce 100 g 145 12.4 8.7 4.1
Boiled carp 100 g 102 16.0 3.7 2.0
Fresh carp 100 g 110 18.0 4.2 0.0
Fresh chum salmon 100 g 138 22.0 5.6 0.0
Salted chum salmon 100 g 184 24.3 9.6 0.0
Chum salmon, canned 100 g 129 21.5 4.8 0.0
Fresh mullet 100 g 124 21.0 0.4 0.0
Hot smoked sprat 100 g 162 21.3 8.5 0.0
Sprat, spiced 100 g 154 14.8 10.5 0.0
Salted sprat 100 g 137 17.1 7.6 0.0
Whale meat 100 g 119 22.5 3.2 0.0
Canned crabs 100 g 85 18.7 1.1 0.1
Boiled crabs 100 g 96 16.0 3.6 0.0
Canned shrimps 100 g 81 17.8 1.1 0.0
Boiled shrimps 100 g 95 18.9 2.2 0.0
Fresh shrimps 100 g 97 22.0 1.0 0.0
Bream in tomato sauce 100 g 138 15.3 7.4 2.6
Cured bream 100 g 221 42.0 5.9 0.0
Hot smoked bream 100 g 172 32.8 4.5 0.0
Boiled bream 100 g 126 20.9 4.7 0.0
Fresh bream 100 g 105 17.1 4.1 0.0
Cold smoked bream 100 g 160 29.7 4.6 0.0
Smoked salmon 100 g 162 21.5 8.4 0.0
Grilled Salmon 100 g 283 20.7 22.3 0.6
Fresh salmon 100 g 201 19.9 13.6 0.0
Salted salmon 100 g 269 21.0 20.5 0.0
Salmon sauté 100 g 379 21.1 31.4 4.1
Boiled mackerel 100 g 124 22.8 3.6 0.0
Boiled mussels 100 g 50 9.1 1.5 0.0
Boiled pollock 100 g 79 17.6 1.0 0.0
Fresh pollock 100 g 73 16.6 0.6 0.0
Fresh capelin 100 g 157 13.4 11.5 0.0
Seaweed 100 g 5 0.9 0.2 0.0
Boiled burbot 100 g 92 21.4 0.7 0.0
Fresh burbot 100 g 80 18.8 0.6 0.0
Hot smoked sea bass 100 g 175 23.5 9.0 0.0
Sea perch 100 g 112 19.9 3.6 0.0
Fresh sea perch 100 g 117 17.6 5.2 0.0
Sea bass stew 100 g 120 10.9 6.6 4.2
Roasted river perch 100 g 180 20.6 9.1 4.0
Baked river perch 100 g 103 6.8 4.7 8.4
Steamed river perch 100 g 109 19.5 3.5 0.0
Fresh river perch 100 g 82 18.5 0.9 0.0
Stuffed river perch 100 g 130 14.9 6.1 3.9
Sturgeon in tomato sauce 100 g 181 14.7 12.0 3.4
Fried sturgeon 100 g 273 16.0 17.4 13.2
Boiled sturgeon 100 g 179 17.7 12.0 0.0
Steamed sturgeon 100 g 179 17.8 11.9 0.0
Fresh sturgeon 100 g 163 16.4 10.9 0.0
Sturgeon, canned 100 g 163 16.4 10.6 0.6
Octopus 100 g 73 18.2 0.0 0.0
Boiled halibut 100 g 216 14.0 17.8 0.0
Fresh halibut 100 g 102 18.9 3.0 0.0
Cod liver 100 g 610 4.0 66.0 0.0
Fresh roach 100 g 110 19.0 0.4 0.0
Boiled sea crayfish 100 g 90 20.5 0.7 0.3
Fresh sea crayfish (lobster, lobster) 100 g 89 18.8 1.3 0.5
Boiled river crayfish 100 g 97 20.3 1.3 1.0
Fresh river crayfish 100 g 76 15.5 1.0 1.2
Chopped cod cutlets 100 g 260 14.9 17.8 10.9
Saury blanched in oil 100 g 283 18.3 23.3 0.0
Fresh saury 100 g 182 18.6 12.0 0.0
Fish salad from perch 100 g 182 4.7 15.7 5.5
Sardine in tomato sauce 100 g 162 17.0 9.9 1.4
Boiled sardine 100 g 178 20.1 10.8 0.0
Fresh sardine 100 g 169 20.6 9.6 0.0
Sardines in oil 100 g 221 24.1 13.9 0.0
Sevruga in tomato sauce 100 g 179 16.1 11.5 2.8
Fresh sevruga 100 g 160 17.0 1.0 0.0
Herring in vegetable oil 100 g 301 16.4 26.5 0.0
Herring in sour cream 100 g 97 5.5 6.2 5.3
Herring in tomato sauce 100 g 159 13.8 9.7 4.6
Hot smoked herring 100 g 215 21.8 14.3 0.0
Pickled herring 100 g 192 16.5 12.6 3.4
Fresh herring 100 g 161 16.3 10.7 0.0
Salted herring 100 g 217 19.8 15.4 0.0
Smoked mackerel 100 g 221 20.7 15.5 0.0
Boiled mackerel 100 g 211 19.6 14.7 0.0
Fresh mackerel 100 g 181 18.7 11.9 0.0
Mackerel, canned 100 g 258 16.4 21.4 0.0
Catfish in tomato sauce 100 g 126 12.9 6.3 4.3
Boiled catfish 100 g 196 18.4 13.6 0.0
Steamed catfish 100 g 121 18.2 5.4 0.0
Fresh catfish 100 g 143 16.8 8.5 0.0
Horse mackerel in oil 100 g 309 15.6 27.4 0.0
Horse mackerel in tomato sauce 100 g 110 14.8 2.3 7.3
Fried horse mackerel 100 g 190 20.3 10.5 3.7
Boiled horse mackerel 100 g 133 20.6 5.6 0.0
Stewed horse mackerel 100 g 122 19.6 4.8 0.0
Fresh horse mackerel 100 g 119 19.0 5.0 0.0
Cold smoked horse mackerel 100 g 94 17.1 2.8 0.0
Fresh sterlet 100 g 122 17.0 6.1 0.0
Pike perch in tomato sauce 100 g 119 14.0 5.3 3.7
Boiled pike perch 100 g 97 21.3 1.3 0.0
Fresh pike perch 100 g 84 19.2 0.7 0.0
Stewed pike perch 100 g 89 19.6 1.2 0.0
Stuffed pike perch 100 g 144 13.7 6.0 8.7
Cod meatballs 100 g 112 14.2 2.6 8.8
Hot smoked cod 100 g 115 26.0 1.2 0.0
Fried cod 100 g 111 23.0 0.1 0.0
Baked cod 100 g 90 6.0 3.7 8.0
Boiled cod 100 g 78 17.8 0.7 0.0
Grilled cod 100 g 172 22.1 9.1 0.6
Fresh cod 100 g 78 17.7 0.7 0.0
Salted cod 100 g 98 23.1 0.6 0.0
Stewed cod 100 g 101 9.7 5.1 3.9
Cold smoked cod 100 g 94 22.1 0.5 0.0
Tuna in vegetable oil 100 g 190 27.1 9.0 0.0
Tuna in own juice 100 g 96 21.0 1.2 0.0
Fresh tuna 100 g 101 23.0 1.0 0.0
Salted sprat 100 g 225 19.8 16.2 0.0
Smoked eel 100 g 326 17.9 28.6 0.0
Fresh marine eel 100 g 93 19.1 1.9 0.0
Fresh eel 100 g 332 14.5 30.5 0.0
Fresh oysters 100 g 95 14.0 0.3 6.0
Cod fillet, breaded, fried 100 g 273 19.1 15.8 14.6
Trout 100 g 97 19.2 2.1 0.0
Salted hamsa 100 g 166 21.2 9.0 0.0
Boiled hake 100 g 95 18.5 2.3 0.0
Fresh hake 100 g 86 16.6 2.2 0.0
Fish schnitzel from perch 100 g 215 17.6 12.5 8.1
Sprats in vegetable oil 100 g 363 17.4 32.4 0.4
Pike in tomato sauce 100 g 108 14.2 4.0 3.6
Boiled pike 100 g 98 21.3 1.3 0.0
Poached pike 100 g 90 19.6 1.2 0.0
Fresh pike 100 g 82 18.4 0.8 0.0
Stuffed pike 100 g 141 13.3 6.0 8.4
Fresh ide 100 g 81 18.2 1.0 0.0

“Divine fruit” and a symbol of good luck: what to make from persimmon

© GoncharukMaks / Shutterstock / FOTODOM

Fire of Jupiter, wheat of Zeus, God’s pear … This is the name of persimmon, the season of which is now at its peak and will officially end on New Year’s Eve.This fruit has character: if you don’t understand it, then the gastronomic pleasure can completely ruin the viscous tannins.

The most delicious persimmon is of deep orange-red color, translucent and very soft. I always choose it carefully: one awkward movement and it bursts right in my hands. But just for persimmons, this is the norm: only in this case it is not viscous. If the fruit cracks on the way home, it’s best to eat it right away or keep it in the refrigerator for no longer than a day.

There is also a right for a viscous persimmon.To get rid of tannins, leave the fruit to ripen for several days in direct, dim sunlight, in paper or a container with apples, pears or bananas – this is how ethylene is released, which helps to ripen faster. Another way is to put the persimmon in the freezer. But I like it the least – the cell walls are damaged, and the fruit loses its charm.

Since childhood, I adore a special kind of persimmon – kinglet. It is almost always sugar-sweet and crunchy. True, he also has one important subtlety.A ripe fruit has a chocolate-colored flesh. And it should show through even through a dense skin. Now I appreciate the kinglet for two more advantages – it always keeps its shape in dishes and looks appetizing due to the contrast of the skin and pulp.

HLS-fruit for haiku

The homeland of persimmon trees is China: they have been growing there for more than 10 thousand years. True, they began to cultivate much later: from 220 BC. during the Qin and Han dynasties. In Chinese culture, persimmon is a symbol of good luck.

But the fruit became truly national in Japan, where it appeared in the 7th century.Persimmon was often sung in haiku – the famous lyrical three-verses. The most famous poet of this genre – Matsuo Base – wrote:

This old village –

no houses

without persimmon trees.

In the 19th century, the fruit was first brought to Europe, to France. Persimmon appeared in Russia in 1888, when the country ordered seedlings from Italy to grow in Sukhum. And seven years later, 22 varieties were growing in the Tiflis Botanical Garden.

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Nowadays persimmon is one of the most important healthy lifestyle products.First, one medium fruit weighing 168 g contains half the daily value of vitamin A. This micronutrient is vital for vision, including color perception and adaptation in low light conditions, supports reproductive function, is necessary for a healthy immune system, and also affects growth and cell development.

Secondly, persimmon contains a lot of vitamin C. It strengthens the immune system, is an antioxidant defense of our body and is necessary for the production of the protein “beauty” collagen and neurotransmitters – including the “happiness hormone” serotonin.

The fruit is also useful for the cardiovascular system: it contains potassium and magnesium, which helps to absorb vitamin B6.

In addition, persimmon contains the most important phenolic compounds – powerful antioxidants. They remove free radicals from the body that destroy DNA, bind metals and prevent fat oxidation, which also produces free radicals.

Smoothie, porridge and healthy jam

I like to start the morning with persimmon: coconut yogurt with fruit wedges, smoothies with banana, walnuts and aromatic cinnamon or chia pudding with persimmon puree.For the latter, grind the pulp in a blender to a paste consistency. According to my mood, I add vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg, a little ginger or freshly squeezed lemon juice to it to balance the taste. By the way, this puree is a natural jam without heat treatment, so all vitamins and minerals remain in it. I like it with pancakes, waffles and toast.

One of my favorite autumn breakfasts is oatmeal with persimmon in almond or coconut milk. Most often I cook it, but sometimes I do it lazily, without cooking – I pour the cereal in the evening, put it in the refrigerator overnight, and in the morning I cut the fruit and add it on top.

Sugar-free quinoa porridge with persimmon

This healthy recipe is used when variety is desired. Unlike all other cereals, only quinoa and amaranth have the “complete” protein, as in animal products, that is, all nine essential amino acids. I recommend soaking the quinoa in cold water overnight to get rid of phytic acid as much as possible – it interferes with the absorption of vitamins and minerals.

© Foxys Forest Manufacture / Shutterstock / FOTODOM

I must sprinkle the porridge with a handful of finely chopped walnuts – a source of essential omega-3 fatty acids for the health of the cardiovascular system.And I love adding natural vanilla seeds – they blend perfectly with all the ingredients to create a cozy taste and aroma.

What you need (for 2 portions)

  • White quinoa – 80 g
  • Persimmon – 2 pcs.
  • Peanut butter – 2 tbsp l.
  • Coconut milk, 60% fat – 400 ml
  • Filtered water – 100 ml
  • Vanilla pod (optional) – ½ pc.
  • Walnuts – 30 g

What to do

  • Add quinoa to a fine sieve and rinse under running water until the water is not soapy and clear.This is usually five to seven times.
  • Slice the vanilla pod lengthwise and scrape off the seeds with a teaspoon.
  • Pour coconut milk and water into a small saucepan or saucepan, bring to a boil, add quinoa, vanilla seeds, stir and cook over medium heat, covered, until cooked for 12-15 minutes.
  • Wash the persimmon and dry with a paper towel, remove the stem and seeds. Cut gently into large cubes or wedges.
  • Chop the walnuts finely.
  • When the quinoa is done, add the peanut butter and stir well.
  • Place porridge in bowls, top with persimmon and sprinkle with walnuts.

Incredible salsa and prosciutto filling

Due to its sweetness and light vanilla aftertaste, unusual appetizers and salads are obtained with persimmon. For example … bruschetta. A crunchy slice of baguette, cheese (brie, ricotta, sheep or cashew vegetable), persimmon wedges, and on top is a tiny pinch of hot red pepper for piquancy, or a few of your favorite nuts.Woodland and pistachios work well.

On this topic

Another topping option is persimmon salsa. This is a modern version of the traditional Mexican sauce made from tomatoes, chili, onions, garlic, black pepper and coriander. Cut the persimmon into a medium dice, add chopped red sweet onions, cilantro and mint, freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice, salt, and optionally a ring of hot jalapeno or chili peppers, which can be replaced with ginger. By the way, sometimes tomatoes are added to this sauce – it turns out quite unusual, but very tasty.I like to add salsa to rolls with avocado and fried tofu. It is also suitable for any white fish and smoked salmon.

When there is not enough time, I recommend preparing the fastest appetizer – wrap persimmon slices in prosciutto or jamon. Cured ham goes well with this fruit as well as with melon. Or make caprese – with burrata or vegetable in the Asian style: with avocado, sesame seeds and soy sauce and sesame oil dressing.

Quick salad with persimmon and rucola

Persimmons are suitable for any greens – be it any kind of lettuce, Swiss chard, green basil, spinach and even bitter Italian radicchio chicory.Try a salad with this fruit, salad mix, grapefruit wedges, avocado and sweet red onion rings.

© Elena Elizarova / Shutterstock / FOTODOM

I like this autumn recipe for its simplicity and at the same time complex taste: spice and light bitterness from rucola, sweetness from persimmon, sourness from cranberries, and pomegranate and balsamic vinegar give an unexpected depth.

What you need (for 4 portions)

  • Persimmon – 2 pcs.
  • Rucola – 80 g
  • Dried cranberries – 30 g
  • Walnuts – 40 g
  • Pomegranate seeds – 30 g
  • Extra virgin olive oil – 2 tbsp.l.
  • Balsamic vinegar – 1 tbsp l.
  • Pink Salt – to taste

What to do

  • Wash and dry the rucola.
  • Peel the persimmons and cut into medium cubes.
  • Lightly chop the walnuts.
  • Whisk together the olive oil, balsamic vinegar and salt in a small bowl.
  • Add herbs, cranberries and walnuts to salad bowl, stir and season.
  • Add persimmon, mix gently again and sprinkle with pomegranate seeds.

Meat Spice and Michelin Paste

It is quite unexpected to meet persimmon in hot dishes, but it is still quite often baked with pork to add sweetness. The second most popular option is chicken. In this case, the fruit is combined with rosemary, sage or ginger. If you want a lighter version of the hot one, then bake it with root vegetables – rutabaga, parsnips, turnips, carrots – and season with sprigs of fresh thyme.

Persimmons are also often used in Italian dishes.For example, in a risotto sprinkled with pomegranate seeds, or as a pizza filling with spicy gorgonzola cheese. And in the American restaurant Oenotri, marked by the Michelin guide, they prepare pasta with fruit – pappardelle with persimmon, parmesan and walnuts. Another popular version is with arugula and thyme.

Creamy soup of persimmon and pumpkin with coconut milk

Surprisingly, they even put persimmon in soup. This recipe is a real treasure for immunity. It contains three powerful anti-inflammatory spices: ginger, turmeric and garlic.I recommend always adding black pepper to turmeric – it helps to absorb its active substance curcumin.

© Arkhipenko Olga / Shutterstock / FOTODOM

I also recommend trying a more European version: sweet potato puree soup with ginger and French classics – onions, carrots and celery.

What you need (for 4 portions)

  • Butternut or nutmeg pumpkin – 400 g
  • Persimmon – 3 pcs.
  • Onions (medium) – 1 pc.
  • Coconut milk, 60% fat – 300 ml
  • Garlic – 2 cloves
  • Cinnamon – ¼ tsp
  • Turmeric – ¼ tsp
  • Paprika – ½ tsp
  • Ginger – 1-2 rings 2 mm wide
  • Filtered water (optional to thin the soup) – 100-200 ml
  • Extra virgin olive oil – 1 tbsp. l.
  • Freshly ground black pepper – to taste
  • Pink Salt – to taste
  • Pumpkin seeds and 2 sprigs of thyme – for serving

What to do

  • Peel and chop the onion, garlic and ginger into small cubes.
  • Cut the peeled pumpkin into medium cubes.
  • Peel and cut the persimmons into medium cubes.
  • Heat a skillet over medium heat, add oil and onion, season with salt and cook for five to seven minutes.
  • Add garlic and ginger and simmer for one minute until aroma appears.
  • Add cinnamon, turmeric and paprika and sauté for 30 seconds, stirring constantly.
  • Add pumpkin and persimmon and simmer for ten minutes. You can add some coconut milk instead of butter.
  • Pour in coconut milk and 100 ml of water. Bring to a boil and cook for another five minutes.
  • Puree with a hand blender or in a stationary bowl.
  • Serve in bowls, garnish with freshly ground black pepper, pumpkin seeds and thyme leaves.