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What Helps You Feel Better When You Have Bronchitis?

Your bronchial tubes, which carry air to your lungs, can get infected and swollen. This is called bronchitis. When you’ve got it, you probably have a bad cough, lots of mucus, and maybe some general cold symptoms like body aches or chills.

In some cases, you might get medicine from your doctor. Since most bronchitis is caused by viruses that do not respond to antibiotics, your doctor may recommend over the counter medications to treat your symptoms. But more often you’ll just have to ride it out. As you do that, some good old-fashioned self-care can help you feel better.

How to Ease Your Symptoms

There are two types of bronchitis — “acute” and “chronic.” Acute bronchitis is more common and usually goes away on its own within a few weeks. Chronic bronchitis keeps coming back or doesn’t go away at all. It is almost always caused by smoking.

With either type, the best approach is to avoid things that irritate your lungs:

  • If you smoke, the most important thing you can do is stop. If you need help quitting, talk to your doctor about what might work best for you.
  • Avoid dust, chemical fumes, smoke from other people, and anything else that can bother your lungs. If you can’t avoid these things, try wearing a mask.
  • Wear a mask if cold air triggers your cough or makes you short of breath.
  • if you have seasonal allergies, take an antihistamine when your allergies are bad.

Steam is also helpful, since it can loosen up all that mucus. You also might want to:

  • Breathe in steam from a bowl of hot water.
  • Take a hot shower.
  • Use Vicks Vapor Rub on your chest
  • Use a humidifier (Make sure to clean it as directed so bacteria and fungi don’t grow inside it.).

Relief for Acute Bronchitis

You can start with these basic steps:

For your cough: It’s best to stay away from cough medicine unless your cough keeps you awake at night. Your cough helps clear that gunk out of your lungs. When it comes to kids, avoid cough medicine for those under 4 years old and check with your doctor about giving it to older children.

Instead of cough medicine, you can:

  • Take throat lozenges that don’t have medicine in them (Avoid these with young children as they could cause choking.).
  • Try a mixture of honey and lemon or a spoonful of honey (Don’t give honey to children under 1 year old).
  • if your cough is think and you are having trouble getting the phlegm out, try guaifenesin over the counter (it comes as a pill or liquid) to loosen it up.

Relief for Chronic Bronchitis

Chronicx bronchitis is long term inflammation of the bronchi and is common among smokers. In addition to quitting smoking, you can get relief by making some lifestyle changes, focus on your breathing, and do your best not to get colds or the flu. Some things to think about and do:

  • Diet: Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. You can also eat meats low in fat, chicken, fish, and low-fat or nonfat dairy.
  • Exercise: Along with a good diet, exercise will keep your weight in check. This is a big deal, because more weight makes it harder to breathe. Also, the muscles you use for breathing get stronger when you exercise. You can start with a slow, 15-minute walk three times a week, then do a little more at a time. Your doctor can help you come up with a plan that works for you.
  • Pursed-lip breathing: This can help slow down the fast breathing that sometimes comes with chronic bronchitis. First, take a deep breath in. Then, purse your lips like you’re about to kiss someone and breathe out slowly through your mouth. This type of breathing props your airways open and may make it easier for you to clear out thick mucus with a good cough.
  • Try to avoid colds and flu: Do your best to keep your distance from people who have a cold or the flu, and wash your hands often. Get an annual flu shot.

When Should I Call My Doctor?

Call your doctor if your cough:

  • Turns up mucus that’s yellow or green
  • Keeps you awake at night
  • Lasts more than 3 weeks
  • Produces blood

You’ll also want to call your doctor if you have a cough and:

  • A foul-tasting fluid in our mouth — this could be reflux
  • Fever over 100.4 F
  • Wheezing or shortness of breath

If you have chronic bronchitis, your cough will go on for months. It’s best to check in with your doctor regularly.

You may also have times where your symptoms get worse. If you have chronic bronchitis, you can still get acute bronchitis with worsening cough and mucus. You’ll want to see your doctor then, too, to see if you need an antibiotic.

Bronchitis: Diagnosis, Treatment, Antibiotics

If you recently had a cold that turned into a nagging cough, you might have acute bronchitis. (In medical terms, “acute” means conditions that come on quickly and last a short time).

Bronchitis happens when your bronchial tubes, which carry oxygen from your windpipe to your lungs, become inflamed. The lining of the tubes makes mucus, which makes your cough worse.

The condition can also cause wheezing and make it hard to catch your breath.

To know for sure whether your recent illness is acute bronchitis and not an allergy or other problem, you should see your doctor.

While many cases go away on their own, others require treatment. Learn more about how doctors diagnose and treat bronchitis:

How Do I Know Whether it’s Acute or Chronic?

First, it’s important to figure out a time line.

If you have a cough and breathing problems that have lasted for months or years, it might be chronic bronchitis. This is a long-term health problem that needs ongoing treatment.

Some people with very serious chronic bronchitis have it their entire lives. Others can successfully treat it. You’re more likely to get it if you smoke.

This usually requires a combination of medications and lifestyle changes. Important ways you can improve your lung health include:

But those steps are important if you think you have acute bronchitis, too.

To learn other ways to treat your cough, see your doctor to find out what’s causing it.

Diagnosis of Acute Bronchitis

When you see your doctor, be ready to talk about your symptoms in detail. You should be able to answer:

  • How long have you had your cough?
  • Are you coughing up mucus?
  • Is there blood in your sputum?
  • Did you ever have a fever or other symptoms, such as chest tightness?
  • Did you have a cold before the cough?
  • Are you wheezing?
  • Do you have trouble catching your breath?
  • Have you been around other people who have the same kinds of symptoms?

At the appointment, your doctor will go over your symptoms and give you a physical exam. They’ll listen to your chest while you cough. This may be enough to make a diagnosis. You may not need any tests. However, there are other times when you might need one or more.

Tests

Here are some of the tests your doctor might order:

  • Chest X-ray. If you have a fever or had one recently, this can help rule out or confirm pneumonia.
  • Sputum culture. If your symptoms are severe, your doctor might get a sample of the mucus you cough up (sputum). A lab test can tell whether the mucus is caused by an allergy or whooping cough (pertussis), which is a very contagious bacterial infection. Serious symptoms may also mean another test.
  • Spirometry. This is a test of your lung function. It measures how much air your lungs can hold and how quickly you can blow it all out. The test can help your doctor find out whether you have asthma or another breathing problem, along with your bronchitis.

Treatments

Don’t be surprised if your doctor simply recommends rest and lots of fluids. A bout of acute bronchitis will often fade away on its own. Letting your body rest and drinking plenty of fluids may help it disappear more quickly.

Other treatments may include:

  • A cough suppressant (but only if you’re not bringing up mucus anymore; if you are, it means you’re still clearing your airways and your doctor likely won’t advise you to take one)
  • Pain reliever
  • Sleeping near a humidifier or sitting in a steamy bathroom
  • Bronchodilators (inhaled medicines that help open your airways)

What About Antibiotics?

Antibiotics are powerful medicines that treat bacterial infections. But acute bronchitis is usually caused by a viral infection. Antibiotics don’t help with a virus.

If your doctor thinks the cause is bacteria, you might get a prescription for antibiotics.

If so, be sure to take the full prescription of antibiotics. Even if you feel better, the infection could still be in your system. You want to make sure you kill all the bacteria on the first try.

Other Medications

A bout of acute bronchitis can make breathing even tougher if you have other respiratory problems.

Allergies, asthma, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) all can narrow your airways. If you have one of these conditions along with bronchitis, you will probably need an inhaler and other treatments.

Be sure to tell your doctor all the medicines you are already taking to make sure no drugs will interact with each other.

At-Home Care

Even with treatment, your cough may last for a few more weeks. It should become milder and drier as the days go by. You may also feel tired for a while longer. Plan to get rest. Don’t expect to have a lot of energy right away.

If your cough doesn’t improve and you continue to feel sick, see your doctor again. It could be a bacterial infection after all. Or you might have other breathing problems that are keeping you from getting over your acute bronchitis.

Chronic Bronchitis Treatment | UCSF Health

The goal of therapy for chronic bronchitis is to relieve symptoms, prevent complications and slow the progression of the disease. Quitting smoking is also essential for patients with chronic bronchitis, since continuing to use tobacco will only further damage the lungs. Our Tobacco Education Center offers classes as well as individual consultations with doctors trained in treating tobacco addiction. We help smokers maximize the likelihood of success in their efforts to quit.

Treatment may include:

  • Bronchodilator Medications Inhaled as aerosol sprays or taken orally, bronchodilator medications may help to relieve symptoms of chronic bronchitis by relaxing and opening the air passages in the lungs.
  • Steroids Inhaled as an aerosol spray, steroids can help relieve symptoms of chronic bronchitis. Over time, however, inhaled steroids can cause side effects, such as weakened bones, high blood pressure, diabetes and cataracts. It is important to discuss these side effects with your doctor before using steroids.
  • Antibiotics Antibiotics may be used to help fight respiratory infections common in people with chronic bronchitis.
  • Vaccines Patients with chronic bronchitis should receive a flu shot annually and pneumonia shot every five to seven years to prevent infections.
  • Oxygen Therapy As a patient’s disease progresses, they may find it increasingly difficult to breathe on their own and may require supplemental oxygen. Oxygen comes in various forms and may be delivered with different devices, including those you can use at home.
  • Surgery Lung volume reduction surgery, during which small wedges of damaged lung tissue are removed, may be recommended for some patients with chronic bronchitis.
  • Pulmonary Rehabilitation An important part of chronic bronchitis treatment is pulmonary rehabilitation, which includes education, nutrition counseling, learning special breathing techniques, help with quitting smoking and starting an exercise regimen. Because people with chronic bronchitis are often physically limited, they may avoid any kind of physical activity. However, regular physical activity can actually improve a patient’s health and wellbeing.

Bronchitis | NHLBI, NIH

When you breathe in, air passes down your airways, called your bronchi and bronchioles, into the air sacs of your lungs. In chronic bronchitis, the lining of the brochioles becomes inflamed.This causes mucus to build up along the airways and makes the airways narrow (bronchoconstriction), which causes you to cough. Medical Animation Copyright © 2020 Nucleus Medical Media, All rights reserved.

Most people with acute bronchitis recover after a few days or weeks. Viral infections, such as the cold or flu, are usually the cause of acute bronchitis. Occasionally, acute bronchitis can be caused by a bacterial infection.

Chronic bronchitis is an ongoing cough that lasts for several months and comes back two or more years in a row. The cough is productive, meaning it brings up mucus. In chronic bronchitis, the lining of the airways is constantly inflamed. This causes the lining to swell and make more mucus, which can make it hard to breathe. Chronic bronchitis is often part of a serious condition called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Your risk for either type of bronchitis is higher if you smoke cigarettes or have asthma or allergies. Chronic bronchitis is most often caused by smoking cigarettes, but it can occur in non-smokers as well. Women who smoke may be more at risk than men. Those who are older, have been exposed to fumes or secondhand smoke, have a family history of lung disease, have a history of childhood respiratory diseases, or have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), are also at higher risk of getting chronic bronchitis.

The most common symptom of bronchitis is coughing associated with mucus production. Other symptoms include wheezing or shortness of breath, chest pain, or a low fever. To diagnose bronchitis, your doctor will do a physical exam and ask about your medical history and symptoms. The doctor may also order a blood test to look for signs of infection or a chest X-ray to see if your lungs and bronchial tubes look normal and rule out pneumonia.

Usually, acute bronchitis goes away on its own, without treatment. Sometimes over-the-counter medicines that loosen mucus or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as ibuprofen can help manage acute bronchitis. Taking a couple of teaspoons of honey or using a humidifier may also reduce the symptoms and help with comfort. Doctors typically prescribe antibiotics only if they find that you have a bacterial infection, which is more common in young children. To prevent acute bronchitis from recurring, your doctor may recommend that you get a seasonal flu vaccine, quit smoking, and avoid being around secondhand smoke.

The goal of treatment for chronic bronchitis is to help you breathe better and control your symptoms. Your doctor may recommend healthy lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking; taking medicines to help clear your airways or to prevent symptoms from getting worse; or, in some cases, getting oxygen therapy to help you breathe better. Pulmonary rehabilitation can teach you breathing techniques such as pursed-lip breathing and help you prevent symptoms from worsening.

Learn more about Acute Bronchitis and Chronic Bronchitis.

Bronchitis: Should I Take Antibiotics?

You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor’s recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them.

Bronchitis: Should I Take Antibiotics?

Get the facts

Your options

  • Take antibiotics for acute bronchitis.
  • Don’t take antibiotics. Try home treatment instead.

Key points to remember

  • Bronchitis is usually caused by a virus and often follows a cold or flu. Antibiotics usually do not help acute bronchitis, and they may be harmful.
  • Experts recommend that you not use antibiotics to try to relieve symptoms of acute bronchitis if you have no other health problems.
  • Most cases of acute bronchitis go away in 2 to 3 weeks, but some may last 4 weeks. Home treatment to relieve symptoms is usually all that you need.
  • Taking antibiotics too often or when you don’t need them can be harmful. Not taking the full course of antibiotics when your doctor prescribes them also can be harmful. The medicine may not work the next time you take it when you really do need it. This is called antibiotic resistance.
  • Antibiotics may help prevent complications from acute bronchitis in people who have other problems, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), other long-term breathing problems (such as asthma or cystic fibrosis), or heart failure.

FAQs

Acute bronchitis means that the tubes that carry air to the lungs (the bronchial tubes) are inflamed and irritated. When this happens, the tubes swell and produce mucus. This makes you cough.

Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by a virus. It’s more common during the winter months and often develops after an upper respiratory tract infection such as the flu or a cold. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) may be a cause, especially in adults older than 65.

Acute bronchitis can also be caused by exposure to smoke, chemicals, or air pollution, all of which can irritate the bronchial tubes. Or it may happen if you accidentally inhale food or vomit.

If you have no other health problems, acute bronchitis poses little risk.

Pneumonia is the most serious problem that can occur. It’s most likely to develop if you have a long-term (chronic) disease, such as:

  • COPD.
  • Asthma.
  • Cystic fibrosis.
  • Heart failure.

Treatment for people with these health problems depends on their condition.

If you don’t have any other health problems besides acute bronchitis, antibiotics won’t be very helpful.

Antibiotics can help shorten the length of time you have a cough, but they may cause side effects and contribute to antibiotic resistance.footnote 1

Most cases of acute bronchitis go away in 2 to 3 weeks, but some may last 4 weeks. Home treatment to relieve symptoms is usually all that you need. Here are some things you can try that may help you feel better:

  • Relieve your cough by drinking fluids, using cough drops, and avoiding things like smoke that can irritate your lungs.
  • Get enough rest so that your body has the energy it needs to fight the virus. You’ll feel better sooner if you rest more than usual while you have acute bronchitis.
  • Try over-the counter medicines such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or aspirin to relieve fever and body aches. Do not give aspirin to anyone younger than 20. It has been linked to Reye syndrome, a serious illness. Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label.

Your doctor may recommend that you take antibiotics for acute bronchitis if:

  • You are at risk for pneumonia.
  • Your condition hasn’t gotten better in 14 to 21 days.
  • You have COPD, asthma, cystic fibrosis, or heart failure.

Compare your options

Compare Option 1Take antibiotics for acute bronchitisDon’t take antibiotics

Compare Option 2Take antibiotics for acute bronchitisDon’t take antibiotics

What is usually involved?

What are the benefits?

What are the risks and side effects?

Take antibiotics for acute bronchitis Take antibiotics for acute bronchitis

  • You take the antibiotic medicine as prescribed by your doctor. Don’t stop taking it just because you feel better. You’ll need to take the full course of antibiotics.
  • Antibiotics may shorten the length of time you have a cough by about a day.
  • Antibiotics may be helpful to treat acute bronchitis if you also have other health problems, such as:
    • COPD.
    • Other long-term breathing problems such as asthma or cystic fibrosis.
    • Heart failure.
  • Antibiotics don’t help a night cough or a cough with mucus. And they don’t improve your quality of life.
  • Taking antibiotics too often or when you don’t need them can be harmful. The antibiotic may not work the next time you take it when you really do need it.
  • Side effects from antibiotics include:
    • Diarrhea.
    • Nausea, upset stomach, or vomiting.
    • Mouth sores.
    • Skin rash.
    • Dizziness.
    • Headache.
    • Increased sensitivity to sun.
    • Vaginal yeast infection.

Don’t take antibiotics Don’t take antibiotics

  • You try home treatment to relieve your cough, such as drinking fluids and using cough drops.
  • You take over-the-counter medicines to relieve fever and body aches.
  • You may reduce your cough with home treatment.
  • You avoid the cost and side effects of antibiotics.
  • You avoid promoting antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
  • If you have acute bronchitis but no other health problems, choosing not to take antibiotics poses no risk.
  • If you have acute bronchitis and other health problems such as COPD, asthma, or heart failure, your risk of getting pneumonia is higher if you don’t take antibiotics.

I was diagnosed with acute bronchitis after having the flu. Although I know people who have used antibiotics for this condition, my doctor told me that antibiotics would not be effective for acute bronchitis caused by a viral infection. She suggested I take cough medicine for my cough if necessary. This made sense to me.

I have asthma. When I was diagnosed with acute bronchitis, my doctor felt that because of the asthma, and my age, that I was at risk for pneumonia. He suggested a course of antibiotics, and I agreed.

When I was diagnosed with acute bronchitis, I thought I’d get some antibiotics and that would be the end of it. My doctor explained that this might shorten my cough by a day but really would do no more. One day is not worth the hassle and cost of antibiotics, so I just used cough medicine.

I guess acute bronchitis usually goes away in a couple of weeks, so my doctor suggested I treat my symptoms at home. But it’s been about a month and I’m still coughing and feeling bad. We are going to try some antibiotics.

What matters most to you?

Your personal feelings are just as important as the medical facts. Think about what matters most to you in this decision, and show how you feel about the following statements.

Reasons to take antibiotics

Reasons not to take antibiotics

I’m worried that I might be sick with something other than acute bronchitis.

I just have acute bronchitis.

More important

Equally important

More important

My cough is pretty bad, and I think antibiotics could help me relieve it.

I want to try home treatment to relieve my cough.

More important

Equally important

More important

I’m not worried about the side effects of antibiotics.

I don’t want to deal with the side effects of antibiotics.

More important

Equally important

More important

I’m willing to take the risk that antibiotics won’t work the next time I really need them.

I don’t want to take antibiotics if I don’t really need them.

More important

Equally important

More important

My other important reasons:

My other important reasons:

More important

Equally important

More important

Where are you leaning now?

Now that you’ve thought about the facts and your feelings, you may have a general idea of where you stand on this decision. Show which way you are leaning right now.

Taking antibiotics

NOT taking antibiotics

Leaning toward

Undecided

Leaning toward

What else do you need to make your decision?

1.1, Will antibiotics help you feel better faster when you have acute bronchitis? 2.2, Can home treatment relieve most symptoms of acute bronchitis? 3.3, Is there anyone who can benefit from taking antibiotics for acute bronchitis? 4.4, Can you take antibiotics as often as you feel you need to and still have them work every time? 1.1,Do you understand the options available to you?2.2,Are you clear about which benefits and side effects matter most to you?3.3,Do you have enough support and advice from others to make a choice?

1.
How sure do you feel right now about your decision?

Not sure at all

Somewhat sure

Very sure

2.2, Check what you need to do before you make this decision.

Use the following space to list questions, concerns, and next steps.

Your Summary

Here’s a record of your answers. You can use it to talk with your doctor or loved ones about your decision.

Next steps

Which way you’re leaning

How sure you are

Your comments

Key concepts that you understood

Key concepts that may need review

Credits

Author Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer E. Gregory Thompson MD – Internal Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Adam Husney MD – Family Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Robert L. Cowie MB, FCP(SA), MD, MSc, MFOM – Pulmonology

References

Citations

  1. Wark P (2015). Bronchitis (acute). BMJ Clinical Evidence. http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com/x/systematic-review/1508/overview.html. Accessed April 14, 2016.

You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor’s recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them.

Bronchitis: Should I Take Antibiotics?

Here’s a record of your answers. You can use it to talk with your doctor or loved ones about your decision.

  1. Get the facts
  2. Compare your options
  3. What matters most to you?
  4. Where are you leaning now?
  5. What else do you need to make your decision?

1. Get the Facts

Your options

  • Take antibiotics for acute bronchitis.
  • Don’t take antibiotics. Try home treatment instead.

Key points to remember

  • Bronchitis is usually caused by a virus and often follows a cold or flu. Antibiotics usually do not help acute bronchitis, and they may be harmful.
  • Experts recommend that you not use antibiotics to try to relieve symptoms of acute bronchitis if you have no other health problems.
  • Most cases of acute bronchitis go away in 2 to 3 weeks, but some may last 4 weeks. Home treatment to relieve symptoms is usually all that you need.
  • Taking antibiotics too often or when you don’t need them can be harmful. Not taking the full course of antibiotics when your doctor prescribes them also can be harmful. The medicine may not work the next time you take it when you really do need it. This is called antibiotic resistance.
  • Antibiotics may help prevent complications from acute bronchitis in people who have other problems, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), other long-term breathing problems (such as asthma or cystic fibrosis), or heart failure.

FAQs

What is acute bronchitis?

Acute bronchitis means that the tubes that carry air to the lungs (the bronchial tubes) are inflamed and irritated. When this happens, the tubes swell and produce mucus. This makes you cough.

What causes acute bronchitis?

Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by a virus. It’s more common during the winter months and often develops after an upper respiratory tract infection such as the flu or a cold. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) may be a cause, especially in adults older than 65.

Acute bronchitis can also be caused by exposure to smoke, chemicals, or air pollution, all of which can irritate the bronchial tubes. Or it may happen if you accidentally inhale food or vomit.

What are the risks of acute bronchitis?

If you have no other health problems, acute bronchitis poses little risk.

Pneumonia is the most serious problem that can occur. It’s most likely to develop if you have a long-term (chronic) disease, such as:

  • COPD.
  • Asthma.
  • Cystic fibrosis.
  • Heart failure.

Treatment for people with these health problems depends on their condition.

How well do antibiotics work to treat acute bronchitis?

If you don’t have any other health problems besides acute bronchitis, antibiotics won’t be very helpful.

Antibiotics can help shorten the length of time you have a cough, but they may cause side effects and contribute to antibiotic resistance.1

How can you treat acute bronchitis without antibiotics?

Most cases of acute bronchitis go away in 2 to 3 weeks, but some may last 4 weeks. Home treatment to relieve symptoms is usually all that you need. Here are some things you can try that may help you feel better:

  • Relieve your cough by drinking fluids, using cough drops, and avoiding things like smoke that can irritate your lungs.
  • Get enough rest so that your body has the energy it needs to fight the virus. You’ll feel better sooner if you rest more than usual while you have acute bronchitis.
  • Try over-the counter medicines such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or aspirin to relieve fever and body aches. Do not give aspirin to anyone younger than 20. It has been linked to Reye syndrome, a serious illness. Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label.

Why might your doctor recommend taking antibiotics?

Your doctor may recommend that you take antibiotics for acute bronchitis if:

  • You are at risk for pneumonia.
  • Your condition hasn’t gotten better in 14 to 21 days.
  • You have COPD, asthma, cystic fibrosis, or heart failure.

2. Compare your options

  Take antibiotics for acute bronchitis Don’t take antibiotics
What is usually involved?
  • You take the antibiotic medicine as prescribed by your doctor. Don’t stop taking it just because you feel better. You’ll need to take the full course of antibiotics.
  • You try home treatment to relieve your cough, such as drinking fluids and using cough drops.
  • You take over-the-counter medicines to relieve fever and body aches.
What are the benefits?
  • Antibiotics may shorten the length of time you have a cough by about a day.
  • Antibiotics may be helpful to treat acute bronchitis if you also have other health problems, such as:
    • COPD.
    • Other long-term breathing problems such as asthma or cystic fibrosis.
    • Heart failure.
  • You may reduce your cough with home treatment.
  • You avoid the cost and side effects of antibiotics.
  • You avoid promoting antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
What are the risks and side effects?
  • Antibiotics don’t help a night cough or a cough with mucus. And they don’t improve your quality of life.
  • Taking antibiotics too often or when you don’t need them can be harmful. The antibiotic may not work the next time you take it when you really do need it.
  • Side effects from antibiotics include:
    • Diarrhea.
    • Nausea, upset stomach, or vomiting.
    • Mouth sores.
    • Skin rash.
    • Dizziness.
    • Headache.
    • Increased sensitivity to sun.
    • Vaginal yeast infection.
  • If you have acute bronchitis but no other health problems, choosing not to take antibiotics poses no risk.
  • If you have acute bronchitis and other health problems such as COPD, asthma, or heart failure, your risk of getting pneumonia is higher if you don’t take antibiotics.

Personal stories

Personal stories about taking antibiotics for acute bronchitis

These stories are based on information gathered from health professionals and consumers. They may be helpful as you make important health decisions.

“I was diagnosed with acute bronchitis after having the flu. Although I know people who have used antibiotics for this condition, my doctor told me that antibiotics would not be effective for acute bronchitis caused by a viral infection. She suggested I take cough medicine for my cough if necessary. This made sense to me.”

“I have asthma. When I was diagnosed with acute bronchitis, my doctor felt that because of the asthma, and my age, that I was at risk for pneumonia. He suggested a course of antibiotics, and I agreed.”

“When I was diagnosed with acute bronchitis, I thought I’d get some antibiotics and that would be the end of it. My doctor explained that this might shorten my cough by a day but really would do no more. One day is not worth the hassle and cost of antibiotics, so I just used cough medicine.”

“I guess acute bronchitis usually goes away in a couple of weeks, so my doctor suggested I treat my symptoms at home. But it’s been about a month and I’m still coughing and feeling bad. We are going to try some antibiotics.”

3. What matters most to you?

Your personal feelings are just as important as the medical facts. Think about what matters most to you in this decision, and show how you feel about the following statements.

Reasons to take antibiotics

Reasons not to take antibiotics

I’m worried that I might be sick with something other than acute bronchitis.

I just have acute bronchitis.

More important

Equally important

More important

My cough is pretty bad, and I think antibiotics could help me relieve it.

I want to try home treatment to relieve my cough.

More important

Equally important

More important

I’m not worried about the side effects of antibiotics.

I don’t want to deal with the side effects of antibiotics.

More important

Equally important

More important

I’m willing to take the risk that antibiotics won’t work the next time I really need them.

I don’t want to take antibiotics if I don’t really need them.

More important

Equally important

More important

My other important reasons:

My other important reasons:

More important

Equally important

More important

4. Where are you leaning now?

Now that you’ve thought about the facts and your feelings, you may have a general idea of where you stand on this decision. Show which way you are leaning right now.

Taking antibiotics

NOT taking antibiotics

Leaning toward

Undecided

Leaning toward

5. What else do you need to make your decision?

Check the facts

1.
Will antibiotics help you feel better faster when you have acute bronchitis?

You’re right. Antibiotics kill bacteria or slow or stop their growth. But since acute bronchitis is most often caused by a virus and not by bacteria, antibiotics don’t work very well to treat it.

2.
Can home treatment relieve most symptoms of acute bronchitis?

You’re right. Most cases of acute bronchitis go away in 2 to 3 weeks. Home treatment to relieve symptoms is usually all that you need.

3.
Is there anyone who can benefit from taking antibiotics for acute bronchitis?

You’re right. Antibiotics may help people who have acute bronchitis and other health problems, such as COPD or asthma.

4.
Can you take antibiotics as often as you feel you need to and still have them work every time?

You’re right. Taking antibiotics too often or when you don’t really need them can be harmful. The medicine may not work the next time when you really do need it.

Decide what’s next

1.
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Credits

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer E. Gregory Thompson MD – Internal Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Adam Husney MD – Family Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Robert L. Cowie MB, FCP(SA), MD, MSc, MFOM – Pulmonology

References

Citations

  1. Wark P (2015). Bronchitis (acute). BMJ Clinical Evidence. http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com/x/systematic-review/1508/overview.html. Accessed April 14, 2016.

Note: The “printer friendly” document will not contain all the information available in the online document some Information (e.g. cross-references to other topics, definitions or medical illustrations) is only available in the online version.

Current as of: October 26, 2020

Author:
Healthwise Staff

Medical Review:E. Gregory Thompson MD – Internal Medicine & Adam Husney MD – Family Medicine & Robert L. Cowie MB, FCP(SA), MD, MSc, MFOM – Pulmonology

Wark P (2015). Bronchitis (acute). BMJ Clinical Evidence. http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com/x/systematic-review/1508/overview.html. Accessed April 14, 2016.

Bronchitis – Managing Side Effects


Chemocare.com

Care During Chemotherapy and Beyond


What is bronchitis?

  • Bronchitis is a condition where there is swelling and irritation in your air passages
    (called the bronchi). You may have:
  • Acute Bronchitis: When the bronchitis is at its’ worst, and is
    happening now or
  • Chronic Bronchitis: When the bronchitis has been occurring for
    a long time.
  • People with acute bronchitis usually have a cough with sputum (secretions or phlegm),
    and sometimes have pain when they take a deep breath.
  • You may develop acute bronchitis from:
    • Smoking cigarettes
    • Environmental irritants, such as pollution, chemicals and hair spray
    • If you are elderly, or have an altered immune system from chemotherapy, long-term
      steroid use, or have chronic diseases
  • Acute bronchitis may be from bacteria, but is more commonly due to a virus. Even
    though you may have greenish-or yellowish sputum, bronchitis is usually an inflammation
    of your air passages, and there may be no bacteria present.
  • You may be treated with antibiotics if there are bacteria present in a sputum sample,
    or if your healthcare provider is concerned that bacteria has caused an infection.
  • If your bronchitis is due to a virus, your symptoms may take 2 or more weeks to
    resolve, but antibiotics won’t help. Treatment of a virus includes cough medications,
    drinking lots of fluids, and avoiding irritants.
  • Chronic bronchitis may have been caused by long-term exposure to smoking cigarettes,
    air pollution, or other irritants. People with chronic bronchitis have trouble breathing
    because thick mucus may clog their air passages. They will also have inflammation
    in their air passages, with similar symptoms.
  • Chronic bronchitis is diagnosed based on symptoms of a productive cough, on most
    mornings, for 3 or more months, for 2 years in a row.
  • Because this is a long-term disease, those with chronic bronchitis may go through
    periods when they feel well, and then go through periods when they feel ill.
  • Severe outbreaks of cough, shortness of breath and congestion (called exacerbations),
    may last for 3 months at a time, and occur a few times a year. As the disease progresses,
    the periods when you will be less short of breath will lessen.

Symptoms:

  • You may notice that you are wheezing, or have shortness of breath with both types
    of bronchitis.
  • You may have fever, chills, or a headache if you have an acute bronchitis.
  • You may have pain in your muscles, or pain in your lungs when you take a deep breath
    with both types of bronchitis, especially if you are coughing really hard, for long
    periods of time.
  • You may be overly tired, or very weak (fatigued). It may be hard for you to do any
    kind of your normal activities with both types of bronchitis.
  • You may have sudden onset of coughing spells, or a long-term (chronic) cough.
    You may or may not be able to bring up any secretions (sputum), or you may bring
    up greenish-yellow sputum. People with chronic bronchitis tend to bring up a lot
    of sputum early on in the morning.
  • You may experience shortness of breath, either at rest or while performing any type
    of activity. This may include walking to the door, or climbing stairs.
  • You may have trouble lying flat in bed, and you may have to sleep on 2 or more pillows.
    Your shortness of breath may cause you to wake up in the middle of the night.

Things You Can Do:

  • Make sure you tell your doctor, as well as all healthcare providers, about any other
    medications you are taking (including over-the-counter, vitamins, or herbal remedies).
  • Remind your doctor or healthcare provider if you have a history of diabetes, liver,
    kidney, or heart disease. If you have a family history of heart disease, stroke,
    high blood cholesterol, or high blood pressure, in a first or second-degree relative,
    you may be at risk for certain problems. Notify your healthcare provider if you
    have any of these diseases in your family.
  • If you are still smoking, you should quit. If you do not smoke, avoid smoke-filled
    rooms. Smoking first or second-hand can further damage lung tissue. Discuss with
    your healthcare provider techniques that can help you quit.
  • Avoid people who are sick. Wash your hands often, with soap and water, for at least
    15 seconds at a time. Use tissues when you sneeze or cough.
  • Do not share eating or drinking utensils with anyone.
  • If you are over the age of 65 years, or have an altered immune system due to chemotherapy,
    chronic disease or steroid use, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends
    that you receive a flu vaccine every year, and a pneumonia vaccine every 5 years.
    Discuss this with your healthcare provider if this is right for you.
  • People with lung problems need to circulate air from the bottom of their lungs and
    out of your lungs (oxygenation), to prevent infection and pneumonia. Using an incentive
    spirometer for 15 minutes a day, twice a day, can help promote oxygenation.
  • Controlling secretions through coughing and deep breathing will help you to breathe
    easier. Remember, if you are dehydrated, your secretions will be thicker, and harder
    to bring up. Make sure to drink 2 to 3 liters of fluids (non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated)
    per day, to remain well hydrated.
  • Taking warm showers or baths, and using a vaporizer, may help to thin out your secretions.
  • Try to exercise, as tolerated, to promote air exchange (oxygenation), and to maintain
    your optimal level of functioning. Walking, swimming, or light aerobic activity
    may also help you to lose weight, and feel better. Make sure to exercise, under
    the supervision of your healthcare provider, and discuss with your healthcare provider
    how you can create a specific exercise program to suit your needs.
  • Try to avoid “environmental allergens” (such as smoke, pollution, and common causes
    of seasonal allergies), as well as things that may cause allergies in your home
    (hair sprays, mold, dust mites, and pets). These may trigger an episode of shortness
    of breath, and make your symptoms worse.
  • Keep a diary of your any abnormal symptoms, such as excessive fatigue, shortness
    of breath or chest pain, if these are occurring regularly. Write down the foods
    that you have eaten, the exercise or activity you were undergoing when the symptoms
    occurred, and how you felt before they occurred. This diary may be valuable in identifying
    certain “triggers” of your symptoms.
  • Questions to ask yourself, may include:
    • Did my symptoms occur gradually, or did this episode come on all of a sudden? Was
      I feeling anxious? Did I perform any kind of activity, or was I resting?
    • Did I eat any different kinds of foods? Was I around any pets? Did I travel recently?
      Did I do anything differently than I normally do?
  • With severe breathing problems, sleeping at night with your head of the bed elevated
    may make it easier to breathe. You may do this by sleeping on 2 or 3 extra pillows.
    This will help lung expansion (spreading out), as well as promote the drainage of
    secretions.
  • Use relaxation techniques to decrease the amount of anxiety you have. If you feel
    anxious, place yourself in a quiet environment, and close your eyes. Take slow,
    steady, deep breaths, and try to concentrate on things that have relaxed you in
    the past.
  • You should restrict the amount of alcohol you take in, or avoid it all together.
    Alcohol may adversely interact with many medications.
  • If you are ordered a medication to treat this disorder, do not stop taking any medication
    unless your healthcare provider tells you to. Take the medication exactly as directed.
    Do not share your pills with anyone.
  • If you miss a dose of your medication, discuss with your healthcare provider what
    you should do.
  • If you experience symptoms or side effects, especially if severe, be sure to discuss
    them with your health care team. They can prescribe medications and/or offer
    other suggestions that are effective in managing such problems.
  • Keep all your appointments for your treatments.

Medications for Treatment of Bronchitis:

  • Depending on your lung function, and your overall health status, your doctor may
    recommend that certain drugs be used to help your lungs function more effectively,
    and decrease symptoms. Some of the common drugs that are used to treat lung
    problems may include:

    • Antibiotics – If your doctor or healthcare provider suspects that
      you have a lung infection, he or she may order antibiotic pills or intravenous (IV).
      Commonly prescribed antibiotics for lung infections include azithromycin (Zithromax®), and levofloxacin (Levaquin®).
      If you are prescribed antibiotics, take the full prescription. Do not stop taking
      pills once you feel better
    • Anticholinergic agents – these drugs are given to persons with
      chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD). Anticholinergic
      agents work in a complex manner by relaxing the lung muscles, which will help you
      to breathe easier. A commonly prescribed drug is ipatropium bromide (Atrovent®).
    • Bronchodilators – These drugs work by opening (or dilating) the
      lung passages, and offering relief of symptoms, including shortness of breath. These
      drugs, typically given by inhalation (aerosol), but are also available in pill form.
    • Beta-adrenergic receptor agonists (Beta-agonists) – Beta-agonists
      can be considered bronchodilators, as these drugs relax airway smooth muscle, and
      block the release of substances that cause bronchoconstriction, or narrowing of
      your lungs, if you are having a lung “spasm.” Drugs such as albuterol (Proventil®), or terbutaline (Brethine®),
      are commonly used.
    • Corticosteroids: Steroids work by decreasing inflammation and swelling,
      which may be present with certain lung disorders. People may benefit from steroids,
      either inhaled, by pill form, or in the vein (IV).
    • Beclomethasone (Beclovent®), an
      inhaled steroid, is useful in the treatment of chronic asthma and bronchitis.
      Inhaled steroids act directly on the lung tissue, so there are fewer long-term side
      effects, compared with a pill or IV form.
    • People who have an outbreak of severe shortness of breath and airway inflammation
      may be ordered a steroid pill, such as prednisone, for a short period of time. This
      is usually given with inhaled steroids.
    • Patients with severe asthma or bronchitis may require IV administration of another
      steroid, methylprednisolone (Solumedrol®).
    • Cough Medications/Decongestants – may help you to be more comfortable
      if you are coughing a lot. Guaifenesin is an active ingredient in many cough medications,
      may be given alone, but is often combined with other drugs, such as codeine, to
      help your cough. Guaifenesin may also be combined with pseudoephedrine (Sudafed®) as a decongestant, or any one of many medications,
      depending on your symptoms. Another common medication you may receive is Hydrocodone
      Bitartrate-Homatropine Methylbromide (Hycodan®).
      This is a narcotic antitussive (anti-cough medication), which will help relieve
      your cough.
    • Diuretics – may be known as “water pills” as they work to prevent
      or treat lung congestion by making you urinate out extra fluid. Some examples of
      this medication may include furosemide (Lasix®),
      and Hydrochlorthiazide. You may receive this medication alone or in combination
      with other medications.
    • Narcotics – Such as Morphine Sulfate may be useful, in certain
      cases of shortness of breath, to relieve your body’s need to breathe. Morphine is
      called an Opiate. Opiates tell your breathing center in your main brain stem not
      to breathe so hard. This might make you more comfortable. If you are taking morphine,
      though, make sure you discuss with your healthcare provider common side effects,
      such as constipation, drowsiness, nausea and vomiting, and how to control these
      side effects.
    • Oxygen therapy – If you are experiencing shortness of breath at
      rest, or on exertion, your healthcare provider may see if oxygen therapy is right
      for you. This will help reduce your work breathing. You may take oxygen when your
      symptoms are at their worst. For example, some people are only on oxygen at nighttime,
      and not during the day. Some take oxygen when they are performing activities, but
      not all the time.
  • Your healthcare provider will discuss with you which treatments are helpful to you.
  • Do not stop any medications abruptly, as serious side effects may occur

When to Call Your Doctor or Health Care Provider:

  • Fever of 100.5° F (38° C), chills, sore throat (possible signs of infection if you
    are receiving chemotherapy).
  • If you cough up blood
  • Shortness of breath, chest pain or discomfort; swelling of your lips or throat should
    be evaluated immediately
  • Feeling your heart beat rapidly, or experience palpitations
  • Any new rashes on your skin
  • Any unusual swelling in your feet and legs
  • Weight gain of greater than 3 to 5 pounds in 1 week.
  • If your symptoms worsen or do not improve in 3 days of therapy


Note: We strongly encourage you to talk with your health
care professional about your specific medical condition and treatments. The information
contained in this website is meant to be helpful and educational, but is not a substitute
for medical advice.

Chemocare.com is designed to provide the latest information about chemotherapy to patients and their families, caregivers and friends. For information about the 4th Angel Mentoring Program visit www.4thangel.org

Best Medicine for Bronchitis?

Wake Forest Bronchitis is an infection, usually caused by a viral upper respiratory infection, that causes irritation and inflammation to the linings of the bronchial tubes.  Bronchitis can be either acute (temporary) or chronic (long-term) and typically includes a persistent, mucus-producing cough.  The best medicine for treating bronchitis primarily depends on whether the infection is acute or chronic in nature.  To better understand the treatment options available to patients, we will investigate the best medicines for both acute and chronic bronchitis.

Acute Bronchitis Medicines

Acute bronchitis often corrects on its own so adequate rest and fluid intake are often all that is needed to help a patient recover.  In other cases, medication is needed to effectively manage symptoms and may include:

  • Cough suppressants (antitussives): Because these medications simply suppress the urge to cough, rather than treating the inflamed linings of the bronchi, cough suppressants are not commonly used to treat acute bronchitis when the patient is still producing mucus when coughing (a “wet” cough).  Should a cough persist and become dry, cough suppressants can be used for up to two weeks to treat the symptoms.  Common cough suppressants include dextromethorphan (available over the counter) and codeine (prescription).
  • Expectorants: These medicines make breathing easier by helping to loosen up mucus from the airways making it easier to cough up and clear.  One of the most common expectorants is guaifenesin which is available over the counter.
  • Pain relievers: Besides the persistent cough, other symptoms of acute bronchitis can include a mild fever, headaches, and body aches.  Taking pain relievers, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or aspirin, can help relieve these symptoms.
  • Antibiotics: Bronchitis is primarily viral in nature and as such, antibiotics are an ineffective treatment option.  In rare cases, bronchitis can be caused by a bacterial infection that may be treatable with antibiotics.  Antibiotic use should be thoroughly discussed with your medical provider as some have can have serious side effects.  Common antibiotics used to treat bronchitis include amoxicillin, azithromycin, doxycycline, and erythromycin.

Chronic Bronchitis Treatments

Because chronic bronchitis by definition is long-term or permanent, alleviating symptoms, slowing progression of the disease, and preventing complications are the primary treatment goals.  Often, a combination of treatments or therapies, including those associated with acute bronchitis, is required for chronic bronchitis.  Common medicines used to treat chronic bronchitis include:

  • Bronchodilators: Help patients breathe easier by relaxing and dilating (opening) the airways.  In addition to opening the airways, bronchodilators relieve bronchospasms, wheezing, and reduce chest tightness.  Available by prescription, these medications are typically inhaled.  Albuterol is one of the more common bronchodilators prescribed for treating bronchitis. It comes in the from of an inhaler.
  • Steroids: If chronic bronchitis symptoms are stable or slowly getting worse, inhaled steroids,  can be used to help minimize bronchial tube inflammation.  Should chronic bronchitis symptoms rapidly worsen, oral steroids such as prednisone may be beneficial. Similar to the use of antibiotics, there is ongoing research regarding the safety and efficacy of using steroids.  Some steroids can have potentially dangerous side effects and as such, should only be used under doctor supervision and recommendation.
  • Supplemental Oxygen: Chronic bronchitis can have long-term or permanent consequences for the lungs.  While not a medicine per se, chronic bronchitis patients may require supplemental oxygen as a result of the chronic long term damage in order to get adequate oxygen to the lungs. This should not be used without the supervision of a qualified medical professional.

More on Bronchitis : How Serious is Bronchitis?

Bronchitis: symptoms and treatment of chronic and acute bronchitis

Definition and risk factors

Bronchitis (obstructive bronchitis) is an inflammatory respiratory disease that affects the bronchi.

Edema of the bronchi and excessive amount of mucus in the airways against the background of the inflammatory process impede the flow of air to the lungs, which leads to difficulty breathing.

Depending on the etiology, there are:

  1. viral bronchitis
  2. bacterial bronchitis.

Also, this disease is classified depending on the duration and characteristics of the course of acute bronchitis and chronic bronchitis . The symptoms and treatment of these two forms of bronchitis have some differences.

Factors affecting the development of bronchitis

The main reasons why bronchitis can develop:

  • smoking
  • unfavorable climatic living conditions
  • harmful working conditions
  • frequent hypothermia
  • inhalation of toxic substances.

Particularly common smoker’s bronchitis . The symptoms of bronchitis caused by exposure to tobacco smoke are particularly difficult to treat.

Symptoms of bronchitis

Signs of bronchitis are similar to those of other respiratory diseases. An accurate diagnosis can only be made by a qualified doctor.

Symptoms of bronchitis in adults usually appear at the very beginning of the development of the disease.

A cough appears, the patient feels general weakness, rapid fatigability, fever, the temperature rises.All these are manifestations of general intoxication of the body caused by inflammation of the bronchi.

Symptoms of acute bronchitis

In addition to attacks of dry painful cough, acute bronchitis is accompanied by symptoms such as:

  • runny nose and nasal congestion
  • pain and sore throat
  • hoarse voice
  • chills
  • high body temperature
  • weakness
  • headache
  • sweating
  • soreness of the muscles of the limbs and back.

Symptoms of Chronic Bronchitis

Symptoms of Chronic Bronchitis in adults usually worsen during cold and wet seasons.

Chronic bronchitis has two main symptoms:

  • dry or more often wet cough
  • fatigue.

Diagnostics and treatment of bronchitis

Treatment of obstructive bronchitis in adults in the A-Media clinic is prescribed only after accurate confirmation of the diagnosis. To do this, you need to see a therapist, at which he will conduct an examination, find out the patient’s complaints and collect anamnesis, prescribe the necessary examination, and based on the results obtained, he will draw up a treatment plan and give all the necessary recommendations.

For the diagnosis of bronchitis, the doctor can send for the following types of research:

  • auscultation
  • blood test
  • chest x-ray
  • bronchoscopy
  • and other examination techniques.

How to treat bronchitis in adults, the specialist decides, based on the characteristics of the course of the disease.

Since chronic and acute bronchitis in adults have different symptoms, the treatment of these two forms of the disease is planned in different ways.

Treatment of acute bronchitis

When diagnosed with acute bronchitis, treatment includes:

  • Antiviral or antibacterial therapy
  • Taking drugs that suppress the cough reflex
  • Taking expectorants
  • Physiotherapy procedures.

Treatment of chronic bronchitis

When diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, treatment during periods of exacerbation is planned as follows:

  • taking drugs that eliminate bronchial inflammation
  • taking drugs that restore bronchial patency
  • antibacterial therapy
  • phytotherapy.

The advisability of taking a particular drug for bronchitis is determined by the doctor.

Especially careful should be treated bronchitis in pregnant women in order to avoid pathologies of fetal development.

Prevention of bronchitis

In order to avoid the development of acute bronchitis and exacerbation of chronic bronchitis, the following preventive measures are recommended: season

  • sports and gymnastics.
  • Contact a therapist of the A-Media clinic at the first signs of bronchitis, and our experienced specialist will help you quickly relieve unpleasant symptoms and prescribe a course of therapy aimed at eliminating the causes of the disease.

    Do not self-medicate for bronchitis! Improper treatment can seriously harm your health.

    Bronchitis: symptoms and treatment. Treatment of bronchitis in Ryazan

    The main factors contributing to the disease of bronchitis can be improperly treated colds, infection of the body with bacteria or viruses.Additional reasons are inhalation of dust, tobacco smoke, fumes of toxic chemicals, as well as an unhealthy lifestyle, negative habits, reduced immunity, constant overwork, chronic stress, taking certain medications and much more.

    A tendency to bronchitis can be caused by the characteristics of the structure of the respiratory system. For example, with narrow lumens in the bronchi, even a slight inflammation contributes to the formation and accumulation of phlegm, and this is an ideal environment for the development of harmful microorganisms.

    Varieties and symptoms of bronchitis

    There are several types of bronchitis. Each of them has its own symptoms. And depending on the specific type, the treatment of bronchitis is prescribed.

    Acute bronchitis usually occurs in autumn and winter. It has symptoms similar to colds:

    • lethargy, weakness, fatigue, decreased performance;
    • sore throat;
    • dry cough, which then “transforms” into a wet cough.The color of the mucus is transparent, with a tinge of yellowness, greenish;
    • in some cases – an increase in temperature up to 38-40 degrees;
    • increased sweating, chills;
    • when dried, pronounced wheezing is heard in the chest.

    In acute bronchitis, in case of a severe course of the disease, hemoptysis, discharge of pus, and difficulty in breathing may occur. The average duration of acute bronchitis is two weeks.

    Infections can also provoke bronchitis.In infectious bronchitis are observed:

    • dry cough that becomes wet after a while. With moderate bronchitis, the cough is strong, breathing is difficult;
    • weakness, high fatigue;
    • pain and discomfort in the chest area;
    • increase in body temperature;
    • when listening to the sternum, signs such as wheezing and breathing hardness are noticeable.

    Allergic bronchitis is also distinguished.They are diagnosed by the following criteria:

    • dry cough;
    • dry wheezing;
    • body temperature does not rise;
    • shortness of breath on inspiration;
    • no purulent sputum is released when coughing;
    • disappearance after elimination of the allergen.

    Such bronchitis occurs through direct contact with an allergen – plant pollen, perfume, wool, household chemicals or others.

    Disease with chemical bronchitis is also possible.It occurs when chemical elements that irritate the mucous membranes enter the respiratory system. Its most common features are:

    • severe painful cough;
    • headache;
    • chest pain;
    • shortness of breath until the development of symptoms of respiratory failure;
    • hard dry wheezing;
    • mucous membranes acquire a bluish tint.

    Chronic bronchitis is a disease that lasts several months.Moreover, it can be repeated annually, and each time the manifestation of signs is observed longer and longer. Chronic bronchitis develops with prolonged exposure to provoking factors on the body – tobacco smoke, toxic substances and others.

    Possible complications after the disease

    In case of improper treatment, transfer of illness on the legs, weakening of the immune system, the disease can give serious complications. These include pneumonia up to the septic process, obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchial asthma.The latter is most often manifested in patients prone to allergic reactions. Chronic bronchitis is also a result of refusal of treatment or inappropriate therapy. If a person leads a healthy lifestyle, and the treatment is selected correctly, health is fully restored in two to three weeks.

    How bronchitis is treated

    Treatment of bronchitis should be comprehensive. It is aimed at eliminating the infection that caused the disease, reducing the swelling of the mucous membranes, cleansing the lumen of the bronchi from accumulated mucus, and eliminating the symptoms of intoxication.The disease is treated with pharmaceuticals, physiotherapy, and auxiliary methods.

    For the treatment of bronchitis, the following funds are prescribed:

    • antibacterial or antiviral – depending on the nature of the disease;
    • non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which relieve not only inflammation, but also pain and fever;
    • mucolytic preparations that help dilute sputum;
    • Expectorants – increasing the secretion of mucus with a wet cough;
    • fortifying drugs.

    Treatment of all types of bronchitis also includes oxygen therapy, physiotherapeutic procedures (electrophoresis, UHF, magnetotherapy, paraffin applications and others), inhalations, irrigation of the mucous membranes of the throat and nose with special sprays.

    Patients who are careful about their health, treat bronchitis and auxiliary methods – therapeutic exercises, massages and others.

    Disease prevention

    The best prevention of all types of bronchitis is the elimination of all adverse factors that can cause the disease.You should lead a healthy lifestyle, give up smoking and other bad habits, establish a diet, and practice moderate physical activity. During epidemics of viral and infectious colds, it is necessary to follow the recommendations on the organization of preventive measures.

    Experienced specialists of the Medcom network of clinics will help you to defeat bronchitis at any stage of the disease.

    Acute bronchitis | Doctor MOM®

    Contents:
    Causes of acute bronchitis
    Forms of acute bronchitis
    Symptoms of bronchitis
    Sputum in bronchitis
    9029 Complications of bronchitis Bronchitis complications , which is characterized by an infectious inflammatory process in large, medium and small bronchi.

    CAUSES OF ACUTE BRONCHITIS:

    • Bacteria. These can be opportunistic microorganisms, for example, Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci, pneumococci. A common causative agent of acute bronchitis in children is Bordetella pertussis, a specific bacterial infection that causes whooping cough.

    • Viruses. These are the causative agents of respiratory syncytial infection, influenza, parainfluenza. Viral bronchitis proceeds with severe symptoms of intoxication.Often, on the 3-4th day of viral bronchitis, the bacterial flora joins, which worsens the course of the disease.

    • Fungi. Rarely are an independent causative agent of acute bronchitis. They are more often recorded in the form of a mixed infection with bacteria, as well as in patients with immunodeficiency states.

    Factors that increase the risk of bronchitis:

    • increased dustiness,
    • tobacco smoke,
    • hypothermia,
    • unbalanced diet,
    • stay in an air-conditioned room.

    FORMS OF ACUTE BRONCHITIS:

    • Simple. This is a disease in which catarrhal inflammation of the bronchi develops. This form of bronchitis is characterized by a moderate cough – unproductive or with sputum, which can be transparent or purulent.

    • Obstructive. This is a disease that has infectious and allergic causes and is often found in children, as well as in people with chronic respiratory diseases.The difference from simple bronchitis is the addition of an obstructive syndrome – bronchospasm. As a result, wheezing rales appear, and sputum discharge is difficult.

    • Bronchiolitis. This is a disease with a predominant lesion of the small bronchi. With bronchiolitis, a severe cough with wheezing often occurs, which is due to the development of obstruction. Bronchiolitis usually affects young children under 2 years old, which is associated with age-related “weakness” of the immune system and the penetration of the virus into the small bronchi.In the form of bronchiolitis, adenovirus infection, PM infection can occur.

    SYMPTOMS OF BRONCHITIS:

    • Cough. This is a typical symptom of bronchitis. The cough is usually strong, paroxysmal, and may have wheezing. This symptom is often worse at night.

    • Temperature rise. In case of bronchitis, the temperature can last for 1-2 weeks (in children, low-grade fever persists for up to a month or more). The absence of a decrease in temperature for a week or more is an alarming symptom.

    • Signs of intoxication. Intoxication in bronchitis manifests itself in the form of weakness, loss of appetite, drowsiness, tearfulness, headache and muscle pain.

    SPUTE WITH BRONCHITIS

    Sputum can be:

    • transparent,
    • purulent (yellowish, greenish, brown),
    • streaked with blood.

    The appearance of pus in the sputum is a sign of a bacterial infection. A small amount of blood in the sputum appears with an increase in the fragility of the vessels (for example, with influenza, whooping cough) or indicates complications of bronchitis.This symptom always requires a visit to a doctor to find out its causes. Low-productive cough with bronchitis is associated with poor evacuation of sputum from the bronchi. Pathogenic microorganisms actively multiply in the lower respiratory tract and intensify the manifestations of intoxication. If untreated, bronchitis can turn into pneumonia (pneumonia). Therefore, with an unproductive cough, it is necessary to use drugs with bronchodilator, mucolytic and expectorant effects. Such treatment helps to establish the excretion of phlegm from the bronchi, reduces the symptoms of intoxication.

    COMPLICATIONS OF BRONCHITIS

    • Pneumonia. Pneumonia is a problem that requires treatment in a hospital setting. Severe toxicity and a high risk of respiratory failure can pose a serious health threat.

    • Bronchial obstruction . This is a spasm of the bronchi that occurs in response to infection or as a cross-reaction when ingested food allergens. Symptoms of obstruction in bronchitis are often observed in children, as well as in patients with bronchial asthma.

    TREATMENT OF ACUTE BRONCHITIS

    • Creation of a comfortable microclimate. This is humidification and ventilation of the air, refusal to use air conditioners during illness. It is important to protect the sick person from exposure to tobacco smoke.

    • Inhalation . This method of treatment is aimed at stimulating the excretion of phlegm, expanding the bronchi, and making breathing easier. Inhalations have contraindications, so they are recommended only after consulting a doctor.

    • Physiotherapy and massage. Warming up and mustard plasters are used when the temperature drops, in the recovery stage, strictly on the recommendation of a doctor. Vibration massage relieves the condition due to mechanical stimulation of sputum excretion.

    • Elimination of allergens. It is necessary to carry out wet cleaning of the room especially carefully, and also to refuse interior items that can accumulate dust (decorative pillows, carpets).If a child is sick with bronchitis, it is recommended to adjust his diet in favor of low-allergenic foods. This will help avoid the influence of allergens and reduce the risk of obstructive syndrome.

    • Drug treatment. In case of acute bronchitis, preparations of the line Doctor MOM ®
      • Herbal lozenges for coughing Doctor MOM ® help to get rid of cough. Used for bronchitis, which is accompanied by dry cough. The herbal components of the lozenges have an expectorant, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic effect.The extract of licorice roots in the lozenges has an expectorant effect, which helps to stimulate the secretion of phlegm.
      • Syrup Doctor MOM ® . Used for difficult sputum discharge or dry cough. It can be used in children from 3 years of age and in adults. The syrup contains plant extracts that stimulate the bronchial tubes and thin phlegm, as well as increase its production. This allows you to improve the patient’s condition when coughing.
      • Ointment Doctor MOM ® Phyto. Used for acute respiratory infections, which are accompanied by muscle aches, nasal congestion, headache and other manifestations of intoxication. The ointment contains plant essential oils that facilitate breathing, have analgesic, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory effects. Doctor IOM ® PHYTO can be used to treat adults and children from 3 years old.

    Acute bronchitis is a serious illness that should be treated as soon as symptoms appear.This will help avoid prolonged coughing and complications. Preparations of the line Doctor MOM ® helps to cope with cough in case of bronchitis and other “colds” diseases. Herbal components in specially selected dosages have a multidirectional therapeutic effect, improve sputum discharge and make it more fluid, which contributes to its rapid removal from the bronchial tree.

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    Bronchitis after coronavirus – symptoms and treatment

    The insidiousness of COVID-19 lies in the long-term consequences and complications that the disease leaves behind.Even if the disease was mild, the virus negatively affects the body. The recovery process takes from one month to a year. During this period, malfunctions of the body may occur, so it is necessary to closely monitor the state of health.

    The negative impact of the coronavirus affects the work of all body systems: respiratory, nervous, cardiovascular, reproductive, digestive. After recovery, the respiratory system does not fully recover. Even a mild cold can result in the destruction of the lungs: the tissues did not have time to recover, they are prone to inflammation.Particular attention must be paid to monitoring the work of the lungs.

    Signs of bronchitis

    Bronchitis – inflammation of the lower respiratory tract, bronchi. The usual form of the disease does not pose a threat to human life. But an organism weakened by infection is vulnerable to complications. Treatment of bronchitis, especially after coronavirus, cannot be postponed.

    Disease symptoms:

    • sore throat;
    • nasal congestion, runny nose;
    • headache;
    • increased body temperature;
    • muscle aches;
    • frequent cough;
    • weakness, decreased performance.

    Cough is the main symptom of bronchitis. At the onset of the disease, it is dry, then it becomes moist. Phlegm begins to be secreted, and the lungs are cleared. If this does not happen, the inflammatory process is activated: the trachea and lungs are affected.

    If you see a doctor right away, you will feel better within a week. Advanced bronchitis can lead to pneumonia.

    Diagnosis of the disease

    A medical examination is carried out to make a diagnosis.The doctor checks the body temperature, the nature of the cough, the presence of wheezing in the lungs. Additional studies are assigned:

    • general blood test;
    • chest x-ray;
    • spirometry;
    • bronchoscopy.

    An integrated approach helps to determine an accurate diagnosis, to draw up a treatment program.

    Methods for the treatment of bronchitis

    To determine how to treat bronchitis after coronavirus, it is necessary to take into account the possibility of complications and the presence of concomitant diseases in the patient.Treatment must be comprehensive.

    Traditionally, bed rest and plenty of fluids are recommended to help pass the phlegm. Antitussives, mucolytics and bronchodilators, inhalation are prescribed. At elevated body temperature, antipyretics are prescribed.

    It is important to eat right, give up being in the cold, and stop smoking. The patient is advised to do breathing exercises daily.

    In treatment, antibiotics can be used to avoid complications and the transition of bronchitis to pneumonia.The specific drug is selected by the attending physician, taking into account the results of blood tests, sputum.

    Physiotherapy apparatus “Sun”

    One of the components of the complex treatment of bronchitis is physiotherapy. These are therapeutic measures that, through the influence of physical factors, reduce the inflammatory process, strengthen the human body. The procedures are used in addition to the main medical treatment.

    Ultraviolet irradiators “Solnyshko” are intended for the restoration of bronchi after covid.Medical devices are effective against bronchial tissue damage. The procedure includes intracavitary irradiation of the mucous membranes of the nose and oral cavity. The irradiators are easy to use at home.

    Advantages of using devices:

    • relieve swelling of mucous membranes;
    • stimulate sputum discharge;
    • relieve inflammation;
    • increase the respiratory volume of the lungs;
    • strengthen the immune system.

    Sessions of “Sunshine” treatment will help enhance the effect of medications and accelerate recovery.The devices are actively used in therapy for children, as well as for patients with allergies, when many medications are prohibited. Effective in treating bronchopulmonary diseases, they will help in the prevention and treatment of ARVI and influenza.

    Solnyshko quartz lamps are developed, produced and sold by a production company from Nizhny Novgorod with the same name. Solnyshko LLC has been developing, manufacturing and selling medical equipment since 1991. The company guarantees the quality and safety of the devices.

    What can happen if left untreated?

    Bronchitis can be successfully treated if you do it on time. Self-medication is excluded, you must consult a doctor and follow his recommendations.

    If left untreated, bronchial inflammation after COVID-19 can develop into chronic bronchitis, which is more difficult to treat. Development of bronchopneumonia, airway obstruction, bronchial asthma, emphysema and other dangerous diseases is possible. To avoid complications, take care of your health in a timely manner!

    90,000 Simple gymnastics will help restore the lungs – Rossiyskaya Gazeta

    Even those who have been ill with coronavirus easily say that the disease is not one of those that “removes like a hand”: even after recovery, weakness, shortness of breath, residual cough persist for a long time.The Ministry of Health has just released recommendations for the rehabilitation of patients with COVID-19.

    You can’t do without breathing exercises. The authors of the document say: you need to do at least 3-4 times a week (or better, of course, every day), start with 10-15 minutes, gradually increasing the load.

    Even if you feel unwell, breathing and simple physical exercises can be performed right in bed, lying down. By the way, the document says that after the end of treatment, you need to maintain isolation for another 14 days – it’s time to take care of yourself.The Ministry of Health recommends that polyclinics conduct classes remotely – using telemedicine. But if yours is not that advanced, you can find records of breathing practices on the Internet. And some subscription resources offer online classes.

    According to the document, patients can be sent to a sanatorium for final recovery if this is provided for in regional roadmaps for the treatment of COVID infection. But even here you can act on your own: fresh air, walks somewhere in a pine forest, or, if possible, a trip to the sea is always beneficial.

    In the recommendations of the Ministry of Health, there are complexes of therapeutic exercises for patients with different levels of condition. There are several dozen exercises. We have chosen a few simple and versatile examples.

    How to study at home

    What to look for when recovering from COVID-19, Olga Bogush, our permanent expert, a pulmonologist at the Pirogov Center (CDC Arbatsky), told RG-Nedele.

    – It is now clear that even with a mild course of the disease, many cannot avoid complications.Some have fibrosis – damage to the lungs when normal tissue is replaced by connective tissue. In the lung, in fact, scars appear. As a result, the respiratory surface of the lungs decreases. If small areas are affected, the person does not notice it. But if the fibrosis is more pronounced, shortness of breath occurs.

    Physical recovery is imperative. First of all, this is breathing exercises – exercises aimed at restoring the respiratory muscles, strengthening the muscles that are responsible for inhaling and exhaling.It is important to use the lower parts of the lungs, which are almost never used for breathing in everyday life. For example, yoga practices are aimed at this.

    While weakness persists, you can practice lying in bed.

    Many of my patients, who now come to me for consultation, practice according to the Buteyko method – this is a special “shallow” breathing during which carbon dioxide accumulates in the body. They say that it helps them. But nevertheless, for postcoid patients, I first of all recommend “paradoxical” gymnastics, which was developed by Alexandra Strelnikova many years ago.

    These exercises work well for asthma and other chronic lung conditions. In the recommendations of the Ministry of Health, by the way, it is indicated that you can practice yoga breathing – both diaphragmatic and the so-called full. These breathing practices differ in the way they are performed, but both are good for the condition of the lungs.

    An important point: you should not limit yourself only to breathing exercises, you must definitely add physical activity. While severe weakness persists, you can, while lying in bed, do very simple things: inflate balls, slowly exhale through a thin tube into the water.There are special breathing simulators – they are useful, albeit quite expensive. I think it is quite possible to do with improvised means.

    When the physical condition allows you to get up, add gymnastics. If there is an exercise machine at home – a treadmill or a bicycle, we use them to increase the aerobic load. If not, it’s okay. Regular vigorous walking, arm swings, torso bends, and other elementary exercises will help you recover faster.

    If possible, exercise outdoors.The simplest and safest thing is walking at a brisk pace, you can connect sticks (Nordic walking), use a bicycle.

    Sometimes patients themselves delay the recovery process. For example, they still have a residual cough and take inhalations with mucolytics – lazolvan or some other similar drug. This should not be done without a doctor’s prescription. Inhalation to moisturize the respiratory tract is useful – with mineral water, saline. But if you add mucolytics, it will provoke a cough.

    I want to warn you: if the unpleasant symptoms persist over time – shortness of breath increases, the state of health worsens, the cough takes on a different character, wheezing joins in, for example, you do not need to be treated yourself, you need to consult a doctor and be examined.

    In addition to gymnastics, vibration massage is also good. This is not difficult: lightly tap yourself with your palms on your chest, stomach, and ask someone to also pat on the back for a few minutes. It helps clear mucus from the airways and works as a prevention of congestion in the lungs.

    Finally, an important piece of advice: I recommend that all my patients, including older ones, be sure to get vaccinated not only against influenza, but also against pneumococcus. This vaccination will protect against secondary bacterial pneumonia. By the way, out of about 40 of my patients with chronic lung diseases who were vaccinated against pneumococcus this season, only one contracted the coronavirus and got sick quite easily. So, perhaps this vaccine, by stimulating the immune system, helps protect against coronavirus.

    Details

    Methodological recommendations on rehabilitation for patients with COVID on the website of the Ministry of Health are intended primarily for doctors, but at the end of the document there are several complete complexes of medical and respiratory gymnastics – anyone can use them.

    Infographics “RG” / Anton Perepletchikov / Irina Nevinnaya

    Acute bronchitis – Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

    Acute bronchitis is usually associated with a cough that worsens at night or during physical exertion; lasts> 2 weeks in half of patients and 4 weeks in a quarter of patients; may be associated with bronchospasm and / or excessive sputum production.

    Diagnosis is clinical initially. If suspected, other causes of acute cough, such as pneumonia, asthma, or postnasal drip syndrome, should be ruled out.

    Treatment is aimed at reducing the severity of symptoms until complete recovery and elimination of damage to the bronchi. Antibiotics are not recommended for most patients.

    Complications are rare. The main complication is post-bronchitis syndrome, when the cough is observed for several months.

    Acute bronchitis is an infection of the lower respiratory tract that can heal itself; this distinguishes it from common colds and other diseases of the upper respiratory tract. In this case, bronchitis refers to infections in which inflammatory processes develop in the bronchial tract, while with pneumonia, the infection develops in the lung parenchyma, which leads to a thickening of the affected area or lobe.

    Although there is no universally accepted definition of acute bronchitis, the criteria proposed by McFarlane suggest a clinical approach: (a) acute illness lasting <21 days, (b) cough is the main symptom, (c) at least one of the other symptoms of lower respiratory tract damage, for example, mucus formation, wheezing, chest pain, (d) no other explanation for the presence of these symptoms.[1] MacFarlane J, Holmes W, Gard P, et al. Prospective study of the incidence, aetiology and outcome of adult lower respiratory tract illness in the community. Thorax. 2001; 56: 109-114. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11209098?tool=bestpractice.com Although the McFarlan criteria indicate that symptoms usually last <3 weeks, other studies have shown that coughing can last> 30 days in up to 25% of patients with acute bronchitis. [2] Williamson HA Jr. Pulmonary function tests in acute bronchitis: evidence for reversible airway obstruction.J Fam Pract. 1987; 25: 251-256.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3625141?tool=bestpractice.com
    Thus, acute bronchitis may still be present in patients who cough for> 1 month.

    This section deals with acute bronchitis in adults.

    Bronchitis

    The function of the bronchi in the human body is to transport oxygen-rich air to the alveoli for gas exchange. With diseases of the respiratory system, this process is disrupted.The reverse removal of carbon dioxide is also carried out through the bronchi. When an inflammatory process develops in them, a cough appears.

    What is bronchitis?

    Bronchitis (Latin bronchitis, from bronchus + -itis – inflammation) is a disease of the lower respiratory tract, characterized by inflammation of the mucous membrane of the bronchi – cartilaginous tubes running from the trachea to the pulmonary alveoli. Inflammation can cover all or part of the bronchial tree. Unlike pneumonia, the alveoli are not affected.

    Views

    There are two forms of bronchitis – acute and chronic.

    Classification of acute bronchitis:

    • Due to development: infectious, mixed and bronchitis resulting from inhalation exposure.
    • By the mechanism of development: primary and secondary.
    • By localization: bronchiolitis, tracheobronchitis and bronchitis affecting the middle bronchi.
    • By the nature of the inflammation: purulent and catarrhal.
    • By the nature of the impairment of ventilation of the lungs: obstructive and non-obstructive.
    • By the nature of the course of the disease: protracted and recurrent.

    Classification of the chronic form:

    • By development mechanism: primary and secondary.
    • By the nature of the discharge: catarrhal, mixed and purulent.
    • By the nature of the impairment of ventilation of the lungs: obstructive and non-obstructive.
    • By localization: distal and proximal.

    Causes of occurrence

    Bronchitis in adults and children in most cases is an infectious disease and is caused by various pathogens. In this case, bronchitis is the primary disease. The most common causes of inflammation are:

    • Viruses (parainfluenza, measles, influenza, adenoviruses, RS viruses, rhinoviruses, enteroviruses).
    • Bacteria (various types of streptococci, staphylococci, pertussis causative agent, respiratory mycoplasmas and chlamydophiles, haemophilus influenzae),
    • mushrooms (genus Candida or Aspergillus).

    Non-infectious causes cause acute and chronic bronchitis:

    • Physical factors (dust, smoke, radiation, occupational hazards),
    • long-term smoking.
    • Chemical factors (inhalation of vapors of various gases, toxic chemicals, etc.).
    • Violation of the structure of the bronchopulmonary system, which contributes to a more severe course of infectious diseases of the lower respiratory tract.
    • Presence of foci of chronic infection in the tonsils, sinuses and nasal cavity.

    Symptoms and signs

    Acute bronchitis

    • Dry chest cough with a little phlegm. The coughing fits are worse at night. Makoto doesn’t come off well. Within a few days, the macro begins to come out profusely, and the cough becomes moist and soft.
    • Subfebrile temperature.
    • Signs of a respiratory infection: weakness, nausea, nasal congestion, runny nose.
    • On auscultation in the lungs dry and moist rales.

    Chronical bronchitis

    • Prolonged cough for several months for more than 2 years in a row. The cough is moist, appears in the morning, accompanied by the release of a small amount of sputum. An intensified cough is observed in cold, wet weather and during a dry warm period.
    • General condition – satisfactory.
    • The disease may progress over time: the cough intensifies, takes on the character of attacks, becomes dry, unproductive.There are complaints of purulent sputum, nausea, weakness, fatigue, sweating at night. Shortness of breath is associated with exertion, even small ones.

    Which doctor treats?

    Bronchitis is treated by a therapist or pediatrician. If necessary, the therapist can send to a narrower specialist – a pulmonologist dealing with lung diseases. If patients have symptoms of inflammation of the bronchi and upper respiratory tract, it is recommended to be examined by an otolaryngologist.If the inflammatory process is localized exclusively in the bronchi, consultation with an otolaryngologist is not required. Quite a common occurrence is not infectious, but allergic bronchitis. An allergist will help you carry out the necessary examinations and prescribe an effective treatment. In the chronic form of bronchitis, consultation with an immunologist may be indicated, since the immunity of such patients is significantly weakened.

    Treatment methods

    Treatment of acute bronchitis:

    • Smoking cessation.
    • Leading a healthy lifestyle.
    • Compliance with the regime of the day.
    • Drinking a lot of liquid. This helps prevent dehydration and dilutes phlegm in the lungs, making it easier to remove when you cough.
    • Room humidification (40-60%).
    • Exclusion of contact with irritating substances.

    Medication for bronchitis:

    • Cough suppressants – drugs that block the cough reflex.Such drugs are taken strictly as directed by a doctor for a dry, debilitating cough. Cannot be combined with expectorants.
    • Bronchodilators – means that expand the lumen of the lungs.
    • Expectorants are especially effective for dry coughs and for coughs with little phlegm.
    • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, NSAIDs) – can be prescribed for severe inflammation in the airways.
    • Antibiotics.If you feel like joining a bacterial infection.

    Chronic bronchitis cannot be completely cured, but a healthy lifestyle can help ease the course of the disease.

    • Smoking cessation.
    • Leading a healthy lifestyle.
    • Compliance with the regime of the day.
    • Drinking a lot of liquid. This helps prevent dehydration and dilutes phlegm in the lungs, making it easier to remove when you cough.
    • Room humidification (40-60%).
    • Mucolytic agents – can be used to facilitate sputum discharge.
    • Completed a pulmonary rehabilitation program.

    Results

    In acute catarrhal bronchitis, the prognosis is favorable, the disease usually ends with a complete restoration of the structure of the bronchial mucosa and absolute recovery. In the case of acute purulent bronchitis or the development of bronchiolitis, the prognosis worsens due to residual fibrous thickening of the bronchial wall and narrowing of the bronchial lumen.In the chronic form, the prognosis for complete recovery is unfavorable.

    Rehabilitation and Lifestyle Recovery

    Rehabilitation methods:

    • Physical activity.
    • Exercise therapy and breathing exercises.
    • Physiotherapy, in particular inhalation, electrophoresis, laser treatment, magnetotherapy.
    • Massage.
    • Proper nutrition.

    All of the above measures are aimed at preventing the recurrence of bronchitis and eliminating the residual manifestations of the disease.

    Lifestyle with bronchitis

    Prevention of bronchitis is primarily in the prevention of acute respiratory diseases. The main measures include:

    • Measures for the prevention of respiratory infections: washing hands, rinsing nose and throat with saline solutions.
    • Vaccination.
    • Healthy lifestyle: smoking cessation, including secondhand smoke; a balanced diet rich in protein; regular sports; hardening; creation of optimal conditions in the room (airing every 1-2 hours, wet cleaning, control of humidity and temperature).
    • Treatment of existing respiratory diseases.
    • Treatment of GERD.

    If the disease has already developed, efforts must be made to prevent its exacerbation and progression.

    For highly qualified help, it is worth contacting specialists. Turning to an experienced doctor, you can get not only competent help, but also an attentive and polite attitude from the staff. In the case of referral of a therapist to other specialists, it is also possible to quickly and easily make an appointment with narrowly specialized doctors.Without leaving the clinic, you can also undergo instrumental (CT, MRI, ultrasound) and laboratory tests. Timely diagnosis and the appointment of competent treatment can save you from serious consequences in the future.