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Stomach pain colon: Colon Pain: Causes & How It’s Treated

Colon Pain: Causes & How It’s Treated

6 most common causes

Illustration of various health care options.

Viral Gastroenteritis

Celiac Disease

Crohn’s Disease

Diverticulitis

Lactose Intolerance

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Where is your colon?

Your colon, also known as the large intestine, is located in your abdomen. It’s about 5 to 6 feet long and travels up the right side of your abdomen, across the top, and down the left side. It absorbs water and nutrients and expels waste.

Segments of the colon include the cecum (which connects to the small intestine), the ascending colon, the transverse colon, the descending colon, and the sigmoid colon (which connects to the rectum).

What causes colon pain?

Pain in your colon may be caused by a temporary issue like an infection or a common condition like lactose intolerance.

In some cases, colon pain may be a sign of a serious illness, such as irritable bowel disease or diverticulitis. The pain can vary in location depending on what’s causing it.

Colon pain can be treated with medications like antibiotics and antispasmodic drugs, changes in your diet and, in some cases, surgery.

Dr. Rx

Colon pain is hard to pinpoint. Usually, you will have abdominal pain and symptoms that suggest your GI tract is the culprit. After that, discussions with your doctor, labwork, and imaging may pinpoint your colon as the culprit. —Dr. Shria Kumar

Causes

1. Infection

Symptoms
  • Colon pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Bloody stools

Many types of infections can affect your digestive system. They can change your bowel movements and cause colon pain and pain in other areas of your abdomen. The pain may occur when you have bowel movements or it may be unrelated to them.

Infections can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or parasites. Examples include:

  • Food poisoning, which is caused by eating contaminated food or drinking contaminated water, or poor hand hygiene. Bacteria such as E. coli can cause food poisoning.
  • Viruses such as norovirus (known for spreading on cruise ships), adenovirus (commonly spread among children in daycares), and COVID-19
  • C. difficile infection, which can occur if you were recently hospitalized or are taking antibiotics
  • Parasite infections, such as Giardia or Vibrio
Treating infections

Treatment includes staying hydrated and letting your bowel rest by eating bland foods. Some infections may clear up on their own. But if you have a bacterial or parasitic infection, you’ll need an antibiotic or anti-parasitic medication.

Always see your doctor if your symptoms are severe, they don’t improve after a few days, or you have a compromised immune system (from HIV, cancer, immunosuppressant medications, etc.). You may need to be hospitalized for monitoring and IV fluids.

2. Irritable bowel syndrome

Symptoms
  • Colon pain
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • More frequent stool (more than 3 times a day) or less frequent stool (less than 3 times a week)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder of the gut that causes intestinal pain and changes in your bowel movements. There are three types of IBS: IBS-D (causes diarrhea), IBS-C (causes constipation), and IBS-M (causes alternating diarrhea and constipation).

Every type of IBS causes abdominal pain at least once a week. The pain usually occurs with bowel movements, and it may decrease afterwards.

It’s not known what causes IBS, but research suggests that communication to the brain and gut plays a role. It can affect you for months or years and significantly affect your quality of life. Flares of IBS can happen when you’re stressed, eat certain foods (often lactose-containing products), or are recovering from a stomach bug.

Treating IBS

Your doctor will prescribe treatments based on your symptoms, such as antispasmodics for cramps and anti-diarrheal medication. Cognitive behavioral therapy may also be recommended to help reduce the effect of stress on your gut.

3. Inflammatory bowel disease

Symptoms
  • Colon pain
  • Rectal bleeding
  • Diarrhea
  • Weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Joint pain

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammation of the intestines caused by abnormal immune system activity. There are two types of IBD: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD).

UC mostly affects the large intestine, while Crohn’s disease can occur anywhere in your gastrointestinal (GI) tract and even outside your intestines (particularly the skin and joints.) The pain can be in any part of your abdomen, depending on where the inflammation is located.

You should always see your doctor if you have symptoms of IBD. Left untreated, an inflamed colon can lead to serious problems, such as malnutrition, bleeding, certain cancers, and overall poor health.

Treating IBD

The goal of treatment is to eliminate inflammation so the disease goes into remission. Your doctor will likely recommend changes to your diet and medication. Most people with IBD will have recurrence of symptoms (“flares”). If these are severe, surgery may be necessary to remove parts of the bowel.

4. Celiac disease

Symptoms
  • Colon pain
  • Fatigue
  • Bloating
  • Diarrhea
  • Low blood count

Celiac disease is an inflammation of your gut that’s triggered by eating foods that contain gluten, which is a protein in wheat, rye, and barley. When people with celiac disease eat gluten, their immune system attacks the small intestine, causing inflammation and pain.

This also causes damage to the lining of the small intestine, interfering with your ability to absorb vitamins and minerals and raising your risk of nutrient deficiencies.

Other complications of celiac disease include weight loss, tiredness, reduced bone density, severe skin rashes, mouth ulcers, and anemia.

Treating celiac disease

The treatment is to avoid eating gluten. Your doctor will also monitor your bone health to make sure you’re absorbing vitamin D.

Pro Tip

The main things I’m listening for are accompanying symptoms. Is this truly GI-related, is it related to pelvic organs, or is it muscular? If it’s GI-related—what part of the GI tract? To answer this last question may require blood tests, lab work, and imaging. —Dr. Kumar

5. Diverticulitis

Symptoms
  • Colon pain, usually in the lower left part of your abdomen
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Fevers

Diverticulitis is an inflammation of diverticula pouches, which form when areas of your intestines become weak. (Simply having these diverticula is called “diverticulosis.”) The pouches can develop in any part of the intestine but are most common in the lower part of your large intestine (the sigmoid colon).

Diverticulitis is more common in Western countries and may be triggered by lack of exercise and poor eating habits, such as eating a lot of processed food and too little fiber. These habits can lead to constipation, which puts pressure on the walls of the intestine and creates outpouchings.

Treating diverticulitis

If you have an infection (diverticulitis), your doctor will prescribe antibiotics. But this does not actually cure diverticulosis (the pouches), so it’s possible to develop more infections. In very severe cases, such as repeat infections, you may be referred to a surgeon to discuss removing parts of your intestine.

6. Lactose intolerance

Symptoms
  • Colon pain after consuming lactose
  • Bloating
  • Diarrhea

Lactose intolerance is an inability to digest lactose, which is the main sugar in dairy products like milk, cheese, and ice cream. People with lactose intolerance don’t make enough of an enzyme called lactase, which is necessary to digest lactose. Symptoms occur within 8 hours after you eat or drink dairy products.

Lactose intolerance is a relatively common problem that can be caused by genetics or older age. It may also develop after you have an intestinal infection. In this case, your lactose intolerance may go away once your gut bacteria return to normal.

Treating lactose intolerance

Lactose intolerance is treated by avoiding dairy products or taking a lactase supplement when you want to eat dairy.

Other possible causes

Several types of health problems may also cause colon pain, including:

  • Colorectal cancer (rectal or colon cancer)
  • Volvulus, a severely painful twisting of the intestine
  • Mesenteric ischemia, which occurs when your colon isn’t getting enough blood
  • Colonic obstruction, which may be caused by a cancer, mass, or narrowing of the intestine
  • Appendicitis

When to call the doctor

Call your doctor if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Bleeding with bowel movements
  • Prolonged changes in bowel habits (more than 2 days, or not getting better after 2 days. )
  • Nausea or vomiting

Pro Tip

Important questions to ask your doctor are: What caused this? Should I change anything I am doing? Do I need any treatment? —Dr. Kumar

Should I go to the ER for colon pain?

You should go to the ER if you have:

  • Lightheadedness, dizziness, feeling faint
  • Fever
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Inability to eat or drink
  • Confusion

Treatments

At-home care

  • Eat a balanced diet.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Take lactase supplements.
  • Ensure soft, daily bowel movements by drinking enough water, eating fruits and vegetables, and talking to your doctor about starting a laxative if needed.

Other treatment options

Treatment depends on the cause of the pain and may include:

  • Antibiotics or antiparasitics
  • Antispasmodics
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Anti-diarrheal medications
  • Avoiding dairy products
  • Receiving IV fluids
  • Treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy if you have cancer
  • Surgery

Shria Kumar, MD.

Therapeutic Endoscopy Fellow, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Dr. Kumar is a gastroenterologist, who completed her fellowship at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. She received her undergraduate degrees in Religious Studies and Chemistry from New York University (2010) and graduated from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (2014), where she was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. She is completing her t…

Read full bio

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Colon pain: Location, causes, and more

Problems with the colon, or large intestine, can cause pain in the lower abdomen. Possible causes include constipation, diarrhea, and a range of gastrointestinal problems such as irritable bowel disease or colitis. Treatment will depend on the cause.

Inflammation, irritation, and obstruction in the colon can all cause pain, which a person will typically feel as abdominal pain. Possible causes of colon-related abdominal pain include constipation, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and colorectal cancer.

This article examines how disruptions in the colon may cause abdominal pain. It also looks at their causes and treatments and explains when a person should contact a doctor.

The colon is about 5 feet in length, and it circles through the abdomen and down to a person’s rectum. The colon contracts to move digested food and waste toward the rectum. In a healthy colon, these contractions are painless, and people rarely notice them.

However, irritation, inflammation, and obstructions can cause strong contractions, resulting in pain.

The colon’s winding path through the abdomen can mean that a person feels pain throughout this area of the body if they experience colon disruptions.

However, it is also possible to feel pain only in a specific spot. Some people may also feel pain in the rectum, just above the anus. This pain may feel sharp and stabbing or dull and aching.

Several medical conditions and temporary digestive issues can cause abdominal pain.

Constipation

When stool is too large or hard, it cannot comfortably pass out of the colon and rectum. This can cause abdominal pain and pain near the rectum and anus.

Sometimes, hard stools can cause tears in the lining of the anus, known as anal fissures. People with anal fissures may experience bleeding and pain with bowel movements.

People with constipation may need to make certain dietary adjustments to help soften the stool and allow it to pass more easily. These include:

  • consuming high fiber fruits and vegetables
  • talking with a doctor about fiber supplements
  • drinking plenty of water

Certain medications can also cause constipation. A person with medication-related constipation should talk with a doctor if this side effect is causing them distress.

Learn more about constipation.

Diarrhea

Diarrhea has several possible causes, including hypercontractility. This term refers to the colon contracting too often, causing watery or loose stools three or more times a day. It has a variety of possible causes, ranging from food intolerances to viruses and bacteria.

Learn more about the different causes of diarrhea.

These fast contractions may cause abdominal pain and cramping. Loose stools may also irritate the anus, causing burning and stinging.

Diarrhea is often short-lived if a virus or food intolerance causes it. However, some bacteria and illnesses that cause diarrhea can be severe and potentially lead to dehydration.

Over-the-counter (OTC) antidiarrheal medications may help treat acute diarrhea. However, parents and caregivers should consult a doctor before giving a child OTC drugs.

Learn more about what to eat when experiencing diarrhea.

Irritable bowel syndrome

IBS is a digestive condition with symptoms that often affect the colon. IBS can cause stomach pain and cramping, usually around the time of a bowel movement.

IBS may also cause:

  • gas and bloating
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • mucus in the stool

Learn more about the symptoms of IBS.

No single diet or medication can cure all cases of IBS, but various lifestyle adjustments may help. These include:

  • eating more fiber
  • avoiding gluten and other known trigger foods
  • following a low FODMAP diet
  • practicing stress management techniques
  • keeping a food diary to identify triggers

Diverticular disease

Diverticulosis is a condition in which the colon forms small pouches, or sacs, in its walls. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, it affects more than 30% of adults aged 50–59 years in the United States and more than 70% of those older than 80 years.

If any of these sacs become inflamed or infected, which is known as diverticulitis, this can cause pain, bleeding, and other symptoms.

In addition to abdominal pains, diverticulitis can cause:

  • loose stools or diarrhea
  • cramping in the lower abdomen
  • blood in the stool
  • fever
  • nausea
  • vomiting

Having regular bowel movements reduces the risk of developing diverticulosis and diverticulitis. Adopting a high fiber diet, exercising often, and staying hydrated can help promote regular bowel movements.

People who have symptoms of diverticulitis should see a doctor. In rare cases, diverticulitis can lead to serious complications.

Learn more about diverticular disease.

Colitis

Colitis refers to a group of conditions that cause inflammation in the colon. These conditions include:

  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that involves chronic colon inflammation with ulcers or sores.
  • Crohn’s disease: Crohn’s disease is another type of IBD. A person with Crohn’s disease will experience inflammation that can affect the entire digestive tract.
  • Infectious colitis: In this condition, bacteria, viruses, or parasites cause irritation and swelling of the colon.
  • Ischemic colitis: Ischemic colitis causes reduced blood flow to the colon, which may result in pain and damage.
  • Radiation colitis: Undergoing radiation therapy for cancer sometimes causes radiation colitis.
  • Microscopic colitis: In microscopic colitis, the inflammation is only visible upon microscopic examination of tissue samples.

Colitis can cause pain in the abdominal area. It may also cause:

  • bleeding in the rectum
  • an urgency around bowel movements
  • fever
  • unintentional weight loss
  • fatigue
  • nutritional deficiencies
  • mucus and blood in the stool
  • diarrhea or constipation

A person may need medications, IV fluids, or antibiotics to treat colitis. Severe colitis sometimes requires surgery.

Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer starts in the colon or rectum. It is the third most common cancer diagnosis in the U.S., excluding skin cancer.

Colorectal cancer can cause abdominal pain near the area of the colon, as well as:

  • changes in bowel movements, such as constipation or diarrhea
  • bright red blood in the stool
  • an urgency to have bowel movements that then do not provide relief
  • dark stool
  • fatigue
  • unexplained weight loss

It is important to note that many people with colorectal cancer do not experience symptoms right away. Undergoing a colonoscopy is the best way to detect colorectal cancer early.

Colorectal cancer treatment may include medications, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery.

Learn more about colorectal cancer.

Abdominal pain has many possible causes, so no single test or exam can confirm a diagnosis.

A doctor may initially suggest making dietary changes for mild symptoms. They may also carry out procedures to examine the colon, such as a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy. Sometimes, people may also need blood tests, stool tests, or CT scans.

A doctor will consider a person’s symptoms and medical history before recommending further tests.

The treatment for abdominal pain depends on its cause.

After a person receives a diagnosis, they may need to make dietary or lifestyle changes, such as:

  • consuming more dietary fiber
  • avoiding foods that irritate the colon
  • quitting smoking, if applicable

Medications, surgery, or other procedures may also be necessary in some cases.

People with abdominal pain should speak with a doctor if pain or bowel changes last longer than a few days.

Most pain in this area of the body is due to temporary digestive trouble. However, it is best to speak with a doctor to rule out serious medical conditions, such as IBD or colon cancer.

Abdominal pain and colon disruptions are not always a sign of something serious. Most of the time, certain foods or even stress can cause digestive trouble that will eventually go away on its own.

However, a person with ongoing pain or any other problems with the bowel should speak with a doctor to determine the cause and whether treatment is necessary.

Diseases of the colon

Symptoms of diseases of the colon

Diseases of the colon are initially accompanied by vague symptoms that most people do not attach importance to. This may be a burning sensation, discomfort in the intestines, periodic secretion of mucus – those signs with which the patient is unlikely to turn to a proctologist. In the future, pain, swelling, discharge from the anus and other symptoms appear. A big mistake is to put off going to the doctor and self-medicate.

The intestine is the only organ that simultaneously belongs to two important systems of the body: the immune and gastrointestinal tract. Here are some non-obvious symptoms that may suggest bowel disease:

  • sudden weight loss;
  • weakness in the body;
  • disturbances in metabolic and hormonal processes;
  • hair loss.

These signs are accompanied by severe lesions: cancer, malignant tumors, polyposis. But more often, more obvious symptoms indicate pathological processes in the large intestine:

  • constipation;
  • pains of varying intensity in the abdomen;
  • spotting on bowel movements;
  • discharge of clear or purulent mucus;
  • anemia;
  • flatulence;
  • intestinal obstruction;
  • stool disorder;
  • tenesmus;
  • incontinence.

Constipation

Constipation makes it difficult or impossible to empty the bowels for several days. This can be a constant problem that even laxatives cannot solve. Constipation can alternate with stool disorder – a common picture in irritable bowel syndrome, dysbacteriosis, and functional disorders.
The intensity of pain depends on the type of constipation: atonic or spastic. In the first case, the pain is aching, often not aggressive. With spastic constipation, the patient may complain of constant pain in the groin. If constipation occurs frequently, fecal blockages or intestinal obstruction may appear – life-threatening conditions.

Pain in the abdomen

Pain in the abdomen and groin may indicate organic and functional disorders in the large intestine. In Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, these are painful spastic contractions that radiate to the lumbar region and the outer side of the legs. It is difficult to determine the source of pain: it seems to spread along the lower abdomen.

Persistent pain is a sign of a progressive inflammatory process. Such pains are aching, pulling, steady. Manifested with irritable bowel syndrome, colitis, diverticulosis. May indicate peritonitis or purulent lesion.

Spotting and bleeding

Bleeding occurs in diseases of the rectum and colon. Usually, the color of the blood can reveal the site of the lesion: the brighter the blood, the closer the lesion is to the exit. Clear, bright red blood indicates internal or external hemorrhoids. Significant blood loss can cause weakness, dizziness.

If the fecal masses are homogeneous and contain uniform bloody impurities, this is a sign of a tumor in the upper intestines. Sometimes such masses occur with nonspecific colitis and diverticulosis. The higher the section of the lesion, the more uniform the blood clots in the feces and the darker their color.

In Crohn’s disease, blood may come out clear or in large clots. In some cases, red blood can be a sign of a decaying tumor in the intestine.

Discharge of mucus or pus

Such discharge may be permanent or appear with a bowel movement. They may indicate:

  • an anus fistula is the most common cause;
  • sphincter insufficiency – if the discharge is constant and accompanied by pain, there are erosions and cracks;
  • irritable bowel syndrome,
  • proctitis,
  • tumor formation in the sigmoid colon.

Often the discharge is combined with blood, the appearance of clots.

Pain in the anus

With deep, non-healing fissures, the pain can be aching and periodic, the patient feels fullness in the area of ​​the passage. Jerking and unbearable pains indicate a rupture of hemorrhoids or multiple nodes in the intestine. Ordinary hemorrhoids without complications do not cause pain, the patient feels fullness and swelling in the anus.

Anemia
Anemia is caused by excessive blood loss. This occurs with severe lesions of the intestine, cancer, rapid progression of the tumor.

Bloating and flatulence
A common symptom of any pathology in the gastrointestinal tract. A feeling of bloating and abundant gases is characteristic of constipation, intestinal obstruction, fecal blockages. Flatulence may be associated with enzyme deficiency and speak of disturbances in the work of other internal organs.
Bloating and flatulence are often complained by those who suffer from dysbacteriosis and do not eat properly. Sometimes bloating is accompanied by discomfort and heaviness in the stomach, with excess gas there is severe pain in the abdomen.

Intestinal obstruction
Intestinal obstruction can be complete or partial. The latter is more common, its symptoms are:

  • bloating;
  • pain;
  • flatulence;
  • prolonged constipation;
  • the appearance of impurities and blood;
  • vomiting;
  • loss of appetite.

This may indicate severe colon damage, a life-threatening condition. When intestinal obstruction progresses, symptoms of poisoning of the body, inflammation of the peritoneum appear, a rare and scanty stool is replaced by a profuse disorder. Laxatives and cleansing enemas give only temporary relief.

Disordered stool

Diarrhea accompanies milder bowel diseases and is a common sign of dysbacteriosis. An upset stool in combination with constipation or discharge may indicate an exacerbation of colitis, IBS.

Tenesmus

Tenesmus – false urge to empty the bowel, frequent and persistent. With such urges, a small amount of mucus is separated, sometimes with diarrhea. They appear due to the excited motility of the rectum. Often the cause is inflammation of the mucous membrane of the anal region.

Incontinence

Incontinence of feces and separated gases is a consequence of congenital or acquired changes in the sphincter. Also, regulation can be disrupted due to psychological factors.

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Symptoms of diseases of the large intestine: the nature of pain and manifestation

Diseases of the large intestine do not always manifest themselves clearly and clearly. More often, the initial phase is accompanied by blurred symptoms that people do not attach importance to. This may be a burning sensation, discomfort in the intestines, periodic mucus secretion. The specificity of the intestine is that it may not give such signs for a long time that will indicate the need to visit a proctologist.
Even when a person begins to worry about pain, swelling, discharge from the anus and other symptoms, he does not rush to the doctor. At first, the patient stubbornly tries self-treatment and the means that modern advertising obsessively offers. Meanwhile, the symptoms change, become more noticeable, pains appear and are often aggressive.

Sometimes symptoms may not indirectly indicate bowel disease, the symptoms may be specific:

  • sudden weight loss;
  • weakness in the body;
  • disturbances in metabolic and hormonal processes;
  • hair loss.

These signs accompany the most severe lesions of the intestine: cancer, malignant tumors, polyposis. The intestine is the only organ that simultaneously belongs to two important systems of the body: the immune and gastrointestinal tract. For a full life and health, it is important to be able to recognize those symptoms and signs that suggest a pathological process in the large intestine:

  • constipation;
  • pains of varying intensity in the abdomen;
  • spotting on bowel movements;
  • discharge of clear or purulent mucus;
  • anemia;
  • flatulence;
  • intestinal obstruction;
  • stool disorder;
  • tenesmus;
  • incontinence.

Intestinal constipation
With constipation, there are difficulties with defecalization, up to the complete exclusion of stools within a few days. Constipation can be persistent and persistent, not succumbed to the action of laxatives. An upset stool can replace constipation – this is a common picture in irritable bowel syndrome, dysbacteriosis, and functional disorders.
The intensity of pain depends on the type of constipation: atonic and spastic. In the first case, the pain is aching, often not aggressive. With spastic constipation, there may be cramps in the inguinal region of a persistent nature. The presence of frequent constipation indicates the possibility of the formation of fecal blockages or intestinal obstruction. The conditions are extremely dangerous in nature, capable of threatening life.

Abdominal pain
Pain in the abdomen and groin often accompany organic and functional disorders in the large intestine. So, with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, the pain is in the nature of spastic contractions. Such pains often radiate to the lumbar region, radiating along the outside of the legs. It is difficult to determine the locality, since the pain “spreads” along the lower abdomen, often involving the perineum in the process.

Constant pain – a sign of a progressive inflammatory process. Such pains are aching, pulling, steady. Manifested in IBS, various colitis, diverticulosis. The nature of the pain indicates the likelihood of developing peritonitis or a purulent lesion.

Spotting and bleeding
Bleeding occurs in diseases of the rectum and colon. Usually, the location of the lesion is visually determined by the color of the blood: the brighter the blood, the closer the lesion is to the exit. So, the appearance of clean and bright red blood indicates internal or external hemorrhoids. Sometimes blood loss can be significant and cause weakness, dizziness.

If the stools are homogeneous and contain uniform bloody impurities, then this is a symptom of the formation of a tumor in the upper intestines. Sometimes such masses occur with nonspecific colitis and diverticulosis. The higher the section of the lesion, the more uniform the blood clots in the feces will look and the darker their color.

In Crohn’s disease, blood may come out clear or in large clots. In some cases, red blood can be a sign of a decaying tumor in the intestine.

Discharge of mucus or pus
Such secretions are either permanent or appear during bowel movements. Most often, this becomes a sign of the formation of a fistula in the anus. With constant secretion of mucus and pain, sphincter insufficiency can be assumed. In this case, numerous erosions and cracks form, which brings itching and pain.

Such secretions are characteristic of irritable bowel syndrome, proctitis, with the formation of tumors in the sigmoid colon. Often the discharge is combined with blood, the appearance of clots.

Pain in the anus
Pain can be aching and periodic, arching the area of ​​​​the passage. This happens with deep cracks, they heal difficult, especially in the presence of constipation. Jerking and unbearable pains appear when hemorrhoids rupture or there are multiple nodes in the intestine. Ordinary hemorrhoids without complications do not cause such pain, it is felt only by bursting and swelling in the anus.

Anemia
Anemia develops when a person has lost a lot of blood. This occurs with severe lesions of the intestine, cancer, rapid progression of the tumor.

Bloating and flatulence
Bloating is a common symptom for almost any pathology in the gastrointestinal tract. A feeling of bloating and abundant gases is characteristic of constipation, intestinal obstruction, fecal blockages. Often flatulence is the result of enzyme deficiency and may indicate disturbances in the work of other internal organs.
Often bloating and flatulence accompany those who suffer from dysbacteriosis and do not eat properly. In some cases, bloating occurs with a feeling of discomfort and heaviness in the stomach, but with an excess of gas, severe pain in the abdomen may appear.

Intestinal obstruction
Intestinal obstruction can be complete or partial. More often you have to deal with partial, which is characterized by:

  • swelling;
  • pain;
  • flatulence;
  • prolonged constipation;
  • the appearance of impurities and blood;
  • vomiting;
  • loss of appetite.

More often this indicates a severe lesion of the large intestine of organic origin. The condition is extremely painful and dangerous to human health. With progression, signs of poisoning of the body, inflammation of the peritoneum appear. With partial obstruction of the intestine, the stool is rare, scanty, often replaced by a profuse disorder.