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Zinc yogurt: 9 zinc-rich foods that belong in your diet

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9 zinc-rich foods that belong in your diet

Unless you’re a die-hard
nutrition buff or an expert in biochemistry, you likely only associate zinc
with those old-school sticks of sunscreen your mom made you use at the beach.
But zinc is also an essential mineral key to a healthy diet.

Zinc is necessary for immune function, it helps your blood clot
when you’re injured, and it helps regulate your blood sugar, says Amy Gorin,
owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City area.

Zinc is indeed crucial to your health, but you only need small
quantities. “Women 19 years old and older need 8mg of zinc daily, a
pregnant woman needs 11mg, and a breastfeeding woman needs 12mg,” says Gorin.

While it’s easier for your body to absorb zinc from animal sources
like meat, eggs, and seafood, there are plenty of zinc-rich, plant-based foods
as well. Read on for the best zinc-rich foods for any diet.

1. Oysters

Per gram, oysters have the highest zinc concentration of any food.
Three ounces of raw oysters contain 32mg of zinc, more than three
times your recommended daily intake.

Per 85g serving: 50
calories, 1g fat (0g saturated), 4.5g carbs, 0g sugar, 151mg sodium, 0g
fibre, 4g protein

Read more: 10 best fitness foods for women

2. Lean sirloin steak

Love digging into a tender cut of meat on occasion? Opt for lean
sirloin with most of the fat trimmed, and you’ll get five mg of
zinc per four-ounce (113g) serving.

Per 113-gram serving: 144
calories, 4g fat (1.5 g saturated), 0g carbs, 0g sugar, 63mg sodium, 0g
fibre, 25g protein

3. Lamb

Swap beef for lamb to switch things up during stew season. A
113g serving of lamb contains just under four mg of zinc, almost
half of what the average woman needs in a day.

Per 113g serving (fat
trimmed):
 168 calories, 9g fat (3g saturated), 1g carbs, 0g sugar,
121mg sodium, 0g fibre, 21g protein

4. Hemp seeds

Looking for plant-based sources of zinc? Hemp seeds are your best
bet. Try sprinkling these seeds on your yogurt or salad to mix things up.
They’re loaded with healthy fats, and a three-tablespoon serving
contains 3mg of zinc.

Per tablespoon serving: 166
calories, 14.5g fat (1.5g saturated), 2.5g carbs, 0.5g sugar, 2mg sodium,
1g fibre, 9.5g protein

5. Chickpeas

Beans and legumes are another great plant-based option if you want
to up your zinc intake without meat. A cup of cooked chickpeas is high in fibre
and protein, and contains 2.5mg of zinc.

Per 1-cup serving: 269 calories, 4g fat (0.5g saturated), 45g carbs,
8g sugar, 11mg sodium, 12.5g fibre, 14.5g protein

Read more: 13 foods with more protein than an egg

6. Black beans

Another excellent plant source of zinc is black beans. Toss a cup of
cooked black beans on top of a salad and you’ll get 2mg of
zinc.

Per 1-cup serving: 227 calories, 1g fat (0g saturated), 41g
carbs, 0.5g sugar, 2mg sodium, 15g fibre, 15g protein

7. Greek yoghurt

Greek yoghurt has so many stellar health benefits, and here’s
another one to add to the list: a 200g container of plain, low fat Greek
yogurt packs 1.5mg of zinc, nearly a quarter of your daily need.

Per 200g serving: 146 calories, 4g fat (2.5g saturated), 8g
carbs, 7g sugar, 68mg sodium, 0g fibre, 20g protein

8. Cashews

Cashews are one of the most affordable nuts –and, in my totally
biased opinion, the most delicious – so there’s no reason not to keep a container
in your pantry. You can eat them roasted or raw, since minerals aren’t affected
by heat, and get just over 1.5mg of zinc per ounce.

Per 28g serving: 157
calories, 12g fat (2g saturated), 8.5g carbs, 1.5g sugar, 3mg sodium, 1g
fibre, 5g protein

9. Cheddar cheese

28g of sharp cheddar has 1mg of zinc, which
is decent if you want a little extra boost. Melt it on top of a burger made
with lean ground beef, and you have a meal that meets more than half your zinc
needs for the day.

Per 28g serving: 115
calories, 9.5g fat (5g saturated), 0.5g carbs, 0g sugar, 180mg sodium, 0g
fibre, 6.5g protein

This article was originally
published on 
www.womenshealthmag.com

Image credit: iStock

Zinc Rich Foods | Foods With Zinc for Runners

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Zinc is like the “middle child” of the mineral world. It doesn’t receive all that much attention, but it has its hands in everything. “Zinc is an important micronutrient that is involved in immune function, cell growth and division, DNA production, metabolism, and wound healing,” says Liz Shaw M.S. R.D.N. C.P.T., author of Instant Pot for Dummies. Because of its role in the growth and multiplication of cells, zinc plays a part in crucial growth periods like childhood and pregnancy.

But zinc is most commonly known for its ability to ease the common cold. Although zinc won’t prevent you from catching a cold, there is some research to suggest that it might decrease the duration of a cold. Runners who are in the throes of heavy endurance training, such as marathoners or ultra-marathoners, may have a compromised immune system (due to stress, lack of sleep, etc.), making them more susceptible to viruses and infections. Zinc won’t ward off illness entirely, but it might get you back on your feet faster.

[Stay injury free on the road by getting on the mat with Yoga for Runners.]

Plus, it may prevent your usual run from turning into a sprint to the bathroom. “Since zinc is involved in digestion it might prevent GI issues that would impede performance,” says Shaw. Research suggests that a zinc deficiency may impair many metabolic functions, according to a paper published in The Journal of Nutrition.

The good news is that zinc is prevalent in a variety of animal and plant-based foods, so it’s fairly easy to meet your needs through food sources. (The recommended daily intake for zinc is 8 milligrams (mg) per day for females and 11 mg per day for males.) Below are nine foods you can add to your diet that contain the mineral.

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Chuck Roast

Zinc per serving: 5 mg in 3 ounces

Eat it: Chuck roast becomes moist and tender when cooked for a long period of time, which is why it’s primarily used in hearty stews and pot roasts.

Good to know: This shoulder cut of beef serves up about 50 percent of your daily zinc. Try preparing it in a slow cooker or pressure cooker for the most tender results.

Chickpeas

Zinc per serving: 1 mg per 1/2 cup

Eat it: “My favorite way to eat chickpeas is to buy a bag of dry beans and prepare them from scratch in my Instant Pot,” says Shaw. “Then either add them to my avocado toast for more protein or mash them to make a hummus,” she adds.

Good to know: Canned chickpeas are just as good—just rinse them with water to remove any excess salt.

Cashews

Zinc per serving: 1.6 mg per 1 ounce

Eat it: Cashews can be transformed into a “cream” sauce for vegan dishes. To try it at home, soak 1 cup of raw cashews in water overnight. Discard the water in the morning, add 1/2 cup of fresh water to the cashews, and puree in a food processor or blender until creamy and smooth.

Good to know: Like most nuts, cashews supply healthy fats and some protein to the diet. They are also a good source of zinc. Cashews are a filling snack, and they also add crunch to stir fries and grain dishes.

Greek Yogurt

Zinc per serving: 1. 47mg per 1 cup

Eat it: Incorporate Greek yogurt into your postrun recovery smoothie to give your muscles much needed protein and carbs. Or simply top with fresh fruit for a healthy and satisfying breakfast.

Good to know: Greek yogurt is known for its calcium, protein, and creamy taste. Opt for plain to avoid added sugars.

Crab

Zinc per serving: 5 mg in 3 ounces

Eat it: Although it might not be on your weekly grocery list, a serving of crab has about half the daily value of zinc. Make your own crab cakes at home with bread crumbs, eggs, and spices, or add crab meat to a pasta dish with lemon and olive oil.

Good to know: Cooking live crab may be overwhelming, so opt for canned or frozen, or buy the meat from the fish section.

Pumpkin Seeds

Zinc per serving: 2. 13 mg per 1 ounce

Eat it: Like nuts, pumpkin seeds are rich in protein and omega-3 fatty acids. A 1-ounce serving has a whopping 9 grams of protein, which makes it a filling and nutritious snack. Shaw recommends adding pumpkin seeds to salads or oatmeal for texture. Bring out the flavor by roasting them.

Good to know: Store them in the fridge to prevent the natural oils in them from going rancid.

Oysters

Zinc per serving: 33 mg in 3 ounces

Eat it: A small serving of oysters is a zinc powerhouse, with 300 percent the daily value. Oysters are traditionally eaten raw with a squeeze of lemon juice and cocktail sauce.

Good to know: If you’re nervous about preparing them at home, ask the fishmonger at the supermarket for the highest quality oysters and how to shuck them. Or buy them pre-shucked and throw them into a fish stew.

Hemp Seeds

Zinc per serving: 2 mg per 2 tablespoons

Eat it: They have a soft and almost buttery texture with a slight crunch, and they taste great in salads, smoothies, and oatmeal.

Good to know: The seeds of the hemp plant pack in nearly 20 percent of your daily zinc, 10 grams of protein, healthy fats, magnesium, Vitamin E, and fiber.

Lentils

Zinc per serving: 1.1 mg per 1/2 cup cooked

Eat it: Lentils not only serve up zinc, but they are also rich in plant-based protein and fiber. Lentils are a versatile pantry staple that can be used in burgers, tacos, grain bowls, and meatless “meatballs”.

Good to know: The same 1/2 cup serving that is a good source of zinc also has 9 grams of protein and 30 percent of your daily fiber, two nutrients that contribute to feelings of fullness.

Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD
Registered Dietitian
Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD is a New York City-based dietitian, food and nutrition writer, national speaker and owner of Nutrition a la Natalie, a sports nutrition practice.

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What You Need to Know about Zinc




 


**** Dietitian support during COVID-19****


Zinc is a mineral that your body needs to be healthy. Zinc supports your immune system and helps in normal growth and development at all ages. Read on to learn more about which foods have zinc and how much you need.


How much zinc do I need?


The amount of zinc you need depends on your age, sex and life stage. The table below shows you how much you need:







Age


Zinc


Amount needed per day


Men 19 and older


11 mg


Women 19 and older


8 mg


Pregnant women 19 and older


11 mg


Breastfeeding women 19 and older


12 mg


 


Which foods have zinc?


Although zinc comes from a variety of different foods, the best sources are high protein foods like seafood, meat, beans and lentils.  Some dairy products also have zinc. If you are eating a variety of foods based on Canada’s Food Guide, you will likely get the zinc you need.


The table below shows foods that contain zinc:














    Food


Serving Size


Zinc (mg)


Oysters (Eastern, Pacific, wild and farmed)


75 g (2 ½ oz)


25-59


Beef


75 g (2 ½ oz)


4 to 9


Wheat germ cereal


30 mL (2 Tbsp)


2


Pork


75 g (2 ½ oz)


2 to 4


Heart of palm, raw


2 hearts (66 g)


2


Cheese (cheddar, swiss, gouda, brie, mozzarella)


50 g (1 ½ oz)


1 to 2


Ricotta cheese


125 mL (1/2 cup)


2


Yogurt


175 mL (3/4 cup)



Turkey


75g (2 ½ oz)


1-3


Baked beans, canned


175 mL (3/4 cup)


4


Lentils, canned


175 mL (3/4 cup)


2


 


Do I need to take a zinc supplement?


No. You do not need to take a zinc supplement if you are eating a variety of foods and you have no health conditions.

Here are some of the reasons why you may need a zinc supplement:


  • You are recovering from surgery on your digestive system.

  • You have a disease like Ulcerative Colitis,  Crohn’s, or chronic liver disease.

  • You are a vegetarian and not eating a variety of plant based protein sources with zinc.


Before taking zinc supplements, it is best to speak with your healthcare provider. Zinc can be harmful if you take too much. At any age, it is important to have no more than 40 mg of zinc per day from foods and supplements.


Can zinc supplements prevent colds?


Research has shown that if you take zinc acetate supplements (often found in cold lozenges) while you have a cold, they may reduce symptoms and how long the cold lasts.


Meal and snack ideas to include more zinc in your diet


Try the tips below to get more zinc in your diet.


  • Lean beef is a tasty protein option. Try this vermicelli beef and broccoli pasta.

  • Ricotta cheese and yogurt are sources of zinc and make excellent snacks. Spread ricotta on whole wheat crackers or add sliced fruit to your favourite yogurt.

  • Purée beans or lentils with a little water and add it to hamburger mixtures, casseroles, soups, stews or pasta sauces. 

  • Add some spice to your turkey dish by trying this Thai Curry Turkey.


Try these other nutritious recipes that are rich in zinc:


Banana Whole Grain Griddle Cakes
Black Bean Couscous Salad


And try these recipes from Cookspiration:


Baked eggs with lentils, peppers and tomatoes
Beef and lentil burgers
Savoury Broccoli and Cheese Muffins

Last Update – January 7, 2021

20 Foods High in Zinc to Add to Your Diet — Eat This Not That

We know that getting enough vitamins in our diet is important, and the same goes for minerals. And one mineral in particular that deserves a spotlight is zinc. Did you know that after iron, zinc is the most abundant mineral in the body? And that it’s needed for a ton of important processes, like maintaining the health of your immune system and allowing your body to heal?

“Zinc is going to be found in all of your tissues, and it’s required for the metabolism of protein, fats, carbohydrates. It also stabilizes cells and organ structures, helps with thyroid function, is important for vision, blood clotting, wound healing, and immune function,” says nutritionist Jessica Ash, CNC, HHC, FDN-P and founder of Jessica Ash Wellness. “It’s also important for cell division, so if we’re talking about pregnancy or women who are growing a baby, it’s very important for when cells are rapidly dividing.”

Why do you need zinc in your diet?

The recommended daily amount of zinc is eight milligrams for adult women (11 during pregnancy), and 11 milligrams for adult men. So how do you know if you’re getting enough zinc in your diet (besides getting tested)? Two tell-tale signs include whether you get sick frequently and how your fingernails look.

“Zinc deficiency has been linked to poor immune function, so if you find yourself catching colds more often than usual, consider whether you’re eating enough zinc,” says Melissa Groves, RDN, LD, CLT, and founder of Avocado Grove Nutrition. “One quick way to determine if you have a deficiency: take a look at your fingernails. If you have white spots, you might want to get your zinc levels tested.”

Other issues that can come up from a zinc deficiency include slow wound healing and a poor appetite, according to Groves. Ash notes that gut and digestive issues are commonly related to low zinc levels, as are acne, mood issues, hair loss, blood sugar issues, thyroid problems, and even reproductive issues.

Getting enough zinc in your diet through the food you eat is important because your body uses it frequently, and can’t store it, according to Ash. “Zinc is not stored in the body, so you have to be getting it regularly from dietary intake since it is used all the time,” says Ash.

What are the best zinc foods?

“I’d recommend aiming to include shellfish in your diet weekly, as well as other meats throughout the week,” says Groves. If you don’t eat meat or any animal products, you can still get some zinc from your food, but you may need to consider a supplement. “If you’re on a vegetarian diet, focus on nuts and seeds, and you might want to consider a zinc supplement if you’re not getting enough,” Groves says.

Keep reading below for the top 20 food sources of zinc to find out how to incorporate enough of the important mineral into your diet.

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Oysters are hands-down the richest source of zinc. Just three ounces of oysters gets you a whopping 66.81 milligrams of zinc, exceeding your daily recommended zinc intake. Incorporating oysters even once a week is a great way of making sure your zinc needs are met.

With just three ounces of Alaskan king crab, you’ll be well on your way to getting your daily dose of zinc. (As if you needed another reason to go to Red Lobster.)

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Ground beef is a great source of zinc, with just a four-ounce serving clocking in at over half of your daily need for zinc. Beef is also rich in protein and B-vitamins, making it a great option to have in your diet a few times a week.

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If you can stomach the taste, beef liver is a great source of zinc. You can get over half of the daily recommended value of zinc in a three-ounce serving. If liver and onions are not your cup of tea, try adding chopped beef liver into your ground beef patties, meatballs, or meatloaf.

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Looking for a reason to splurge on that lobster at dinner? Here’s one. A three-ounce serving of lobster has three milligrams of zinc, nearly 40 percent of your daily value.

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If you love a warm bowl of oats in the morning, good news. Your daily serving of oats gets you nearly three milligrams of zinc, which clocks in at almost 40 percent of your daily value of zinc.

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Pumpkin seeds aren’t just for fall—they make a great snack, salad topping, or addition to your trail mix any time of the year. Plus, just one ounce of pumpkin seeds gets you almost 40 percent of your daily value of zinc.

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Pork loin is a popular and tasty protein option for dinner. And did you know that a four-ounce serving has two milligrams towards your daily needs for zinc? That’s 25 percent of what you need in a day.

RELATED: The easy way to make healthier comfort foods.

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A handful of cashews is a tasty snack full of satisfying, healthy fat. But did you know that cashews are also a good source of zinc? In fact, a one-ounce serving will get you nearly 20 percent of your recommended total daily zinc.

Deryn Macey/Unsplash

Chickpeas are arguably one of the most versatile foods. From hummus (yes, that’s chickpeas!) to chickpea pasta and so much more, they are the stars of many plant-based eaters and vegans or vegetarians alike. With 1.53 milligrams of zinc per each 100-gram serving, it’s a smart choice for making sure your daily zinc needs are met.

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Chicken, specifically the dark meat like the thighs and legs, is a great option for making sure you’re getting enough zinc in your diet. One three-ounce serving of chicken thighs contains more than one milligram of zinc, making it a great addition to your weekly menu.

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Not only is yogurt a good source of protein and calcium, but it contains a decent amount of zinc, too. An eight-ounce serving contains 1.34 milligrams of zinc. Not bad for your go-to snack or breakfast, right?

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Peas may not have been your favorite vegetable growing up, but chances are you feel differently about them now. And if you do, good news. A 100-gram serving of green peas contains more than one milligram of zinc.

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Whether you enjoy it on cereal, in smoothies, or straight from the glass, milk is one way to pack in a lot of nutrients, like calcium and vitamin D. And milk contains zinc—specifically, 1.17 milligrams of it per cup.

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Who doesn’t love cheese? And if you need another reason to grab a slice, then good news. Swiss cheese contains a pretty good amount of zinc—almost one milligram per slice—which is not bad when you’re working towards that daily goal.

Tetiana Bykovets/Unsplash

While they may not be as good of a source of zinc as cashews, almonds also contain some zinc, with almost a full milligram of the mineral in a one-ounce serving. Try adding them into your favorite snack mix or trail mix, slice them on top of salads, or you can try almond butter or almond flour in your recipes.

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Swiss isn’t the only type of cheese that contains zinc; cheddar makes the list too. With almost one milligram of zinc per slice, cheddar cheese gets you closer to your total zinc daily value. Add a slice of cheddar to your grass-fed beef burger and you’ll meet about 75 percent of your total daily zinc goals.

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Surprisingly enough, dark meat chicken specifically gets you the most zinc per serving. But If you prefer the chicken breast, you’ll still get some zinc, with 0.696 milligrams per 87-gram serving. Maybe just try a leg, wing, or thigh next time you’re looking to boost your zinc?

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One 100-gram serving of kidney beans is a great source of fiber and protein. It’s also a good source of zinc. Kidney beans taste great in soups, stews, or even the classic dish, red beans and rice.

If you enjoy fish, try deviating from your usual choice and go for a three-ounce serving of flounder. The white fish is mild in flavor and will get you a little bit closer to your total daily requirement of zinc.

Now that you know a variety of foods that will help you get more zinc into your diet, there’s no excuse for not eating enough of it.

Zinc in yogurt, per 100g

Yogurt List, zinc Content per 100g

1. Cereals ready-to-eat, GENERAL MILLS, CHEERIOS, Yogurt Burst, strawberry – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 17 / 100     food group – Breakfast Cereals
  Zinc
(%RDA)
Calories
(%RDA)
Carbohydrate
(%RDA)
Fat
(%RDA)
Protein
(%RDA)
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  12.5 mg (83%) 400 kcal (20%) 81.75 g (63%) 5.23 g (8%) 6.67 g (12%)
  Typical Serving size of .75 cup (1 NLEA serving) (or 30g):
   3.75 mg (25%) 120 kcal (6%) 24.53 g (19%) 1.57 g (2%) 2 g (4%)
2. Babyfood, snack, GERBER GRADUATE YOGURT MELTS – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 16 / 100     food group – Baby Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  1. 77 mg (12%) 429 kcal (21%) 71.43 g (55%) 4 g (6%) 14.29 g (26%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 serving (or 7g):
   0.12 mg (1%) 30.03 kcal (2%) 5 g (4%) 0.28 g (0%) 1 g (2%)
3. Cereals ready-to-eat, KELLOGG’s FIBERPLUS Berry Yogurt Crunch – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 19 / 100     food group – Breakfast Cereals
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  1.7 mg (11%) 315 kcal (16%) 80.9 g (62%) 1.8 g (3%) 6.6 g (12%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (1 NLEA serving) (or 53g):
   0. 9 mg (6%) 166.95 kcal (8%) 42.88 g (33%) 0.95 g (1%) 3.5 g (6%)
4. Snacks, granola bar, GENERAL MILLS, NATURE VALLEY, with yogurt coating – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Snacks
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  1.58 mg (11%) 423 kcal (21%) 74.29 g (57%) 11.43 g (18%) 5.71 g (10%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 bar (or 35g):
   0.55 mg (4%) 148.05 kcal (7%) 26 g (20%) 4 g (6%) 2 g (4%)
5. Cereals ready-to-eat, KELLOGG, SPECIAL K, Fruit & Yogurt – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 17 / 100     food group – Breakfast Cereals
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  1. 2 mg (8%) 367 kcal (18%) 85.3 g (66%) 2.9 g (4%) 7.1 g (13%)
  Typical Serving size of .75 cup (1 NLEA serving) (or 32g):
   0.38 mg (3%) 117.44 kcal (6%) 27.3 g (21%) 0.93 g (1%) 2.27 g (4%)
6. Yogurt, chocolate, nonfat milk – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  1.13 mg (8%) 112 kcal (6%) 23.53 g (18%) 0 g (0%) 3.53 g (6%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 container (6 oz) (or 170g):
   1. 92 mg (13%) 190.4 kcal (10%) 40 g (31%) 0 g (0%) 6 g (11%)
7. Yogurt, chocolate, nonfat milk, fortified with vitamin D – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  1.13 mg (8%) 112 kcal (6%) 23.53 g (18%) 0 g (0%) 3.53 g (6%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 container (6 oz) (or 170g):
   1.92 mg (13%) 190.4 kcal (10%) 40 g (31%) 0 g (0%) 6 g (11%)
8. Yogurt, plain, skim milk, 13 grams protein per 8 ounce – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 16 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0. 97 mg (6%) 56 kcal (3%) 7.68 g (6%) 0.18 g (0%) 5.73 g (10%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   2.38 mg (16%) 137.2 kcal (7%) 18.82 g (14%) 0.44 g (1%) 14.04 g (25%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  2.2 mg (15%) 127.12 kcal (6%) 17.43 g (13%) 0.41 g (1%) 13.01 g (23%)
9. Yogurt, plain, low fat, 12 grams protein per 8 ounce – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 16 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0. 89 mg (6%) 63 kcal (3%) 7.04 g (5%) 1.55 g (2%) 5.25 g (9%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   2.18 mg (15%) 154.35 kcal (8%) 17.25 g (13%) 3.8 g (6%) 12.86 g (23%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  2.02 mg (13%) 143.01 kcal (7%) 15.98 g (12%) 3.52 g (5%) 11.92 g (21%)
  Other serving sizes .5 container (4 oz) (or 113g):
  1.01 mg (7%) 71.19 kcal (4%) 7.96 g (6%) 1.75 g (3%) 5.93 g (11%)
10. Yogurt parfait, lowfat, with fruit and granola – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 17 / 100     food group – Fast Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0. 89 mg (6%) 84 kcal (4%) 15.86 g (12%) 1.01 g (2%) 3.36 g (6%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 item (or 149g):
   1.33 mg (9%) 125.16 kcal (6%) 23.63 g (18%) 1.5 g (2%) 5.01 g (9%)
11. Snacks, candy bits, yogurt covered with vitamin C – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Snacks
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.86 mg (6%) 415 kcal (21%) 86.9 g (67%) 7.5 g (12%) 0 g (0%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 package (or 20g):
   0. 17 mg (1%) 83 kcal (4%) 17.38 g (13%) 1.5 g (2%) 0 g (0%)
12. Yogurt, vanilla, low fat, 11 grams protein per 8 ounce – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.83 mg (6%) 85 kcal (4%) 13.8 g (11%) 1.25 g (2%) 4.93 g (9%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   2.03 mg (14%) 208.25 kcal (10%) 33.81 g (26%) 3.06 g (5%) 12.08 g (22%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  1. 88 mg (13%) 192.95 kcal (10%) 31.33 g (24%) 2.84 g (4%) 11.19 g (20%)
13. Yogurt, vanilla, low fat, 11 grams protein per 8 ounce, fortified with vitamin D – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.83 mg (6%) 85 kcal (4%) 13.8 g (11%) 1.25 g (2%) 4.93 g (9%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   2.03 mg (14%) 208.25 kcal (10%) 33.81 g (26%) 3.06 g (5%) 12.08 g (22%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  1. 88 mg (13%) 192.95 kcal (10%) 31.33 g (24%) 2.84 g (4%) 11.19 g (20%)
  Other serving sizes .5 container (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.94 mg (6%) 96.05 kcal (5%) 15.59 g (12%) 1.41 g (2%) 5.57 g (10%)
14. Yogurt, vanilla flavor, lowfat milk, sweetened with low calorie sweetener – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.83 mg (6%) 86 kcal (4%) 13.8 g (11%) 1.25 g (2%) 4.93 g (9%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 container (or 170g):
   1. 41 mg (9%) 146.2 kcal (7%) 23.46 g (18%) 2.13 g (3%) 8.38 g (15%)
15. Yogurt, fruit, low fat, 11 grams protein per 8 ounce – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.82 mg (5%) 105 kcal (5%) 18.6 g (14%) 1.41 g (2%) 4.86 g (9%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
   1.86 mg (12%) 238.35 kcal (12%) 42.22 g (32%) 3.2 g (5%) 11.03 g (20%)
  Other serving sizes . 5 container (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.93 mg (6%) 118.65 kcal (6%) 21.02 g (16%) 1.59 g (2%) 5.49 g (10%)
16. Yogurt, fruit, lowfat, with low calorie sweetener – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.82 mg (5%) 105 kcal (5%) 18.6 g (14%) 1.41 g (2%) 4.86 g (9%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 8 oz container (8 oz) (or 227g):
   1.86 mg (12%) 238.35 kcal (12%) 42.22 g (32%) 3.2 g (5%) 11. 03 g (20%)
  Other serving sizes 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
  2.01 mg (13%) 257.25 kcal (13%) 45.57 g (35%) 3.45 g (5%) 11.91 g (21%)
  Other serving sizes 1 6 oz container (6 oz) (or 170g):
  1.39 mg (9%) 178.5 kcal (9%) 31.62 g (24%) 2.4 g (4%) 8.26 g (15%)
17. Yogurt, fruit, lowfat, with low calorie sweetener, fortified with vitamin D – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0. 82 mg (5%) 105 kcal (5%) 18.6 g (14%) 1.41 g (2%) 4.86 g (9%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 8 oz container (8 oz) (or 227g):
   1.86 mg (12%) 238.35 kcal (12%) 42.22 g (32%) 3.2 g (5%) 11.03 g (20%)
  Other serving sizes 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
  2.01 mg (13%) 257.25 kcal (13%) 45.57 g (35%) 3.45 g (5%) 11.91 g (21%)
  Other serving sizes 1 6 oz container (6 oz) (or 170g):
  1.39 mg (9%) 178.5 kcal (9%) 31.62 g (24%) 2.4 g (4%) 8.26 g (15%)
18. Yogurt, fruit, low fat, 10 grams protein per 8 ounce – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0. 74 mg (5%) 102 kcal (5%) 19.05 g (15%) 1.08 g (2%) 4.37 g (8%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   1.81 mg (12%) 249.9 kcal (12%) 46.67 g (36%) 2.65 g (4%) 10.71 g (19%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (6 oz) (or 170g):
  1.26 mg (8%) 173.4 kcal (9%) 32.39 g (25%) 1.84 g (3%) 7.43 g (13%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  1.68 mg (11%) 231.54 kcal (12%) 43.24 g (33%) 2.45 g (4%) 9.92 g (18%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container and Dannon Sprinkl’ins (4.1 oz) (or 116g):
  0.86 mg (6%) 118.32 kcal (6%) 22.1 g (17%) 1.25 g (2%) 5.07 g (9%)
  Other serving sizes .5 container (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.84 mg (6%) 115.26 kcal (6%) 21.53 g (17%) 1.22 g (2%) 4.94 g (9%)
19. Yogurt, fruit, low fat, 10 grams protein per 8 ounce, fortified with vitamin D – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.74 mg (5%) 102 kcal (5%) 19.05 g (15%) 1.08 g (2%) 4.37 g (8%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   1.81 mg (12%) 249.9 kcal (12%) 46.67 g (36%) 2.65 g (4%) 10.71 g (19%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (6 oz) (or 170g):
  1.26 mg (8%) 173.4 kcal (9%) 32.39 g (25%) 1.84 g (3%) 7.43 g (13%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  1.68 mg (11%) 231.54 kcal (12%) 43.24 g (33%) 2.45 g (4%) 9.92 g (18%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container and Dannon Sprinkl’ins (4.1 oz) (or 116g):
  0.86 mg (6%) 118.32 kcal (6%) 22.1 g (17%) 1.25 g (2%) 5.07 g (9%)
  Other serving sizes .5 container (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.84 mg (6%) 115.26 kcal (6%) 21.53 g (17%) 1.22 g (2%) 4.94 g (9%)
20. Yogurt, fruit variety, nonfat, fortified with vitamin D – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.74 mg (5%) 95 kcal (5%) 19 g (15%) 0.2 g (0%) 4.4 g (8%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   1.81 mg (12%) 232.75 kcal (12%) 46.55 g (36%) 0.49 g (1%) 10.78 g (19%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (4.4 oz) (or 125g):
  0.93 mg (6%) 118.75 kcal (6%) 23.75 g (18%) 0.25 g (0%) 5.5 g (10%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (6 oz) (or 170g):
  1.26 mg (8%) 161.5 kcal (8%) 32.3 g (25%) 0.34 g (1%) 7.48 g (13%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  1.68 mg (11%) 215.65 kcal (11%) 43.13 g (33%) 0.45 g (1%) 9.99 g (18%)
21. Yogurt, fruit variety, nonfat – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.74 mg (5%) 95 kcal (5%) 19 g (15%) 0.2 g (0%) 4.4 g (8%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   1.81 mg (12%) 232.75 kcal (12%) 46.55 g (36%) 0.49 g (1%) 10.78 g (19%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (4.4 oz) (or 125g):
  0.93 mg (6%) 118.75 kcal (6%) 23.75 g (18%) 0.25 g (0%) 5.5 g (10%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (6 oz) (or 170g):
  1.26 mg (8%) 161.5 kcal (8%) 32.3 g (25%) 0.34 g (1%) 7.48 g (13%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  1.68 mg (11%) 215.65 kcal (11%) 43.13 g (33%) 0.45 g (1%) 9.99 g (18%)
22. Candies, confectioner’s coating, yogurt – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 13 / 100     food group – Sweets
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.7 mg (5%) 522 kcal (26%) 63.94 g (49%) 27 g (42%) 5.87 g (10%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup chips (or 170g):
   1.19 mg (8%) 887.4 kcal (44%) 108.7 g (84%) 45.9 g (71%) 9.98 g (18%)
23. Yogurt, fruit, low fat, 9 grams protein per 8 ounce – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.67 mg (4%) 99 kcal (5%) 18.64 g (14%) 1.15 g (2%) 3.98 g (7%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   1.64 mg (11%) 242.55 kcal (12%) 45.67 g (35%) 2.82 g (4%) 9.75 g (17%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (4.4 oz) (or 125g):
  0.84 mg (6%) 123.75 kcal (6%) 23.3 g (18%) 1.44 g (2%) 4.98 g (9%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (5 oz) (or 142g):
  0.95 mg (6%) 140.58 kcal (7%) 26.47 g (20%) 1.63 g (3%) 5.65 g (10%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (6 oz) (or 170g):
  1.14 mg (8%) 168.3 kcal (8%) 31.69 g (24%) 1.96 g (3%) 6.77 g (12%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  1.52 mg (10%) 224.73 kcal (11%) 42.31 g (33%) 2.61 g (4%) 9.03 g (16%)
  Other serving sizes .5 container (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.76 mg (5%) 111.87 kcal (6%) 21.06 g (16%) 1.3 g (2%) 4.5 g (8%)
24. Yogurt, vanilla or lemon flavor, nonfat milk, sweetened with low-calorie sweetener – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.67 mg (4%) 43 kcal (2%) 7.5 g (6%) 0.18 g (0%) 3.86 g (7%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 container (6 oz) (or 170g):
   1.14 mg (8%) 73.1 kcal (4%) 12.75 g (10%) 0.31 g (0%) 6.56 g (12%)
25. Yogurt, fruit, low fat, 9 grams protein per 8 ounce, fortified with vitamin D – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.67 mg (4%) 99 kcal (5%) 18.64 g (14%) 1.15 g (2%) 3.98 g (7%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   1.64 mg (11%) 242.55 kcal (12%) 45.67 g (35%) 2.82 g (4%) 9.75 g (17%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (4.4 oz) (or 125g):
  0.84 mg (6%) 123.75 kcal (6%) 23.3 g (18%) 1.44 g (2%) 4.98 g (9%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (5 oz) (or 142g):
  0.95 mg (6%) 140.58 kcal (7%) 26.47 g (20%) 1.63 g (3%) 5.65 g (10%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (6 oz) (or 170g):
  1.14 mg (8%) 168.3 kcal (8%) 31.69 g (24%) 1.96 g (3%) 6.77 g (12%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  1.52 mg (10%) 224.73 kcal (11%) 42.31 g (33%) 2.61 g (4%) 9.03 g (16%)
  Other serving sizes .5 container (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.76 mg (5%) 111.87 kcal (6%) 21.06 g (16%) 1.3 g (2%) 4.5 g (8%)
26. Yogurt, vanilla or lemon flavor, nonfat milk, sweetened with low-calorie sweetener, fortified with vitamin D – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.67 mg (4%) 43 kcal (2%) 7.5 g (6%) 0.18 g (0%) 3.86 g (7%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 container (6 oz) (or 170g):
   1.14 mg (8%) 73.1 kcal (4%) 12.75 g (10%) 0.31 g (0%) 6.56 g (12%)
27. Yogurt, plain, whole milk, 8 grams protein per 8 ounce – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.59 mg (4%) 61 kcal (3%) 4.66 g (4%) 3.25 g (5%) 3.47 g (6%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (8 fl oz) (or 245g):
   1.45 mg (10%) 149.45 kcal (7%) 11.42 g (9%) 7.96 g (12%) 8.5 g (15%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (8 oz) (or 227g):
  1.34 mg (9%) 138.47 kcal (7%) 10.58 g (8%) 7.38 g (11%) 7.88 g (14%)
  Other serving sizes .5 container (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.67 mg (4%) 68.93 kcal (3%) 5.27 g (4%) 3.67 g (6%) 3.92 g (7%)
28. Babyfood, yogurt, whole milk, with fruit, multigrain cereal and added DHA – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Baby Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.59 mg (4%) 98 kcal (5%) 13.22 g (10%) 3.53 g (5%) 3.4 g (6%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 oz (or 31g):
   0.18 mg (1%) 30.38 kcal (2%) 4.1 g (3%) 1.09 g (2%) 1.05 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (or 113g):
  0.67 mg (4%) 110.74 kcal (6%) 14.94 g (11%) 3.99 g (6%) 3.84 g (7%)
29. Babyfood, yogurt, whole milk, with fruit, multigrain cereal and added iron – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 16 / 100     food group – Baby Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.54 mg (4%) 92 kcal (5%) 13 g (10%) 3.08 g (5%) 3.05 g (5%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 tbsp (or 16g):
   0.09 mg (1%) 14.72 kcal (1%) 2.08 g (2%) 0.49 g (1%) 0.49 g (1%)
  Other serving sizes 1 container (or 69g):
  0.37 mg (2%) 63.48 kcal (3%) 8.97 g (7%) 2.13 g (3%) 2.1 g (4%)
30. Yogurt, Greek, plain, nonfat – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 16 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.52 mg (3%) 59 kcal (3%) 3.6 g (3%) 0.39 g (1%) 10.19 g (18%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 container (or 170g):
   0.88 mg (6%) 100.3 kcal (5%) 6.12 g (5%) 0.66 g (1%) 17.32 g (31%)
31. Yogurt, frozen, flavors not chocolate, nonfat milk, with low-calorie sweetener – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 16 / 100     food group – Dairy and Egg Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.49 mg (3%) 104 kcal (5%) 19.7 g (15%) 0.8 g (1%) 4.4 g (8%)
  Typical Serving size of .5 cup (or 68g):
   0.33 mg (2%) 70.72 kcal (4%) 13.4 g (10%) 0.54 g (1%) 2.99 g (5%)
32. Frozen yogurts, chocolate, soft-serve – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Sweets
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.49 mg (3%) 160 kcal (8%) 24.9 g (19%) 6 g (9%) 4 g (7%)
  Typical Serving size of .5 cup (4 fl oz) (or 72g):
   0.35 mg (2%) 115.2 kcal (6%) 17.93 g (14%) 4.32 g (7%) 2.88 g (5%)
33. Frozen yogurts, chocolate, nonfat milk, sweetened without sugar – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 16 / 100     food group – Sweets
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.49 mg (3%) 107 kcal (5%) 19.7 g (15%) 0.8 g (1%) 4.4 g (8%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (or 186g):
   0.91 mg (6%) 199.02 kcal (10%) 36.64 g (28%) 1.49 g (2%) 8.18 g (15%)
34. Frozen yogurts, vanilla, soft-serve – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Sweets
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.42 mg (3%) 159 kcal (8%) 24.2 g (19%) 5.6 g (9%) 4 g (7%)
  Typical Serving size of .5 cup (or 72g):
   0.3 mg (2%) 114.48 kcal (6%) 17.42 g (13%) 4.03 g (6%) 2.88 g (5%)
35. Salad, grape and apple with yogurt and candied walnuts – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Fast Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.37 mg (2%) 117 kcal (6%) 15.73 g (12%) 5.05 g (8%) 2.15 g (4%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 item (or 163g):
   0.6 mg (4%) 190.71 kcal (10%) 25.64 g (20%) 8.23 g (13%) 3.5 g (6%)
36. McDONALD’S, Fruit ‘n Yogurt Parfait – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Fast Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.36 mg (2%) 105 kcal (5%) 20.72 g (16%) 1.3 g (2%) 2.73 g (5%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 item 5.2 oz (or 149g):
   0.54 mg (4%) 156.45 kcal (8%) 30.87 g (24%) 1.94 g (3%) 4.07 g (7%)
37. Tofu yogurt – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 16 / 100     food group – Legumes and Legume Products
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.31 mg (2%) 94 kcal (5%) 15.96 g (12%) 1.8 g (3%) 3.5 g (6%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (or 262g):
   0.81 mg (5%) 246.28 kcal (12%) 41.82 g (32%) 4.72 g (7%) 9.17 g (16%)
38. McDONALD’S, Fruit ‘n Yogurt Parfait (without granola) – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 16 / 100     food group – Fast Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.3 mg (2%) 90 kcal (5%) 17.67 g (14%) 1.13 g (2%) 2.47 g (4%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 item (or 142g):
   0.43 mg (3%) 127.8 kcal (6%) 25.09 g (19%) 1.6 g (2%) 3.51 g (6%)
39. Babyfood, apple yogurt dessert, strained – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 17 / 100     food group – Baby Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.28 mg (2%) 96 kcal (5%) 19.5 g (15%) 1.6 g (2%) 0.8 g (1%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 tbsp (or 15g):
   0.04 mg (0%) 14.4 kcal (1%) 2.93 g (2%) 0.24 g (0%) 0.12 g (0%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar NFS (or 113g):
  0.32 mg (2%) 108.48 kcal (5%) 22.04 g (17%) 1.81 g (3%) 0.9 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Beech-Nut Stage 2 (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.32 mg (2%) 108.48 kcal (5%) 22.04 g (17%) 1.81 g (3%) 0.9 g (2%)
40. Frozen yogurts, chocolate – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Sweets
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.28 mg (2%) 127 kcal (6%) 21.6 g (17%) 3.6 g (6%) 3 g (5%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (or 174g):
   0.49 mg (3%) 220.98 kcal (11%) 37.58 g (29%) 6.26 g (10%) 5.22 g (9%)
41. Frozen yogurts, flavors other than chocolate – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 14 / 100     food group – Sweets
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.28 mg (2%) 127 kcal (6%) 21.6 g (17%) 3.6 g (6%) 3 g (5%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 cup (or 174g):
   0.49 mg (3%) 220.98 kcal (11%) 37.58 g (29%) 6.26 g (10%) 5.22 g (9%)
42. Babyfood, dessert, banana yogurt, strained – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 16 / 100     food group – Baby Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.26 mg (2%) 78 kcal (4%) 17.35 g (13%) 0.52 g (1%) 1.1 g (2%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 tbsp (or 15g):
   0.04 mg (0%) 11.7 kcal (1%) 2.6 g (2%) 0.08 g (0%) 0.17 g (0%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar NFS (or 113g):
  0.29 mg (2%) 88.14 kcal (4%) 19.61 g (15%) 0.59 g (1%) 1.24 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Gerber Second Food (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.29 mg (2%) 88.14 kcal (4%) 19.61 g (15%) 0.59 g (1%) 1.24 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Beech-Nut Stage 2 (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.29 mg (2%) 88.14 kcal (4%) 19.61 g (15%) 0.59 g (1%) 1.24 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Heinz Strained-2 (4.25 oz) (or 120g):
  0.31 mg (2%) 93.6 kcal (5%) 20.82 g (16%) 0.62 g (1%) 1.32 g (2%)
43. Margarine-like spread with yogurt, approximately 40% fat, tub, with salt – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Fats and Oils
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.24 mg (2%) 330 kcal (17%) 2 g (2%) 35 g (54%) 2 g (4%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 tablespoon (or 14g):
   0.03 mg (0%) 46.2 kcal (2%) 0.28 g (0%) 4.9 g (8%) 0.28 g (1%)
44. Snacks, candy rolls, yogurt-covered, fruit flavored with high vitamin C – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Snacks
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.19 mg (1%) 359 kcal (18%) 74.64 g (57%) 6.53 g (10%) 0.46 g (1%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 Roll (or 23g):
   0.04 mg (0%) 82.57 kcal (4%) 17.17 g (13%) 1.5 g (2%) 0.11 g (0%)
45. Babyfood, dessert, peach yogurt – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Baby Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.18 mg (1%) 76 kcal (4%) 17.6 g (14%) 0.18 g (0%) 0.9 g (2%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 tbsp (or 15g):
   0.03 mg (0%) 11.4 kcal (1%) 2.64 g (2%) 0.03 g (0%) 0.14 g (0%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar NFS (or 113g):
  0.2 mg (1%) 85.88 kcal (4%) 19.89 g (15%) 0.2 g (0%) 1.02 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Gerber Second Food (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.2 mg (1%) 85.88 kcal (4%) 19.89 g (15%) 0.2 g (0%) 1.02 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Beech-Nut Stage 2 (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.2 mg (1%) 85.88 kcal (4%) 19.89 g (15%) 0.2 g (0%) 1.02 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Heinz Strained-2 (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.2 mg (1%) 85.88 kcal (4%) 19.89 g (15%) 0.2 g (0%) 1.02 g (2%)
46. Babyfood, banana juice with low fat yogurt – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 18 / 100     food group – Baby Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.14 mg (1%) 89 kcal (4%) 17.54 g (13%) 0.8 g (1%) 2.5 g (4%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 fl oz (or 31.5g):
   0.04 mg (0%) 28.04 kcal (1%) 5.53 g (4%) 0.25 g (0%) 0.79 g (1%)
  Other serving sizes 1 bottle NFS (or 126g):
  0.18 mg (1%) 112.14 kcal (6%) 22.1 g (17%) 1.01 g (2%) 3.15 g (6%)
47. Babyfood, mixed fruit juice with low fat yogurt – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 19 / 100     food group – Baby Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.14 mg (1%) 76 kcal (4%) 14.68 g (11%) 0.8 g (1%) 2.4 g (4%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 fl oz (or 31.5g):
   0.04 mg (0%) 23.94 kcal (1%) 4.62 g (4%) 0.25 g (0%) 0.76 g (1%)
  Other serving sizes 1 bottle NFS (or 126g):
  0.18 mg (1%) 95.76 kcal (5%) 18.5 g (14%) 1.01 g (2%) 3.02 g (5%)
48. Babyfood, dessert, blueberry yogurt, strained – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Baby Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.14 mg (1%) 77 kcal (4%) 17.05 g (13%) 0.7 g (1%) 0.5 g (1%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 tbsp (or 15g):
   0.02 mg (0%) 11.55 kcal (1%) 2.56 g (2%) 0.11 g (0%) 0.08 g (0%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar NFS (or 113g):
  0.16 mg (1%) 87.01 kcal (4%) 19.27 g (15%) 0.79 g (1%) 0.57 g (1%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Heinz Strained-2 (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.16 mg (1%) 87.01 kcal (4%) 19.27 g (15%) 0.79 g (1%) 0.57 g (1%)
49. Babyfood, mixed fruit yogurt, strained – Zinc
  Nutritional Value : 15 / 100     food group – Baby Foods
  Zinc Calories Carbohydrate Fat Protein
  Profile for a 100g serving :
  0.11 mg (1%) 75 kcal (4%) 16.23 g (12%) 0.8 g (1%) 0.8 g (1%)
  Typical Serving size of 1 tbsp (or 15g):
   0.02 mg (0%) 11.25 kcal (1%) 2.43 g (2%) 0.12 g (0%) 0.12 g (0%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar NFS (or 113g):
  0.12 mg (1%) 84.75 kcal (4%) 18.34 g (14%) 0.9 g (1%) 0.9 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Gerber Second Food (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.12 mg (1%) 84.75 kcal (4%) 18.34 g (14%) 0.9 g (1%) 0.9 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Beech-Nut Stage 2 (4 oz) (or 113g):
  0.12 mg (1%) 84.75 kcal (4%) 18.34 g (14%) 0.9 g (1%) 0.9 g (2%)
  Other serving sizes 1 jar Heinz Strained-2 (4.25 oz) (or 120g):
  0.13 mg (1%) 90 kcal (5%) 19.48 g (15%) 0.96 g (1%) 0.96 g (2%)

Fortification of yogurt with nano and micro sized calcium, iron and zinc, effect on the physicochemical and rheological properties

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lwt.2017.03.025Get rights and content

Highlights

Fortification of a dairy products with minerals.

Nanoparticles and micro-minerals were incorporated to yogurt.

Nanoparticles fortification improve syneresis compared to micro-minerals.

Nanoparticles fortification does not alter the flow properties of yogurt.

Nanoparticles fortification enhances the consistency and firmness of yogurt.

Abstract

Yogurt is a highly consumed dairy product, regarded as healthy. The objective of this study was to fortify a set-type yogurt with two levels of iron oxide, zinc oxide, and calcium phosphate nanoparticles. Minerals were also used to make a comparison between nano and micro-sized minerals, to determine their effect on the physicochemical and rheological properties during 28 days of storage. The pH decreased while acidity increased in all samples during storage. Density and moisture did not show differences between samples, or during storage. Color parameters showed variations in iron-fortified samples, whereas an increase in net color change through storage was recorded for all samples. Syneresis increased significantly in micro-mineral samples, being lower in nano-fortified ones; during storage the separation significantly increased in all samples. The Herschel-Bulkley flow model fitted well the non-Newtonian behavior of the yogurt. The yogurts fortified with calcium and zinc nanoparticles increased their consistency and firmness concerning to the other samples, both parameters decreased during storage in all samples; yield stress and flow index did not significantly change during storage. In vitro digestion analysis of the yogurt with nanoparticles showed more solubility than micro-minerals, for the three minerals. In general, nanoparticles showed advantages over conventional fortification.

Keywords

Yogurt

Fortification

Nanoparticles

Rheological properties

Physicochemical properties

Chemical compounds studied in this article

Calcium phosphate (PubChem CID: 24441)

Iron oxide (PubChem CID: 14833)

Zinc oxide (PubChem CID: 14806)

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17 Best Foods for Zinc

  • Zinc is a mineral that’s important for many functions including maintaining a strong immune system.
  • There are plenty of ways to get enough zinc in your diet, even if you’re vegan or vegetarian.
  • Oysters, king crab, pumpkin seeds, and cashews are some of the richest sources of zinc.
  • Visit Insider’s Health Reference library for more advice.

Zinc is one of the most abundant trace elements in the human body, playing an important role in immune function, wound healing, your sense of taste and smell, and the production of key proteins and DNA.

Because the body can’t store it in significant amounts, it’s important to get enough

zinc

in your diet. ​​And that’s sometimes harder said than done as an estimated 17% of the global population — and 40% of the elderly — is at risk for a zinc deficiency.

Important: The daily recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for zinc is 11 milligrams for adult men, and 8 milligrams for adult women. This requirement increases to 11 milligrams in pregnant women, and 12 milligrams in lactating women.

It’s best to get this mineral through your diet rather than a supplement, says Jonathan Clinthorne, PhD, a nutritional scientist and Director of Nutrition at Atkins. 

With supplements, it’s easier to consume too much zinc, which can cause problems like a copper deficiency,

high cholesterol

, and impaired immune function. With that in mind, below are some of the richest food sources of zinc.

1. Eggs

Eggs can be a nutritious part of any meal, not just breakfast.

4kodiak/Getty Images

One large hard-boiled egg contains 0.53 milligrams of zinc (4.8% RDA for men, 6.6% RDA for women). 

Eggs are a complete protein, meaning they provide all nine essential amino acids — none of which your body can produce on its own, so you have to get them through food. 

Eggs get a bad rap for being high in cholesterol, but the vast majority of cholesterol is produced in the body, and research has shown that limiting dietary cholesterol doesn’t necessarily lower levels of the “bad” artery-clogging LDL cholesterol in the blood. 

So, as long as you aren’t serving them up with bacon and butter-loaded toast, eggs are a healthy food packed with high-quality protein and important minerals. That said, experts recommend limiting egg consumption to seven per week.

2. Regular and sweet potatoes

Baked potato wedges are a healthier and equally delicious option compared to French fries.

margouillat photo/Shutterstock

One medium-sized russet potato contains 0.61 milligrams of zinc (5.5% RDA for men, 7.6% RDA for women). Sweet potatoes have slightly less than regular potatoes: 0.37 milligrams (3.4% RDA for men, 4.6% RDA for women). 

Rather than topping your potato with sour cream, butter, and bacon bits — all of which are high in saturated fat — opt for healthy alternatives like avocado, broccoli and feta cheese, three-bean vegetarian chili, or pesto and sundried tomatoes. Black beans, salsa, and nonfat plain Greek yogurt is another high-fiber, low-fat option.

3. Sesame seeds

Sprinkle sesame seeds over a stir fry.

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One tablespoon of sesame seeds contains 0.7 milligrams of zinc (6.4% RDA for men, 8.8% RDA for women).

Sesame seeds are also a source of manganese and calcium, with 0.22 milligrams (9.6% RDA for men, 12.2% RDA for women) and 87.8 milligrams (8.8% RDA), respectively. 

Manganese helps the body metabolize fats and carbohydrates and plays a role in blood sugar regulation. It also helps your body absorb calcium, which is essential for building and maintaining strong, healthy bones, and ensuring your heart, muscles, and nerves are working properly.

4. Mozzarella or cheddar cheese

Low-fat cheddar is a healthier option to its traditional form.

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A 1-ounce serving of part-skim mozzarella cheese contains 0.78 milligrams of zinc (7.1% RDA for men, 9.8% RDA for women). 

The same serving size of low-fat cheddar contains 0.52 milligrams of zinc (4.7% RDA for men, 6.5% RDA for women).

Dairy products, including cheese, are generally a good source of calcium, but to absorb calcium effectively, your body needs vitamin D. So try pairing your cheese with foods high in vitamin D — like salmon, tuna, fortified cereals and yogurts, beef liver, and egg yolks.

5. Hemp seeds

The nutty flavor of hemp seeds make it a great addition to your oatmeal.

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One tablespoon of hemp seeds contains 1 milligram of zinc (9% RDA for men, 12.5% RDA for women). 

Hemp seeds add a nutty taste and subtle crunch to salads, grain bowls, smoothie bowls, oatmeal, and yogurt. You can also cook with hemp seed oil, which contains all the essential amino acids, is high in many minerals including phosphorus, sulfur, and potassium, and is rich in heart-healthy fatty acids.

6. Yogurt

Add fresh fruit to plain yogurt for an extra zing without the added sugars of flavored yogurts.

Rachel Hosie

A 7-ounce portion of plain low-fat Greek yogurt contains 1.2 milligrams of zinc (10.9% RDA for men, 15% RDA for women).

Yogurt is chock full of probiotics — live, gut-friendly bacteria that help to support a healthy digestive system and immune system. 

As most flavored yogurts contain added sugar, it’s best to stick to plain yogurt and add your own sweetness with fresh or frozen fruit, or a small drizzle of honey. 

Note: Greek yogurt tends to be higher in protein and contains probiotics. Look for yogurts that say “live and active cultures” on the label.

7. Chickpeas

Grind chickpeas with Tahini, salt, and olive oil for a smooth, deliciously fresh hummus.

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A ½ cup serving of cooked chickpeas contains 1.26 milligrams of zinc (11.4% RDA for men, 15.7% RDA for women). 

Chickpeas can be added to salads, wraps, soups, and pasta, or smashed into a hummus dip for pita chips or crudités. 

However, it’s important to note that while they’re an excellent source of fiber, with 6.25 grams per serving (16.4% RDA for men, 25% RDA for women), chickpeas also contain a complex sugar called raffinose, which can cause gas because it isn’t easily digested.

8. Lentils

Lentil soup is a healthy, filling meal that’s also vegetarian friendly.

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A ½ cup serving of cooked lentils contains 1.26 milligrams of zinc (11.4% RDA for men, 15.7% RDA for women). 

Not only are lentils low in fat and high in satiating protein and fiber, but they also provide 179 micrograms of folate per serving (44.8% RDA). This B vitamin plays a major role in immune function and nerve health and also helps your body draw energy from food. 

Folate also helps lower the risk of neural tube defects in a pregnant woman’s unborn baby.

Quick tip: Try soaking dry chickpeas and lentils for a few hours before cooking them, says Andres Ayesta, MS, a registered dietitian and founder of Planos Nutrition. Many seeds, grains, legumes, and nuts contain phytic acid — a compound that binds with some minerals (including zinc) and thus blocks your body from absorbing them. Soaking these foods reduces the phytic acid content so you can absorb more zinc from your meal.

9. Cashews 

Add cashews to a stir fry for an extra level of flavor.

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A 1-ounce serving of dry roasted cashews contains 1.59 milligrams of zinc (14.5% RDA for men, 19.9% RDA for women).

Pecans, Brazil nuts, and almonds are other nuts that are good sources of zinc. 

Moreover, nuts, in general, can boost your heart health by reducing inflammation and LDL cholesterol levels.

10. Chicken (dark meat)

Come over to the dark side and enjoy some dark meat for an extra zinc kick.

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A 3-ounce serving of dark meat chicken contains 1.99 milligrams of zinc (18% RDA for men, 24.9% RDA for women).

While dark meat chicken has a few more calories and marginally higher saturated fat than white meat, it also offers twice the amount of healthy unsaturated fat, which can help your body absorb vitamins and minerals (like zinc) more effectively. 

You can also make your meal a tad healthier by removing the skin, which is high in saturated fat.

11. Squash and pumpkin seeds

Pumpkin seeds are a tasty snack on their own or a great addition to salads and stir fry.

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A 1-ounce serving of dried pumpkin seeds contains 2.21 milligrams of zinc (20% RDA for men, 27.6% RDA for women).

Pumpkin is just one type of squash — other squash seeds from butternut squash, acorn squash, and spaghetti squash offer a comparable amount of zinc. 

Note: Sprouted squash seeds come with a higher risk of foodborne illness from bacteria such as Salmonella or E. coli.

12. Pork

Shred up some pork for a sandwich or taco.

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A 3-ounce serving of bone-in cooked pork chop contains 2.64 milligrams of zinc (24% RDA for men, 33% RDA for women).

It’s worth noting that pork is considered red meat, so it can contain large amounts of saturated fat. You should limit your consumption to a maximum of two servings (or 6 ounces) of red meat per week — or half that if you have

heart disease

or high cholesterol.

Also, keep in mind that not all cuts are created equal when it comes to fat content — pork tenderloin is the leanest cut of pork. Other low-fat options are boneless loin roast, and boneless extra-lean ham, which all have less than 6 grams of fat. 

13. Lobster

Splurge on a lobster roll every now and again — you can say it’s for your health.

Katie M./Yelp

A 3-ounce serving of lobster contains 3.44 milligrams of zinc (31% RDA for men, 43% RDA for women).

Lobster also contains 62 micrograms of selenium per serving. This trace mineral has many health benefits, such as assisting with DNA and thyroid hormone production, preventing cell damage, and protecting you from infections.

14. Lamb

This rich and spicy Iraqi breakfast dish is made with ground lamb.

Fanfo/Shutterstock

A 3-ounce serving of cooked lamb contains 3.97 milligrams of zinc (36% RDA for men, 49.6% RDA for women).

Not only is lamb high in protein, but it’s also a good source of vitamin B12, with 2.22 micrograms per serving (92.5% RDA). 

Vitamin B12 is a versatile nutrient that supports brain function, helps form red blood cells, facilitates hair and nail growth, and may also prevent birth defects.

Note: Lamb is considered a red meat and therefore should be limited to two servings per week, or half that for people with heart disease or high cholesterol.

15. Ground beef

For even more zinc, eat your ground beef burger on a sesame seed bun.

Rachel Hosie

A single 3-ounce beef patty contains 5.31 milligrams of zinc (48.3% RDA for men, 66.4% RDA for women).

Beef is also a good source of iron, with 2.48 milligrams per serving (28.5% RDA for men, 16.8% RDA for women). Iron helps to make the red blood cells that transport oxygen throughout the body. 

However, beef can also be high in saturated fat, which may increase your “bad” cholesterol levels and thus elevate your risk of heart disease. For this reason, it’s best to opt for cuts that are at least 90% lean, and to include this in your weekly red meat consumption, which ought to be limited to no more than 6 ounces per week

16. Alaskan king crab

Alaskan king crab is great on its own or as side.

dapan photography/Getty Images

A 3-ounce serving of Alaskan king crab contains 6.48 milligrams of zinc (59% RDA for men, 81% RDA for women).

King crab is also a source of omega-3 fatty acids, which may help keep your heart healthy by lowering blood pressure and enhancing blood vessel function. This family of fats may help protect against certain autoimmune diseases or benefit those with autoimmune disorders. There is some research that omega 3s lower the risk of certain cancers, however, more studies are needed.

17. Oysters

Oysters are one of the best sources of zinc.

Sandra Stoiber / EyeEm/Getty Images

Two raw oysters contain 11 milligrams of zinc (100% RDA for men, 137.5% RDA for women).

While oysters are one of the best food sources of zinc, pregnant women should avoid eating them raw. Raw foods, like shellfish, are more likely to cause foodborne illnesses like Toxoplasma gondii, which may lead to premature birth or miscarriage. 

Note: Vibriosis is a foodborne illness caused by eating raw or undercooked shellfish, and each year, approximately 80,000 people get it and 100 people die from it.

Insider’s takeaway

“Zinc is found in many foods, so there isn’t usually a need for supplementation if you have a varied diet that’s based on whole foods,” says Ayesta.

Keep in mind that the zinc in animal products is more easily absorbed by the body than the zinc from plant foods. Your body also tends to absorb more zinc when it’s consumed alongside protein.

Finally, be careful not to consistently exceed the upper limit of 40 milligrams per day, says Clinthorne, as excessive zinc intake can cause a copper deficiency and other issues.

90,000 Five zinc-rich foods to boost your immune system

Eggs are an important source of zinc
Photo: pixabay.com

During periods of infection, the usual proportion of zinc in the diet should be slightly increased.

Zinc is found in many medicines for cold and flu symptoms because it boosts immunity and prevents inflammation.Therefore, as a preventive measure, experts recommend eating more zinc-rich foods. The MedicForum portal has prepared a list of five such products.

Meat . Any meat, beef or chicken, is a great source of zinc. 100 g of raw minced meat contains about 40% of the RDA for zinc.

Legumes . For vegetarians, legumes are the best meat substitute. A cup of cooked beans provides up to 38% of your daily zinc requirement.A cup of chickpeas – up to 18%. In addition, legumes are rich in fiber, folate, and iron.

Pumpkin seeds. 40 g pumpkin seeds can provide up to 15% of the body’s daily value for zinc. Also, this product provides other substances useful for immunity: magnesium, proteins and antioxidants.

Yogurt . All dairy products are a source of zinc, but yogurt contains the maximum amount: one glass contains up to 11% of the daily value.In addition, it contains probiotics that strengthen the intestinal microflora.

Eggs . One large chicken egg contains approximately 5% of the RDA for zinc. As additional elements that strengthen the immune system, it also contains B vitamins, selenium and choline.

90,000 10 products for immunity, good vision and healthy skin

Zinc is an important trace element that affects both individual functions and the body as a whole.Zinc is involved in wound healing, DNA and hemoglobin formation. In this article, we will explain why you need zinc and which foods contain the most zinc.

Zinc and health – what you need to know

Zinc affects many vital functions of the body, namely vision, immunity, skin health and much more. So what and how does zinc affect?

Vitamin A is needed for good vision, and zinc is needed for vitamin A to be absorbed normally.A diet rich in zinc improves the quality of night vision. In addition, zinc reduces the likelihood of age-related macular degeneration, which leads to loss of vision.

  • Resistance to colds

Zinc affects the functioning of T cells, as well as the self-reproduction of DNA, which directly affects the state of the immune system. Simply put, people who are deficient in zinc are more likely to get colds.

Like most vitamins and minerals, zinc affects not only the internal state, but also the appearance.Zinc is essential for the healing of wounds and cuts. In addition, zinc supports the health of the digestive tract, which affects the condition of the skin.

According to some studies, zinc affects the condition of the prostate gland and is necessary for the prevention of prostate cancer. In addition, zinc affects male reproductive functions.

Zinc deficiency symptoms

Symptoms of zinc deficiency include frequent colds, leaky gut, persistent diarrhea, poor vision, infertility, thinning hair, stunted growth in children, and slow wound healing.

The recommended daily intake of zinc in the diet is 11 mg for men and 8 mg for women.

People who are at risk of zinc deficiency: vegetarians, pregnant women, people with digestive problems, people who abuse alcohol.

Top 10 products with high zinc content

1. Seafood

100 grams of cooked oysters contains 78.6 mg of zinc (that is, more than 5 daily allowances). Also, zinc is found in lobster and crab meat.Since these foods are very high in zinc, it is not recommended to eat them too often.

2. Meat

If you love meat, you are less likely to be deficient in zinc than vegetarians. Most zinc is found in beef, lamb, pork, chicken and turkey. For example, 100 grams of beef contains 12.3 mg of zinc.

3. Wheatgrass

Wheatgrass is an excellent source of zinc suitable for vegetarians (in 100 grams – 16.7 mg of zinc).If you’re not sure what to cook with wheatgrass, try adding them to salads.

4. Spinach

Spinach is a leading product in the content of vitamins and minerals. It contains vitamins A, E, K, as well as calcium, iron, magnesium and potassium. 100 grams of spinach contains 0.8 mg of zinc.

5. Seeds

100 grams of pumpkin seeds contains 10.3 mg of zinc. In addition, zinc is found in sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, Spanish sage and flax seeds.

6. Nuts

Nuts are also considered a good source of zinc. In particular, cashews contain the most zinc – 5.6 mg per 100 grams. Other types of nuts that contain zinc include pine nuts, pecans, almonds, walnuts, peanuts, and hazelnuts.

7. Cocoa and chocolate

Cocoa and chocolate are not only tasty, but also healthy. 100 grams of cocoa powder contains 6.8 mg of zinc, and 100 grams of dark unsweetened chocolate contains 9.6 mg.It turns out that the habit of pampering yourself with chocolate has health benefits! Read about how to make cocoa in our article “Why hot cocoa with milk is useful and how to make it – 5 recipes.”

8. Vegetables, legumes and mushrooms

Certain types of vegetables and legumes are also sources of zinc. These are soybeans, peas, lima beans, green beans, Brussels sprouts and asparagus, beets, potatoes, and pumpkin. Zinc is also contained in some types of mushrooms, such as morel, portobello (champignon variety), oyster mushroom, etc.

9. Dairy and fermented milk products

Good sources of zinc are yogurt and kefir. Depending on the fat content and manufacturer, a cup of yogurt or kefir can contain about 2 mg of zinc. In addition, both yogurt and kefir are rich in probiotics, which are beneficial for the health of the intestines and the body as a whole. Also, zinc is found in cheddar and mozzarella (about 3 mg in 100 grams of cheese).

10. Fruit

Zinc is not found in all fruits and in not very large quantities.Sources of zinc are avocados, pomegranates, berries (blackberries, raspberries, logan berries), dates.

How zinc is useful: 9 main beneficial properties of zinc

Regular use of this micronutrient can help to avoid many diseases. And the benefits of zinc are the following 9 properties.

No. 1 Maintaining the normal functioning of the thyroid gland

Zinc acts on thyroid hormones and regulates their activity. And its deficiency increases the likelihood of diseases of this organ and may be accompanied by hair loss.When there is any thyroid disorder, the person’s iron levels are checked and the deficiency is replenished with supplements and foods.

No. 2 Zinc for immunity

The element in question activates T-lymphocytes and accelerates the transmission of signals between cells of the immune system, as a result of which the body quickly reacts to the pathogen and begins to fight it. What’s more, a 2012 study found that zinc supplementation reduced the duration of colds in adults over 19.It is also added to some nasal sprays and other cold medicines. The lack of this element leads to a weakening of the immune system.

# 3 Promotes wound healing and acne

The skin contains 5% of zinc from its total amount in the human body. It is involved in the synthesis of collagen, and in case of ulcers, burns, wounds and other skin lesions, a deficiency of this element appears. Therefore, Zn is a part of wound healing agents and is actively used in medicine.

A pathology such as acne is also associated with a lack of zinc. This disease occurs in 4.9% of the world’s population and is an acne rash, which is caused by the activity of the bacteria Propionibacterium acnes and the blockage of the sebaceous glands. The substance in question inhibits the activity of these bacteria and helps in the fight against acne.

# 4 Zinc for hair

Zinc deficiency, as well as its overdose, negatively affects hair growth and health. The use of the substance in question in too large or small amounts leads to telogenic, androgenic and alopecia areata (alopecia).But if you follow the recommended dosages, then there will be no problems with your hair.

# 5 Affects male fertility

Fertility in men is their ability to have children. The seminal fluid of infertile men is characterized by significantly reduced levels of Zn. And its use increases sperm motility and helps to increase their number.

The results of an experiment conducted in the Netherlands showed that after a man takes zinc sulfate, more active sperm cells are produced in his body.However, infertile men should consult a doctor before using supplements.

No. 6 Increases the likelihood of having a healthy baby

Pregnant women need to consume more zinc than everyone else, namely at least 12 mg per day. This is due to the fact that a certain amount of this element is required not only for the woman’s body, but also for the normal development of the fetus. It is involved in the synthesis of DNA, protein and cell division.

Low levels of this substance can lead to miscarriage, fetal growth retardation and premature birth.

No. 7 Contributes to the normal functioning of the gastrointestinal tract

If a person takes a normalized amount of Zn with food and food additives, then the likelihood of any deviations from the gastrointestinal tract is extremely small. However, with serious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (stomach ulcer, Crohn’s disease, gastrointestinal tract, celiac disease), there is a deficiency of the substance in question.

In addition, the WHO recommends zinc tablets to treat diarrhea in children and adults.

# 8 Strengthens bones

It is generally accepted that calcium is directly related to bone strength. But zinc is just as important for maintaining bone mass and its strength. Low Zn intake can lead to bone fragility and loss of bone mass, especially in postmenopausal women.

No. 9 Promotes good vision and prevents its pathology

Zinc is one of the key components of enzymes that affect visual acuity and the ability of a person to see in the dark.A large lack of it provokes changes in the retina of the eye and entails a deterioration in vision. Many researchers have suggested that this chemical slows down the progression of age-related macular degeneration.

Its deficiency can lead to many negative consequences for a person. But how does it manifest itself and who is most inclined to it?

Nutridrink instructions for use: indications, contraindications, side effects – description Nutridrink is a specialized product of dietary therapeutic and preventive dietary nutrition. Liquid high-protein, high-calorie mixture with banana flavor: bottle reservoir.200 ml (54841)

C is a specialized product of dietary therapeutic food – liquid high-protein, high-calorie, low-lactose mixture with vanilla flavor for children over 3 years old and adults.

Composition (mixture with vanilla flavor): water, maltodextrin, cow’s milk proteins, sugar, vegetable oils (rapeseed, sunflower), potassium citrate, emulsifier (soy lecithin), flavor, magnesium chloride, tricalcium phosphate, acidity regulator ( citric acid), choline chloride, carotenoids (contain soy: betacarotene, lutein, lycopene oleoresin from tomatoes), calcium hydroxide, sodium L-ascorbate, potassium hydroxide, iron lactate, zinc sulfate, dye (curcumin), magnesium hydroxide, nicotinamide, retinol acetate, copper gluconate, DL-α-tocopherol acetate, sodium selenite, manganese sulphate, calcium D-pantothenate, chromium chloride, D-biotin, colecalciferol, thiamine hydrochloride, pteroylmonoglutamic acid, pyridoxine hydrochloride, cyanocobalamin, ribofodide iodide , sodium fluoride, phytomenadione.

C specialized product of dietary therapeutic and preventive dietary nutrition – liquid high-protein, high-calorie mixture with banana or strawberry or chocolate flavors for adults over 18 years old.

Composition (mixture with banana flavor): water, maltodextrin, cow’s milk proteins, sugar, vegetable oils (rapeseed, sunflower), potassium citrate, emulsifier (soy lecithin), magnesium chloride, flavoring, tricalcium phosphate, acidity regulator ( citric acid), choline chloride, carotenoids (contain soy: betacarotene, lutein, lycopene oleoresin from tomatoes), calcium hydroxide, sodium L-ascorbate, potassium hydroxide, iron lactate, dye (curcumin), zinc sulfate, magnesium hydroxide, nicotinamide, retinol acetate, copper gluconate, DL-α-tocopherol acetate, sodium selenite, manganese sulphate, calcium D-pantothenate, chromium chloride, D-biotin, colecalciferol, thiamine hydrochloride, pteroylmonoglutamic acid, pyridoxine hydrochloride, cyanocobalamin, ribofodide iodide , sodium fluoride, phytomenadione.

Composition (mix with strawberry flavor): water, maltodextrin, cow’s milk proteins, sugar, vegetable oils (rapeseed, sunflower), potassium citrate, emulsifier (soy lecithin), magnesium chloride, tricalcium phosphate, acidity regulator (citric acid ), flavoring, choline chloride, dye (carminic acid), carotenoids (contain soy: betacarotene, lutein, lycopene oleoresin from tomatoes), calcium hydroxide, sodium L-ascorbate, potassium hydroxide, iron lactate, zinc sulfate, magnesium hydroxide, nicotinamide, retinol acetate, copper gluconate, DL-α-tocopherol acetate, sodium selenite, manganese sulfate, calcium D-pantothenate, chromium chloride, D-biotin, colecalciferol, thiamine hydrochloride, pteroyl monoglutamic acid, pyridoxine hydrochloride, cyanocobalamin, sodium molybdenum, sodium ribobalamin iodide, sodium fluoride, phytomenadione.

Composition (mixture with chocolate flavor): water, maltodextrin, cow’s milk proteins, sugar, vegetable oils (rapeseed, sunflower), cocoa, flavoring, emulsifier (soy lecithin), acidity regulator (citric acid), potassium citrate, magnesium chloride, calcium hydroxide, choline chloride, carotenoids (contain soy: betacarotene, lutein, lycopene, oleoresin from tomatoes), dipotassium hydrogen phosphate, sodium L-ascorbate, tricalcium phosphate, potassium chloride, stabilizer (carrageenan), potassium hydroxide, iron lactate, zinc sulfate, nicotinamide, retinol acetate, copper gluconate, DL-α-tocopherol acetate, sodium selenite, manganese sulfate, calcium D-pantothenate, chromium chloride, D-biotin, colecalciferol, thiamine hydrochloride, pteroylmonoglutamic acid, pyridoxine hydrochloride, sodium cytobalamine , sodium fluoride, riboflavin, potassium iodide, phytomenadione.

K kJ / 150 kcal 1 Vitamin B336 ) 902 Vitamin B 9 )
Nutritional value 100 ml
with banana / strawberry / vanilla flavors with chocolate flavor
Proteins 5.9 g 5.8 g
Fats 5.8 g 5.8 g
incl. saturated fat 0.6 g 0.7 g
Carbohydrates 18.4 g 18.5 g
incl. sugar 6.7 g 6.8 g
lactose <0.025 g <0.025 g
Dietary fiber 0.3 g
g
Vitamins
Vitamin A 123 μg RE 123 μg RE
Vitamin D 3 1.1 μg 1.1 μg
Vitamin E 1.9 mg α-TE 1.9 mg α-TE
Vitamin K 8 μg 8 μg
0.23 mg 0.23 mg
Riboflavin (Vitamin B 2 ) 0.24 mg 0.24 mg
Niacin (nicotinamide, 9033 B) 3 2.7

2.7 mg NE
Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B 5 ) 0.8 mg 0.8 mg
Vitamin B 6 0.26 mg 0.26 mg
40 μg 40 μg
Vitamin B 12 0.32 μg 0.32 μg
Biotin 6 μg 6

Vitamin 902 902 9032 15 mg 15 μg
Minerals and trace elements
Sodium (Na) 90 mg 90 mg
Potassium (K) mg 159 mg

Chlorides (Cl ) 87 mg 87 mg
Calcium (Ca) 91 mg 91 mg
Phosphorus (P ) 78 mg 78 mg
Magnesium (Mg) 23 mg 23 mg
Iron (Fe) 2.

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