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Tylenol acetaminofeno: Drug Database | Medical Device Database

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Extra Strength TYLENOL® for Headache, Pain & Fever Relief

Extra Strength TYLENOL® for Headache, Pain & Fever Relief | TYLENOL®
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Get back to the things you love with powerful relief of tension headaches, back pain and more.

Find simple steps to alleviate back pain.

See what causes headaches to help avoid them.

This website contains current product information and may differ from the information on the product packaging you may have.

Find simple steps to alleviate back pain.

See what causes headaches to help avoid them.

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Simple Steps to Back Pain Relief

Simple Steps to Back Pain Relief | TYLENOL®
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STAY COOL

Ice it for the first 48 hours 5-10 mins at a time.

WARM UP

Use heating pads and hot showers after 48 hours to relieve pain.

REST + RELIEF

Take a pain reliever like TYLENOL® (Use as directed) and avoid strenuous activity.

SLEEP SMART

Choose a firm mattress and sleep with a pillow between your knees (for side sleepers) or under them (for back sleepers)

GET SOME SUPPORT

Use a chair with good lower back support. Sit with raised feet if necessary.

STAND UP

Soft knees, shoulders back, keep moving. Posture is everything!

LIFT WITH YOUR KNEES

Your mom and gym teacher were right! Never bend from the waist.

Stand up with your hands on your lower back. Slowly and carefully bend back a little, toward your hands. Hold for a few seconds and then release. Repeat a few times.

Lie flat on your back with your knees bent. Put your hands around your left knee and pull it down toward your chest. Hold the stretch for a few seconds, then release. Repeat with right knee. Then, pull both knees toward your chest together and hold a few seconds.

* Talk to your doctor before beginning or revising any exercise regimen.

Try these simple steps and you may be back in action in no time!

Pain relief you can count on.

Learn more about safe acetaminophen usage.

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Sinus + Tension Headache Relief + Prevention

Sinus + Tension Headache Relief + Prevention | TYLENOL®
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Just like there are many different types of headaches, there are many different ways to relieve and prevent them. If you are still experiencing headache pain, you may need a headache reliever such as TYLENOL® Extra Strength.

As always if you think you’re having migraines or cluster headaches, or have any other questions or concerns, please consult your doctor.

Quick Relief

Take a hot bath or shower to relax and ease sore muscles.
This is especially helpful for tension headaches and sinus headaches.

Take a walk outside.
Fresh air and increasing blood flow can go a long way to relieve a headache, especially if it removes you from common causes of a headache like
strong smells or harsh lighting.

Headache Prevention

One of the most common causes of a headache is stress.
To help prevent a tension headache brought on by stress, try this simple therapeutic breathing exercise:

Sit
Sit or lie down comfortably and rest your hand on your stomach, just below your rib cage.

Breathe
Slowly breathe in through your nose, focusing on your stomach expanding up and out as your lungs fill.

Exhale
Exhale slowly through your mouth, letting your stomach empty and fall.

Repeat
Repeat 10 to 20 times, as needed.

How Sleep Habits Can Cause Headaches

How Sleep Habits Can Cause Headaches
Inconsistent sleep patterns can lead to stress, fatigue, and anxiety—
all common cause of headaches. If you feel you aren’t getting enough sleep, try changing your pillows, sleep positions, or the side of the bed you sleep on!

Trigger Tracking

A key way to prevent headaches is to find out which triggers affect you.
Keep a running list of when your headaches occur along with what happened
in the hours before onset. Some important questions to ask when
considering how to prevent a headache include:

  • Did you eat? What was it and at what time?
  • Were you inside or outside? Bright or fluorescent light
    are a common migraine trigger.
  • Were there any strong smells, perfumes, or odors?

Pain relief you can count on.

Feel a headache coming on? Try a few simple relaxation exercises to stop a stress headache in its tracks.

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TYLENOL® (Acetaminophen) Dosage for Adults

TYLENOL® (Acetaminophen) Dosage for Adults | TYLENOL®
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Product Form

Directions

2 Tablets Every 4-6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 10 tablets in 24 hours, unless directed by a doctor

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Product Form

Directions

2 Capsules Every 4-6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 10 capsules in 24 hours, unless directed by a doctor

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Product Form

Directions

2 Tablets Every 6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 6 tablets in 24 hours, unless directed by a doctor

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Product Form

Directions

2 Gelcaps Every 6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 6 gelcaps in 24 hours, unless directed by a doctor

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Product Form

Directions

2 Caplets Every 8 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 6 caplets in 24 hours

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Product Form

Directions

2 Caplets Every 8 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 6 caplets in 24 hours

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Product Form

Directions

2 Powders Every 6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 6 powders in 24 hours

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Visit GET RELIEF RESPONSIBLY® for a list of other common medicines you may be taking that contain acetaminophen. If you have any questions, we encourage you to talk to your healthcare professional or contact our Consumer Call Center at 1-877-414-7711.

Exceeding the Recommended Dosage

An estimated 50 million Americans use acetaminophen each week to treat conditions such as pain, fever and aches and pains associated with cold and flu symptoms. To help encourage the safe use of acetaminophen, the makers of TYLENOL® have lowered the maximum daily dose for single-ingredient Extra Strength TYLENOL® (acetaminophen) products sold in the U.S. from 8 pills per day (4,000 mg) to 6 pills per day (3,000 mg). The dosing interval has also changed from 2 pills every 4 – 6 hours to 2 pills every 6 hours.

In case of overdose, you should get medical help right away or contact the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222. Quick medical attention is critical for adults as well as for children even if no signs or symptoms are noticed.

Learn more about
product information.

Learn more about safe acetaminophen usage.

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Pain Management Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning

005363218_PB

oblong, white, imprinted with GPI A5

005363222_PB

round, white, imprinted with GPI A325

005363231_PB

round, white, imprinted with GPI A5

009041982_PB

round, white, imprinted with GPI, A325

009041983_PB

oval, white, imprinted with GPI A5

009041988_PB

round, white, imprinted with GPI A5

009045256_PB

round, pink, imprinted with 1G

493480042_PB

capsule, white, imprinted with L484

505800496_PB

round, white, imprinted with TYLENOL, 325

505800501_PB

oval, white, imprinted with TYLENOL 325 HOSPITAL

578960101_PB

round, white, imprinted with M2A3, 57344

acetaminophen 325 mg 005361164

round, white, imprinted with L403, 325MG

Acetaminophen 325 mg 009046719

round, white, imprinted with L403, 325MG

Acetaminophen 325 mg 00904677361

round, white, imprinted with CPC 220

Acetaminophen 325 mg 493480973

round, white, imprinted with M2A3, 57344

Acetaminophen 500 mg 009046720

oblong, white, imprinted with L484

Acetaminophen 500 mg 009046730

round, white, imprinted with 54 27

Acetaminophen 500 mg 516450705

round, white, imprinted with GPI A5

Acetaminophen ER 650 mg 009045769

capsule, white, imprinted with L544

Acetaminophen ER 650 mg 461220062

oval, white, imprinted with cor116

Acetaminophen ER 650 mg 502680052

oval, white, imprinted with cor116

Acetaminophen ER 650 mg 620110338

capsule, white, imprinted with L544

Acetaminophen ER 650mg Caplets 009046883.JPG

capsule, white, imprinted with L544

Acetaminophen Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing

Take this product by mouth as directed. Follow all directions on the product package. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

There are many brands and forms of acetaminophen available. Read the dosing instructions carefully for each product because the amount of acetaminophen may be different between products. Do not take more acetaminophen than recommended. (See also Warning section.)

If you are giving acetaminophen to a child, be sure you use a product that is meant for children. Use your child’s weight to find the right dose on the product package. If you don’t know your child’s weight, you can use their age.

For suspensions, shake the medication well before each dose. Some liquids do not need to be shaken before use. Follow all directions on the product package. Measure the liquid medication with the provided dose-measuring spoon/dropper/syringe to make sure you have the correct dose. Do not use a household spoon.

For rapidly-dissolving tablets, chew or allow to dissolve on the tongue, then swallow with or without water. For chewable tablets, chew thoroughly before swallowing.

Do not crush or chew extended-release tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split the tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing.

For effervescent tablets, dissolve the dose in the recommended amount of water, then drink.

Pain medications work best if they are used as the first signs of pain occur. If you wait until the symptoms have worsened, the medication may not work as well.

Do not take this medication for fever for more than 3 days unless directed by your doctor. For adults, do not take this product for pain for more than 10 days (5 days in children) unless directed by your doctor. If the child has a sore throat (especially with high fever, headache, or nausea/vomiting), consult the doctor promptly.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens or if you develop new symptoms. If you think you may have a serious medical problem, get medical help right away.

TYLENOL® Dosing Guidelines | TYLENOL® Professional

TYLENOL® Dosing Guidelines | TYLENOL® Professional
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Use these charts to guide proper dosage for your patients 12 and older

Patients may have questions about over-the-counter analgesics. Use the information below to help them find
the TYLENOL® product that’s right for them. Remember, many medicines contain the same active
ingredient, so remind patients to use ONLY 1 medicine containing the same active ingredient at a
time.

PROFESSIONAL DISCRETIONARY DOSING: To help encourage the safe use of acetaminophen, in 2011,
the makers of TYLENOL® lowered the labeled maximum daily dose for single-ingredient TYLENOL® Extra Strength
(acetaminophen) products sold in the US from 8 pills/day (4000 mg) to 6 pills/day (3000 mg). The dosage
interval also changed from 2 pills every 4 to 6 hours to 2 pills every 6 hours. If pain or fever persists at
the total labeled daily dose, healthcare professionals may exercise their discretion and recommend up
to 4000 mg/day.
*

Regular Strength
TYLENOL® Regular Strength Liquid Gels
ACTIVE INGREDIENT
ACTIVE INGREDIENT, DOSAGE* & DIRECTIONS
DOSAGE FREQUENCY* DIRECTIONS

Acetaminophen

325 mg (in each capsule)

2 capsules every 4-6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 10 capsules in 24 hours, unless directed by a doctor

Total labeled daily dose:
3250 mg/day

Regular Strength
TYLENOL® Regular Strength Tablets
ACTIVE INGREDIENT
ACTIVE INGREDIENT, DOSAGE* & DIRECTIONS
DOSAGE FREQUENCY* DIRECTIONS

Acetaminophen

325 mg (in each tablet)

2 tablets every 4-6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 10 tablets in 24 hours, unless directed by a doctor

Total labeled daily dose:
3250 mg/day

Extra Strength
TYLENOL® Extra Strength Caplets
ACTIVE INGREDIENT
ACTIVE INGREDIENT, DOSAGE* & DIRECTIONS
DOSAGE FREQUENCY* DIRECTIONS

Acetaminophen

500 mg (in each caplet)

2 caplets every 6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 6 caplets in 24 hours, unless directed by a doctor

Total labeled daily dose:
3000 mg/day

Extra Strength
TYLENOL® Extra Strength Coated Tablets
ACTIVE INGREDIENT
ACTIVE INGREDIENT, DOSAGE* & DIRECTIONS
DOSAGE FREQUENCY* DIRECTIONS

Acetaminophen

500 mg (in each tablet)

2 tablets every 6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 6 tablets in 24 hours, unless directed by a doctor

Total labeled daily dose:
3000 mg/day

Extra Strength
TYLENOL® Extra Strength Dissolve Packs
ACTIVE INGREDIENT
ACTIVE INGREDIENT, DOSAGE* & DIRECTIONS
DOSAGE FREQUENCY* DIRECTIONS

Acetaminophen

500 mg (in each powder)

2 powders every 6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 6 powders in 24 hours, unless directed by a doctor

Total labeled daily dose:
3000 mg/day

Extra Strength
TYLENOL® Rapid Release Gels
ACTIVE INGREDIENT
ACTIVE INGREDIENT, DOSAGE* & DIRECTIONS
DOSAGE FREQUENCY* DIRECTIONS

Acetaminophen

500 mg (in each gelcap)

2 gelcaps every 6 hours while symptoms last

Not to exceed 6 gelcaps in 24 hours, unless directed by a doctor

Total labeled daily dose:
3000 mg/day

Extended Release
TYLENOL® 8HR Arthritis Pain Tablets
ACTIVE INGREDIENT
ACTIVE INGREDIENT, DOSAGE* & DIRECTIONS
DOSAGE FREQUENCY* DIRECTIONS

Acetaminophen

650 mg (in each bi-layer tablet)

2 bi-layer tablets every 8 hours with water

Not to exceed 6 bi-layer tablets in 24 hours

Total labeled daily dose:
3900 mg/day

Extended Release
TYLENOL® 8HR Muscle Aches & Pain Tablets
ACTIVE INGREDIENT
ACTIVE INGREDIENT, DOSAGE* & DIRECTIONS
DOSAGE FREQUENCY* DIRECTIONS

Acetaminophen

650 mg (in each bi-layer tablet)

2 bi-layer tablets every 8 hours with water

Not to exceed 6 bi-layer tablets in 24 hours

Total labeled daily dose:
3900 mg/day

PM Extra Strength
TYLENOL® PM Extra Strength Caplets
ACTIVE INGREDIENTS
ACTIVE INGREDIENTS, DOSAGE* & DIRECTIONS
DOSAGE FREQUENCY* DIRECTIONS

Acetaminophen 500 mg
Diphenhydramine HCl 25 mg

(in each caplet)

2 caplets at bedtime

Not to exceed 2 caplets in 24 hours

Total labeled daily dose:
Acetaminophen 1000 mg/day
Diphenhydramine HCl 50 mg/day

This is not a complete list.

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Acetaminophen: Pediatric Medication | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

This document, provided by Lexicomp ® , contains all the information you need to know about the drug, including the indications, route of administration, side effects and when you should contact your healthcare provider.

Trade names: USA

Acephen [OTC]; Aspirin Free Anacin Extra Strength [OTC]; Cetafen Extra [OTC]; Cetafen [OTC]; FeverAll Adult [OTC]; FeverAll Children’s [OTC]; FeverAll Infants’ [OTC]; FeverAll Junior Strength [OTC]; GoodSense Pain Relief; GoodSense Pain Relief Extra Strength [OTC]; Little Fevers [OTC]; Mapap Arthritis Pain [OTC]; Mapap Children’s [OTC]; Mapap Extra Strength [OTC]; Mapap [OTC]; Midol Long Lasting Relief [OTC]; Non-Aspirin Pain Reliever [OTC] [DSC]; Nortemp Children’s [OTC]; Ofirmev; Pain & Fever Children’s [OTC]; Pain Eze [OTC]; Pain Relief Children’s [OTC]; Pain Relief Extra Strength [OTC]; Pharbetol Extra Strength [OTC]; Pharbetol [OTC]; Q-Pap Children’s [OTC] [DSC]; Q-Pap Extra Strength [OTC] [DSC]; Q-Pap Infants’ [OTC] [DSC]; Q-Pap [OTC] [DSC]; Silapap Children’s [OTC]; Triaminic Children’s Fever Reducer Pain Reliever [OTC]; Tylenol 8 HR Arthritis Pain [OTC]; Tylenol 8 HR [OTC] [DSC]; Tylenol Children’s [OTC]; Tylenol Dissolve Packs [OTC]; Tylenol Extra Strength [OTC]; Tylenol Infants’ [OTC]; Tylenol [OTC]; Valorin Extra [OTC]; Valorin [OTC]

Trade names: Canada

Abenol; Apo-Acetaminophen; Atasol; Novo-Gesic; Pediatrix; Tempra; Tylenol

Warning

  • This medicine contains acetaminophen.Liver disorders have been reported during acetaminophen use. In some cases, these disorders required liver transplantation or resulted in death. In most cases, liver disorders occurred in patients who exceeded the acceptable daily dose of acetaminophen. Often, patients used not one, but several drugs containing acetaminophen at the same time. If you have any questions, talk to your child’s doctor.

What is this drug used for?

  • Used to relieve pain and fever.

What should I tell my doctor BEFORE my child takes this drug?

  • If your child is allergic to this drug, any of its ingredients, other drugs, foods, or substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and how your child has it.
  • If your child has liver disease.

This list of drugs and diseases that may be adversely associated with this drug is not exhaustive.

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about all medications your child is taking (prescription and over-the-counter, natural products, and vitamins) and any health concerns. You need to make sure that this drug is safe for your child’s illness and in combination with other drugs that he or she is already taking. You should not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drug your child is taking without talking to your doctor.

What do I need to know or do while my child is taking this drug?

  • Tell all health care providers for your child that your child is taking this drug. These are your child’s doctors, nurses, pharmacists and dentists.
  • It is not recommended to give your child other medicines containing acetaminophen. Read the instructions for medicines carefully. Taking too much acetaminophen can lead to liver problems.
  • Follow the instructions exactly. Do not exceed your child’s prescribed daily dose of acetaminophen. If you are unsure of your child’s daily dose of acetaminophen, ask your doctor or pharmacist. If you have exceeded your child’s daily dose of acetaminophen, contact the child’s doctor immediately, even if the child is not feeling any worse.
  • Alcohol may interact with this drug. Make sure your child does not drink alcohol.
  • This drug may interfere with some laboratory tests. Tell all healthcare professionals and laboratory staff providing your child’s healthcare that your child is taking this drug.
  • If your child has PKU, talk to your doctor. Some foods contain phenylalanine.
  • Allergic reactions have happened with this drug.Some reactions, in rare cases, can be very severe or life-threatening. Consult your doctor.
  • Doses of this drug indicated for use in children may vary by brand. Talk to your doctor before giving this drug to a child.

If your daughter is pregnant or breastfeeding:

  • Consult a doctor if your daughter is pregnant, pregnant, or breastfeeding.The benefits and risks for your daughter and her child will need to be discussed.

What side effects should I report to my child’s healthcare provider right away?

WARNING / CAUTION: Although rare, this drug can cause very serious and sometimes deadly side effects in some people. Call your child’s doctor right away or get medical attention if your child has any of the following signs or symptoms that could be associated with a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction such as rash, hives, itching, reddened and swollen skin with blistering or scaling, possibly associated with fever, wheezing or wheezing, tightness in the chest or throat, difficulty breathing, swallowing or speaking, unusual hoarseness, swelling in the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of liver problems such as dark urine, feeling tired, lack of appetite, nausea or abdominal pain, light stools, vomiting, yellowing of the skin and eyes.
  • Difficulty urinating or change in the amount of urine excreted.
  • Possible severe skin reaction (Stevens-Johnson syndrome / toxic epidermal necrolysis). This can lead to serious and permanent health problems and sometimes death.Get medical help right away if your child has symptoms such as redness, skin swelling with blistering or scaling (with or without a fever), redness or irritation of the eyes, painful sores on the lining of the mouth, throat, nose, or eyes …

What are some other side effects of this drug?

Any drug can have side effects. However, many people have little or no side effects.Call your child’s doctor or get medical help if any of these or other side effects bothers your child or does not go away:

  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • Sleep disorders.
  • Headache.
  • Constipation.

This list of potential side effects is not exhaustive. If you have any questions about side effects, talk to your child’s doctor. Talk to your child’s doctor about side effects.

You can report side effects to the National Health Office.

What is the best way to give this drug?

Give this drug to your child as directed by the doctor. Read all the information provided to you. Follow all instructions strictly.

All oral preparations:

  • Give this drug with or without food.

Chewable Tablet:

  • Make sure that the child chews the drug thoroughly before swallowing.

Lozenge:

  • Place on tongue and let dissolve.

Extended release tablets:

  • Have your child swallow whole. Tell your child not to chew, crush, or crush the tablet.
  • Give this drug with a full glass of water.

Liquid (drops):

  • Measure liquid doses carefully. Use the measuring container that came with the medicine.

All other liquid preparations:

  • Doses of liquid preparation should be measured with caution. Use the dispenser that comes with the medicine. If a dispenser is not included in the package, ask your pharmacist for the dosing product for this drug.

Liquid (suspension):

  • Shake well before use.

Suppositories:

  • Suppositories are intended for rectal administration only.
  • Wash hands before and after use.
  • If the candle is soft, refrigerate it or keep it under cold water.
  • Remove the foil wrapper before using the candle.
  • Moisten the suppository before placing it in the rectum.
  • Pressing gently, insert the candle with the pointed end forward into the rectum. Don’t hold it in your hands for too long.

Injection:

  • For intravenous infusion.

What if my child misses a dose of a drug?

Oral preparations and suppositories:

  • If the child is taking the drug regularly, give the missed dose as soon as you remember.
  • If it is time for your child to take the next dose, do not take the missed dose and then return to your child’s normal dosage schedule.
  • Do not give a double dose at the same time or additional doses.
  • In most cases, this drug is used as needed. Do not give your child the drug more often than the doctor tells you to.

Injection:

  • Contact your child’s doctor to find out what to do next.

How do I store and / or discard this drug?

All oral preparations:

  • Store at room temperature. Do not place in refrigerator or freezer.
  • Store in primary container.
  • The lid must be tightly closed.

Suppositories:

  • Store at room temperature. Do not freeze.
  • Some drugs can be stored in the refrigerator. Check with your pharmacist or read the package label.

Oral preparations and suppositories:

  • Protect from light.
  • Store in a dry place.Do not store in the bathroom.

Injection:

  • If you need to store this drug at home, check with your child’s doctor, nurse, or pharmacist for information about how it is stored.

All forms of issue:

  • Store all medicines in a safe place. Keep all medicines out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Dispose of unused or expired drugs.Do not empty into toilet or drain unless directed to do so. If you have any questions about the disposal of your medicinal products, consult your pharmacist. Your area may have drug recycling programs.

General information on medicinal products

  • If your child’s symptoms or health problems do not improve, or if they get worse, see your child’s doctor.
  • Do not share your child’s medicine with others or give anyone’s medicine to your child.
  • Some medicines may have different patient information sheets. If you have questions about this drug, talk with your child’s doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other healthcare professional.
  • If you think there has been an overdose of a drug, call a Poison Control Center immediately or seek medical attention. Be prepared to tell or show which drug you took, how much and when it happened.

Use of information by the consumer and limitation of liability

This information should not be used to make decisions about taking this or any other drug. Only the attending physician has the necessary knowledge and experience to make decisions about which drugs are appropriate for a particular patient. This information does not guarantee that the drug is safe, effective, or approved for the treatment of any disease or specific patient.Here are only brief general information about this drug. It does NOT contain all available information on the possible use of the drug with instructions for use, warnings, precautions, information about interactions, side effects and risks that may be associated with this drug. This information should not be construed as a treatment guide and does not replace information provided to you by your healthcare professional. For complete information on the possible risks and benefits of taking this drug, consult your doctor.

Copyright

© UpToDate, Inc. and its affiliates and / or licensors, 2021. All rights reserved.

90,000 paracetamol relieves fear of death – RT in Russian

It turns out that a medicine that helps not only for physical pain, but also for mental pain, still exists. Scientists from Canada have discovered a new property of ordinary paracetamol – the drug relieves existential anxiety, signs of depression and fear of death.

  • © samcatchesides / flickr.com

Sooner or later we all think about death, and some of these thoughts can lead to depression and pronounced anxiety. Awareness of one’s place in life, attempts to understand the structure of the world, feelings of loneliness or self-doubt – all this causes a person mental pain, which psychotherapists often try to treat with expensive psychotropic drugs, which also have a whole list of side effects.

A recent study by a group of scientists from the University of British Columbia, Canada, showed that paracetamol can help to cope with all these existential problems.

Tylenol, acetaminophen – all these are the names of the medicine that everyone knows, sold in any pharmacy without a prescription and is usually used to reduce fever in adults and children, as well as help get rid of headaches and other pains. Mental pain, as it turned out, paracetamol can also stop, blocking “disturbing” brain signals.

The experiment involved 120 people who were divided into two groups. Some took 1,000 mg of Tylenol before the test, others took dummy tablets and a placebo. Then all the participants were shown videos with public protests, as well as fragments of films by the American director David Lynch, whose films evoke the darkest thoughts and are thoroughly imbued with the spirit of surrealism.

To enhance the effect, the study participants also wrote several essays on what will happen to them after death.The volunteers were then asked to name the amount of the bond they would have paid for the prostitute. The placebo control group cited a higher bail amount and were also skeptical about the actions of the protesters. Researchers believe that paracetamol dulls the desire to judge others, as well as experienced internal aggression, fear of their own death or unpleasant emotions when watching surreal films.

“We have found that paracetamol has the ability to eliminate not only feelings of pain, but also internal anxiety and fear.It can probably slow down or weaken the corresponding nerve impulses in the brain, “suggests study co-author Professor Daniel Randles.

Error in the text? Select it and press “Ctrl + Enter”

Pro Tylenol (acetaminophen) – alexey5351 – LiveJournal

Pro Tylenol (acetaminophen) [Sep. 22nd, 2013 | 10:30 am ]

alexey5351


A fairly detailed, high-quality and unexpected for me journalistic investigation of one of the most popular drugs in the United States – both for pains of various kinds, and for colds and other symptoms.

http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/505/use-only-as-directed

Briefly the essence is as follows. If you are taking acetaminophen within the stated daily dose, there is nothing to worry about. But. This drug has a very insignificant difference between the therapeutic dose and the toxic one (safety margin). Doubling the daily dose from 4 to 8 grams can be fatal if taken on this regimen for several days. Increasing the dose by just a gram means that two extra extra strength pills translate into serious liver damage.

Approximately one hundred and fifty people a year die in the United States from an unintentional overdose of acetaminophen. The problem is that this drug is touted as one of the safest and most effective drugs in its class. There is a bit of logic in this – because the alternative drugs – ibuprofen, analgin, etc. – have more side effects at a normal dose. But at the same time, there is not a single recorded case of death from an overdose of ibuprofen. For these drugs, an increase in the dose to toxic occurs from an 8-fold to 20-fold increase in the daily dose.Tylenol has only twice. The federal agency that regulates drug safety in the market – the FDA – is familiar with these statistics, but does not respond quickly enough.

If you have taken this drug before, then do not worry and regret. You are alive and the liver is as it is. In any case, it is important to consult a doctor, read the description of the medication carefully and in no case exceed the maximum daily dose.

It is hoped that the drug company will issue a notice on the packaging of a serious overdose hazard.With such a low difference in the toxic dose from the medicinal one, this drug can hardly be called the safest.

Details:

http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/505/use-only-as-directed
http://www.propublica.org/article/tylenol-mcneil-fda- use-only-as-directed

Comments:

Maybe you know how close paracetamol and acetaminophen are? Does paracetamol also have a difference between a normal dose and a dangerous one?

apparently the same

http: // en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paracetamol

My wife told me about it. I didn’t hear her until NPR told it 🙂

Ibuprofen can also be dangerous, in 2011 our girl drank it for five days after tooth extraction, but it turned out to be in acetaminophen resuscitation with a failed liver and was the first in line for a liver transplant. True, at the last moment, the liver began to recover and transplantation was not necessary. Healthy 27-year-old girl with no medical history.

Anything can be dangerous, including water.You can die if you drink more water than your body can handle. I would not want to mix everything into one, and generalize a particular case to the whole phenomenon. About acetaminophen there are specific mortality statistics that were collected for 10 years in a country with a population of 300 million, there is a specific criterion (safety margin) and specifically for this criterion, ibuprofen is better. But there is no panacea, any medicine has a main effect and a side effect, one must consciously use them – this does not mean that the medicines are bad and dangerous.I would not want to feed the drug phobia, because it is just as distortion as taking too much drugs. The whole question is in measure.

It is worth treating specific cases very carefully and considering all factors, not generalizing, if possible, one case to the whole phenomenon.

Doubling the daily dose from 4 to 8 grams is just two extra extra strength pills
——————————– ——– ——
Tylenol Extra Strong Tablet – 500mg.
Two such tablets – 1000mg, 1g.
4 + 1 = 5, not 8.
You need to eat 8 extra tablets in order to rise from 4 mg to 8 mg.

You are absolutely right, there is a typo in the text, I corrected it. Two facts are indicated in the article – 5 grams is a dose leading to serious liver damage. These are two extra extra strength pills.

http://www.propublica.org/article/tylenol-mcneil-fda-use-only-as-directed

as little as 25 percent above the maximum daily dose – or just two additional extra strength pills a day – has been reported to cause liver damage, according to the agency.
(FDA)
8 grams – dose at which there were deaths.
I corrected a typo.

And with the arithmetic lesson, you come in again, come in. Maybe teach me to breathe or some other important thing.

Advil vs. Tylenol (Health) | The difference between similar objects, words and terms.

Advil and Tylenol are both drugs used to relieve pain and reduce fever.Advil also has anti-inflammatory properties, which is why it is used to treat arthritis or joint pain. There are differences in the mechanisms of action and side effects of the two drugs.

The active ingredient in Advil is ibuprofen, while in Tylenol it is acetaminophen. Children should not take Advil if they are vomiting, dehydrated, or not eating a lot; they should only take Advil if they have eaten something.

High or long-term doses of Advil can damage the lining of the stomach or kidneys.On the other hand, too much Tylenol can damage the liver.

Comparison table

Differences – similarities –

Comparison table Advil and Tylenol

, sinus pain, cramps, cramps , ear pain, back pain, sports injuries.

Advil Tylenol
Usually preferable for Headache, arthritis
dosage 200-800 mg per dose 325-650 mg per dose
Advil is available in the form of tablets, chewable tablets, capsules, gel capsules and suspensions oral drops…. Tylenol is available as a liquid suspension, chewable tablets, gelatin capsules, gelatin and suppositories.
Side effects Nausea, dizziness, gastrointestinal bleeding Kidney, liver, organ damage, reacts to
Active ingredient Ibuprofen Acetaminophen
Mechanism of action Acts by inhibiting cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) Tylenol is considered a weak inhibitor of COX-2 , inhibits the third variant of COX-3….
Brand owned by Pfizer (formerly Wyeth) McNeil Consumer Healthcare, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson.
FDA Approval 1974 May 26, 1976
Benefits Body pain relief (including arthritis), temperature reduction, anti-clotting Body and muscle pain relief, relief headache, fever.
Available over-the-counter yes yes

Contents: Advil vs. Tylenol

  • 1 Active ingredient in Tylenol vs. Advil
  • 2 What is best for acetaminophen and ibuprofen
  • Mechanism of action

  • 4 Dosage
  • 5 Risks and side effects
    • 5.1 When to avoid (contraindications)
    • 5.2 Pregnancy
  • 6 Reviews
  • 7 Preparation / Form
  • 8 Drug Interactions
  • 9 References

The active ingredient in Tylenol vs Advil

The active ingredient in Advil is ibuprofen, which is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. On the other hand, the active ingredient in Tylenol is acetaminophen (also known as paracetamol), an analgesic and antipyretic agent.

Advil and Tylenol in the pharmacy.

What acetaminophen and ibuprofen are best for

Both ibuprofen and acetaminophen are antipyretics (medicines that reduce fever). However, some studies show that ibuprofen has a slight advantage in this area.

Ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) is also better for certain types of pain and inflammation – back pain, menstrual cramps, muscle pain, toothache and pain in the ear. A review published in the British Medical Journal found that:

  • paracetamol [also known as acetaminophen or Tylenol] is ineffective in reducing pain and disability or improving quality of life in patients with low back pain.
  • Paracetamol (aka acetaminophen or Tylenol) offers a small but not clinically important benefit for pain relief and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee
  • patients taking paracetamol (aka acetaminophen or Tylenol), almost four times more likely to have abnormal liver function tests compared to those taking an oral placebo

Tylenol is preferred for headache and arthritis pain.

Mechanism of Action

Advil acts by inhibiting cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and therefore prostaglandins, which are produced by the body in response to injury and inflammation. Acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol) is a weak inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis.

The mechanism of action of Tylenol differs from that of Advil, as Tylenol is believed to be a weaker inhibitor of COX-1 and COX-2. Scientists are studying the possibility of inhibiting the third variant of COX-3….

Metabolism

Tylenol and Advil are metabolized in the liver, broken down into non-toxic products and then excreted by the kidneys through urine ..

dosage

The adult dose for Advil is about 200-800 mg per dose, maximum four times per dose day. In children, the dose is 5-10 mg / kg. In case of overdose, consult your doctor.

For adults, the dose of Tylenol is 325-650 mg every 4-6 hours. In children, this dose is less – about 7 mg per pound of body weight.Taking an overdose of Tylenol can cause side effects and should be avoided.

Risks and side effects

Common side effects of Advil at high doses include nausea, gastrointestinal bleeding, stomach ulcers, diarrhea, constipation, headache, dizziness, salt and fluid retention, and hypertension. Other rare side effects include esophageal ulcer, heart failure, kidney failure, and confusion.

Side effects from acetaminophen (Tylenol) overdose include risk of stomach bleeding, kidney or liver damage, abdominal pain, or serious allergic reactions such as like swelling, dizziness, difficulty breathing and other reactions….

When to avoid (contraindications)

Ibuprofen (Advil) should be avoided before and after cardiac surgery due to the cardiovascular risk of all NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). If you are allergic to other NSAIDs such as aspirin or naproxen, you may also be allergic to ibuprofen.

pregnancy

Single use of NSAIDs such as Advil (ibuprofen) and Motrin is generally considered safe in the first two trimesters of pregnancy.Ibuprofen is a category C drug, ie. Risk is not excluded – animal studies have shown side effects in fetuses; there are no adequate and well-controlled human studies, but the potential benefits may justify the use of the drug in pregnant women despite the potential risks.

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is also associated with problems and is also a Category C drug. A study published in JAMA Pediatrics in 2016 concluded that

Children exposed to acetaminophen in utero are at increased risk of multiple behavioral difficulties, and associations does not appear to be explained by unmeasured behavioral or social factors associated with acetaminophen use, as they are not seen with acetaminophen use in the postnatal period or in a partner.While these results may have implications for public health recommendations, further research is needed to replicate the results and understand the mechanisms.

Reviews

Tylenol has been recalled twice. The 1982 Tylenol murders in Chicago caused huge panic in the United States and forced the company to recall 31 million bottles of pills. It was a huge blow to the brand, but it recovered and gradually recovered over the years ..

In January 2010, there was another Tylenol recall.On January 15, 2010, 20 months after first receiving consumer complaints, Johnson & Johnson announced the voluntary recall of several hundred batches of popular drugs, including Benadryl, Motrin, Rolaids, Simply Sleep, St. Joseph Aspirin and Tylenol. The recall was triggered by complaints about a musty odor, which is believed to be related to contamination of the packaging with the chemical 2,4,6-tribromoanisole.

Advil has never been recalled, so it certainly has a better track record than Tylenol in this regard….

Preparation / Form

Advil is available in the form of tablets, chewable tablets, capsules, suspensions and oral drops. Tylenol is available in liquid suspension, chewable tablets, gelatin capsules, gelatin and suppositories.

Drug Interactions

Advil taken with other drugs such as aminoglycosides or warfarin may cause side effects and should be avoided. Medicines such as carbamazepine, isoniazid, rifampin, and cholestyramine reduce the effects of Tylenol….

References

  • Wikipedia: Tylenol
  • Wikipedia: Advil
  • Mechanism of action of paracetamol – NIH
  • Acetaminophen – MedicineNet
  • Ibuprofen – MedicineNet
  • Acetaminophene

    and osteoarthritis – British Medical Journal

Johnson and Johnson will warn of the danger of paracetomol overdose

New packages of the popular pain reliever Tylenol containing paracetamol (acetaminophen) will be issued with a warning about the fatal risk of overdose, the Associated Press reports, citing Johnson and Johnson.

Paracetamol is a popular antipyretic and analgesic agent that is part of such drugs as Calpol, Tylenol, Panadol and others.

Tylenol contains acetaminophen, which can cause sudden liver failure. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 55,000 to 80,000 Americans each year end up in emergency rooms due to an overdose of paracetamol. Paracetamol can be found in over 600 freely available medicines, and one in four Americans use it weekly.

New packages, which will go on sale in October, will say that overdose of this drug can be dangerous.

At the same time, the US Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is developing safety measures that could restrict the use of Tylenol and other medications containing acetaminophen.

Recall that in early August 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) already warned of the risk of developing rare but life-threatening allergic skin reactions associated with the use of drugs containing paracetamol (acetaminophen).

The FDA reported at the time about such rare manifestations of drug allergies as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis (Lyell’s syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. The first two of them, in the absence of timely and appropriate therapy, are fatal. They are united by the rapid development of symptoms, general intoxication of the body, the appearance of blisters, and then bleeding erosions on the mucous membranes and skin.

Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis has a better prognosis, with symptoms usually resolving two weeks after stopping the drug that caused the reaction.

The FDA experts made a conclusion about the likelihood of such consequences of taking paracetamol based on an analysis of data published in the medical literature and data from its own information database of side effects of drugs, the Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

It should also be recalled that the drug manufacturer had already updated the packaging in the 1990s due to lawsuits.In 1994, the company added a warning that liver failure was among the side effects. Even Antonio Benedi, assistant to US President George W. Bush, filed a lawsuit against the manufacturer of this drug. Benedy received $ 8.8 million in compensation.

Source: medportal.ru

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Abscess, Incision And Drainage

An abscess (sometimes called an “abscess”) occurs when bacteria enter the skin and begin to multiply.Pus forms in the abscess cavity, as the body reacts to the presence of bacteria. An abscess can be associated with an insect bite, ingrown hair, a blockage of the sebaceous gland, acne, cysts, or puncture wounds.

Your abscess required an incision to remove pus. If the abscess cavity is large, then a gauze pad could be inserted. At the next visit, this tampon will need to be removed and possibly replaced with a different one. When treating a simple abscess, antibiotics are not required unless the infection has spread to the skin around the wound (called cellulitis).

The wound will take approximately one to two weeks to heal, depending on the size of the abscess. Healthy tissue will grow from the bottom and edges of the wound until the wound heals.

Home Care

  1. During the first two days, fluid may leak from the wound. Cover the wound with a clean, dry dressing. If the dressing becomes soaked in blood or pus, change it.

  2. If a gauze swab was inserted into the abscess cavity, then you may have been advised to remove it yourself.This can be done in the shower. After removing the tampon, it is necessary to wash the abscess area under the shower or in the bath 3-4 times a day until the wound heals.

  3. If you are prescribed antibiotics, take them as directed by your doctor until they run out.

  4. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) can be taken to relieve pain if no other pain relievers have been prescribed. [ NOTE. If you have liver disease or have a history of stomach ulcers, consult your doctor before taking these medications.]

See a doctor for FOLLOW-UP as directed by our staff. If a gauze swab was inserted into the wound cavity, it must be removed after 1-2 days. Examine the wound every day for signs of worsening infection, which are listed below.

Get Immediate Medical Assistance

for any of the following:

  • increased redness or swelling;

  • red stripes on the skin radiating from the wound;

  • increasing pain or swelling in the wound area;

  • continued discharge of pus two days after opening the abscess;

  • At 100.4єF (38єC) or higher, or as recommended by a healthcare practitioner.

90,000 Acetaminophen or Children’s Tylenol ™? – meds.is

Comparison of the effectiveness of Acetaminophen and Children’s Tylenol

The effectiveness of Acetaminophen is quite similar to Children’s Tylenol – this means that the ability of the drug to have the maximum possible effect is similar.

For example, if the therapeutic effect of Acetaminophen is more pronounced, then when using Children’s Tylenol, even in large doses, it will not be possible to achieve this effect.

Also, the rate of therapy – an indicator of the rate of therapeutic action for Acetaminophen and Children’s Tylenoli is approximately the same. And bioavailability, that is, the amount of a medicinal substance reaching the site of its action in the body, is similar. The higher the bioavailability, the less its losses will be during assimilation and use by the body.

Safety Comparison of Acetaminophen and Pediatric Tylenol

The safety of the drug includes many factors.

At the same time, it is higher in Children’s Tylenol than in Acetaminophen.It is important where the drug is metabolized: medicinal substances are excreted from the body either unchanged or in the form of products of their biochemical transformations. Metabolism occurs spontaneously, but most often it involves major organs such as the liver, kidneys, lungs, skin, brain, and others. When evaluating the metabolism in Children’s Tylenol, as well as in Acetaminophen, we look at which organ is metabolizing and how critical is the effect on it.

Risk-to-benefit ratio is when prescribing a medicinal product is undesirable, but justified under certain conditions and circumstances, with mandatory caution in use.At the same time, Children’s Tylenol has less risks when used than Acetaminophen.

Also, when calculating safety, it is taken into account whether only allergic reactions or possible dysfunction of the main organs are manifested. In other matters, as well as the reversibility of the consequences of the use of Children’s Tylenol and Acetaminophen.

Comparison of Acetaminophen and Pediatric Tylenoli contraindications

Based on the instructions. The number of contraindications for Acetaminophen is quite similar to Children’s Tylenol and is small.This is a list of symptoms with syndromes, and diseases, various external and internal conditions under which the use of Acetaminophen and Children’s Tylenol may be undesirable or unacceptable.

Comparison of Addiction in Acetaminophen and Child Tylenol

Like safety, addiction also includes many factors that must be considered when evaluating a drug.

So the set of values ​​of such parameters as “withdrawal syndrome” and “development of resistance” in Acetaminophen is quite similar to those in Children’s Tylenol.Withdrawal syndrome is a pathological condition that occurs after the termination of the intake of substances that cause addiction or dependence into the body. And by resistance is meant the initial resistance to the drug, in this it differs from addiction, when the resistance to the drug develops over a certain period of time. The presence of resistance can be ascertained only if an attempt was made to increase the dose of the drug to the maximum possible. At the same time, Acetaminophen’s values ​​of “withdrawal syndrome” and “resistance” are quite small, however, as well as in Children’s Tylenoli.

Comparison of Acetaminophen and Children’s Tylenoli Side Effects

Adverse events or adverse events are any medically adverse event occurring in a subject following administration of a drug.

Acetaminophen has almost the same adverse event status as Child Tylenoli. They both have few side effects. This implies that the frequency of their manifestation is low, that is, the indicator of how many cases of manifestation of an undesirable effect from treatment is possible and registered is low.The undesirable effect on the body, the strength of the influence and the toxic effect of Acetaminophen is similar to the Children’s Tylenol: how quickly the body can recover after taking it and whether to recover at all.

Comparison of the ease of use of Acetaminophen and Children’s Tylenol

This is the selection of the dose, taking into account various conditions, and the frequency of receptions. At the same time, it is important not to forget about the form of release of the drug, it is also important to take it into account when drawing up an assessment.

Ease of use for Acetaminophen is approximately the same as for Children’s Tylenol.However, they are not convenient enough to use.

The drug rating is compiled by experienced pharmacists studying international research.