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What is sternum pain: Sternal pain – different causes

Sternum Pain: What Is It?

Pain in your sternum, or breastbone, may be caused by a number of things, including inflammation, a joint or collarbone injury, and acid reflux. Pain in your sternum may also happen with a heart attack, but this is more likely if you’re over the age of 40 and have heart disease.

Your sternum, or breastbone, connects the two sides of your rib cage together. It sits in front of many major organs located in your chest and gut, including your heart, lungs, and stomach. As a result, many conditions that don’t necessarily have anything to do with your sternum may cause pain in your sternum and the surrounding area.

Your first reaction to chest pain, especially severe or consistent chest pain, may be to think it’s a heart attack. But in many cases, chest pain has nothing to do with your heart. This is especially true if you’re under age 40 and don’t have any serious health issues or existing conditions.

Sternum pain is actually more likely caused by conditions that have to do with your muscles, your bones, or your digestive tract than with your heart or the sternum itself.

Keep reading to learn the most common reasons for sternum pain and when you should see your doctor.

The most common cause of sternum pain is a condition called costochondritis. This occurs when the cartilage that connects your ribs to your sternum becomes inflamed.

Symptoms of costochondritis include:

  • sharp pains or aches on the side of your sternum area
  • pain or discomfort in one or more ribs
  • pain or discomfort that gets worse when you cough or breathe in deeply

Costochondritis doesn’t always have a specific cause, but it’s most often a result of a chest injury, strain from physical activity, or joint conditions like osteoarthritis. Costochondritis isn’t a serious condition and shouldn’t cause you to be concerned.

See your doctor if the pain persists or if you have other symptoms that might indicate a more serious underlying condition.

Conditions or injuries to the muscles and bones around your sternum can also cause sternum pain.

This includes:

  • joint injury
  • collarbone (clavicle) injury
  • fractures
  • hernias
  • surgery on the sternum (such as open heart surgery)

These aren’t the only musculoskeletal conditions that may make your sternum hurt, but they’re among the most common.

Sternoclavicular joint injury

The sternoclavicular joint (SC joint) connects the top of your sternum with your collarbone (clavicle). Injury to this joint can cause pain and discomfort in your sternum and in the area in your upper chest where this joint exists.

Common symptoms of injury to this joint include:

  • feeling mild pain or having aching and swelling around your upper chest and collarbone area
  • hearing pops or clicks in the joint area
  • feeling stiff around the joint or not being able to fully move your shoulder

Collarbone trauma

The collarbone is directly connected to your sternum, so injuries, dislocation, fractures, or other trauma to the collarbone can affect the sternum.

Common symptoms of collarbone trauma include:

  • bruises or bumps around area of collarbone injury
  • intense pain when you try to move your arm upwards
  • swelling or tenderness around collarbone area
  • pops, clicks, or grinding noises when you lift your arm
  • abnormal frontward sagging of your shoulder

Sternum fracture

Fracturing your sternum can cause a lot of pain, because your sternum is involved in many of your upper body movements. This type of injury is often caused by blunt force injuries to your chest. Examples of this include your seat belt tightening in a car accident or your chest getting hit while you’re playing sports or doing other high-impact physical activity.

Common symptoms include:

  • pain when you breathe in or cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • pops, clicks, or grinding noises when you move your arms
  • swelling and tenderness over the sternum

Muscle strain or hernia

Pulling or straining a muscle in your chest can cause pain around your sternum.

Common symptoms of a pulled muscle include:

  • pain around the pulled muscle
  • discomfort when using the affected muscle
  • bruising or tenderness around the affected muscle

A hernia can also cause sternum pain. A hernia happens when an organ is pushed or pulled from the area where it normally sits into a nearby part of the body.

The most common kind is a hiatal hernia. This happens when your stomach moves up past your diaphragm into your chest cavity.

Common symptoms of a hiatal hernia include:

  • frequent burping
  • heartburn
  • having trouble swallowing
  • feeling like you ate too much
  • throwing up blood
  • having black-colored stool

Check out: Muscle strain treatment »

Your sternum sits right in front of several major digestive organs. Conditions that affect your esophagus, stomach, and intestines can all cause sternum pain. Having heartburn or acid reflux after a meal are the most common gastrointestinal causes for sternum pain.

Heartburn

Heartburn happens when acid from your stomach leaks into your esophagus and causes chest pain. It’s common to get right after you eat. Pain usually gets worse when you lie down or bend forward.

Heartburn usually goes away without treatment after a short time.

Check out: Post-meal tips to ease heartburn »

Acid reflux

Acid reflux is similar to heartburn, but happens when stomach acid or even what’s in your stomach starts to bother or wear away the lining of your esophagus. It can be part of a chronic condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Symptoms of acid reflux include:

  • burning in your chest
  • abnormal bitter taste in your mouth
  • difficulty swallowing
  • coughing
  • throat soreness or hoarseness
  • feeling like you have a lump in your throat

Learn more: How to prevent acid reflux and heartburn »

Conditions that affect your lungs, windpipe (trachea), and other parts of your body that help you breathe can cause sternum pain.

Pleurisy

Pleurisy happens when your pleura gets inflamed. The pleura is made up of tissue within your chest cavity and around your lungs. In some cases, fluid can build up around this tissue. This is called pleural effusion.

Common symptoms include:

  • sharp pain when you breathe in, sneeze, or cough
  • feeling like you can’t get enough air
  • an abnormal cough
  • fever (in rare cases)

Bronchitis

Bronchitis happens when the bronchial tubes that bring air into your lungs become inflamed. It often happens when you get the flu or a cold.

Bronchitis pain can also make your sternum hurt as you breathe in and out. It can last only briefly (acute bronchitis) or become a long-term condition (chronic bronchitis) due to smoking or infections.

Common bronchitis symptoms include:

  • persistent wet cough that causes you to spit up mucus
  • wheezing
  • difficulty breathing
  • pain or discomfort in your chest

Flu or cold symptoms that can go along with bronchitis include:

  • high fever
  • exhaustion
  • runny nose
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting

Check out: 7 home remedies for bronchitis »

Pneumonia

Pneumonia happens when your lungs get infected by a virus or bacteria.

Common symptoms of pneumonia include:

  • difficulty breathing
  • high fever
  • persistent cough

Other conditions that affect your gastrointestinal tract or your chest muscles can cause sternum pain.

Stomach ulcer

A stomach ulcer (peptic ulcer) happens when you get a sore on the lining of your stomach or at the bottom of your esophagus.

Symptoms of a stomach ulcer include:

  • stomach pain, especially on an empty stomach, that responds to antacids
  • feeling bloated
  • nausea
  • lack of appetite

Panic attack

A panic attack happens when you suddenly feel fear, as if something dangerous or threatening is happening, with no actual reason to be afraid. It’s often a result of stress or a symptom of mental health conditions, such as generalized anxiety disorder or depression.

Symptoms of a panic attack include:

  • feeling like something bad is about to happen
  • feeling dizzy or lightheaded
  • having trouble breathing or swallowing
  • sweating
  • feeling alternately hot and cold
  • stomach cramps
  • chest pain

Check out: 11 ways to stop a panic attack »

Sternum pain can sometimes be the result of a heart attack. This is much less likely if you’re under age 40 or are in overall good health. They’re more likely to happen if you’re over 40 and have an existing condition, such as heart disease.

A heart attack is life-threatening. You should go to the emergency room right away if you have any symptoms besides sternum pain that may indicate a heart attack, especially if they appear without any obvious cause or if you’ve had a heart attack before.

Symptoms of a heart attack include:

  • chest pain in the middle or left side of your chest
  • pain or discomfort in your upper body, including your arms, shoulder, and jaw
  • feeling dizzy or lightheaded
  • having trouble breathing
  • sweating
  • nausea

The more of these symptoms you have, the more likely that you’re having a heart attack.

See your doctor right away if you have heart attack symptoms or symptoms that cause you sharp, consistent pain that gets in the way of your daily life.

You should also see your doctor if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • sternum and general chest pain that has no obvious cause
  • sweating, dizziness, or nausea with no specific cause
  • trouble breathing
  • pain that spreads from your chest throughout your upper body
  • chest tightness

If you’re experiencing other symptoms and they last for more than a few days, talk to your doctor.

You can find a primary care doctor near you through the Healthline FindCare tool.

Your next steps depend on what condition might be causing your sternum pain and how severe the condition is.

You may just need to take over-the-counter pain medication or change your diet. But you may need long-term treatment if the underlying condition is more serious. In some cases, you may need surgery to treat a heart or gastrointestinal condition.

Once your doctor diagnoses the cause, they can develop a treatment plan that can help relieve the symptoms and causes of your sternum pain.

Sternum Pain: What Is It?

Pain in your sternum, or breastbone, may be caused by a number of things, including inflammation, a joint or collarbone injury, and acid reflux. Pain in your sternum may also happen with a heart attack, but this is more likely if you’re over the age of 40 and have heart disease.

Your sternum, or breastbone, connects the two sides of your rib cage together. It sits in front of many major organs located in your chest and gut, including your heart, lungs, and stomach. As a result, many conditions that don’t necessarily have anything to do with your sternum may cause pain in your sternum and the surrounding area.

Your first reaction to chest pain, especially severe or consistent chest pain, may be to think it’s a heart attack. But in many cases, chest pain has nothing to do with your heart. This is especially true if you’re under age 40 and don’t have any serious health issues or existing conditions.

Sternum pain is actually more likely caused by conditions that have to do with your muscles, your bones, or your digestive tract than with your heart or the sternum itself.

Keep reading to learn the most common reasons for sternum pain and when you should see your doctor.

The most common cause of sternum pain is a condition called costochondritis. This occurs when the cartilage that connects your ribs to your sternum becomes inflamed.

Symptoms of costochondritis include:

  • sharp pains or aches on the side of your sternum area
  • pain or discomfort in one or more ribs
  • pain or discomfort that gets worse when you cough or breathe in deeply

Costochondritis doesn’t always have a specific cause, but it’s most often a result of a chest injury, strain from physical activity, or joint conditions like osteoarthritis. Costochondritis isn’t a serious condition and shouldn’t cause you to be concerned.

See your doctor if the pain persists or if you have other symptoms that might indicate a more serious underlying condition.

Conditions or injuries to the muscles and bones around your sternum can also cause sternum pain.

This includes:

  • joint injury
  • collarbone (clavicle) injury
  • fractures
  • hernias
  • surgery on the sternum (such as open heart surgery)

These aren’t the only musculoskeletal conditions that may make your sternum hurt, but they’re among the most common.

Sternoclavicular joint injury

The sternoclavicular joint (SC joint) connects the top of your sternum with your collarbone (clavicle). Injury to this joint can cause pain and discomfort in your sternum and in the area in your upper chest where this joint exists.

Common symptoms of injury to this joint include:

  • feeling mild pain or having aching and swelling around your upper chest and collarbone area
  • hearing pops or clicks in the joint area
  • feeling stiff around the joint or not being able to fully move your shoulder

Collarbone trauma

The collarbone is directly connected to your sternum, so injuries, dislocation, fractures, or other trauma to the collarbone can affect the sternum.

Common symptoms of collarbone trauma include:

  • bruises or bumps around area of collarbone injury
  • intense pain when you try to move your arm upwards
  • swelling or tenderness around collarbone area
  • pops, clicks, or grinding noises when you lift your arm
  • abnormal frontward sagging of your shoulder

Sternum fracture

Fracturing your sternum can cause a lot of pain, because your sternum is involved in many of your upper body movements. This type of injury is often caused by blunt force injuries to your chest. Examples of this include your seat belt tightening in a car accident or your chest getting hit while you’re playing sports or doing other high-impact physical activity.

Common symptoms include:

  • pain when you breathe in or cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • pops, clicks, or grinding noises when you move your arms
  • swelling and tenderness over the sternum

Muscle strain or hernia

Pulling or straining a muscle in your chest can cause pain around your sternum.

Common symptoms of a pulled muscle include:

  • pain around the pulled muscle
  • discomfort when using the affected muscle
  • bruising or tenderness around the affected muscle

A hernia can also cause sternum pain. A hernia happens when an organ is pushed or pulled from the area where it normally sits into a nearby part of the body.

The most common kind is a hiatal hernia. This happens when your stomach moves up past your diaphragm into your chest cavity.

Common symptoms of a hiatal hernia include:

  • frequent burping
  • heartburn
  • having trouble swallowing
  • feeling like you ate too much
  • throwing up blood
  • having black-colored stool

Check out: Muscle strain treatment »

Your sternum sits right in front of several major digestive organs. Conditions that affect your esophagus, stomach, and intestines can all cause sternum pain. Having heartburn or acid reflux after a meal are the most common gastrointestinal causes for sternum pain.

Heartburn

Heartburn happens when acid from your stomach leaks into your esophagus and causes chest pain. It’s common to get right after you eat. Pain usually gets worse when you lie down or bend forward.

Heartburn usually goes away without treatment after a short time.

Check out: Post-meal tips to ease heartburn »

Acid reflux

Acid reflux is similar to heartburn, but happens when stomach acid or even what’s in your stomach starts to bother or wear away the lining of your esophagus. It can be part of a chronic condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Symptoms of acid reflux include:

  • burning in your chest
  • abnormal bitter taste in your mouth
  • difficulty swallowing
  • coughing
  • throat soreness or hoarseness
  • feeling like you have a lump in your throat

Learn more: How to prevent acid reflux and heartburn »

Conditions that affect your lungs, windpipe (trachea), and other parts of your body that help you breathe can cause sternum pain.

Pleurisy

Pleurisy happens when your pleura gets inflamed. The pleura is made up of tissue within your chest cavity and around your lungs. In some cases, fluid can build up around this tissue. This is called pleural effusion.

Common symptoms include:

  • sharp pain when you breathe in, sneeze, or cough
  • feeling like you can’t get enough air
  • an abnormal cough
  • fever (in rare cases)

Bronchitis

Bronchitis happens when the bronchial tubes that bring air into your lungs become inflamed. It often happens when you get the flu or a cold.

Bronchitis pain can also make your sternum hurt as you breathe in and out. It can last only briefly (acute bronchitis) or become a long-term condition (chronic bronchitis) due to smoking or infections.

Common bronchitis symptoms include:

  • persistent wet cough that causes you to spit up mucus
  • wheezing
  • difficulty breathing
  • pain or discomfort in your chest

Flu or cold symptoms that can go along with bronchitis include:

  • high fever
  • exhaustion
  • runny nose
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting

Check out: 7 home remedies for bronchitis »

Pneumonia

Pneumonia happens when your lungs get infected by a virus or bacteria.

Common symptoms of pneumonia include:

  • difficulty breathing
  • high fever
  • persistent cough

Other conditions that affect your gastrointestinal tract or your chest muscles can cause sternum pain.

Stomach ulcer

A stomach ulcer (peptic ulcer) happens when you get a sore on the lining of your stomach or at the bottom of your esophagus.

Symptoms of a stomach ulcer include:

  • stomach pain, especially on an empty stomach, that responds to antacids
  • feeling bloated
  • nausea
  • lack of appetite

Panic attack

A panic attack happens when you suddenly feel fear, as if something dangerous or threatening is happening, with no actual reason to be afraid. It’s often a result of stress or a symptom of mental health conditions, such as generalized anxiety disorder or depression.

Symptoms of a panic attack include:

  • feeling like something bad is about to happen
  • feeling dizzy or lightheaded
  • having trouble breathing or swallowing
  • sweating
  • feeling alternately hot and cold
  • stomach cramps
  • chest pain

Check out: 11 ways to stop a panic attack »

Sternum pain can sometimes be the result of a heart attack. This is much less likely if you’re under age 40 or are in overall good health. They’re more likely to happen if you’re over 40 and have an existing condition, such as heart disease.

A heart attack is life-threatening. You should go to the emergency room right away if you have any symptoms besides sternum pain that may indicate a heart attack, especially if they appear without any obvious cause or if you’ve had a heart attack before.

Symptoms of a heart attack include:

  • chest pain in the middle or left side of your chest
  • pain or discomfort in your upper body, including your arms, shoulder, and jaw
  • feeling dizzy or lightheaded
  • having trouble breathing
  • sweating
  • nausea

The more of these symptoms you have, the more likely that you’re having a heart attack.

See your doctor right away if you have heart attack symptoms or symptoms that cause you sharp, consistent pain that gets in the way of your daily life.

You should also see your doctor if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • sternum and general chest pain that has no obvious cause
  • sweating, dizziness, or nausea with no specific cause
  • trouble breathing
  • pain that spreads from your chest throughout your upper body
  • chest tightness

If you’re experiencing other symptoms and they last for more than a few days, talk to your doctor.

You can find a primary care doctor near you through the Healthline FindCare tool.

Your next steps depend on what condition might be causing your sternum pain and how severe the condition is.

You may just need to take over-the-counter pain medication or change your diet. But you may need long-term treatment if the underlying condition is more serious. In some cases, you may need surgery to treat a heart or gastrointestinal condition.

Once your doctor diagnoses the cause, they can develop a treatment plan that can help relieve the symptoms and causes of your sternum pain.

Chest pain – multidisciplinary clinic Miracle Doctor in Moscow

In order to understand how much pain is a danger to human life, people without proper education need to know the symptoms of serious diseases and be guided by how urgently they need to see a doctor. It should be understood that such pain symptoms in any case are a serious problem for human health. To fully understand and master the situation, you need to figure out what symptoms should immediately call an ambulance.

The causes may be a variety of symptoms of the disease, which may not be associated with heart disease. Also, pain can hide the causes of problems with the upper respiratory tract, problems with the gastrointestinal tract, spine and central nervous system. Pain behind the sternum may indicate an extremely dangerous disease, the consequence of which may be death, as well as a functional disorder in which an urgent call for an ambulance and hospitalization are not necessary.

Angina pectoris or heart attack

Pain in the chest is often associated with this particular disease. In medicine, a term appeared – a typical attack. The main symptomatology of the disease is pain in the left side of the chest, which presses on the left side. Can give into the hand along the entire length. The pain is so severe that it makes a person stop while walking, pressing his hand to his chest.

The accompanying picture is a panic state, increased pallor of the skin, outflow of blood from the extremities, as a result of which they are cold to the touch. Possible increased heart rate and high blood pressure.

Pain often occurs as a result of heavy physical exertion, in which the heart needs more oxygen. Excessive cooling or food in weak patients can also provoke angina pectoris.

Basically, the typical pain of manifestation lasts for 2-5 minutes, sometimes it lasts up to ten minutes, then the pain subsides. The first drug that can relieve pain is nitroglycerin.

When is an ambulance urgently needed?

Due to the fact that it is extremely difficult for a person without medical education to independently determine the cause of pain, a doctor should be called, no matter what. The following factors may be the reason for the threat to life:

  • Sudden sharp pain associated with shortness of breath, accompanied by a feeling of lack of oxygen. Also rapid pulse and darkening of the eyes.
  • Pain does not go away for more than ten minutes, even after taking nitroglycerin.
  • After the onset of pain, the person lost consciousness.

First aid before the arrival of medical workers

Due to the difficulty in self-diagnosis of pain, a number of actions aimed at relieving the syndrome are very limited, but, nevertheless, there are a number of actions through which you can help save the life of yourself and another person.

In order to relieve pain behind the sternum, you should act according to the following scheme:

  • Take a horizontal position of the body. The head should be on a slight elevation. This will allow oxygen to enter the lungs more easily. If a cough has begun, the head should be turned to the side – this indicates a violation in the respiratory tract.
  • Take nitroglycerin under the tongue and drink an aspirin tablet to thin the blood.
  • Call medical personnel.
  • If pain gets worse or does not go away, take an additional dose.
  • Open windows to let fresh air into the room.
  • Perform cardiac massage if the patient is unconscious and not breathing. If the person is breathing, give a sniff of ammonia.

A cardiologist recommends contacting medical professionals for any manifestations of pain or anxiety in the chest. Self-healing does not occur with pathological diseases. Consult a doctor to diagnose the body, after which appropriate treatment will be prescribed.

Author

Demidova Alla Sergeevna

therapist, cardiologist, gastroenterologist

Doctor of the highest category

Experience 36 years

+7 (495) 032-15-21

Chest pain

Chest pain can have a variety of causes. To begin with, it should be noted that we will analyze only the pain that is not related to the pathology of internal organs, primarily the heart (angina pectoris, heart attack) or acute diseases of the pleura and lungs (pleurisy, pneumonia), as well as large vessels (aortic aneurysm, thromboembolism pulmonary artery). These diseases are acute life-threatening conditions and they are dealt with by specialists of the appropriate profile. We are approached by patients with chest pain of a long-term chronic nature, and they have already been examined by most specialists (cardiologists, internists, neurologists, vascular surgeons), but no pathology has been identified.

Divide chest pain into:

1. Pain along the anterior surface of the chest wall

2. Lateral pain

3. Pain on the posterior surface, usually between the shoulder blades

4. Girdle pain

5. Cancer pain (lung cancer, rib metastases)

I. Pain along the anterior surface of the chest along the sternum, especially on the left side, can mimic acute cardiac pathology or dissecting aortic aneurysm, while there are no changes on the ECG and analyzes also do not show an acute violation of the coronary circulation. If the patient has had previous heart surgery, then as a rule, pain in the sternum is due to damage to the costosternal joints or the sternum itself after sternotomy.

In addition, pain in the costosternal joints can be caused by arthrosis, intercostal neuralgia with radiating pain in the sternum also causes similar pain.

Costochondritis is a condition defined as a painful chronic inflammation of the costochondral junctions of the ribs or chondrosternal joints of the anterior chest wall. This is a clinical diagnosis that does not require special diagnostic studies in the absence of concomitant cardiopulmonary symptoms or risk factors. Costochondritis is often confused with Tietze’s syndrome. The difference is that the affected joints show swelling, swelling under the breastbone, and/or redness of the skin over the painful area.

On palpation, pain is reproduced in the affected areas of the cartilage, which can spread into the chest wall.

Tietze’s syndrome is an inflammatory process that causes visible enlargement of the costochondral junction. This condition causes severe pain when coughing and breathing deeply. Tietze’s syndrome is not life-threatening or contagious, but it is persistent and painful. Costochondritis and Tietze’s syndrome are often mistaken for each other, but are two completely different conditions.

The chest wall consists of the sternum in front, the spine (12 thoracic vertebrae) behind, limited by 12 paired ribs and costal cartilages. The ribs are made up of bone and cartilage, with the cartilage serving as an elastic bridge between the bony part of the rib and the sternum. There are three types of ribs: The first seven pairs of ribs are called “true ribs” because they are directly attached to the sternum. The eight to tenth pair of ribs are called “false ribs” because they are not attached to the sternum, but are attached to each other. Finally, the eleventh and twelfth are called “floating ribs” because they are only attached to the back of the vertebrae. Each rib is attached to the back of the spine: rib 1 is attached to vertebrae 1, rib 2 is attached to vertebrae 2, and so on.

Anteriorly, the costal cartilage of the first rib is connected to the manubrium (handle of the sternum) by a rigid bone-cartilage fusion. The next seven pairs of ribs articulate with the sternum through cartilage at the synovial joints. Ribs eight through ten are attached anteriorly to the cartilaginous portion of the rib below them. The bottom two ribs do not connect to any structure in front.

Ribs move with breathing or movement of the upper limbs. The intercostal nerves provide innervation to the chest wall.

In the clinic “ANESTA” blockades of the rib-sternal joints with the introduction of steroids are performed. With insufficient efficiency, ablation of the anterior branches of the intercostal nerves innervating this zone is performed.

.

II. Pain on the side of the chest

The most common cause of pain on the lateral surface of the chest is intercostal neuralgia associated with nerve damage to the herpes virus (shingles). Such pain can also have a girdle character in the form of periodic lumbago along the intercostal nerves. At the same time, in the affected area and scars after a herpes infection, the patient feels a constant burning sensation and bursting pain.

Postherpetic neuralgia of the intercostal nerves is very difficult to treat, especially if the case is neglected and the patient applied 6 months after the illness. In such cases, the ANESTA clinic, in addition to systemic therapy, performs ablation of the intercostal nerves, in case of ineffectiveness, ablation of the dorsal (sensitive) ganglia of the spinal roots, which form the corresponding nerve.

III. Pain in the back of the chest

Pain on the back surface (interscapular region). The most likely cause of the pain is damage to the facet joints of the thoracic spine, costotransverse joints, or neuralgia of the dorsal nerve of the scapula.

Spondylarthrosis – arthrosis of the facet joints (popular name – osteochondrosis)

Spondylarthrosis refers to the wear of the vertebral or facet joints, whose function is to stabilize the posterior column of the spine. In more than 90% of cases, facet arthrosis manifests itself secondarily and occurs as a result of degeneration and shrinkage of the intervertebral discs, which leads to a loss of the natural height of the disc. Thus, the facets are squeezed towards each other and gradually wear out. In about 10% of cases, facet arthrosis manifests itself primarily in adolescence (idiopathically) in the form of scoliosis or congenital lordosis of the sacral spine (hyperlordosis). Osteoarthritis of the facet joints can be accompanied by acute pain.

Regular physical therapy or injection of a steroid mixed with a local anesthetic into the joints often helps to relieve pain symptoms. If these methods of treatment did not lead to an improvement in your health, the ANESTA clinic also applies denervation (thermal ablation) of these joints, i.e. the nerve endings that innervate the facet joints are eliminated, which can significantly reduce pain symptoms.

Pain along the edge of the scapula, interscapular region, radiating to the shoulder girdle may be associated with neuralgia of the dorsal nerve of the scapula.