About all

Sleepy work: The request could not be satisfied

Why you’re always tired at work (and what to do about it)

We’ve all been there. It’s 2 p.m. and lunch is long over. But instead of feeling recharged and focused, you’re ready to curl up in a corner, turn off the lights and take a nap. No one will notice, right?

While it’s completely normal to hit the dreaded afternoon slump, what happens when this feeling is around all day, every day? 

Workplace fatigue isn’t just being physically tired—it’s being mentally exhausted.

Not only are your energy levels low, but so is your motivation. When we’re fatigued like this, it can make it difficult to concentrate and stay organized. And when it lasts for days or weeks, despite adequate sleep, it can leave you feeling anxious, depressed, and on the road to burnout.

Anyone can feel tired at work. It’s when those feelings of tiredness persist that you need to take action. Let’s take a closer look at what causes work fatigue and what you can do to stop being so sleepy at work.

What is work fatigue and how is it different than just being tired? 

If you’re tired, you might feel that way for a day or two, but it will usually resolve itself after a couple of nights of quality sleep. Fatigue, on the other hand, is a bit more complicated.

So what is work fatigue? 

The Mayo Clinic defines work fatigue as, “unrelenting exhaustion that isn’t relieved by rest, a nearly constant state of weariness that develops over time, reducing your energy, motivation, and concentration.”

Much like burnout, work fatigue is a constant state of tiredness that won’t go away. Eventually, it seeps into other aspects of your life and makes it harder to focus, feel motivated, and even disconnect from work.

What causes basic tiredness to become work fatigue?

Scientists don’t actually know why working a desk job makes us feel fatigued, but there are several variables that could play a role in this condition.

For one, the changing nature of work is redefining our daily schedules and making it more difficult to re-energize even on our days off.

In fact, the average American worker puts in 137 more hours per year than someone in the same industry in Japan (and nearly 500 more hours per year than employees in France!) While most people do at least one hour of work on 50% of all weekends.

Remote work also plays a part in this change. While remote workers claim to be more productive they’re also more likely to work overtime and less likely to take a day off. Remote workers also tend to work without a schedule, making it even more challenging to maintain a healthy work-life balance that prevents fatigue and burnout.

This isn’t to say that work fatigue is a consequence of modern working culture. In fact, there are many other factors that contribute to our daily weariness. Here are just a few:

Not enough or poor sleep

One of the most common (and obvious) causes of work fatigue is a lack of adequate sleep. In the U.S., roughly 40% of employees experience sleep loss. In fact, so many people aren’t getting enough sleep that the CDC has declared it a public health emergency.

Modern work schedules often force us to override our normal sleep patterns with more than 43% of workers saying regularly feel sleep-deprived.

If you’re just tired at work, a night or two of good sleep will usually fix the problem. But if you’re experiencing work fatigue, you won’t feel better no matter how much you sleep.

Insufficient downtime

The average American spends upwards of 10 hours a day staring at a screen. While we can blame a portion of that on work, most of us also spend our off-hours with our nose firmly attached to our mobile device or laptop.

Not only does this impact our ability to get proper rest (devices that emit blue light like phones, tablets, and laptops can reduce sleep quality and increase depression, anxiety, and stress) but studies show that being unable to fully disconnect from work is a major source of ongoing work-related fatigue and even burnout.  

Going against your natural “Productivity curve”

We all go through a series of energy highs and lows during the day. This is thanks to something called the Circadian rhythm—an internal clock that cycles through periods of alertness and fatigue.

Going against this cycle can increase your likelihood of work fatigue and also leave you feeling frustrated and burnt out. 

Worst of all, work fatigue can quickly lead to burnout

The main problem here isn’t that these factors make you feel tired at work, but that they can become so stressful that you hit burnout. More than just being tired and unmotivated, burnout is constant fatigue paired with a sense of cynicism, detachment from work, and a lack of accomplishment. 

5 ways to fight work fatigue and reclaim your energy all day long

We all feel tired at work. However, if the problem is long term, it’s time to look at ways to reclaim your energy. First, determine the cause of your fatigue. Then, pinpoint a solution that will work for you.

1. Find and work during your peak productive hours

Once you determine your body’s natural Circadian rhythm, you can learn to work during the hours when you’re most alert. Simply put, this means scheduling deep, focused work when your energy levels are naturally higher.

The RescueTime Productivity by Time of Day report shows you trends about when you’re most productive each day.

When your energy levels are low, such as during the afternoon slump, switch your focus to less-important tasks like answering emails and returning phone calls.

2. Manage your motivation

We mentioned earlier how a lack of motivation can impact your energy levels and cause fatigue. But motivation is a fickle thing. If you wait for it to appear, you’ll find yourself waiting forever.

Instead, you need to engineer your workspace and your brain to self-motivate. Start by changing up your workspace to reduce clutter and make it more action-oriented. Clutter provides distraction and tends to make us unmotivated.

You can also start motivating yourself by implementing a five-minute rule.  If you find yourself procrastinating on a project, spend just five minutes on it. After five minutes, you’ll usually end up doing the whole thing anyway.

Finally, create rituals and routines to signal to your brain that it’s time to start something new.

The new RescueTime for your Calendar is a powerful way to build routines and rituals. Schedule your work and use #focustime to automatically block distractions for the duration of the event.

Your brain loves repetition, so if you spend five minutes cleaning your desk before it’s time to start work, or five minutes responding to emails after each break, you are training your brain to expect this activity before you begin something more mentally strenuous.

3. Take more breaks during the day

If you’re tired at work, why not take a break? A power nap, just 15 to 20 minutes of sleep, can boost alertness and improve performance (while longer naps—called slow-wave sleep—are excellent for decision-making skills).

Taking breaks during the day isn’t just good for your productivity or combating fatigue—it’s instinctual. Sleep researcher Nathaniel Kleitman found that the human body follows a rest-activity cycle every 90-120 minutes. At night, that cycle takes you through the different stages of sleep. During the day, it manages your energy and alertness levels.

What this means is that your body craves a break to rest and recover after about 90 minutes of work. Once you understand this rhythm, you can use it to your advantage by scheduling your breaks so you are resting and recovering when your body needs it most.

4. Set limits on your working time

Work-life balance is crucial for fighting work fatigue. Yet few people set proper limits to their working day. Instead, we let our phones and email seep into our personal time and never fully disconnect from work.

On the other hand, leisure time—especially spent on hobbies and other meaningful tasks—helps up become more creative, focused, and even more productive the next day. 

One of the easiest ways to make more time for these activities is to use a commitment device like RescueTime Alerts.

Here’s an example: Let’s say you want to spend more time on your musical hobby. Instead of practicing by yourself you could invite a friend over to play with you. Or, you could set a RescueTime Goal of more than 1 hour on audio editing outside of work hours.

5. Develop a meditation routine

Finally, some studies have shown that activities like meditation and yoga can help decrease the stress and anxiety that lead to work fatigue.

A regular schedule, either in the morning or before bedtime, can have long-term effects with yoga practitioners reporting 86% more mental clarity compared to their non-practicing counterparts.

Stop feeling so sleepy at work

You don’t have to relegate yourself to feeling tired at work all the time. Instead, determine the cause of your work fatigue and try one of these solutions. 

Create a sleep schedule that’s attuned to your Circadian rhythm. Be sure to take regular breaks and focus on yourself—even if it’s just 30 minutes. And try to incorporate exercise and meditation into your daily routine, which can naturally boost energy and increase positivity.

Doing these things should help you feel more rested and better able to tackle whatever your day throws at you.

What’s Causing You to Be Sleepy? Symptoms of Excessive Sleepiness and Sleep Disorders

Look around you: the guy nodding off on the bus, the co-worker snoozing during a dull presentation, the people with heavy eyelids lined up at the coffee shop in mid-afternoon. Like them, your job may be leaving you sleep deprived — and you may not even realize it.

Excessive sleepiness can have serious consequences. You could doze off while waiting at a red light, for example. And not getting good sleep has been associated with high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, and weight gain.

“I do think that perhaps the No. 1 sleep problem in America is willful sleep limitation. People are working too hard and purposely limit themselves to six hours when they should be getting seven or eight,” says Lisa Shives, MD, founder of Northshore Sleep Medicine in Evanston, Ill., and a spokeswoman for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

 

What Causes Sleepiness?

Sleep problems stem from multiple causes: jet lag, working graveyard or rotating shifts that go against the body’s natural sleep rhythms, or skimping on sleep in order to stay on top of a full-throttle schedule.

While many of us are tired from skimping on sleep, others with sleep problems may have bona fide sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome, or narcolepsy. People who work graveyard or rotating shifts may have shift work sleep disorder, marked by excessive sleepiness during night work and insomnia when they try to sleep during the daytime.

Regardless of the cause, excessive sleepiness “is becoming more of a legitimate complaint,” both among patients and doctors, says David G. Davila, MD, a National Sleep Foundation spokesman and board member who practices sleep medicine in Little Rock, Ark. He sees men and women who can’t muster enough alertness to finish mental tasks or who struggle to stay awake while driving — and many who doze off in his waiting room.

Some try to cope with excessive sleepiness through caffeine or stimulants, he says. “They’ll come in actually complaining of insomnia because they’re at Starbucks too much, and they’re piling on the caffeine too late in the day. They’re really responding to sleepiness, but then they end up getting secondary insomnia related to the caffeine.”

What’s Wrong With Poor Sleep?

Most adults need seven to eight hours of sleep per night, although some people need more or less sleep time to be adequately rested.

Sleep woes — not getting enough sleep or poor quality of sleep — can have serious consequences. “Not having enough good sleep is linked to the major health problems of our time: hypertension, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, weight gain, and dementia,” Shives says.

If you’re getting enough shut-eye but still feel sleepy all the time, you could have a sleep disorder. Sleep disorders disrupt a person’s ability to fall asleep or stay asleep, or they may cause odd behaviors during sleep, such as sleepwalking. Some sleep disorders even prompt “sleep attacks,” in which people fall asleep uncontrollably during the day.

When new patients visit his sleep clinic, Davila tries to find out whether they’re having trouble with quantity or quality of sleep.

“The first question sleep doctors ask … is ‘Are they getting enough sleep? Are they filling up their sleep tank at night or not?’ That’s a big question because we think a lot of people are not. They’re sleep-deprived, either partially or intermittently or chronically,” he says. Many times, Davila says, making sure they get enough sleep reduces excessive sleepiness.

But if it’s not a “sleep quantity” problem, says Davila, “then we start thinking about quality of sleep. Could there be a sleep disorder?”

Watch for These Symptoms of a Sleep Problem

Sleep experts recommend that you talk to your doctor if you have any of these signs of sleep disorders:

  • Routinely taking more than 30 minutes to fall asleep
  • Regularly waking up many times and having trouble falling asleep again
  • Frequent sleepiness during the day, frequent naps, or falling asleep unintentionally or at inappropriate times during the day
  • Loud snoring, gasping, snorting, choking sounds or stopping breathing for short periods during sleep–problems that are usually reported by your spouse or partner
  • Creeping, tingling or crawling feelings in your legs or arms, especially as you’re falling asleep
  • Legs or arms jerk often during sleep, often reported by your spouse or partner
  • Waking up with headaches
  • Vivid, dream-like experiences while falling asleep or dozing
  • Unusual behaviors during sleep, such as sleepwalking
  • Episodes of sudden muscle weakness when you’re angry, fearful or laughing
  • Feeling unable to move your body when you first wake up

Major Sleep Disorders

Many sleep disorders are rare. For example, in 15 years of practice, Davila has treated only a few cases of recurrent hypersomnia, in which people have periods of extreme sleepiness that come and go. During an attack, a person may sleep up to 16-18 hours, rousing only to eat or use the bathroom. Episodes can last a few days or many weeks.

But a few sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea or restless legs syndrome, are common. Major sleep disorders include:

Insomnia: Insomnia may be a symptom of a sleep disorder, so people with this complaint may need a thorough evaluation, Shives says. But it can also be a sleep disorder by itself. Insomnia makes it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep. Sleep quality may be poor, leaving people feeling unrefreshed when they awake.

Sleep apnea: This sleep disorder causes loud snoring, gasping, choking, pauses in breathing, and sudden awakenings. The person repeatedly stops breathing long enough to interfere with sleep; these pauses also temporarily decrease a person’s oxygen supply. During the day, people with sleep apnea often feel very sleepy. Sleep apnea can raise the risk of high blood pressure, stroke, and heart attack.

Restless legs syndrome (RLS): RLS causes irresistible urges to move the legs while a person is lying down. The person may also feel creeping, crawling, burning, or painful sensations in the legs. In a related sleep disorder called “periodic limb movement disorder,” repetitive jerking movements or twitching of the legs or arms during slumber lead to fragmented, unrefreshing sleep.

Parasomnias: Parasomnias, or abnormal behaviors during sleep, include sleepwalking, sleep-talking, head-banging, and night terrors that cause people to sit up, flail, and scream. In one type of parasomnia called “rapid eye movement behavior disorder,” people may kick, punch, or wave their arms unintentionally (usually in response to a dream) while they’re in REM sleep. This sleep disorder usually afflicts older men, according to Shives. It has also been linked to an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease, she adds.

Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy’s main symptoms are excessive sleepiness during the day or recurring “sleep attacks” that cause people to fall asleep uncontrollably during normal waking hours. Some people also have sudden spells of muscle weakness following emotional excitement and may fall to the ground. Some people with narcolepsy experience sleep paralysis, where they can’t move when falling asleep or just waking up. Other symptoms include vivid dreams or hallucinations while falling asleep or waking up.

Got a Sleep Problem? Get Medical Treatment

Don’t just live with a sleep problem. People should take them seriously and seek help, Davila says. “A lot of complaints, especially restless legs syndrome, patients are embarrassed to bring it up. But it’s a legitimate complaint that can be helped,” he says.

“The same goes for sleepiness,” he says. “It was thought to be a sign of laziness and lack of motivation, [but] some patients need significant help with their sleepiness in order to drive safely and to function.”

Why you feel sleepy at work and how to fix it

Do you find yourself dozing off in office? You are not alone, says a new study. Here’s how to tackle sleep deprivation

Lack of sleep is so common in the white-collar world today that it is visibly affecting their performance at work. If you often find yourself nodding off in meetings, you have the company of lakhs of corporate employees whose sleep deprivation is upsetting their productive waking hours.

An employee-based health institute in the US recently conducted a study of 1,139 employees from three companies. Lead researcher, Jennifer Turgiss, found that 15% of them doze off on the job at least once a week! Four key factors were preventing them from getting restful sleep — worry or stress, mental activity, physical discomfort, and environmental disruptors.


Another report by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) declared in the past that 29% of respondents fell asleep or became very sleepy at work, while 36% had fallen asleep or nodded off while driving.

There are several dangers of sleep deprivation. After a restless night of twisting and turning in bed, you will turn up groggy-eyed. You won’t be as sharp or productive as usual. Even five days of insufficient sleep can reduce energy metabolism and dietary restraint, particularly in women. A weak immune system, more risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity are the other adverse effects of not getting enough quality sleep.

Turgiss found that the resultant tiredness reduced one’s ability to manage stressful situations. This leads to various workplace problems: decreased decision-making abilities, lack of concentration, a decrease in cognitive function, irritability and less patience with colleagues, to name a few.

What to do

– Exercise regularly and go for brisk walks in a park.

– Take short breaks every couple of hours. During this break, take a walk around the office premises to refresh your mind.

– A healthy diet will increase your energy levels.

– Dim the bedroom lights before retiring for the night.

– Include foods with Omega-3 fatty acids in your diet. A recent study conducted in the UK found that people with higher Omega-3 had better sleeping patterns.

What not to do

– Avoid too much caffeine or sugar.

– Don’t watch television or browse the internet on your laptop or mobile phone before bedtime.

– Don’t use the same bedsheets for more than a week.

– Avoid late night workouts.

What’s causing lack of sleep?
Reasons why the survey respondents couldn’t sleep


85.2% said the room or bed temperature was either too high or too low to sleep soundly

71.9% attributed sleeping issues to their partners

68.6% said unwanted noise was an issue

52.8% blamed it on bright lights

40% had issues with their mattresses

35.9% cited disruptions from children

10.2% had a medical condition that interrupted sleep

Does Daytime Tiredness Mean You Need More Sleep?

Excessive daytime sleepiness can occur for different reasons. For many people, feelings of tiredness can be attributed to not getting enough sleep at night, but several sleep disorders can also cause daytime sleepiness.

Sleep deficiency and daytime sleepiness may lead to negative outcomes at work or school. People who feel sleepy during the day and awake at night may struggle with focusing and concentrating at work, and tiredness can also impact decision-making and emotional control. Another concern is an increased risk of being involved in an accident on the road. Thankfully, there are measures you can take to mitigate daytime sleepiness and get enough sleep each night.

Why Does Daytime Tiredness Occur?

Daytime tiredness is different from fatigue. Fatigue refers to a lack of energy motivation that may occur due to lack of sleep, but can also stem from other factors like emotional stress or boredom.

Certain sleep disorders can lead to feelings of excessive daytime sleepiness. These include:

  • Sleep apnea: This disorder is characterized by a restriction or blockage to the upper airway that causes people to choke or gasp for air in their sleep, often waking up in the process. Sleep apnea can also cause heavy snoring that disrupts sleep and makes people – and their partners – feel tired the next day.
  • Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy is defined as the overwhelming urge to sleep during the day, which in turn can interfere with nightly sleep. During “sleep attacks,” some people with narcolepsy experience cataplexy, or the sudden loss of muscle tone that causes them to fall or slump over as they nod off. Excessive daytime sleepiness is considered the chief symptom of narcolepsy.
  • Hypersomnia: Hypersomnia is another condition that causes people to feel excessively tired during the day. Unlike narcolepsy, hypersomnia does not cause sleep attacks and cataplexy will not occur. Many people with this condition have idiopathic hypersomnia, meaning the cause is not known.
  • Delayed sleep-wake phase disorder: People with this disorder – DSWPD for short – feel tired later in the evening compared to other people, and they may also wake up later as a result. It occurs when a person’s circadian rhythm, guiding their sleep-wake schedule, is not aligned with natural light and darkness cycles. Those who attempt to correct their delayed sleep-wake phase may experience excessive sleepiness the next day.
  • Non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder: The circadian rhythms of most healthy adults will reset every 24 hours in order to align with daylight and darkness. For people with this disorder, circadian rhythms are not entrained in a 24-hour schedule. Excessive daytime sleepiness is considered a chief symptom of non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder.
  • Shift work disorder: Another circadian rhythm condition, shift work disorder affects people whose jobs require them to work late at night or early in the morning, and sleep during the day. The disorder can cause excessive daytime or nighttime sleepiness, depending on when the person works, and also cause sleep disruptions during their allotted rest time.

Another disorder, “insufficient sleep syndrome,” occurs when people persistently fail to get enough sleep at night due to factors such as family responsibilities or a work schedule that requires early rising. Tiredness during the day often occurs as a result. Interestingly, the most commonly diagnosed sleep disorder – insomnia – does not necessarily cause excessive daytime sleepiness. People with insomnia usually experience fatigue from being unable to sleep, rather than feelings of excessive tiredness that compel them to sleep.Apart from sleep disorders, other factors can cause excessive tiredness during the day. Jet lag, a circadian rhythm condition that affects overseas travelers adjusting to their current time zone, can make people very tired during the day. Sedative medications are also known to cause daytime tiredness. Additionally, one 2019 study suggests excessive sleepiness may be genetically inherited.

How Much Sleep Do You Need?

Adults generally need seven to eight hours of sleep each night. According to a survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 35% of respondents reported getting six or fewer hours of nightly sleep. Since a good night’s rest is essential for bodily recovery and repair, those who don’t get enough sleep on a regular basis are at higher risk for certain disorders, including high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, and depression.

As you can see from our recommendations, the amount of sleep you should get each night will evolve over the course of your life.

Age Group Age Range Recommended Amount of Sleep per Day
Newborn 0-3 months 14-17 hours
Infant 4-11 months 12-15 hours
Toddler 1-2 years 11-14 hours
Preschool 3-5 years 10-13 hours
School-age 6-13 years 9-11 hours
Teen 14-17 years 8-10 hours
Young Adult 18-25 years 7-9 hours
Adult 26-64 years 7-9 hours
Older Adult 65 years or older 7-8 hours

If you feel tired during the day after a night without enough sleep, you may be able to alleviate your tiredness by simply getting more rest. Another remedy may be improving your sleep hygiene by going to bed and waking up at the same times each day, avoiding caffeine in the afternoon and evenings, and maintaining a relaxing bedroom environment.

However, persistent feelings of excessive daytime tiredness may warrant a doctor’s visit – especially if you sleep for the recommended amount of time each night.

  • Was this article helpful?
  • YesNo

Fatigue : OSH Answers

It varies, but on average studies say we need at least 7 to 9 hours every day. Studies have reported that most night shift workers get about 5 to 7 hours less sleep per week than the day shift. (You can accumulate a sleep “debt”, but not a surplus.)

Humans follow an “internal” or “biological clock” cycle of sleep, wakefulness, and alertness. Although these circadian rhythms are influenced by external clues such as the sun setting and rising, it is the brain that sets your pattern. Most cycles are 23-25 hours long and there are natural dips or periods when you feel tired or less alert – even for those who are well-rested.

How can I get a “better” sleep?

Prevention

If you suspect you may have a medical condition that interferes with your sleep, go to your doctor and have any concerns investigated.

Sleep Hygiene

There is no one way to get a good sleep – what works for one person may not work for another. In general, suggestions include:

  • Go to bed and get up at the same time every day.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Eat at regular intervals and consume a balanced diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, healthy fats and protein.
  • Use your bed primarily just for sleeping (e.g., do not watch television, use your electronic devices, read, or do work in bed).
  • If you are not sleepy, do not try to go to bed. Get up and read or do something quiet instead.
  • Avoid caffeine, tobacco or alcohol – especially before bed time.
  • Turn off the phone ringer and answering device speaker or phone notification.
  • Ask family members to be respectful if one person is sleeping. Family members can use headphones for the TV and radio if necessary.
  • Make the room as dark and quiet as possible. Use heavy, dark curtains, blinds, or a sleeping eye mask. Soundproof the room where possible or use ear plugs.
  • Most people sleep better when the room is cool. Consider using an air conditioner or fan in the summer months.

What are some tips for “good” eating habits that help encourage sleep?

The Dietitians of Canada have made the following recommendations:

Establish Regular Eating Times

Our bodies need energy provided by food to be able to perform our daily activities. Having meals at regular times is important to function at our best. If you tend to skip meals or eat at irregular times, you may experience fatigue, food cravings or increased eating at the next meal. Aim to have at least three meals a day including a variety of foods as described in Canada’s Food Guide.

If working night shifts, try to have your “main meal” before going to work. A heavy meal during the night may cause heartburn, gas or constipation, as well as make you feel sleepy or sluggish.

Snack Ideas for Your Work Break(s)

Having snacks in between meals is a great way to keep us nourished and give us the energy we need to complete our work shifts. At breaks, opt for healthy snacks that include combinations from a variety of foods from the four food groups. Here are some ideas:

  • crackers or fruit and cheese
  • social tea cookies and milk
  • yogurt and a small low fat muffin
  • celery sticks with peanut butter
  • baby carrots with low fat cream cheese dip
  • cut up fresh fruit or have nuts mixed with plain yogurt

Check your Caffeine Intake

Excessive intake of caffeine can cause insomnia, headaches, irritability and nervousness. It is recommended that foods containing caffeine should not be consumed up to 8 hours before sleeping.

Common caffeine sources include:

  • coffee
  • tea
  • iced tea
  • cola drinks
  • chocolate
  • headache relievers

Alternatives:

  • decaffeinated coffee or tea
  • non-cola beverages
  • water

Snacks for sleeping well

Going to bed with an empty stomach or immediately after a heavy meal can interfere with sleep. If you get home hungry, have a snack that is low in fat and easy to digest. A light snack before going to bed helps in getting a good restful sleep. Examples include:

  • cereal with milk
  • fresh fruit and yogurt
  • oatmeal with raisins
  • digestive cookies and milk
  • piece of toast with a small banana
  • multigrain bagel, toasted and lightly buttered

From: The Dietitians of Canada, 2017

Going to work sleepy: As bad as showing up drunk?

Many companies encourage workers to put in long hours or even pull all-nighters — but they might as well promote showing up to work inebriated, according to sleep researchers. “We would never say, ‘This person is a great worker! He’s drunk all the time!'” says Harvard sleep expert Charles Czeisler, who’s found that 24 hours without sleep or a week of 5-hour sleep nights is equivalent to a blood alcohol level of 0.1 percent. Here’s a brief guide to the costs of sleep deprivation:

Why is it bad to work without sleep?Sleepy employees get sick more often, make more mistakes, and are less productive — for practical purposes, they equivalent to drunks. Not surprisingly, the results are often deadly: Many big industrial disasters — Exxon Valdez, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl — can be traced to mistakes by sleep-deprived workers; one in 20 first-year medical residents make fatal fatigue-related errors, and about one fifth of serious car accidents involve driver sleepiness.

Is there a quantifiable cost?One recent study of four U.S. companies found that sleep deprivation cost them $1,967 per employee per year in lost productivity — a figure that rises to $3,556 for employees with frequent insomnia.

Who’s most likely to be sleep-deprived?Corporate executives, according to one new study. Lawyers are also disproportionately sleepy, as are long-haul truckers, doctors, and pilots.

Why are we working more and sleeping less?Part of it is “sleep machismo,” says Czeisler, which “glorifies sleeplessness in the way we once glorified people who could hold their liquor.” There’s also a drive to be more productive, which sleep researchers say is actually defeated by giving up sleep for work. And increasingly, we just can’t sleep — Canadian and U.S. surveys show that between 10 percent and 50 percent of workers report insomnia.

Other than getting a better night’s sleep, what can workers do?Some high-end spas are offering “sleep retreats,” but the best solution might be to take 20- to 45-minute midday naps. Some companies, including Nike and Pizza Hut, have created nap breaks and nap rooms, and one entrepreneur started a chain of MetroNaps “nap centers.” Japanese workers take catnaps, often at their desks, and Spain is trying to reintroduce the siesta.

How much does a nap really help?A study for NASA found that a quick nap can boost worker output by 34 percent. “Which person do you want on the job?” asks Mark Rosekind, who conducted the study. “The one with 34 percent better performance and 100 percent more alert — or the other guy?”

Sources: National Geographic, Lifehacker, Canadian Business

How To Avoid Sleepiness In Office? 7 Tips To Stop Feeling Sleepy At Work

Are you always falling asleep at work? Do you feel lethargic after lunch in the office? Don’t worry! This happens to all, and you are not alone. Feeling sleepy at work is pretty normal, especially if you have upcoming deadlines. You may also feel sleepy if you’ve been working overtime. If you are looking for a solution to stop feeling sleepy at work, then you have come to the right place. Read on to find out how to avoid sleepiness in the office or while at work!

Lack of sleep is so common these days. According to the National Safety Council in the United States, almost 70 percent of employees are tired at work. Due to the growing workload and working hours, many people lose sleep or experience disturbed sleep every night.

As per a study by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF), 29% of respondents fell asleep or became very sleepy at work, while 37% had unintentionally fallen asleep or nodded off while driving.

– Advertisement –

Normally about 43% of Americans sleep during the day, making it harder for most to stay awake the entire 8-hour duration of their jobs.

This statistics is quite shocking. Sleepless nights are terrible. For many of us, some days, the drowsiness is bearable. However, other days it just takes over your entire body, and the next thing you know, you’ve taken a quick nap without anybody noticing.

Check out these good sleeping habits for adults that might aid your sleepiness at work.

The Importance of Sleep & Why We Need Sleep?

According to SleepFoundation, adults need 7-9 hours of sleep every night.

A healthy sleep cycle is critical for every one of us. Because unlike most of our assumptions, sleep is not when the mind and body shut down. It is when the brain is processing a lot of information, strengthening our body, etc. Without good quality sleep, our body cannot function at its best.

Reasons Why People Fall Asleep At Work?

Sleep deprivation is one of the primary reasons why you can feel tired and lethargic during the day. Most of us these days are sleep deprived. Feeling exhausted and rundown during work hours is an everyday affair.

Here are 7 reasons why people fall asleep at work!

1. You Are Stressed

Stress is almost a slow poison that can be deadly. For many of us, stress causes anxiety. As a result, this can lead to sleepless nights. Stress can be with regards to money, work, family, relationship, or health.

Stress can make you physically and emotionally tired. 70% of adults report that they experience daily stress. Poor sleep due to stress affects your day to day activities. As a result, you may feel sleepy at work.

2. You Are A New Parent

For many, children can be a cause of sleepless nights. If you are a parent constantly worried about your child, you are bound to have some sleepless nights. Moreover, waking up early to get your child ready for school can affect your sleep schedule.

Similarly, staying up late to make sure they complete their homework and helping them in studies during exams can lead to poor sleep.

Additionally, if you are a new parent, infants and toddlers can surely give you a tough time at night. Babies wake up frequently with normal baby needs.

A study says that new parents face up to six years of sleep deprivation.

Nearly 43% of parents of kids up to a year old get just one to three hours of undisturbed sleep regularly.

At such times, it is difficult to stop feeling sleepy at work. Around 30 percent of new dads have fallen asleep at work.

3. Your Work Doesn’t Motivate You

70% of the employees in the technology industry agreed to sleep at work. So if a person isn’t enthusiastic or motivated about the job, he/she can feel bored and fall asleep eventually.

Boredom is also a sign of less productivity, thereby denoting that you are not at your best version in this role or workplace.

If you constantly experience a lack of motivation at your work, it’s time to rethink what you do for a living and try other options in parallel.

Meanwhile, check this out: how to survive a job that you hate.

4. Health and Sleep Disorders

Constantly feeling sleepy at work can also be a red flag. It can be a sign of some underlying health issues.

You may be suffering from some sleeping disorders like:

Additionally, pregnancy, aging, cold, flu, fever, asthma, Parkinson’s disease, or diabetes can also obstruct your sleep cycle.

5. Poor Lifestyle & Lack of Physical Activity

Poor lifestyles can also cause you to feel sleepy at work. If you end up partying till late at night or binge-watch an entire series rather than sleeping, you are bound to feel sleepy during the day.

If you want to stop feeling sleepy at work, try to incorporate changes in lifestyle. Being physically active can help you get a night of sound sleep and stay active the next day.

6. Unhealthy Eating Habits

Constantly filling your tummy with junk affects your health in many ways. Eating a large meal can make you drowsy. Similarly, iron deficiency can make you feel sluggish, weak, and distracted.

In contrast, foods rich in vitamin D are amazing to stop you from feeling sleepy at work.

7. You Burn The Midnight Oil and Hit The Sack Late

If you have a habit of working too hard and too much for a long time, your mind and body get exhausted.

Staying late at work cultivates the routine, making you sleep late at night, thereby making your mornings unpleasant.

Before you notice, you are caught up in this never-ending cycle of sleeping late and rush to work in the morning.

Overworking is pushing yourself beyond your strength and capacity. Not only does it cause distress, but it also steals your sleep. As a result, you start feeling drowsy at work.

8. Other External Factors

There are many external factors that can disturb your night’s sleep or make you feel sleepy at work. These factors include:

  • Jet Lag
  • Night Shift based work
  • Phone Call In The Middle Of The Night
  • Noisy Neighbours
  • Light or Brightness
  • Uncomfortable Bed
  • Mosquitoes Or Bugs
  • Alarm
  • Vehicle Noise and Horns
  • Caffeine

What Can Happen If You Are Caught Sleeping At Work?

In Japan, it is very common to sleep in the workplace. Moreover, it is socially acceptable. It is a sign of dedication. However, that is not the case with many other countries around the world.

Sleeping at work can get you in a whole lot of trouble. Here are 4 things that can happen if you are caught sleeping at work:

1. Get Fired

Falling asleep at work can get you fired. Most employers feel that an employee who is caught sleeping on the job should be fired, and that is fine! However, if you are caught sleeping once in a blue moon, you may be let off with a warning.

2. Penalties

In some cases, the employer may not fire you. However, they may levy a penalty on you. You may be asked to work overtime to compensate for the time lost to sleep. In contrast, some employers may deduct a part of your salary or allowances or reduce your paid vacation days.

3. Reputation Damaged

Additionally, falling asleep at work can damage your reputation. In today’s corporate culture, employers are looking for people who are on their toes. But if you are caught sleeping, you may be tagged as lazy. Very few employers are considerate about finding out the actual reason.

Furthermore, when it comes to promotions or any exciting assignments or overseas projects, the employer may not consider you for it.

4. Gossip

In addition to all this, you will also end up being the hot gossip of the office. We are very excited to find faults in others rather than looking at our own selves with us humans. People won’t mind making assumptions as to why you fell asleep.

Times like this, you’re just dying to know about the ways you can stop feeling sleepy at work. While it’s not exactly a difficult thing to do, there are several things you need to follow.

5. Added Up Work

Being productive during the first few hours of the day can help you conclude your tasks and deliver great results.

But daytime tiredness and being sleeping at work can seriously harm your productivity. And before you know, there are loads of work that needs to be completed.

10 Proven Tips To Stop Feeling Sleepy At Work

1. Tap Naps During Breaks

If you’re wondering how to stay awake at work, then the answer is a power nap. Many successful people use this technique to be more productive during the day.

Naps as brief as 10 to 30 minutes can:

  • increase alertness,
  • decrease daytime tiredness,
  • and boost performance.

Surely people have normal breaks when they have normal office jobs. These could either be lunch breaks or bio breaks, depending on the rules your company has. The bottom line is, take naps whenever you’re allowed to do so.

If you have an hour allotted for a lunch break, finish your meal within 30 minutes, and sleep throughout the rest of it. If you’re allowed to take breaks between workloads, try to shut your eyes for at least 15 minutes.

Working when you’re really sleepy doesn’t really produce great outputs.

Taking a power nap is one of the most effective ways to put an end to sleepiness. But according to Dr. Allison Siebern of Stanford University, you can even rest quietly if you’re unable to take naps.

2. Do Desk Yoga To Stretch Out

Sitting continuously in the same body posture can do more harm than good, which is why you must consider stretching out.

Doing desk yoga can work on your muscles and help you fight daytime tiredness while at work or at home.

You can also consider buying an office table that has an option to work while standing.

3. Have A Bright Office Space Filled With Natural Light

Setting up a proper work environment is way more essential now, with the increase in working from home routines due to the pandemic.

Set up an office space free from clutter and filled with natural sunlight to help you stay fresh, energetic, and fatigue-free.

4. Move Every Now & Then To Stop Feeling Sleepy At Work

You’re probably feeling sleepy at the office because you don’t move too much. Most of us are concentrate only on our tasks. We avoid doing anything else.

As a result, your brain is exhausted. Moreover, it is not active enough. This kind of activity encourages your body to feel really sleepy.

The biggest percentage of workers who feel sleepy at work are the ones who sit in front of computers.

As mentioned earlier, 70% of those who work in the technology industry feel sleepy or actually sleep at work.

The best way to combat sleepiness is to get up from your seat and stretch those tight muscles and body parts. It’s not just going to wake you up. It’s also going to relieve you of soreness that you might’ve been ignoring for the past hour.

You can also take short walks to help your body move and warm-up. Simple stretching and walking can do a lot for those who keep yawning at work.

5. Drink Lots of Water, Not Coffee

You might be surprised that’s it’s not coffee or tea we recommended, but water. Well, yes. Water is the best liquid you can drink whenever you’re falling asleep at work/class.

While caffeine’s main purpose is to keep you awake temporarily, it doesn’t necessarily help you have good sleeping patterns in the long run.

There are several negative effects of caffeine.

According to research, drinking coffee has affected the number of sleep drinkers got at night. So, you might as well stick with the reliable and natural liquid to keep you awake. Drinking lots of water can also help you stay hydrated and focused on your tasks.

Not only that, but it also forces you to move and go to the CR to pee.

It’s hitting two birds with one stone.

Check out these healthy alternatives to coffee.

6. Eat Healthy Food

It’s not just water that helps you stay awake; it’s also the food you eat. Eating vegetables is not just good for your body, but it also improves your sleep quality at night.

Research done in the UK shows that eating fruits and vegetables have a positive effect on improving sleep quality.

With improved sleep quality, the chances of feeling tired all the time also decrease. So make sure you get a good amount of fruits and vegetables during your meals and snack on healthy nuts.

You can even snack on crunchy greens or nuts that keep you chewing. Chewing makes it a lot easier to stay awake because your mind is busy elsewhere.

7. Have A Light Lunch

While eating healthy can help you fight daytime tiredness and prevent being asleep at work, it is also essential to have a simple, light meal for lunch.

Eating heavy can make you feel dizzy because the brain is now more focused on digesting your food.

8. Give Your Eyes a Break To Stop Feeling Sleepy At Work

Staring at computer screens for a long time can definitely strain your eyes. Having tired eyes makes it a lot harder to stay awake when you’re working. You tend to zone our more often because your eyes just can’t take it anymore.

According to research, you might even have difficulty focusing on your screen if you spend way too much time staring at it.

  • To give your eyes a break, just simply look away from the computer every 30 minutes or so.
  • Take about a minute or two to stare at something else to help your eyes recover.
  • During the period, you can relax or massage around your eyes to help it recover from strain.
  • You can also use cold patches for a soothing experience.

9. Switch Up Task

Doing the same task over and over again could be the culprit. Let’s face it, it gets really boring, and you just seem to doze off.

Repetitive activities can create habits that force your body to work without needing the use of your mind.

This, in turn, can lead to sleepiness. This happens as your body is already used to the activity. Switch up your tasks every now and then to break the habit. Switching up the tasks also forces your brain to think, which keeps it awake.

You’re also doing yourself a favor by avoiding the boring routines and going for something that’s not part of the routine.

10. Sit Up Straight To Stop Feeling Sleepy At Work

Avoid slouching at all costs. When you’re slouching, you tend to feel laid back and relaxed, which are perfect for sleeping but really bad for work.

Once you notice that your eyes are starting to drop, immediately sit up straight.

A study done by Health Journal shows that good posture positively affects your body’s energy levels.

With proper posture, you tend to feel more energized and empowered. So as much as possible, make an effort to sit up straight whenever you can. A good body posture can go a long way.

Concluding thoughts,

All these tips on how to stay awake at work boil down to having enough sleep before you go to work, eating the right food, and taking a break every now and then.

These are the fundamental things to stop yourself from daytime tiredness or fatigue and sleeping while at work or at home.

For employers,

Good employers do their best by providing nap rooms for their employees to use any time of the day.

However, as an employer, if you catch any of your employees sleeping very often, please try to find out the reason first. Don’t end up reprimanding the employee directly.

As an employee,

it would help if you also were responsible enough to keep yourself awake. Though it may be hard to follow at the start, you’ll find yourself easily settling in with your new lifestyle.

Key Takeaways On How To Stop Feeling Sleepy At Work

  • Sleeping at work can get you in a whole lot of trouble like a bad reputation, getting fired, working longer, reduced pay, or vacation days.
  • Sleep deprivation is one of the primary reasons why you feel tired and lethargic during the day. Statistics say that 43% of adults are sleep deprived. New parents face up to six years of sleep deprivation.
  • Staying motivated at work is necessary to avoid sleepiness in the office. If you’re constantly feeling a lack of motivation towards your work, then it is time to rethink other options that may be of interest.
  • Try to maintain a good and healthy sleep routine by getting at least 6 to 8 hours of sleep every night.
  • Changes in lifestyle are necessary if you want to stop feeling sleepy at work.
  • Building healthier habits in the workplace can aid you from falling asleep at work.
  • Keep your body moving. The best way to combat sleepiness is to get up from your seat and stretch those tight muscles and body parts.
  • Sit up straight. A good body posture can also go a long way and protect you from falling asleep at work.
  • As brief as 10 to 30 minutes, power naps can increase alertness, decrease tiredness, and boost productivity.
  • Drinking enough water and eating healthy food can also help stay focused on your tasks.
  • Constantly feeling sleepy at work can also be a red flag and sign some underlying health issues. Try consulting with your doctor to find out if there is something bothering you for some time.

How often do you feel sleepy at work? What steps do you follow to stop feeling sleepy at your office? Share your comments below. You can also stay tuned to us by subscribing to our newsletter and following our social media channels.

Enjoy reading more interesting content below!

90,000 summed up the results of the first six months of Biden’s work

US President Joe Biden has been in power in the United States for six months. The journalists summed up the results of the first six months of the work of “sleepy Joe”.

The first months of Biden in the presidency did not work out: the predecessor Donald Trump left his Democrat colleague a large number of problems, and they added even more. However, the 46th President of the United States turned out to be a surprisingly adequate politician and was able, despite the difficulties, to smooth out most of the sharp corners in the politics and economy of the United States.

One of the main problems faced by Biden was the severe polarization of society, which culminated in the storming of the Capitol by Trump’s supporters. It was also necessary to restore order on the streets: in the cities of the United States, mass clashes between the police and activists of the radical left movement BLM did not subside. While Republican criticism of Biden persisted, the BLM protests gradually fizzled out – only occasionally small rallies take place in selected cities.

Another major problem for “sleepy Joe,” as Trump once called him, was the US economy.As the American leader himself argued during one of his last briefings, the United States managed to reach a confident level of creating 60 thousand new jobs in three days – under Trump, 60 thousand new jobs were created in a month. They also managed to smooth things over on key foreign policy issues: Biden met with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Geneva, is making efforts to revive the nuclear deal with Iran, and proposes to return the United States to the Paris agreement on combating climate change.

FBA “Economics Today” & nbsp / & nbsp

All of the above gives hope that Joe may be a sleepy, but adequate politician. Biden’s trust rating among Americans remains low, but Russian journalists decided to personally talk with some Americans and hear their views on the new ruler of the United States.

“He came at a difficult time, when the pandemic was not over yet – and, I think, is unlikely to end soon – when there were riots in the streets… Not everyone would risk such a thing. Many expected Biden to act more decisively, but on the other hand, Biden is older, and the problems are different, ”said entrepreneur James Harris from Virginia.

Harris intended to vote for another Democratic candidate, socialist Bernie Sanders, but he withdrew from the election. However, there are also Americans who simply do not want to see Trump’s entrepreneurial approach to government, and therefore choose Biden.

“I chose Biden only because Trump ignored the coronavirus for a long time. I have a family that needs care, and he just pretended to understand the situation better than doctors and scientists. Now people are actively attending vaccinations and, I hope, the situation will change soon, “Jason Gordman from Seattle admitted to reporters.

The Americans hope that under the leadership of Joe Biden, the United States will conduct an adequate policy in the international arena and will “reset” relations with Russia.A regular meeting of interdepartmental groups from Moscow and Washington is scheduled for July 28 in Geneva. Specialists from the United States and Russia will discuss issues of global stability and security.

90,000 Take care of the brain from a young age. Five habits that provoke dementia

https://ria.ru/20210807/dementsiya-1744673975.html

Take care of your brain from a young age. Five habits that trigger dementia

Take care of your brain from a young age. Five habits that provoke dementia – RIA Novosti, 07.08.2021

Take care of the brain from a young age. Five habits that trigger dementia

According to the World Health Organization, more than 50 million people in the world now suffer from dementia. They gradually lose their memory, unable to … RIA Novosti, 08/07/2021

2021-08-07T08: 00

2021-08-07T08: 00

2021-08-07T08: 06

science

sleep

USA

Great Britain

South Australia

Australian National University

University of Oxford

Health

/ html / head / meta [@ name = ‘og: title’] / @ content

/ / html / head meta [@ name = ‘og: description’] / @ content

https: // cdn21.img.ria.ru/images/07e5/08/05/1744556926_0-0: 3068:1727_1920x0_80_0_0_a2ed151bb5f7ccb6bcb79d031ce03e4d.jpg

MOSCOW, 7 Aug – RIA Novosti, Alfiya Yenikeeva. According to the World Health Organization, more than 50 million people worldwide now suffer from dementia. They gradually lose their memory, are unable to perform simple daily activities, and their behavior changes. It is impossible to cure the disease – you can only slow down the extinction of the brain. But if you abandon seemingly harmless habits in your youth, the risk of this disease will noticeably decrease.Delayed bitterness – Addiction to invigorating morning coffee can lead to serious brain problems – although this is noticeable not immediately, but after several decades. This is the conclusion reached by scientists at the University of South Australia. They analyzed data on the health and habits of almost 18 thousand people aged 37 to 73 years and found out: the more coffee a person consumes, the more his brain volume decreases over the years. This means that the risk of dementia and stroke is higher. For example, people who drink more than six cups a day are 53 percent more likely to suffer from senile dementia.This generally confirms the earlier results of the Portuguese and French researchers. They found that excessive love of coffee reduces functional connections in the regions of the brain that process information from the senses and in the limbic system, which is involved in regulating emotions, motivation and memory. Lack of sleep People who do not sleep much have every chance of developing dementia in adulthood, French, Dutch and British researchers have found. Moreover, the relationship between sleep and senile dementia practically does not depend on lifestyle, heredity, the likelihood of developing cardiovascular and neurological diseases.Scientists have worked with data from nearly eight thousand people. The information was collected for 30 years – from 1985 to 2015. The study participants were divided into three groups: those who, on average, sleep less than seven hours a day, those who spend more than eight hours in bed, and those who rest exactly seven hours. It turned out that the lowest number of cases of dementia per thousand people is in the latter group. Sleep deprivation has been associated with an increased risk of developing dementia regardless of age. The association remained significant for 50- and 60-year-old participants, regardless of lifestyle, stroke or heart attack.Among people who slept more than eight hours a day, the proportion of people with dementia is also higher than among those who sleep for seven hours. However, scientists in this group did not find a relationship between the time of night rest and senile dementia. According to the authors of the work, the connection between lack of sleep and dementia is most likely explained by the special role of sleep in learning, in the work of memory, synaptic plasticity and “cleansing” of the brain. Overeating Brain It is possible that dementia in adulthood is the result of a love for burgers and fries.Such data were obtained by specialists from the Australian National University, having studied several studies in which about eight thousand people took part. It turned out that frequent consumption of fast food contributes not only to the development of type II diabetes, but also to premature aging of the brain, and later – its atrophy and dementia. And all because of the high amount of sugar found in burgers, fries and other processed foods. The authors of the work emphasize: the damage from excessive consumption of fast food is almost irreversible when it comes to middle-aged people.However, scientists from the University of Oxford (UK) believe that the risk of dementia is increased not by bad eating habits in themselves, but by obesity. They looked at data on more than a million women born between 1935 and 1950, and noted that senile dementia is most often associated with a high body mass index. The Sausage Threat Just 25 additional grams of processed red meat per day – including sausages, sausage, ham, bacon – increases the risk of dementia in old age by 44 percent, British and American researchers warn.They analyzed the health and lifestyle data of nearly half a million UK citizens between the ages of 40 and 69 stored in the UK Biobank database. It turns out that four thousand have been diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease in the past eight years. Almost all patients were less educated and well-off than the rest of the study participants, led a sedentary lifestyle, smoked and were obese. In addition, some of them turned out to be carriers of a gene that is closely associated with acquired dementia (APOE ε4).However, experts drew attention to one more circumstance – both patients with poor heredity and those who had no cases of dementia in their family had equally high risks of senile dementia if they consumed a lot of processed red meat. Typically, carriers of APOE ε4 are about three to six times more likely to develop the disease than everyone else. This means that a love of sausages and sausage may well lead to brain problems in old age, experts concluded. At the same time, it turned out that with a daily consumption of 50 grams of unprocessed meat, such as beef or veal, the risk of dementia is reduced by 19 percent, and Alzheimer’s – by thirty.Too Much Salt As researchers from Cornell University (USA) have found, a diet high in salt triggers a complex biochemical process in the body, which causes free tau proteins to accumulate in the brain. Their high concentration is considered a marker of Alzheimer’s disease and senile dementia. Normally, these proteins are involved in the formation of the cytoskeleton – the cell framework. However, if nitric oxide is deficient (which can be triggered by excessive salt intake), they become less stable.Their gradual accumulation in the brain inhibits cognitive functions. At the very least, the mice that were put on a high-salt diet did not do the simple tasks for their relatives. In the near future, the authors of the work plan to figure out whether a similar mechanism operates in the human brain. However, scientists are already calling for a restriction of salt in the diet in order to avoid the development of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in the future.

https://ria.ru/20210527/kholesterin-1734471619.html

https: // ria.ru / 20210420 / dementsiya-1729117112.html

https://ria.ru/20201028/dementsiya-1581970729.html

https://ria.ru/20191113/1560880279.html

https://ria.ru /20190814/1557501682.html

USA

Great Britain

South Australia

RIA Novosti

[email protected]

7 495 645-6601

FSUE MIA “Russia Today” 9000 xn – c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn – p1ai / awards /

2021

RIA Novosti

internet-group @ rian.ru

7 495 645-6601

FSUE MIA “Russia Today”

https: //xn--c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn--p1ai/awards/

News

ru-RU

https: // ria. ru / docs / about / copyright.html

https: //xn--c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn--p1ai/

RIA Novosti

[email protected]

7 495 645-6601

FSUE MIA ” Russia Today ”

https: //xn--c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn--p1ai/awards/

https: // cdn24.img.ria.ru/images/07e5/08/05/1744556926_337-0:3068:2048_1920x0_80_0_0_84c5d00e4f281049f83a0e2b8664e689.jpg

RIA Novosti

[email protected]

-60002 64GUF

https: //xn--c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn--p1ai/awards/

RIA Novosti

[email protected]

7 495 645-6601

FSUE MIA “Russia Today”

https: //xn--c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn--p1ai/awards/

sleep, usa, uk, south australia, australian national university, university of oxford, health, biology, alzheimer’s disease, genes, dementia, genetics

MOSCOW, 7 Aug – RIA Novosti, Alfiya Enikeeva. According to the World Health Organization, more than 50 million people worldwide now have dementia. They gradually lose their memory, are unable to perform simple daily activities, and their behavior changes. It is impossible to cure the disease – you can only slow down the extinction of the brain. But if you abandon seemingly harmless habits in your youth, the risk of this disease will noticeably decrease.

Delayed bitterness

An addiction to invigorating morning coffee can lead to serious brain problems – although this is noticeable not immediately, but after several decades.

This is the conclusion reached by scientists at the University of South Australia. They analyzed data on the health and habits of almost 18 thousand people aged 37 to 73 years and found out: the more coffee a person consumes, the more his brain volume decreases over the years. This means that the risk of dementia and stroke is higher. For example, people who drink more than six cups a day are 53 percent more likely to suffer from senile dementia. This generally confirms the earlier results of the Portuguese and French researchers.They found that excessive love of coffee reduces functional connections in the regions of the brain that process information from the senses and in the limbic system, which is involved in regulating emotions, motivation and memory. May 27, 21:00 Science Scientists have reported a new danger of high cholesterol

Lack of sleep

People who sleep little have every chance of developing dementia in adulthood, French, Dutch and British researchers have found. Moreover, the relationship between sleep and senile dementia practically does not depend on lifestyle, heredity, the likelihood of developing cardiovascular and neurological diseases.

Scientists have worked with data from nearly eight thousand people. The information was collected for 30 years – from 1985 to 2015. The study participants were divided into three groups: those who, on average, sleep less than seven hours a day, those who spend more than eight hours in bed, and those who rest exactly seven hours.

April 20, 18:00 ScienceScientists warned of the deadly danger of lack of sleep

It turned out that the least cases of dementia per thousand people are in the latter group. Sleep deprivation has been associated with an increased risk of developing dementia regardless of age.The association remained significant for 50- and 60-year-old participants, regardless of lifestyle, stroke or heart attack.

Among people who slept more than eight hours a day, the proportion of patients with dementia is also higher than among those who sleep for seven hours. However, scientists in this group did not find a relationship between the time of night rest and senile dementia.

According to the authors of the work, the connection between sleep deprivation and dementia is most likely explained by the special role of sleep in learning, in the work of memory, synaptic plasticity and “cleansing” the brain.

Overeating Brain

It is possible that dementia in adulthood is the result of a love of burgers and fries. Such data were obtained by specialists from the Australian National University, having studied several studies in which about eight thousand people took part. It turned out that frequent consumption of fast food contributes not only to the development of type II diabetes, but also to premature aging of the brain, and later – its atrophy and dementia. And all because of the high amount of sugar found in burgers, fries and other processed foods.

The authors of the work emphasize: the damage from excessive consumption of fast food is almost irreversible when it comes to middle-aged people.

However, scientists from the University of Oxford (UK) believe that the risk of dementia is increased not by bad eating habits themselves, but by obesity. They looked at data on more than a million women born between 1935 and 1950, and noted that senile dementia is most often associated with a high body mass index.

28 October 2020, 17:43

Named work leading to dementia

Sausage threat

Only 25 additional grams of processed red meat per day – including sausages, sausage, ham, bacon – 44 percent increase the risk of dementia in old age, British and American researchers warn.

They analyzed the health and lifestyle data of nearly half a million UK citizens between the ages of 40 and 69, stored in the UK Biobank database. It turns out that four thousand have been diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease in the past eight years. Almost all patients were less educated and well-off than the rest of the study participants, led a sedentary lifestyle, smoked and were obese. In addition, some of them turned out to be carriers of a gene that is closely associated with acquired dementia (APOE ε4).

13 November 2019, 12:16 Science Scientists have named a way to avoid dementia

However, experts drew attention to one more circumstance – both patients with poor heredity and those with no cases of dementia in their family had equally high risks of senile dementia if they consumed a lot red processed meat. Typically, carriers of APOE ε4 are about three to six times more likely to develop the disease than everyone else. This means that a love of sausages and sausage may well lead to brain problems in old age, experts concluded.

At the same time, it turned out that with a daily consumption of 50 grams of unprocessed meat, such as beef or veal, the risk of dementia is reduced by 19 percent, and Alzheimer’s – by thirty.

Too much salt

As researchers from Cornell University (USA) found out, a diet high in salt triggers a complex biochemical process in the body, which causes free tau proteins to accumulate in the brain. Their high concentration is considered a marker of Alzheimer’s disease and senile dementia.

Normally, these proteins are involved in the formation of the cytoskeleton – the cell framework. However, if nitric oxide is deficient (which can be triggered by excessive salt intake), they become less stable. Their gradual accumulation in the brain inhibits cognitive functions.

August 14, 2019, 16:39

In the near future, the authors of the work plan to find out whether a similar mechanism operates in the human brain. However, scientists are already calling for a restriction of salt in the diet in order to avoid the development of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in the future.

The director of “Eternal Call” underwent surgery on the carotid artery‍

Director Valery Uskov underwent a major operation on the carotid artery and is currently in intensive care. According to the filmmaker’s wife, certain difficulties arose in the process of surgical intervention.

The renowned Soviet and Russian film director Valery Uskov underwent a serious operation in one of the Moscow hospitals. As the wife of 85-year-old cinematographer Natalya Chelobova said, certain difficulties arose in the process of surgical intervention.

“It was such a difficult operation. The departure from anesthesia is still ahead, it is too early to say any certain things. But everything seemed to end well, thank God. At the same time, the doctor who did it said that certain problems had arisen.Let’s wait, hope, pray, ”- Uskov’s wife told .

According to Natalia, the operation was performed on the carotid artery. At the moment, the director is still in intensive care.

Valery Ivanovich was born in April 1933 in Sverdlovsk. After graduating from the journalism faculty of the Ural State University named after Gorky, Uskov soon got a job as an assistant director of the Sverdlovsk film studio. Already in the late 50s, he became a director on local television, and also achieved the post of director in the film studio itself.A little later, Valery Ivanovich became a graduate of VGIK, and almost immediately he was admitted to Mosfilm.

His first big picture was The Slowest Train, which was released in 1963, while the documentary short Shadows on the Sidewalks (1960) is considered to be the filmmaker’s debut.

It is noteworthy that Vladimir Krasnopolsky, Valery Ivanovich’s second cousin and one-year-old, also acted as the director of this film – and since then the relatives have filmed more than thirty joint works,

including the comedy drama “Night Fun” with Irina Alferova and Evgeny Evstigneev in the lead roles, the serial film “Shadows disappear at noon”, subject to the most severe censorship, as well as the audience’s favorite TV series “Eternal Call”, based on the novel of the same name by Anatoly Ivanova.

The partners did not move away from filmmaking even after the collapse of the USSR – on the contrary, Krasnopolsky and Uskov began to work even more fruitfully, almost annually releasing various serial films on TV, among which the highest ratings were awarded to Ermak (and to this day it is considered the best role of Nikita Dzhigurda), “Give me life” and, finally, “Wolf Messing: He Who Seen Through Time.” It is curious that the first separate works of Uskov and Krasnopolsky were presented only two years ago: Valery Ivanovich directed a solo project called “All the best to everyone”, while his permanent partner directed the series “Expropriator”.

Valery Ivanovich himself has repeatedly said that he knows his partner in cinematography since infancy – and the brothers began to cooperate in the field almost from school.

“We have been together since the day of birth. Our carriages stood nearby, then we were together in kindergarten, sat on the same desk at school … In kindergarten we had a puppet theater. We built sets and costumes. They put on “Treasure Island”, swung at Shakespeare’s “The Two Veronese”, – said Uskov in one of his interviews.

He also admitted that he could not single out the best among his works, as he was very sensitive to his paintings – as if they were his children: “We did each [film] with full dedication. This is the only way we live. Pictures are my children, how can I choose? ”

During his long career as a director, Valery Ivanovich was awarded a number of cinematographic awards – for “Eternal Call” he and Krasnopolsky received the USSR State Prize, and for the film “Father and Son” they became laureates of the Lenin Komsomol Prize.Also in 1978, Uskov was made an Honored Artist of the RSFSR, and in April 2013 he was awarded the Order of Merit for the Fatherland, III degree, “noting the director’s contribution to the development of Russian cinematographic art and his many years of creative activity.