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Sinus pain after drinking alcohol: Alcohol intolerance – Symptoms & causes

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Alcohol intolerance – Symptoms & causes

Overview

Alcohol intolerance can cause immediate, uncomfortable reactions after you drink alcohol. The most common signs and symptoms are stuffy nose and skin flushing.

Alcohol intolerance is caused by a genetic condition in which the body can’t break down alcohol efficiently. The only way to prevent these uncomfortable reactions is to avoid alcohol.

Although not a true allergy, in some cases, what seems to be alcohol intolerance might be your reaction to something in an alcoholic beverage — such as chemicals, grains or preservatives. Combining alcohol with certain medications also can cause reactions.

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Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of alcohol intolerance — or of a reaction to ingredients in an alcoholic beverage — can include:

  • Facial redness (flushing)
  • Red, itchy skin bumps (hives)
  • Worsening of pre-existing asthma
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Low blood pressure
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea

When to see a doctor

Having a mild intolerance to alcohol or something else in alcoholic beverages might not require a trip to a doctor. Simply avoid alcohol, limit how much you drink or avoid certain types of alcoholic beverages.

However, if you have a serious reaction or severe pain, see your doctor. Also, if your symptoms seem to be linked to an allergy or a medication you’re taking, see your doctor.

Causes

Alcohol intolerance occurs when your body doesn’t have the proper enzymes to break down (metabolize) the toxins in alcohol. This is caused by inherited (genetic) traits most often found in Asians.

Other ingredients commonly found in alcoholic beverages, especially in beer or wine, can cause intolerance reactions. These include:

  • Sulfites or other preservatives
  • Chemicals, grains or other ingredients
  • Histamine, a byproduct of fermentation or brewing

In some cases, reactions can be triggered by a true allergy to a grain such as corn, wheat or rye or to another substance in alcoholic beverages.

Rarely, severe pain after drinking alcohol is a sign of a more serious disorder, such as Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Risk factors

Risk factors for alcohol intolerance or other reactions to alcoholic beverages include:

  • Being of Asian descent
  • Having asthma or hay fever (allergic rhinitis)
  • Having an allergy to grains or to another food
  • Having Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Complications

Depending on the cause, complications of alcohol intolerance or other reactions to alcoholic beverages can include:

  • Migraines. Drinking alcohol can trigger migraines in some people, possibly as a result of histamines contained in some alcoholic beverages. Your immune system also releases histamines during an allergic reaction.
  • A severe allergic reaction. In rare instances, an allergic reaction can be life-threatening (anaphylactic reaction) and require emergency treatment.

Prevention

Unfortunately, nothing can prevent reactions to alcohol or ingredients in alcoholic beverages. To avoid a reaction, avoid alcohol or the particular substance that causes your reaction.

Read beverage labels to see whether they contain ingredients or additives you know cause a reaction, such as sulfites or certain grains. Be aware, however, that labels might not list all ingredients.

Alcohol intolerance – Symptoms & causes

Overview

Alcohol intolerance can cause immediate, uncomfortable reactions after you drink alcohol. The most common signs and symptoms are stuffy nose and skin flushing.

Alcohol intolerance is caused by a genetic condition in which the body can’t break down alcohol efficiently. The only way to prevent these uncomfortable reactions is to avoid alcohol.

Although not a true allergy, in some cases, what seems to be alcohol intolerance might be your reaction to something in an alcoholic beverage — such as chemicals, grains or preservatives. Combining alcohol with certain medications also can cause reactions.

Products & Services

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of alcohol intolerance — or of a reaction to ingredients in an alcoholic beverage — can include:

  • Facial redness (flushing)
  • Red, itchy skin bumps (hives)
  • Worsening of pre-existing asthma
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Low blood pressure
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea

When to see a doctor

Having a mild intolerance to alcohol or something else in alcoholic beverages might not require a trip to a doctor. Simply avoid alcohol, limit how much you drink or avoid certain types of alcoholic beverages.

However, if you have a serious reaction or severe pain, see your doctor. Also, if your symptoms seem to be linked to an allergy or a medication you’re taking, see your doctor.

Causes

Alcohol intolerance occurs when your body doesn’t have the proper enzymes to break down (metabolize) the toxins in alcohol. This is caused by inherited (genetic) traits most often found in Asians.

Other ingredients commonly found in alcoholic beverages, especially in beer or wine, can cause intolerance reactions. These include:

  • Sulfites or other preservatives
  • Chemicals, grains or other ingredients
  • Histamine, a byproduct of fermentation or brewing

In some cases, reactions can be triggered by a true allergy to a grain such as corn, wheat or rye or to another substance in alcoholic beverages.

Rarely, severe pain after drinking alcohol is a sign of a more serious disorder, such as Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Risk factors

Risk factors for alcohol intolerance or other reactions to alcoholic beverages include:

  • Being of Asian descent
  • Having asthma or hay fever (allergic rhinitis)
  • Having an allergy to grains or to another food
  • Having Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Complications

Depending on the cause, complications of alcohol intolerance or other reactions to alcoholic beverages can include:

  • Migraines. Drinking alcohol can trigger migraines in some people, possibly as a result of histamines contained in some alcoholic beverages. Your immune system also releases histamines during an allergic reaction.
  • A severe allergic reaction. In rare instances, an allergic reaction can be life-threatening (anaphylactic reaction) and require emergency treatment.

Prevention

Unfortunately, nothing can prevent reactions to alcohol or ingredients in alcoholic beverages. To avoid a reaction, avoid alcohol or the particular substance that causes your reaction.

Read beverage labels to see whether they contain ingredients or additives you know cause a reaction, such as sulfites or certain grains. Be aware, however, that labels might not list all ingredients.

How to treat chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses: symptoms, causes, methods

Contents

  • 1 Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses: symptoms, treatment, prevention
    • 1. 1 Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses: what is it?
      • 1.1.1 Definition
      • 1.1.2 Symptoms
      • 1.1.3 Causes
    • 1.2 What symptoms accompany chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?
    • 1.3 What causes chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?
    • 1.4 Diagnosis of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses
    • 1.5 Treatment of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses
      • 1.5.1 Preparations
      • 1.5.2 Physiotherapy
      • 1.5 .3 Surgical intervention
    • 1.6 Alternative methods of treatment of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses nose
    • 1.7 Treatment of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses
      • 1.7.1 What drugs are used in the treatment of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?
    • 1.8 Procedures for the treatment of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses
    • 1.9 Prevention of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses
      • 1. 9.1 How to protect your body?
      • 1.9.2 How to take care of the condition of the nose?
    • 1.10 Prevention of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses
    • 1.11 Which specialist should I contact if I suspect chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?
    • 1.12 Related videos:
    • 1.13 Q&A:
        • 1.13.0.1 What are the symptoms of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?
        • 1.13.0.2 What can cause chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?
        • 1.13.0.3 How is chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses diagnosed?
        • 1.13.0.4 How is chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses treated?
        • 1.13.0.5 What preventive measures can be taken to prevent chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?
        • 1.13.0.6 What are the possible complications of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?

Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses: causes, symptoms and treatments. Find out how to get rid of persistent nasal congestion and smell disorders.

Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses is a common disease characterized by inflammation of the mucous membrane in the paranasal sinuses. It can last several months or years and be repeated at intervals. This condition leads to unpleasant symptoms that cause discomfort and impair the quality of life of patients.

Symptoms of chronic sinusitis can vary and include a runny nose, headache, nasal congestion, and soreness and discomfort in the cheeks, back of the head, or forehead. Also, patients may experience general weakness, fatigue and physical limitations.

Proper diagnosis and treatment of this condition is essential to managing symptoms and preventing complications. Treatment may include antibiotics, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, or supplemental vitamins and minerals.

To prevent the development of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses, it is necessary to monitor your health, strengthen the immune system, avoid chronic stress, and treat upper respiratory tract infections correctly and in a timely manner.

Remember: Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses is a common condition that can lead to unpleasant symptoms and limitation of physical activity. Early contact with a doctor and proper treatment can improve the patient’s condition and prevent complications.

Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses: what is it?

Definition

Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses (CSRI) is a disease that is associated with long-term inflammation and infection of the mucous membrane of the paranasal sinuses.

Symptoms

  • Runny nose;
  • Headache affecting forehead, cheeks, ears and occiput;
  • Swelling and pain in cheeks;
  • Bad smelling breath;
  • Chronic cough with pus;
  • Change in vision;
  • Impaired vision and sound;
  • Feeling of pressure in the head;
  • Fatigue and irritation.

Causes

CVD is usually associated with upper respiratory diseases such as allergies, sinusitis, SARS, influenza, as well as other causes, including facial structural abnormalities. The risks of the disease are increased in smokers, those who drink alcohol and in people who have diabetes.

What symptoms accompany chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?

Headache. Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can lead to persistent headache. Usually the pain is concentrated in the forehead and above the bridge of the nose.

Runny nose and stuffy nose. One of the most common symptoms of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses is a runny nose and nasal congestion, which may not go away for a long time.

Feeling of pressure in the face. Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can cause a feeling of pressure and tension in the area of ​​the cheeks and eyes where the sinuses are located.

Decreased sense of smell and taste. Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can affect the sense of smell and taste, which can reduce quality of life.

Cough and sore throat. Irritation caused by chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can lead to persistent cough and sore throat.

Pustular formations. In some cases, chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can lead to the formation of pustules, which can cause more problems and require medical attention.

What causes chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?

Allergic reaction: one of the causes of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can be an allergic reaction to external factors such as dust, pollen, respiratory diseases and others.

Infections: often chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can be a consequence of infectious diseases such as rhinitis, influenza or tonsillitis. In such cases, inflammation can form as a result of congestive processes in the nasal mucosa.

Structural disorders: In some cases, chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can be caused by structural disorders such as deformities of the nasal septum or various polyps in the mucosal area. Such disorders can interfere with free breathing and cause congestion in the paranasal sinuses.

Immune system disorders: It is also possible that chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses may be the result of disorders in the immune system, which can be provoked by various factors, such as a weakening of the body’s defense functions, genetic disorders and other causes.

Diagnosis of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses

Various factors can lead to chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses, such as allergies, infections, polyps and others. Various methods are used to make a diagnosis.

  1. Physical examination and complete blood count. Your doctor may look for facial lumps, runny nose, and additional signs of inflammation. She may also do a complete blood count to check the levels of white blood cells, which often increase with inflammation.
  2. Fluoroscopy. This method is used to check for sinus inflammation on x-rays of the head.
  3. Computed tomography. With a more accurate CT scan, you can get a more detailed picture of the condition of the paranasal sinuses, including the presence of polyps.

After performing the necessary tests and diagnostic procedures, the physician may recommend appropriate treatment, which may include antibiotics, nasal drops, home remedies, or, in some cases, surgery.

Methods for the treatment of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses

Medications

One of the main methods of treating chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses is taking medications. For this, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, mucolytic and other agents aimed at eliminating the causes and symptoms of the disease can be prescribed.

Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy methods can be used alone or in combination with medical therapy. Possible methods: UVR, hot compresses, hot baths, massage, aerosol therapy, inhalations.

Surgery

Severe cases may require surgery. Treatment may be prescribed in cases where conservative methods of treatment do not bring sufficient results, or in case of complications of the disease. Surgery may include removal of polyps, surgery on drainage tracts, or complete extirpation of the paranasal sinuses.

Traditional treatments for chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses

Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses is a common problem that you can try to solve with the help of traditional methods. It is important to note that before using any recipes, you should consult a specialist, as some products can cause an allergic reaction or aggravate the condition.

Centaury tincture can also be used to treat chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses. Brew two teaspoons of dried centaury leaves in 200 ml of boiling water, then let stand for 30 minutes, strain and drink half a glass 2 times a day before meals.

Another folk method for the treatment of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses is the use of propolis. Mix one teaspoon of propolis with a quarter cup of olive oil, heat in a water bath until the propolis dissolves in the oil. Then strain and use the resulting nasal drops.

  • Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can be overcome using traditional methods.
  • Some of the traditional methods include a mixture of honey and horseradish root, centaury tincture, or the use of propolis as nasal drops.
  • Before using any traditional recipes, you should consult a specialist, as some products can be dangerous or cause an allergic reaction.

Treatment of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses

What drugs are used in the treatment of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?

The following medicines are used to treat chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses:

  • Antibiotics – designed to kill bacteria that cause inflammation. They are prescribed depending on the sensitivity to antibiotics of certain types of bacteria.
  • Corticosteroids are medicines that reduce swelling and inflammation in the sinuses, such as nasal sprays, drops or inhalers.
  • Mucolytics are medicines that make it easier to clear mucus from the nose and paranasal sinuses.
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs – reduce inflammation and pain in the nose and paranasal sinuses.
  • Immunity boosters – help the body cope with illness on its own, such as vitamins and minerals.

It is important to remember that self-medication can aggravate the disease and lead to complications, so you need to get advice from a specialist and choose an effective and safe course of treatment.

Treatments for chronic sinus inflammation

Chronic sinus inflammation can lead to various complications and requires appropriate treatment. In addition to medical therapy, certain procedures are often prescribed to manage symptoms and restore the patient’s health, such as:

  • Conservative sinus surgery. This is a minimally invasive procedure in which a special instrument (endoscope) is inserted through a small opening in the nasal cavity to remove inflamed tissue from the paranasal sinuses.
  • Washing the nose. This procedure consists in thoroughly washing the nasal passages and paranasal sinuses with special solutions. It helps to remove mucus, bacteria, and other debris, promoting healthy tissue repair.
  • Inhalation. This procedure involves the inhalation of vapors or aerosols containing medicinal substances. It helps to quickly and effectively act on inflamed tissues, eliminating symptoms and contributing to the restoration of health.
  • Laser treatment. This treatment uses a laser beam that can destroy inflamed tissue without harming healthy tissue. It allows you to quickly relieve the symptoms of chronic inflammation and promotes the restoration of healthy tissues.

As a rule, the choice of procedure depends on the stage and nature of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses, as well as on the characteristics of the patient’s condition. To determine the most effective method of treatment, it is recommended to consult an experienced otolaryngologist.

Prevention of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses

How to protect your body?

Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses exposes the body to constant stresses that affect the functioning of the immune system. Therefore, it is so important to take care of your health and take measures to strengthen your immunity.

  • Proper nutrition. Include more fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs in your diet. Exclude from the list of products that adversely affect health.
  • Healthy lifestyle. Quitting smoking, reducing alcohol consumption, exercising and exercising will help strengthen the body.
  • Hygiene. Wash your hands regularly and follow other infection prevention measures – avoid contact with sick people and visiting crowded places during epidemics.
  • Rest and sleep. Normalize your sleep and take time to rest to recuperate.

How to take care of the condition of the nose?

Particular attention should be paid to the health of the nose, as it is a direct route to the lungs and the body as a whole.

  • Ventilate the room regularly and humidify the air.
  • Avoid hypothermia, dry air and other factors that can provoke inflammation of the nasal mucosa.
  • At the first sign of a runny or stuffy nose, use saline solutions or other nasal rinses.
  • Get regular check-ups at the ENT.

By taking preventive measures, you can strengthen your body and prevent chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses. And do not forget about regular medical care – only professionals will help maintain your health for many years.

Prevention of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses

Chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can be prevented if you follow a few simple rules.

  • Maintain a strong immune system. Strengthening the immune system is a key factor in the prevention of many diseases, including inflammation of the paranasal sinuses.
  • Avoid contact with allergens. Allergens can be dust, pollen, microbes, foods found in the environment. Avoid contact with allergens to reduce the risk of inflammation.
  • Maintain an optimal level of humidity in the room. Dry air can cause irritation of the nasal mucosa, which can lead to inflammation of the paranasal sinuses. Maintain optimum indoor humidity by using humidifiers.
  • Take care of your health and avoid complications after a cold. The common cold is one of the most common causes of sinus inflammation. If you have a cold, watch your health and avoid complications after the illness.

Which specialist should I contact if I suspect chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?

If chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses is suspected, it is necessary to consult an otolaryngologist. This is due to the fact that ENT specializes in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases associated with the nose and throat.

If you feel that the treatment does not give the desired result or you have any additional questions, you can contact an allergist-immunologist or general practitioner. They can also help treat chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses.

Related videos:

Q&A:

What are the symptoms of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?

Symptoms of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses include persistent nasal congestion, heaviness in the head, pain in the forehead and cheekbones, impaired sense of smell, constant fatigue and irritability.

What can cause chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?

Causes of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses include allergic reactions, impaired nasal breathing, diseases of the upper respiratory tract, immune disorders, microorganisms.

How is chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses diagnosed?

Diagnosis of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses is carried out on the basis of patient complaints, as well as on the basis of a nasal examination and x-ray examination. In some cases, a CT scan may be required.

How is chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses treated?

Treatment of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses includes the use of anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, vasoconstrictors, nasal irrigation with special solutions, in severe cases, surgical treatment may be required.

What preventive measures can be taken to prevent chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?

To prevent chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses, it is necessary to observe the correct sleep and rest regimen, avoid hypothermia, exhale air only through the nose, carry out timely treatment of all diseases of the upper respiratory tract, and regularly wash the nose.

What are the possible complications of chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses?

Complications in chronic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can be chronic pain in the head, the transition of the inflammatory process to other organs, lack of oxygen, the development of asthma.

How and with what to treat diseases of the nose and throat?

Askova Lyudmila Nikolaevna, otorhinolaryngologist of the “Clinic of Modern Medicine”, Doctor of Medical Sciences, Professor.

1. Sinusitis.

Symptoms. How to distinguish from a simple runny nose? What is dangerous? What will happen if not treated? How to treat? Prevention. Causes of occurrence.

Sinusitis is an inflammation of the mucous membrane of the maxillary sinus, which communicates with the nasal cavity. Sinusitis can be acute or chronic.

Acute sinusitis most often develops as a complication of acute rhinitis (runny nose), after infectious diseases, as well as due to inflammatory diseases of the teeth (odontogenic sinusitis). Hypothermia against the background of a decrease in the body’s defenses can serve as a provoking factor. Sinusitis differs from rhinitis (runny nose): the duration of the disease – runny nose lasts 6-8 days, agoymoritis – up to 1 month, the presence of purulent secretions, pain in the area of ​​the affected sinus.

Chronic sinusitis is usually a consequence of the transition of acute inflammation to a chronic form. This can be facilitated by thickening of the nasal mucosa, thickening of the turbinates, curvature of the nasal septum, closing or narrowing the outlet of the maxillary sinuses, insufficient treatment of acute sinusitis.

Acute sinusitis is characterized by symptoms of general intoxication: chills, fever, poor general health, headache of varying intensity. In addition to communities, local symptoms are observed: pain in the cheek area. By nature, the pain is intense and constant, accompanied by a feeling of fullness, aggravated by tilting the head, coughing and sneezing. Sometimes there is photophobia and lacrimation. The nose is stuffed up, there is an abundant discharge of mucous (catarrhal sinusitis), mucopurulent, purulent nature (purulent sinusitis). On the side of the affected sinus, the sense of smell may decrease. When the periosteum is involved in the process, swelling of the cheek and swelling of the lower eyelid are noted.

Chronic sinusitis is characterized by general weakness, malaise, fatigue, headache (more often in the evening), nasal congestion, discharge. The sense of smell may decrease. Vasomotor and allergic sinusitis is characterized by an undulating course with periodic remissions. The clinical picture of exacerbation is characterized by the same symptoms as in acute sinusitis.

Treatment is prescribed by an otorhinolaryngologist. As a rule, treatment is carried out on an outpatient basis and consists of a course of pharmacotherapy: antibiotics, vasoconstrictor drugs, decongestants are prescribed. At the final stage, the doctor may prescribe physiotherapy procedures.

In the case of odontogenic sinusitis, treatment by a dentist is also required.

In severe cases and the presence of complications, hospitalization is indicated.

Treatment of sinusitis is mandatory, because. this disease can cause serious intracranial, intraorbital and bronchus-pulmonary complications: swelling of the meninges, meningitis, swelling of the tissue of the eye sockets and eyelids, bronchitis, pneumonia, and other complications.

2. Tonsillitis

Symptoms. How to treat? Complications. Prevention.

Tonsillitis is a disease that is characterized by inflammation of one or more lymphoid formations of the pharyngeal ring (usually palatine tonsils) and is one of the most common infections of the upper respiratory tract.

Tonsillitis is acute and chronic. Acute tonsillitis is known as angina. The most significant bacterial causative agent of acute tonsillitis is group A hemolytic streptococcus. Less commonly, acute tonsillitis is caused by other streptococci, viruses, pneumococci, fungi, mycoplasmas, and chlamydia.

The pathogen is transmitted by airborne droplets. Sources of infection are sick and less often asymptomatic carriers. The greatest incidence is noted in the winter-spring period.

The incubation period for acute tonsillitis ranges from several hours to 2-4 days. This disease is characterized by an acute onset with fever up to 37.5 – 39 ° C, chills or chills, headache, general malaise, sore throat, aggravated by swallowing; frequent pain in the muscles and joints, swollen lymph nodes. Children may have nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The duration of the disease period (without treatment) is 5-7 days. In the future, in the absence of complications, the main clinical manifestations of the disease (fever, symptoms of intoxication, inflammatory changes in the tonsils) quickly disappear, the blood picture normalizes. The enlargement of the lymph nodes can last up to 10-12 days.

Under the influence of various factors (a weakened body, a highly pathogenic pathogen, improper treatment, lack of treatment, chronic diseases), acute tonsillitis can become chronic. Chronic tonsillitis is characterized by periodic exacerbations (after hypothermia, emotional stress, and other factors). Chronic tonsillitis is a focus of infection in the body. It weakens the body and can spread the infection to other organs (most often the kidneys, heart, joints).

The otorhinolaryngologist may prescribe conservative or surgical treatment.

Conservative method – restoring the health of the tonsils with the help of washing, the use of antibiotics, physiotherapy.

Surgical method – partial removal of damaged tissues by physical exposure to radio waves, laser, cryo exposure or complete removal of the tonsils surgically.

3. Laryngitis, pharyngitis

Laryngitis is an acute or chronic inflammation of the mucous membrane of the larynx. Mass outbreaks are observed during epidemics of viral infections – in late autumn, winter, early spring. Typical symptoms of laryngitis are hoarseness, soreness in the throat, dry cough. This disease is most severe in children of the first years of life. Symptoms of laryngitis in children: barking cough, shortness of breath.

Treatment of laryngitis is associated with the elimination of the causes that cause the disease. For complete rest of the larynx for 5-7 days, the patient is advised not to talk. With laryngitis, you can not smoke, drink alcohol. It is also necessary to exclude spicy seasonings, spices. Warm drinks (milk), gargling with chamomile or sage decoctions, warm alkaline inhalations, antibiotic aerosol inhalations, heat on the neck, hot foot baths, cough medicines are useful.

Pharyngitis is an inflammation of the mucous membrane of the pharynx. Pharyngitis is one of the manifestations of SARS, that is, it has a viral origin. Sometimes pharyngitis can also be caused by bacteria – most often streptococcus.

Manifestation of pharyngitis – sore throat, sore throat (constant, not only when swallowing and when swallowing saliva), cough. Depending on which pathogen caused pharyngitis (virus or bacterium), treatment is also prescribed, since bacterial inflammation must be treated with antibiotics that the doctor selects, and viral inflammation is treated with antiviral drugs.

Chronic pharyngitis is catarrhal, hypertrophic, atrophic. Causes of occurrence: frequent inflammation of the throat and nose, metabolic disorders, diabetes, diseases of the intestines, stomach, heart, lungs, liver and kidneys, harmful factors in the form of dry air, dust, chemicals, smoke, alcohol, fungal origin, etc. .

Treatment of pharyngitis

The treatment regimen for pharyngitis is determined by an otorhinolaryngologist based on the diagnosis. Treatment of pharyngitis depends on the form of pharyngitis (acute or chronic). It may include a course of antibiotics, inhalations, physiotherapeutic procedures, lubrication of the mucous membrane with drugs, etc.