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What To Do For Urinary Retention

Having trouble urinating? You may be experiencing urinary retention.

Urinary retention is a condition in which someone struggles to empty their bladder. If you’re suffering from urinary retention, you may be unable to fully empty your bladder, or you might not be able to start urinating at all.

Keep reading to learn about the symptoms and causes of urinary retention, as well as ways to lower your chances of developing the condition using urinary retention remedies, and medical treatment options that can help you find relief.

Symptoms of Urinary Retention

Symptoms differ depending on whether you’re experiencing acute or chronic urinary retention.

Acute urinary retention is the sudden inability to urinate despite having a full bladder — and it’s a medical emergency that should be treated immediately.

Acute urinary retention symptoms include:

  • A complete inability to urinate
  • A painful and urgent need to urinate
  • Pain, swelling, or bloating in the lower abdomen

Meanwhile, chronic urinary retention develops more gradually. Typically, people with this form of urinary retention can urinate, but they can’t completely empty all of the urine from their bladder.

Chronic urinary retention symptoms include:

  • The need to urinate, but with little success
  • Having to strain to urinate 
  • Feeling the need to urinate again shortly after using the bathroom
  • A weakened stream of urine
  • Urinating more than eight times per day
  • Urinary incontinence

Causes of Urinary Retention

Blockage in the urethra

In order to urinate, all parts of your urinary tract need to be working properly — anything that blocks the flow of urine can cause urinary retention. In men, the urethra may be blocked by an enlarged prostate, which is a common condition for older males. Blockages can also be caused by conditions such as urinary tract infections, urinary stones, and sexually transmitted diseases.

Weak bladder muscles

The bladder is a balloon-shaped muscle designed to stretch as it fills up and contracts as it empties. Therefore, weak bladder muscles are a common cause of urinary retention, as they may not contract with enough strength to completely empty the bladder. Pregnancy, childbirth, and aging are all factors that can weaken bladder muscles.

Recent procedures

Although only temporary, it is common for people to develop urinary retention after surgery. Most surgeries require anesthesia, which prevents you from feeling the need to urinate, despite having a full bladder. Additionally, procedures such as hip replacement, rectal surgery, and hemorrhoid removal surgery can cause urinary retention.

Medications

Certain drugs interfere with nerve signals to your bladder or urethra, which can cause urinary retention. Medications with these side effects include decongestants, antihistamines, antidepressants, anti-inflammatory drugs, and opioids. If you’re using any of these medications, stop using them and see if your ability to urinate improves. 

Holding your bladder

Have you ever needed to urinate for a long time, only to find that your urine stream is weak or you’re unable to go at all? People often hold their bladder when it’s inconvenient to use the restroom; however, this causes your bladder to swell and can lead to urinary retention. Don’t wait — use the bathroom whenever you feel the urge to go. 

How to Manage or Prevent Mild Urinary Retention

Urinary retention isn’t always preventable, but these steps can help lower your chances of developing the condition, as well as manage your symptoms if they do occur.

Physical therapy

Physical therapy is one of the most non-invasive urinary retention remedies that both men and women can benefit from. Pelvic floor exercises, also known as Keegel exercises, are an effective way to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles, which can improve the function of your bladder and help prevent urinary retention. 

Train your bladder

Believe it or not, it is possible to train your bladder! Urinating at specific times can help prevent your bladder from becoming too full. To make sure your bladder is completely empty, another bladder training technique is to wait a short amount of time after urinating before trying to go again. When using the bathroom, it is also helpful to take extra time to relax your muscles and empty your bladder.

Take medication as prescribed

An enlarged prostate is a common cause of urinary retention. If you’re currently taking prostate medication, it is important to take this medication regularly as prescribed by your doctor to prevent urinary retention. Additionally, we recommend avoiding certain medications that can lead to urinary retention, such as decongestants and anti-inflammatory drugs.

Modify your diet

Constipation is another cause of urinary retention that can be prevented by making simple modifications to your diet and lifestyle. Incorporating enough fiber into your diet, drinking plenty of water, and getting regular physical activity can all help lower your chances of developing urinary retention. 

Take a warm bath

If your main symptom is a weak urine stream, then relaxing your lower urinary tract muscles or pelvic floor muscles could be a simple urinary retention remedy. In addition to physical therapy, a warm bath is a good way to relax the muscles and aid urination.  

When to See a Doctor

Seek emergency care immediately if you’re unable to urinate or you’re experiencing severe pain in your lower abdomen. These are symptoms of acute urinary retention, which is very serious and can be life-threatening if it’s not treated as soon as possible. If you’re experiencing any other urinary retention symptoms, it is still important to talk with your healthcare professional, as chronic urinary retention can also cause serious health problems if left untreated.

To treat acute urinary retention, your urologist will drain the bladder by placing a catheter into your urethra. Removing the urine from your bladder will provide immediate relief and help prevent your bladder and kidneys from being damaged.

For chronic urinary retention, your urologist will assess your symptoms and suggest treatments depending on what is causing your urinary retention. Some treatments that a doctor might recommend include antibiotics for a urinary tract infection, physical therapy for pelvic floor dysfunction, or a surgical procedure to treat a blocked urethra or an enlarged prostate.  

Your Urology Specialist Can Help

Having difficulty urinating is an uncomfortable and inconvenient experience. While urinary retention remedies are good practice in preventing future health concerns, not being able to urinate is a medical emergency that requires immediate attention. 

Managing mild urinary retention symptoms is possible, but it is always best to see a urology specialist for a professional opinion to learn about traditional treatment options. Schedule an appointment with us, or visit your local emergency room, if you start showing symptoms of urinary retention. 

Treatment of Urinary Retention | NIDDK

How do health care professionals treat urinary retention?

Health care professionals treat urinary retention based on the type of urinary retention—acute or chronic—and the cause of the urinary retention.

Draining the bladder

With acute urinary retention, a health care professional will immediately drain the urine from your bladder using a catheter. Removing the urine from the bladder eases your pain and helps prevent your bladder and kidneys from being damaged.

If you have chronic urinary retention, your health care professional will first try to diagnose and treat the cause of your retention. However, your health care professional may need to use a catheter to drain the urine from your bladder if the retention continues or becomes severe.

In some cases, people with urinary retention need to continue using a catheter to drain urine from the bladder until their urinary retention can be fixed. The catheter can be indwelling—left in your bladder for a short or long time, or intermittent—inserted to drain the bladder when needed and then removed. If you have to use an intermittent catheter, a health care professional can teach you how to use the catheter.

If your bladder becomes too full, a health care professional may use a catheter to drain the urine from your bladder.

Medicines

Your health care professional may suggest that you take medicine to help treat the medical condition causing your urinary retention

  • 5-alpha reductase inhibitors help to stop the growth of or shrink the prostate, which can improve the flow of urine. Examples include dutasteride and finasteride.
  • Alpha-blockers treat the symptoms of prostate enlargement (benign prostatic hyperplasia) by relaxing muscles in the bladder neck and prostate, which makes it easier to urinate. Examples include alfuzosin, doxazosin, prazosin, silodosin, tadalafil, tamsulosin, and terazosin.
  • A combination of a 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor and an alpha-blocker, such as finasteride and doxazosin or dutasteride and tamsulosin, may work better than an individual medicine alone.
  • Antibiotics treat infections that may cause urinary retention, such as urinary tract infections and prostatitis.

In some people, certain medicines may cause urinary retention. If your health care professional thinks that a medicine is causing your urinary retention, you may be asked to lower the dose or stop using the medicine.

All medicines, even over-the-counter medicines, have side effects. Always consult a health care professional before using any medicine for more than a few days.

Medical procedures and devices

Your health care professional may recommend a medical procedure or device to treat your urinary retention, depending on the cause of the retention. Examples of these procedures and devices include

  • cystoscopy—using a cystoscope to look inside the urethra and bladder to find and remove blockages such as urinary tract stones
  • laser therapy—therapy that uses a strong beam of light to treat an area of enlarged prostate tissue by breaking up the blockage and reducing the obstruction
  • prostatic urethral lift, or UroLift—using tiny implants to lift and hold the prostate away from the urethra so urine can flow more freely
  • transurethral electrovaporization—a procedure that uses heat to vaporize an area of enlarged prostate tissue
  • transurethral water vapor therapy, or Rezum—therapy that uses water vapor, or steam, to shrink an enlarged prostate
  • urethral dilation—gradually increasing the size of the urethral opening by stretching the scar tissue, to help treat urethral stricture
  • vaginal pessary—a stiff ring that is inserted into the vagina to help stop urine leakage, such as with cases of a cystocele (prolapsed bladder) or rectocele

Surgery

Your health care professional may consider surgery to help treat the cause of your urinary retention if other less invasive treatments don’t work. Some of these treatments may include

How can I treat my urinary retention?

Your health care professional may recommend you try self-care treatments—either alone or in addition to other treatments—to manage your urinary retention.

Do physical therapy

Your health care professional may suggest that you work with a physical therapist who specializes in pelvic floor problems. The physical therapist will work to stretch tight pelvic floor muscles and help you keep them relaxed. Pelvic floor muscle exercises, also called Kegel exercises, help the nerves and muscles that you use to empty your bladder work better.

Physical therapy can help you gain control over your urinary retention symptoms.

Train your bladder

Your health care professional may suggest timed voiding—urinating at set times—to help prevent your bladder from becoming too full. Another bladder training technique that your health care professional may recommend is double voiding—waiting a short time after you urinate to try and go again—to help make sure your bladder is completely empty after you urinate.

Take extra time in the bathroom to relax and empty the bladder completely. Women should try to relax the muscles around their bladder when they urinate to make it easier to go. It’s best to sit on the toilet seat or in a full crouching squat. Hovering over a toilet seat to avoid touching it does not allow muscles to fully relax and may result in urine being left in the bladder.

Is Urinary Incontinence Bothering You? Don’t Worry! These Home Remedies Will Cure You In A Jiffy

Simple diet changes can solve half of your medical conditions

Highlights

  • Urinary incontinence occurs when there is involuntary leakage of urine
  • One of the home remedies to cure urinary incontinence is kegel exercises
  • Magnesium plays a key role in performing many functions in our bodies

Urinary incontinence occurs when there is involuntary leakage of urine. This means a person even urinates when they do not want to. Control over the urinary sphincter is either lost or weakened. Loss of bladder control or urinary incontinence can occur at any age. When the situation is severe, the urine leaks even while you cough or sneeze. Some common symptoms of urinary incontinence are unable to hold your urine, urinating several times during the night and experience urinating when you need to go to washroom. However, if your bladder is sensitive, you can manage it by some effective home remedies. Light incontinence can be treated naturally at home without visiting a doctor or undergoing a surgery.

Loss of bladder control or urinary incontinence can occur at any age.
Photo Credit: iStock

Also read: Gallbladder Stones: Symptoms, Causes And Risks

Top home remedies to deal with urinary incontinence:

1. Dietary changes:

Simple diet changes can solve half of your medical conditions. There are certain foods that trigger urinary incontinence. Foods which are spicy, honey, caffeine, alcohol, sodas or fizzy drinks, corn syrup, vinegar, chocolate, honey, tomatoes, fizzy drinks, artificial sweeteners, dairy and citrus juices should be strictly avoided.

Simple diet changes can solve half of your medical conditions.
Photo Credit: iStock

2. Manage your weight:

If you are overweight, losing weight should be an essential step to reduce incontinence. Your excess belly fat puts additional pressure on the bladder and pelvic muscles. Therefore, changes in your diet and regular physical exercise can help you cut down your belly fat. This will further help you restore your bladder control and act as a natural treatment for urinary incontinence problem.

3. Kegel exercises:

One of the effective home remedies to cure urinary incontinence is kegel exercise. These exercises are known to flex muscles that are used to stop urinary flow. They are not only useful for treating early stages of incontinence, but also after a surgical repair to tone the pelvic floor over time. These exercise help strengthen your pelvic muscles.

Also read: Kegel Exercises Or Pelvic Floor Exercises: Kegels Can Help Control Urinary Incontinence

4.

Train your bladder:

It is extremely important that you try to hold the urge to empty your bladder. You should focus on building this up to every three to four hours during the day and every four to eight hours at night. You may notice your urges go down just within a few weeks.

5. Vitamin D:

Low levels of Vitamin D can also lead to urinary incontinence. You can get enough vitamin D from your diet. Include foods like egg yolks, mushrooms, fatty fish, soya milk, cheese, cereals and other dairy products in your diet.

6. Magnesium:

Magnesium plays a key role in performing many functions in our bodies. These include proper muscle and nerve functions. Magnesium plays a more direct role in improving occasional incontinence by reducing bladder muscle spasms and enabling the bladder to fully empty upon urination. Therefore, you should ensure that you eat a lot of green leafy vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds and seafood.

Magnesium plays a key role in performing many functions in our bodies.
Photo Credit: iStock

Also read: Dark Urine: 7 Reasons Why Your Urine Is Dark In Colour

Disclaimer: This content including advice provides generic information only. It is in no way a substitute for qualified medical opinion. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information. NDTV does not claim responsibility for this information.

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Urinary Retention: Treatment and Home Remedies

Urinary retention treatment is designed to rectify the problem of being unable to completely empty the bladder. Occurring more commonly in older men, urinary retention can be a serious condition that may lead to emergency urinary retention treatment.

Acute urinary retention happens suddenly and lasts only a short time. Chronic urinary retention, on the other hand, can be long-lasting and is likely caused by a medical condition. Acute variants can be potentially life-threatening, causing great discomfort or pain and requiring immediate medical treatment. Chronic variants of the condition permit a small amount of urine output, leading sufferers to feel they have not completely emptied their bladders.

Treating and preventing urinary retention

Treatment will differ depending on the severity of the condition. The following are potential treatments:

Bladder drainage: Involves inserting a tube — called a catheter — up through the urethra and into the bladder for drainage. Those suffering from acute cases of urinary retention will see immediate relief of their distressful symptoms. This procedure can be done in an office or in a hospital setting, with the patient receiving local anesthesia. In the rare case that the urethra is blocked — not allowing a catheter to travel upward — the doctor can pass the tube directly through the lower abdomen into the bladder. People with chronic cases of urinary retention may require intermittent, occasional, or long-term catheterization if other treatments do not work.

Urethral dilation: A treatment for urethral strictures — a cause of urinary retention — that works by inserting increasingly wider tubes into the urethra to widen the stricture. A stricture, by definition, is an abnormal narrowing of a passage that may be due to scar tissue. Local anesthesia is always utilized, and if necessary, the patient will receive sedation and regional anesthesia.

Urethral stents: Similar to stents placed in the heart to keep blood vessels open and flowing, stents used in the urethra help to keep urine flowing, bypassing any strictures. Stents work by expanding like a spring, pushing back on surrounding tissue. Stents can either be temporary or permanent. This procedure can be done in an office or in a hospital setting.

Prostate medication: One of the main causes of urinary retention is an increase in male prostate size. By treating this underlying condition, symptoms should ease up. Examples of prostate medication include dutasteride (Avodart) and finasteride (Proscar). Medication also exists to help relax the muscles of the bladder outlet and prostate, including alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), and silodosin (Rapaflo).

Surgery

Prostate surgery: Benign prostate hyperplasia is a condition that may require surgery if medication is not successful. Surgical removal of enlarged prostate tissue through the urethra is commonplace. Removal of the enlarged tissue will usually relieve the blockage and urinary retention.

Internal urethrotomy: The repair of a ureteral stricture moving a special catheter through the urethra. A knife or laser is then used to open the stricture.

Cystocele or rectocele repair: These conditions are caused by weakened supporting tissue and muscles, which cause the bladder or rectum to fall. When this occurs, it can pinch or restrict the flow of urine through the urinary tract, leading to urinary retention. Stitches are used to tighten the affected areas, creating more support. Extra tissue is removed if necessary.

Tumor or cancer surgery: If a tumor or cancer is the cause of urinary retention, its removal may be warranted.

Natural remedies for urinary retention

If your urinary retention isn’t caused by something serious, natural remedies may be suitable. What follows are some things you can add to your routine to help get you started. We’ve also included a list of foods to eat and avoid.

Dandelion: Dandelion root has been used by native American Indians to treat kidney disease, heartburn, and upset stomach. It can also treat bladder inflammation and increase urinary output, as it contains diuretic and anti-inflammatory properties.

Nettle: According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, nettle has restorative properties that can help heal the bladder and kidneys. It’s also frequently used as a diuretic. Nettle is commonly consumed in tea form and should be enjoyed two to three times a day to reap its benefits. It should be noted that nettle may interact with supplements and medication, so it is advised to speak to a physician before using this herb.

Saw palmetto: A traditional herbal remedy for treating prostate enlargement. It is known for preventing the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Saw palmetto also has anti-inflammatory properties.

Sarsaparilla: A commonly used homeopathic remedy for treating cystitis — inflammation of the bladder. Sarsaparilla is also helpful for treating pain associated with urinary stones.

Indian licorice: Containing natural antimicrobial properties, Indian licorice aids in the treatment of cystitis. It is suggested to crush 50mg of the root into a paste, boil it for 30 minutes, and strain it. Drink this tea about three times a week.

Foods to eat

Coconut water: Packed with electrolytes, coconut water is a well-known remedy for many problems affecting the urinary tract. It also has mild diuretic properties, promoting urinary output.

Pineapple juice: Acting in a similar manner to coconut water, drinking 100 percent pure pineapple juice can be a great alternative.

Carrot juice: When consumed regularly, carrot juice can help control urinary retention. Besides being healthy for you, it can also help relieve the burning sensation felt each time you empty your bladder.

Foods to avoid

Constipating foods: Constipation can be a cause of urinary retention, so avoiding the foods that cause them will be beneficial and improve bowel movement. Avoid processed foods such as white bread, sweets, hot dogs, French fries, and all fast food while you’re at it.

Artificial sweeteners: The National Association of Continence says that artificial sweeteners, including saccharin, aspartame, and acesulfame K, may increase bladder discomfort. By avoiding these chemicals, you can give yourself the best chance of treating your urinary retention.

Acidic or spicy foods: These types of foods often cause bladder issues. Acidic foods include citrus fruit and juice, vinegar, and tomatoes. Spicy foods include hot peppers, curry, chili sauce and powder, barbecue sauce, and horseradish.

Living with urinary retention can be very discomforting and decrease your overall quality of life. It is important to seek medical attention right away when you’re suffering from serious urinary retention. If you think the cause of your problem is life threatening, don’t hesitate to see a medical professional.


Natural Remedy for Bladder Retention

Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of hobvias sudoneighm

Bladder retention or urinary retention occurs when the bladder does not empty itself completely. It can happen suddenly or be a chronic condition. Some causes of bladder retention include strictures or scarring of the urethra from infection or injury, nerve or muscle problems in the bladder, prostate cancer, side effect of medication, and urinary tract stones. Treatment of the underlying cause of bladder retention is important because large amounts of urine held in the bladder can lead to kidney damage, according to the University of Rochester Medical Center. Some natural remedies may help with symptoms of bladder retention or with the underlying cause.

Dandelion

Dandelion is a perennial herb typically found growing wild in fields and pastures. Native American Indians used dandelion root to treat kidney disease, heartburn, and stomach upset, according to U.S. National Library of Medicine. Dandelion has anti-inflammatory properties and is frequently used as a diuretic to increase urine output, helping with bladder inflammation and urine retention.

Nettle

Nettle is an herb that is used for cystitis (inflammation of the bladder) and has restorative properties to help heal the bladder and kidney, and is frequently used as a diuretic, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. It is commonly used as a tea, to be consumed two to three times per day. This herb can interact with supplements and medications, so it is wise to talk with your physician before drinking for bladder problems.

Saw Palmetto

Saw palmetto is an herb traditionally used in Europe to treat prostate enlargement, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. It has anti-inflammatory properties, as well as preventing the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, which ultimately can help with bladder retention caused by an enlarged prostate. If your prostate is enlarged, talk to your physician to find out what is medically wrong with it.

Sarsaparilla

Sarsaparilla is a homeopathic remedy that is useful in treating cystitis (inflammation of the bladder), according to UCSD Healthwise Knowledgebase. It is helpful in treating the pain associated when urinary stones are forming in decreasing inflammation and as a pain reliever, especially when pain or burning is felt at the end of urination. Medical treatment should be sought if you have urinary stones.

Indian licorice

Indian licorice extract are a natural substitute for typical antibiotics used to treat cystitis or inflammation of the bladder, according to Mamaherb.com. It can help with bladder retention caused by inflammation or infection with its natural antimicrobial properties. A suggested use consists of crushing up 50 mg of Indian licorice root into a paste, boiling it in a cup of water for 30 minutes, straining and drinking three times per week.

Urinary Incontinence in Men | Michigan Medicine

Topic Overview

What is urinary incontinence in men?

Urinary incontinence is the accidental leaking of urine. It’s not a disease. It’s a symptom of a problem with a man’s urinary tract.

Urine is made by the kidneys and stored in a sac made of muscle, called the urinary bladder. A tube called the urethra leads from the bladder through the prostate and penis to the outside of the body. Around this tube is a ring of muscles called the urinary sphincter. As the bladder fills with urine, nerve signals tell the sphincter to stay squeezed shut while the bladder stays relaxed. The nerves and muscles work together to prevent urine from leaking out of the body.

When you have to urinate, the nerve signals tell the muscles in the walls of the bladder to squeeze. This forces urine out of the bladder and into the urethra. At the same time the bladder squeezes, the urethra relaxes. This allows urine to pass through the urethra and out of the body.

Incontinence can happen for many reasons:

  • If your bladder squeezes at the wrong time, or if it squeezes too hard, urine may leak out.
  • If the muscles around the urethra are damaged or weak, urine can leak out even if you don’t have a problem with your bladder squeezing at the wrong time.
  • If your bladder doesn’t empty when it should, you are left with too much urine in the bladder. If the bladder gets too full, urine will leak out when you don’t want it to.
  • If something is blocking your urethra, urine can build up in the bladder. This can cause leaking.

Urinary incontinence happens more often in older men than in young men. But it’s not just a normal part of aging.

What are the types and symptoms of urinary incontinence ?

Urinary incontinence can be short-term or long-lasting (chronic). Short-term incontinence is often caused by other health problems or treatments. This topic is about the different types of chronic urinary incontinence:

  • Stress incontinence means that you leak urine when you sneeze, cough, laugh, lift something, change position, or do something that puts stress or strain on your bladder.
  • Urge incontinence is an urge to urinate that’s so strong that you can’t make it to the toilet in time. It also happens when your bladder squeezes when it shouldn’t. This can happen even when you have only a small amount of urine in your bladder. Overactive bladder is a kind of urge incontinence. But not everyone with an overactive bladder leaks urine.
  • Overflow incontinence means that you have the urge to urinate, but you can release only a small amount. Since your bladder doesn’t empty as it should, it then leaks urine later.
  • Total incontinence means that you are always leaking urine. It happens when the sphincter muscle no longer works.
  • Functional incontinence means that you can’t make it to the bathroom in time to urinate. This is usually because something got in your way or you were not able to walk there on your own.

What causes urinary incontinence in men?

Different types of incontinence have different causes.

  • Stress incontinence can happen when the prostate gland is removed. If there has been damage to the nerves or to the sphincter, the lower part of the bladder may not have enough support. Keeping urine in the bladder is then up to the sphincter alone.
  • Urge incontinence is caused by bladder muscles that squeeze so hard that the sphincter can’t hold back the urine. This causes a very strong urge to urinate.
  • Overflow incontinence can be caused by something blocking the urethra, which leads to urine building up in the bladder. This is often caused by an enlarged prostate gland or a narrow urethra. It may also happen because of weak bladder muscles.

In men, incontinence is often related to prostate problems or treatments.

Drinking alcohol can make urinary incontinence worse. Taking prescription or over-the-counter drugs such as diuretics, antidepressants, sedatives, opioids, or nonprescription cold and diet medicines can also affect your symptoms.

How is the cause diagnosed?

Your doctor will do a physical exam, ask questions about your symptoms and past health, and test your urine. Often this is enough to help the doctor find the cause of the incontinence. You may need other tests if the leaking is caused by more than one problem or if the cause is unclear.

How is it treated?

Treatments depend on the type of incontinence you have and how much it affects your life. Your treatment may include medicines, simple exercises, or both. A few men need surgery, but most don’t.

There are also some things you can do at home. In many cases, these lifestyle changes can be enough to control incontinence.

  • Cut back on caffeine drinks, such as coffee and tea. Also cut back on fizzy drinks like soda pop. And limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink a day.
  • Eat foods high in fiber to help avoid constipation.
  • Don’t smoke. If you need help quitting, talk to your doctor about stop-smoking programs and medicines. These can increase your chances of quitting for good.
  • Stay at a healthy weight.
  • Try simple pelvic-floor exercises like Kegels.
  • Go to the bathroom at several set times each day. Wear clothes that you can remove easily. Make your path to the bathroom as clear and quick as you can.
  • When you urinate, practice double voiding. This means going as much as you can, relaxing for a moment, and then going again.
  • Use a diary to keep track of your symptoms and any leaking of urine. This can help you and your doctor find the best treatment for you.

If you have symptoms of urinary incontinence, don’t be embarrassed to tell your doctor. Most people with incontinence can be helped or cured.

Cause

Urinary incontinence occurs when the bladder’s sphincter muscle is not strong enough to hold back the urine. This may happen when:

  • The sphincter is too weak.
  • The bladder muscles contract too strongly.
  • The bladder is too full.

Prostate treatment is a major cause of urinary incontinence in men.

  • Short-term incontinence after prostate surgery can go away with time, especially for younger men. In some cases, it lasts up to a year.
  • Stress incontinence is a common problem after prostate removal (radical prostatectomy) or radiation treatment for prostate cancer. It is becoming less common with better surgical techniques.
  • Some treatments for an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH) can also cause incontinence. But this isn’t common.

The bladder contractions that cause urge incontinence can be caused by many conditions, including:

  • Urinary tract infection.
  • Bowel problems, such as constipation.
  • Prostatitis. This is a painful infection of the prostate gland.
  • Certain conditions that affect nerve signals from the brain, such as Parkinson’s disease or stroke.
  • Kidney or bladder stones.
  • Blockage from prostate cancer or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

Overflow incontinence is usually caused by blockage of the urethra from BPH or prostate cancer. Other causes include:

  • Narrowing of the urethra (stricture).
  • Medicines, such as antihistamines and decongestants.
  • Nerve conditions, such as diabetes or multiple sclerosis.

You can have one or more types of incontinence. Each type may have a different cause.

Symptoms

Your symptoms depend on the type of urinary incontinence you have.

The main symptom of stress incontinence is the leaking of urine when you cough, laugh, lift, strain, or change posture.

Symptoms of urge incontinence may include:

  • A sudden, urgent need to urinate.
  • Sudden leakage of a large amount of urine.
  • The need to urinate frequently, often at night.

Symptoms of overflow incontinence may include:

  • A urine stream that starts and stops when you urinate.
  • Leakage of a small amount of urine.
  • A weak urine stream.
  • A need to strain while urinating and a sense that the bladder is not empty.
  • An urgent need to urinate, often at night.
  • Leaking urine while asleep.

What Happens

Urinary incontinence is often related to prostate problems. As men age, the prostate gland grows larger. It can squeeze the urethra and push the neck of the bladder out of position. These changes can lead to incontinence.

  • Stress incontinence
    happens when the muscle (sphincter) surrounding the urethra opens at the wrong time. This can be when you laugh, sneeze, cough, lift something, or change posture.

  • Urge incontinence
    happens when bladder contractions are too strong to be stopped by the sphincter. Often the urge is a response to something that makes you expect to urinate. It can happen when you wait to use a toilet, unlock the door when you come home, or even turn on a faucet. Overactive bladder is a kind of urge incontinence. But not everyone with overactive bladder leaks urine. For more information, see the topic Overactive Bladder.

  • Overflow incontinence
    usually is caused by blockage of the urethra from BPH or prostate cancer. It also happens when the bladder muscles contract weakly or don’t contract when they should.

  • Functional incontinence
    can happen when there are physical or mental limitations that restrict a man’s ability to reach the toilet in time.

In most cases, incontinence caused by an enlarged prostate can be cured by medicine or prostate surgery.

If your incontinence is not related to prostate surgery and it appears suddenly, it will usually clear up after you get treatment for whatever is causing it. For example, incontinence related to a urinary tract infection, prostatitis, or constipation will most likely disappear when the infection or condition is cured.

What Increases Your Risk

Many things have been linked to an increased risk of urinary incontinence in men.

Physical conditions or lifestyle

  • Age-related changes, including decreased bladder capacity and physical frailty
  • Smoking tobacco
  • Injury to the bladder or urethra, such as from radiation therapy or prostate surgery
  • Bladder infection or prostatitis
  • Obesity
  • Structural abnormalities of the urinary tract

Medicines and foods

  • Caffeinated and carbonated drinks, such as coffee, tea, and soda pop
  • Alcohol
  • Prescription medicines that increase urine production, such as diuretics, or relax the bladder, such as anticholinergics and antidepressants
  • Other prescription medicines, such as sedatives, opioids, and calcium channel blockers
  • Nonprescription medicines, such as diet, allergy, and cold medicines

Diseases and health conditions

  • Neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, diabetes, spinal injury, and multiple sclerosis
  • Bladder cancer
  • Chronic bronchitis
  • Interstitial cystitis
  • Anxiety and depression

When should you call your doctor?

See your doctor right away if your urinary incontinence does not go away or you also have:

  • Weakness or numbness in your buttocks, legs, and feet.
  • Fever, chills, and belly or flank pain.
  • Blood in your urine or burning with urination.
  • A change in your bowel habits.

Call your doctor if:

  • Your incontinence gets worse.
  • Leaking urine is enough of a problem that you need to wear a pad to absorb it.
  • Incontinence interferes with your life in any way.

Don’t be embarrassed to discuss incontinence with your doctor. It is not something that always happens with aging. Most people with incontinence can be helped or cured.

Watchful waiting

If you have chronic urinary incontinence that begins slowly, you may be able to control the problem yourself. If home treatment doesn’t control your problem, or if incontinence bothers you, ask your doctor about treatment.

If you have incontinence that begins suddenly (acute), call your doctor. Acute incontinence is often caused by urinary tract problems or medicines. It can be easily corrected.

Who to see

Any of the following health professionals can diagnose and treat urinary incontinence:

If you need surgery to treat your incontinence, make sure to find a surgeon who is experienced in the type of surgery you need, usually a urologist.

Exams and Tests

To learn the cause of your urinary incontinence, your doctor will first review your medical history and give you a physical exam. Along with routine testing, such as a urinalysis, this may be all your doctor needs to diagnose the cause and start treatment.

Your doctor may ask you to keep a voiding log. This is a record of the amount of liquids you drink and how much and how often you urinate.

Incontinence testing

Tests that may be done to find the type and cause of your urinary incontinence include:

  • Urinalysis and urine culture. These tests show whether you have a urinary tract infection (UTI) or prostatitis, or blood or sugar in your urine.
  • Cough test. It checks for urine leakage while you cough.
  • Urodynamic tests, which may include:
    • Uroflowmetry. This test measures your rate of urine flow. A low peak flow rate can be a sign of a blockage or a weak bladder.
    • Pressure flow studies. This testing measures pressure changes in the bladder as the flow changes. It is often used when the cause of a man’s symptoms is uncertain. It can help show if the cause may be a blockage or a problem with the bladder muscles or nerves.
    • Post-void residual volume. This test measures the amount of urine left after you empty your bladder.
  • Cystometrogram (CMG). This test measures how well your bladder can store and release urine.
  • Electromyogram (EMG). This test records the electrical activity of muscles.

Your doctor may do a cystoscopic exam. This is a test that allows your doctor to see inside the urinary tract.

Other tests

You may need more tests if:

  • The first treatment for incontinence has failed.
  • You have had previous prostate surgery, radiation therapy, or frequent urinary tract infections.
  • A catheter cannot be easily placed into your bladder.

Some tests aren’t often used for incontinence, but they may be helpful. One example is cystourethrogram. It’s an X-ray of your bladder and urethra while you are urinating.

If your doctor wants to do more tests, ask how the test can help your doctor treat your incontinence.

Treatment Overview

The treatment you and your doctor choose depends on your type of urinary incontinence and how bad your symptoms are.

If there is no infection or cancer or other cause that could only be cured by surgery, treatment is done in stages.

  • Behavioral strategies may be enough to control your symptoms. These include simple changes to your diet, lifestyle, and urinary habits. See Home Treatment for more information.
  • Medicines that treat infection or bladder muscle spasm may help.
  • Self-catheterization may help you manage overflow incontinence from a weak bladder or blockage. It may also be used if surgery is not the best option for you. When you need to drain your bladder, you insert a thin, hollow tube through your urethra into the bladder. To learn more, see Other Treatment.
  • Surgery is usually considered when it is the only treatment that can cure the incontinence, such as when the condition is caused by a bladder blockage.

Many men who have urge incontinence or overflow incontinence also have an enlarged prostate gland (benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH). For more information, see the topic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH).

What to think about

Exercise is important for your physical and emotional health. Even if being active causes some leakage, get regular exercise. It can help you manage stress and keep your muscles in tone.

Continence products absorb urine or apply pressure to keep urine from leaking. To learn more, see Other Treatment.

Prevention

You may reduce your chances of developing urinary incontinence by:

  • Limiting caffeine and alcohol.
  • Getting to and staying at a healthy weight.
  • Quitting smoking.
  • Avoiding constipation by eating a healthy, high-fiber diet.
  • Doing Kegel exercises to strengthen the muscles that control the flow of urine.

Home Treatment

You can use behavioral strategies to help control urinary incontinence. These include simple changes to your diet, lifestyle, and urinary habits.

Diet and lifestyle strategies

  • Reduce or stop drinking caffeinated and carbonated drinks, such as coffee, tea, and soda pop.
  • Limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink a day.
  • Eat less of any food that might irritate your bladder. Then look for changes in your bladder habits. Such foods include citrus fruit, chocolate, tomatoes, vinegars, spicy foods, dairy products, and aspartame.
  • If you smoke, quit.
  • Avoid constipation:
    • Include fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains in your diet each day. These foods are high in fiber.
    • Drink enough fluids. Don’t avoid drinking fluid because you are worried about leaking urine.
    • Get some exercise every day. Try to do moderate activity at least 2½ hours a week. Or try to do vigorous activity at least 1¼ hours a week. It’s fine to be active in blocks of 10 minutes or more throughout your day and week.
    • Take a fiber supplement with psyllium (such as Metamucil) or methylcellulose (such as Citrucel) each day. Read and follow all instructions on the label.
    • Schedule time each day for a bowel movement. Having a daily routine may help. Take your time and don’t strain.
  • If you are overweight, try to lose some weight. Be more active, and make small, healthy changes to what and how much you eat. You will notice good results over time.
  • Try pelvic floor (Kegel) exercises to strengthen your pelvic muscles.

Urinary habits

Try one or more of these tips. They may help you gain some control over your symptoms:

  • Set a schedule for urinating every 2 to 4 hours. Go whether or not you feel the need.
  • Practice “double voiding.” This means urinating as much as possible, relaxing for a few moments, and then urinating again.
  • If you have trouble reaching the bathroom before you urinate, consider making a clearer, quicker path to the bathroom. Wear clothes that are easy to take off (such as those with elastic waistbands or Velcro closures). Or keep a urinal close to your bed or chair.

Talk with your doctor about all the medicines you take, including nonprescription medicines, to see if any of them may be making your incontinence worse. Medicines that may cause urinary incontinence in men include certain antidepressants, sedatives, and even some allergy and cold medicines.

Medications

Medicine can help with some types of urinary incontinence.

Medicine choices

  • For overflow incontinence: If incontinence is caused by an enlarged prostate, medicines to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia may be prescribed. But these medicines don’t always improve incontinence. For more information, see the topic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH).
  • For urge incontinence:
    • Anticholinergic and antispasmodic medicines, such as oxybutynin and tolterodine, calm the nerves that control bladder muscles and increase bladder capacity.
    • Alpha-blocker medicines, such as alfuzosin and tamsulosin, relax the muscles in the prostate and bladder.
    • The antidepressant medicine duloxetine may help with bladder control.
    • Botox (botulinum toxin) may be an option when other medicines don’t work. A Botox shot helps relax the bladder muscles.
  • For stress incontinence: The antidepressant medicine duloxetine may help with bladder control.

What to think about

Some medicines that are used to treat incontinence may actually make it worse in men whose incontinence is caused by an enlarged prostate gland (benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH). So consulting with a urologist is an important part of incontinence care.

Surgery

Surgery may be an option for men who:

  • Have ongoing (chronic) incontinence.
  • Have severe symptoms and total incontinence.
  • Are extremely bothered by their symptoms.
  • Have problems with urinary retention.
  • Have moderate to severe blood in the urine (hematuria) that keeps coming back.
  • Have urinary tract infections that keep coming back.
  • Have a medical problem that can only be treated with surgery. One example is a bladder outlet blockage that is affecting kidney function.

Surgery choices

Overflow incontinence caused by an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH) is the form of incontinence most often treated with surgery. For more information about surgery options and treatment for BPH, see the topic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH).

Stress incontinence caused by removal of the prostate gland may also be treated with surgery if the incontinence isn’t cured after a period of watchful waiting.

Surgery for severe stress incontinence that does not improve with behavioral methods includes:

  • Artificial sphincter. A silicone rubber device is fitted around the urethra (the tube that carries urine from your bladder to the outside of your body). It can be inflated or deflated to control urination.
  • Urethral bulking. Material is injected around the urethra. This serves to control urination by either closing a hole in the urethra or building up the thickness of the wall of the urethra.
  • Bulbourethral sling. A sling is placed beneath the urethra. It is attached to either muscle tissue or the pubic bone. The sling compresses and raises the urethra. This gives the urethra greater resistance to pressure from the belly. Sling surgery may be considered as a treatment for severe urinary incontinence from prostate surgery.
  • Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS). An electrical stimulator under your skin sends pulses to the sacral nerve in your lower back. This nerve plays a role in bladder storage and emptying.

Severe urge incontinence may be treated with surgery to make the bladder bigger (augmentation cystoplasty) or to make another way to store and pass urine (urinary diversion).

What to think about

Surgery works for some people and not others. It is most likely to improve incontinence when:

  • The diagnosis is right.
  • The cause of your symptoms is something that can be fixed by surgery.
  • Your surgeon is very experienced and skilled with the surgery you’re having.

Things that can lead to disappointing results include:

  • Unrealistic expectations. Surgery won’t always cure the symptoms, but it will usually improve them.
  • Physical factors such as obesity, long-term cough, radiation therapy, poor nutrition, age, and heavy physical activity.

Other Treatment

Treatment other than surgery or medicine may be used to treat urinary incontinence.

  • For stress incontinence, biofeedback can help you learn to read your body’s signals. This helps you improve control.
  • For urge incontinence, behavioral therapies such as biofeedback and bladder training can help you control the bladder muscles.
  • For overflow incontinence, using a catheter tube to drain your bladder can help you keep your bladder from getting too full.

Catheters

  • Catheterization may be used to treat severe incontinence that cannot be managed with medicines or surgery. Catheters don’t cure incontinence. But they do allow you or a caregiver to manage it.

    • Intermittent self-catheterization is done with a thin, flexible, hollow tube (catheter) that is inserted through the urethra into the bladder. This allows the urine to drain out.
    • Indwelling catheterization uses a catheter that remains in place at all times. For more information, see the topic Care for an Indwelling Urinary Catheter.
    • Condom or Texas catheter uses a special condom that can be attached to a tube for short-term use. The condom, placed over the penis, keeps the tube in place. The tube allows the urine to drain out.

Behavioral therapy

Behavioral therapies, including biofeedback and pelvic muscle exercises, are used to treat urge and stress incontinence.

Continence products

Products such as absorbent pads or diapers, incontinence clamps, or pressure cuffs may be used to manage any form of incontinence. Some of these products absorb leaked urine. Others put pressure on the urethra to help prevent urine from leaking.

References

Other Works Consulted

  • Chapple CR, Milson I (2012). Urinary incontinence and pelvic prolapse: Epidemiology and pathophysiology. In AJ Wein et al., eds., Campbell-Walsh Urology, 10th ed., vol. 3, pp. 1871–1895. Philadelphia: Saunders.
  • Herschorn S (2012). Injection therapy for urinary incontinence. In AJ Wein et al., eds., Campbell-Walsh Urology, 10th ed., vol. 3, pp. 2168–2185. Philadelphia: Saunders.
  • Naumann M, et al. (2008). Assessment: Botulinum neurotoxin in the treatment of autonomic disorders and pain (an evidence-based review): Report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology, 70(19): 1707–1714.
  • Resnick, NM (2012). Incontinence. In L Goldman, A Shafer, eds., Goldman’s Cecil Medicine, 24th ed., pp. 110–114. Philadelphia: Saunders.
  • Silva LA, et al. (2011). Surgery for stress urinary incontinence due to presumed sphincter deficiency after prostate surgery. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (4).
  • Wadie BS (2010). Retropubic bulbourethral sling for post-prostatectomy male incontinence: 2-year followup. Journal of Urology, 184(6): 2446–2451.

Credits

Current as of:
June 29, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD – Internal Medicine
Adam Husney MD – Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD – Family Medicine
Avery L. Seifert MD – Urology

Current as of: June 29, 2020

Author:
Healthwise Staff

Medical Review:E. Gregory Thompson MD – Internal Medicine & Adam Husney MD – Family Medicine & Kathleen Romito MD – Family Medicine & Avery L. Seifert MD – Urology

Urinary Incontinence in Men | HealthLink BC

Topic Overview

What is urinary incontinence in men?

Urinary incontinence is the accidental release of urine. It’s not a disease. It’s a symptom of a problem with a man’s urinary tract.

Urine is made by the kidneys and stored in a sac made of muscle, called the urinary bladder. A tube called the urethra leads from the bladder through the prostate and penis to the outside of the body. Around this tube is a ring of muscles called the urinary sphincter. As the bladder fills with urine, nerve signals tell the sphincter to stay squeezed shut while the bladder stays relaxed. The nerves and muscles work together to prevent urine from leaking out of the body.

When you have to urinate, the nerve signals tell the muscles in the walls of the bladder to squeeze. This forces urine out of the bladder and into the urethra. At the same time the bladder squeezes, the urethra relaxes. This allows urine to pass through the urethra and out of the body.

Incontinence can happen for many reasons:

  • If your bladder squeezes at the wrong time, or if it squeezes too hard, urine may leak out.
  • If the muscles around the urethra are damaged or weak, urine can leak out even if you don’t have a problem with your bladder squeezing at the wrong time.
  • You can also have incontinence if your bladder doesn’t empty when it should. This leaves too much urine in the bladder. If the bladder gets too full, urine will leak out when you don’t want it to.
  • If something is blocking your urethra, urine can build up in the bladder and cause leaking.

Urinary incontinence happens more often in older men than in young men, but it’s not just a normal part of aging.

What are the different types of urinary incontinence?

Urinary incontinence can be short-term or long-lasting (chronic). Short-term incontinence is often caused by other health problems or treatments. This topic is about the different types of chronic urinary incontinence:

  • Stress incontinence happens when you sneeze, cough, laugh, lift objects, or do something that puts stress or strain on your bladder and you leak urine.
  • Urge incontinence is an urge to urinate that’s so strong that you can’t make it to the toilet in time. It also happens when your bladder squeezes when it shouldn’t. This can happen even when you have only a small amount of urine in your bladder. Overactive bladder is a kind of urge incontinence. But not everyone with an overactive bladder leaks urine.
  • Overflow incontinence happens when your bladder doesn’t empty as it should and then leaks urine later. This happens when bladder muscles are weak or the urethra gets blocked. These blockages can be related to an enlarged prostate or a narrow urethra.
  • Total incontinence happens when you are always leaking urine. It happens when the sphincter muscle no longer works.
  • Functional incontinence is rare. It happens when you can’t make it to the bathroom in time to urinate. This is usually because something got in your way or you were not able to walk there on your own.

What causes urinary incontinence in men?

Different types of incontinence have different causes.

  • Stress incontinence can happen when the prostate gland is removed. If there has been damage to the nerves or to the sphincter, the lower part of the bladder may not have enough support. Keeping urine in the bladder is then up to the sphincter alone. The sphincter may be too weak to hold back the urine. And any extra pressure from sneezing, coughing, or straining can cause urine to leak.
  • Urge incontinence is caused by bladder muscles that squeeze so hard that the sphincter can’t hold back the urine. This causes a very strong urge to urinate. Doctors don’t know why this happens. But sometimes it can be caused by other urinary problems.
  • Overflow incontinence can be caused by something blocking the urethra, which leads to urine building up in the bladder. This is often caused by an enlarged prostate gland or a narrow urethra. Over time, the bladder gets so full that pressure builds up and forces the extra urine to move past the blockage and out of the bladder. Overflow incontinence may also happen because of weak bladder muscles.

In men, incontinence is often related to prostate problems or treatments.

Drinking alcohol can make urinary incontinence worse. Taking prescription or over-the-counter drugs such as diuretics, antidepressants, sedatives, opioids, or non-prescription cold and diet medicines can also affect your symptoms.

What are the symptoms?

The most common sign of urinary incontinence is leaking urine from the bladder. Other signs will depend on the type of urinary incontinence you have.

  • Stress incontinence: You release a small amount of urine when you cough, strain, lift something, or change position.
  • Urge incontinence: The need to urinate is so strong that you can’t reach the toilet in time.
  • Overflow incontinence: You have the urge to urinate, but you can only release a small amount. And you can’t control the constant dribbling of urine.

How is the cause of urinary incontinence in men diagnosed?

Your doctor will do a physical examination, ask questions about your symptoms and past health, and test your urine. Often this is enough to help the doctor find the cause of the incontinence. You may need other tests if the incontinence is caused by more than one problem or if the cause is unclear.

How is it treated?

Treatments are different for each person. They depend on the type of incontinence you have and how much it affects your life. After your doctor knows what has caused the incontinence, your treatment may include medicines, simple exercises, or both. A few men need surgery, but most do not.

There are also some things you can do at home. In many cases, these lifestyle changes can be enough to control incontinence.

  • Cut back on caffeine drinks, such as coffee and tea. Also cut back on fizzy drinks like soda pop. And don’t drink more than one alcoholic drink a day.
  • Eat foods high in fibre to help avoid constipation.
  • Don’t smoke. If you need help quitting, talk to your doctor about stop-smoking programs and medicines. These can increase your chances of quitting for good.
  • Stay at a healthy weight.
  • Try simple pelvic-floor exercises like Kegels.
  • Go to the bathroom at several set times each day, and wear clothes that you can remove easily. Make your path to the bathroom as clear and quick as you can.
  • When you urinate, practice double voiding. This means going as much as you can, relaxing for a moment, and then going again.
  • Keep track of your symptoms and any leaking of urine with a bladder diary. This can help you and your doctor find the best treatment for you.

If you have symptoms of urinary incontinence, don’t be embarrassed to tell your doctor. Most people with incontinence can be helped or cured.

Cause

Urinary incontinence occurs when the muscle (sphincter) that holds your bladder’s outlet closed is not strong enough to hold back the urine. This may happen if the sphincter is too weak, if the bladder muscles contract too strongly, or if the bladder is overfull.

A man may have one or more types of incontinence, and each type may have a different cause.

  • Stress incontinence occurs when the muscle (sphincter) surrounding the urethra opens at an inappropriate time. This can happen when you laugh, sneeze, cough, lift something, or change posture. Stress incontinence can be caused by surgery to treat an enlarged prostate or prostate cancer, radiation therapy to treat prostate cancer, or removal of the prostate.
  • Urge incontinence is caused by bladder contractions that are too strong to be stopped by the sphincter. Often the urge is a response to something that makes you anticipate urination, such as waiting to use a toilet, unlocking the door when returning home, or even turning on a faucet. The bladder contractions can be caused by many conditions, including: Overactive bladder is a kind of urge incontinence. But not everyone with overactive bladder leaks urine. For more information, see the topic Overactive Bladder.
  • Overflow incontinence usually is caused by obstruction of the urethra from BPH or prostate cancer or when the bladder muscles contract weakly or don’t contract when they should. Other causes include:
    • Narrowing of the urethra (stricture).
    • Medicines, such as antihistamines and decongestants.
    • Nerve conditions, such as diabetes or multiple sclerosis.
  • Functional incontinence is a rare form of incontinence caused by physical or mental limitations that restrict a man’s ability to reach the toilet in time.

Symptoms

Your symptoms will depend on the type of urinary incontinence you have.

The main symptom of stress incontinence is the loss of urine while coughing, laughing, lifting, straining, or changing posture.

Symptoms of urge incontinence may include:

  • A sudden, urgent need to urinate.
  • Sudden accidents in which you lose a large amount of urine.
  • The need to urinate frequently, often at night.

Symptoms of overflow incontinence may include:

  • A urine stream that starts and stops during urination.
  • An accidental release of a small amount of urine.
  • A weak urine stream.
  • A need to strain while urinating and a sense that the bladder is not empty.
  • An urgent need to urinate, often at night.
  • Loss of urine while asleep.

What Happens

Urinary incontinence in men is often related to prostate problems. As men age, the prostate gland grows larger, squeezing the urethra and pushing the neck of the bladder out of position. These changes can lead to incontinence. In most cases, incontinence due to prostate enlargement can be cured by medicine or prostate surgery.

But prostate surgery is also a major cause of urinary incontinence in men.

  • Short-term (acute) incontinence following prostate surgery may go away with time, especially for younger men. In some cases, the incontinence may last up to a year.
  • Stress incontinence is a common complication following prostate removal (radical prostatectomy) or radiation treatment for prostate cancer, though it is becoming less common with improving surgical techniques.
  • Some treatments for an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH) can also cause incontinence, but this is uncommon.

If your incontinence is not related to prostate surgery and it appears suddenly, it will usually clear up after you have received treatment for whatever is causing the incontinence. For example, incontinence related to a urinary tract infection, prostatitis, or constipation will most likely disappear when the infection or condition is cured.

For some men, incontinence may have more than one cause.

What Increases Your Risk

Many things have been associated with an increased risk of urinary incontinence in men. Incontinence may be the result of various health conditions or medical treatments, or it could be caused by family history or lifestyle. In some men, things from more than one of the lists below can combine to cause incontinence.

Physical conditions or lifestyle factors that may make urinary incontinence more likely include:

  • Age-related changes, including decreased bladder capacity and physical frailty.
  • Smoking tobacco.
  • Injury to the bladder or urethra, such as from radiation therapy or prostate surgery.
  • Bladder infection or prostatitis.
  • Obesity.
  • Structural abnormalities of the urinary tract.

Medicines and foods that may make urinary incontinence worse include:

  • Caffeinated and carbonated drinks, such as coffee, tea, and soda pop.
  • Alcohol beverages.
  • Prescription medicines that increase urine production, such as diuretics, or relax the bladder, such as anticholinergics and antidepressants.
  • Other prescription medicines, such as sedatives, opioids, and calcium channel blockers.
  • Non-prescription medicines, such as diet, allergy, and cold medicines.

Several diseases or conditions may increase your risk of urinary incontinence, including:

  • Neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, diabetes, spinal injury, and multiple sclerosis.
  • Bladder cancer.
  • Chronic bronchitis.
  • Interstitial cystitis.
  • Anxiety and depression.

When should you call your doctor?

See your doctor immediately if your urinary incontinence does not go away or is accompanied by:

  • Weakness or numbness in your buttocks, legs, and feet.
  • Fever, chills, and abdominal (belly) or flank pain.
  • Blood in your urine or burning with urination.
  • A change in your bowel habits.

Call your doctor if:

  • You have a problem with urinary incontinence that is getting worse.
  • Uncontrolled loss of urine is enough of a problem that you need to wear an absorbent pad.
  • Incontinence interferes with your life in any way.

Do not be embarrassed to discuss incontinence with your doctor. Incontinence is not an inevitable result of aging. Most people with incontinence can be helped or cured.

Watchful waiting

If home treatment does not control your problem, or if incontinence interferes with your lifestyle, ask your doctor to recommend a treatment.

If you have urinary incontinence that begins suddenly (acute), call your doctor. Acute incontinence is often caused by urinary tract problems or medicines and can be easily corrected.

Who to see

Your family doctor or general practitioner can diagnose and treat some causes of urinary incontinence. You may also be referred to a specialist, such as an internal medicine doctor, a urologist, or a geriatrician.

If you need surgery to treat your incontinence, it is important to find a surgeon who is experienced in the type of surgery you need, usually a urologist.

Examinations and Tests

The first steps your doctor will take to learn the cause of your urinary incontinence are a medical history and a physical examination. The physical examination will include examination of the penis, the prostate, and the nervous system. The history and examination, along with routine diagnostic tests such as a urinalysis, often provide enough information to determine the cause of the incontinence and enable your doctor to start treatment.

Your doctor may ask you to keep a voiding log, which is a record of the amount of liquids you drink and how much and how often you urinate.

Tests that may be done to determine the type and cause of your urinary incontinence include:

  • Urinalysis and urine culture, which may be done to learn whether a urinary tract infection (UTI) or prostatitis is present or whether there is blood or sugar in your urine.
  • Cough test to check for urine leakage while coughing.
  • Urodynamic tests, which could include:
    • Uroflowmetry. The uroflowmetry test measures the rate of urine flow during urination. During the test, a flow curve will be charted to determine the peak flow rate. A low peak flow rate may be suggestive of an obstruction or a weak bladder causing the incontinence.
    • Pressure flow studies, which measure pressures produced in the bladder as the flow changes. Pressure studies may help distinguish between urinary symptoms caused by obstruction and those caused by a problem affecting the bladder muscles or nerves. This test is often used when the cause of a man’s symptoms is uncertain.
    • Residual urine determination. Your doctor may measure your post-void residual volume by inserting a thin tube (catheter) into your bladder or by using a bladder ultrasound scan immediately after you have urinated.
  • Cystometrogram (CMG). This test evaluates your bladder’s ability to store and release urine.
  • Electromyogram (EMG), which is used to record the electrical activity of muscles.

Your doctor may conduct a cystoscopic examination (a test that allows your doctor to see inside the urinary tract) to rule out other causes of incontinence.

Further tests may be required if the first treatment for incontinence has failed. Other tests may also be needed if you have had previous prostate surgery, radiation therapy, or frequent urinary tract infections, or if a catheter cannot be easily placed into your bladder.

Tests such as cystourethrogram, an X-ray taken of your bladder and urethra while you are urinating, are not often used to evaluate incontinence, but they may be helpful. If your doctor wants to do one of these tests, ask whether the test is needed to diagnose your type of incontinence.

Treatment Overview

The treatment you and your doctor choose will depend upon what type of urinary incontinence you have and how much you are bothered by your symptoms.

If there is no infection or cancer or other cause that could only be cured by surgery, treatment for incontinence proceeds in stages.

  • Behavioural strategies are tried first for all types of incontinence. These include reducing the amount of liquids you drink, eliminating caffeinated and carbonated drinks, and setting a schedule for urinating. See Home Treatment for more information.
  • Exercise on a regular basis is important for physical and emotional health. Some men with urinary incontinence stop exercising because they fear that it will cause leakage. But regular exercise is important and can help you manage stress and keep your muscles in tone.
  • Continence products such as absorbent pads or diapers, incontinence clamps, and pressure cuffs may be used if you are progressing through a different treatment and are waiting to see whether your incontinence goes away or if other methods of treatment have failed. But these products should only be used along with a more specific treatment, since they can hide a more serious condition that may be curable.
  • Medicines may be prescribed, depending on the cause of your incontinence.
    • Antispasmodics and anticholinergics may be prescribed to relax the bladder (for urge incontinence).
    • Antibiotics may be prescribed for incontinence caused by infection.
  • Self-catheterization may be tried if you have overflow incontinence from a weak bladder or blockage or if surgery is not the best option for you.
  • Surgery is usually considered when it is the only treatment that can cure the incontinence, such as when the condition is caused by a bladder obstruction.

What to think about

Many men who have urge incontinence or overflow incontinence also have an enlarged prostate gland (benign prostatic hyperplasia). They may want to talk to a doctor about medicine, surgery, or other treatment to relieve their symptoms. For more information, see the topic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH).

Urinary incontinence can be a problem following treatment for prostate cancer, including radiation therapy and removal of the prostate.

Treatment will be different for men who have total incontinence or who cannot comply with or tolerate specific treatments because of a serious illness or disease.

Prevention

You may reduce your chances of developing urinary incontinence by:

  • Limiting caffeine and alcohol.
  • Getting to and staying at a healthy weight.
  • Quitting smoking.
  • Avoiding constipation by eating a healthy, high-fibre diet.
  • Doing Kegel exercises to strengthen the muscles that control the flow of urine.

Home Treatment

In many cases, behavioural changes, including changes to your diet, lifestyle, and urinary habits, can be enough to control urinary incontinence.

The following changes to diet and lifestyle may help reduce incontinence:

  • Reduce or eliminate caffeinated and carbonated drinks—such as coffee, tea, and soda pop—from your diet.
  • Do not drink more than one alcohol drink a day.
  • Try to identify any foods that might irritate your bladder—including citrus fruits, chocolate, tomatoes, vinegars, spicy foods, dairy products, and aspartame—and eat less of those foods.
  • If you smoke, quit.
  • Avoid constipation:
    • Include fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains in your diet each day. These foods are high in fibre.
    • Drink enough fluids. Don’t avoid drinking fluid because you are worried about leaking urine.
    • Get some exercise every day. Try to do moderate activity at least 2½ hours a week. Or try to do vigorous activity at least 1¼ hours a week. It’s fine to be active in blocks of 10 minutes or more throughout your day and week.footnote 1
    • Take a fibre supplement with psyllium (such as Metamucil). Read and follow all instructions on the label.
    • Schedule time each day for a bowel movement. Having a daily routine may help. Take your time and do not strain when having a bowel movement.
  • If you are overweight, try to lose some weight. Remember that effective weight-loss programs depend on a combination of diet and exercise.
  • Try pelvic floor (Kegel) exercises to strengthen your pelvic muscles.

The following changes to urinary habits may help reduce incontinence:

  • Set a schedule for urinating every 2 to 4 hours, regardless of whether you feel the need.
  • Practice “double voiding” by urinating as much as possible, relaxing for a few moments, and then urinating again.
  • If you have trouble reaching the bathroom before you urinate, consider making a clearer, quicker path to the bathroom and wearing clothes that are easily removed (such as those with elastic waistbands or Velcro closures). Or keep a urinal close to your bed or chair.

Talk with your doctor about all the medicines you take, including non-prescription medicines, to see whether any of them may be making your incontinence worse. Medicines that may cause urinary incontinence in men include certain antidepressants, sedatives, and even some allergy and cold medicines.

Medications

Although some types of long-term (chronic) incontinence may be treated with medicine, the likelihood that medicines will improve your incontinence depends on the severity and cause of the problem. Some medicines that are used to treat incontinence may actually make the condition worse in men whose incontinence is caused by an enlarged prostate gland (benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH). So consulting with a urologist is an important part of incontinence care.

Medication choices

  • For overflow incontinence: If incontinence is caused by an enlarged prostate, medicines to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia may be prescribed. But these medicines don’t always improve incontinence. For more information, see the topic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH).
  • For urge incontinence:
    • Anticholinergic and antispasmodic medicines, such as oxybutynin and tolterodine, calm the nerves that control bladder muscles and increase bladder capacity.
    • Alpha-blocker medicines, such as alfuzosin and tamsulosin, relax the muscles in the prostate and bladder.
    • The antidepressant medicine duloxetine may help with bladder control.
    • Botox (botulinum toxin) may be an option when other medicines don’t work. A Botox shot helps relax the bladder muscles.
  • For stress incontinence: The antidepressant medicine duloxetine may help with bladder control.

What to think about

For men with stress incontinence or urge incontinence, behavioural methods of treatment such as bladder training techniques are used in combination with medicine.

Surgery

If your urinary incontinence has not improved after you have tried behavioural methods and medicine, and if your doctor thinks surgery will be an effective treatment, you may choose to have surgery rather than live with your symptoms. In some cases, such as when a bladder outlet obstruction is affecting kidney function, surgery may be the only way to treat the problem that is causing the incontinence.

Surgery may be appropriate for men who:

  • Have ongoing (chronic) incontinence.
  • Have severe symptoms and total incontinence.
  • Are extremely bothered by their symptoms.
  • Have problems with urinary retention.
  • Have moderate to severe blood in the urine (hematuria) that is recurrent (keeps coming back).
  • Have recurrent urinary tract infections.

Overflow incontinence caused by enlargement of the prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH) is the form of incontinence most often treated with surgery.

Stress incontinence caused by removal of the prostate gland because of prostate cancer or an enlarged prostate may also be treated with surgery, if the incontinence isn’t cured after a period of watchful waiting.

Surgery choices

If overflow incontinence is caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostate surgery may relieve the incontinence. For more information about surgery options and treatment for BPH, see the topic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH).

Surgery for severe stress incontinence that does not improve with behavioural methods includes:

  • Artificial sphincter, which is a device made of silicone rubber that fits around the urethra (the tube that carries urine from your bladder to the outside of your body) and can be inflated or deflated to control urination.
  • Urethral bulking, which involves injecting material around the urethra to control urination by either closing a hole in the urethra or building up the thickness of the wall of the urethra.
  • Bulbourethral sling, which may be considered as a treatment for severe urinary incontinence that results from prostate surgery. In this procedure, a sling is placed beneath the urethra to support it and is attached to either muscle tissue or the pubic bone. The sling compresses and elevates the urethra, giving the urethra greater resistance to pressure from the abdomen.
  • Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS). In SNS, the doctor puts an electrical stimulator under your skin above your buttocks. This stimulator looks like a pacemaker. It is attached to electrodes that send pulses to a nerve in your lower back (sacrum). The sacral nerve plays a role in bladder storage and emptying.

Severe urge incontinence may be treated with surgery to make the bladder bigger (augmentation cystoplasty) or to make another way to store and pass urine (urinary diversion).

What to think about

Surgery usually isn’t considered for urinary incontinence unless it is the only reasonable way to cure it or after attempts to treat the problem with conservative measures or other treatment have failed. The decision to have surgery must always be based on an accurate diagnosis and realistic expectations for the surgery.

Factors that increase the chances that surgical treatment will fail to correct incontinence include obesity, long-term (chronic) cough, radiation therapy, age, poor nutrition, and strenuous physical activity.

Other Treatment

Treatment other than surgery or medicine may be used to treat urinary incontinence.

  • For stress incontinence, biofeedback, a technique that helps you learn to control a specific body function, may be an option for some men who have stress incontinence or urge incontinence.
  • For urge incontinence, behavioural therapies such as biofeedback and bladder training can be used to treat urge incontinence.
  • For overflow incontinence, some men may require intermittent self-catheterization. During this procedure, a catheter is inserted into the bladder, usually 3 or 4 times a day.

Other treatment choices

  • Catheterization may be used to treat severe incontinence that cannot be managed with medicines or surgery. Catheters don’t cure incontinence but rather allow you or a caregiver to manage incontinence.
    • Intermittent self-catheterization is done with a thin, flexible, hollow tube (catheter) that is inserted through the urethra into the bladder, allowing the urine to drain out.
    • Indwelling catheterization uses a catheter that remains in place continuously. For more information, see the topic Care for an Indwelling Urinary Catheter.
    • Condom or Texas catheter uses a special condom that can be attached to a tube for short-term use. The condom, placed over the penis, keeps the tube in place. The tube allows the urine to drain out.
  • Behavioural therapies, including biofeedback and pelvic muscle exercises, are used to treat urge and stress incontinence.
  • Continence products such as absorbent pads or diapers, incontinence clamps, or pressure cuffs may be used to manage any form of incontinence. Some of these products absorb leaked urine and some put pressure on the urethra to help prevent urine from leaking.

What to think about

Men often use absorbent products, such as pads or diapers, when other methods of treating incontinence have failed or cannot be used. Some men may prefer to use absorbent products rather than taking medicines or having surgery. They may also use absorbent products after surgery for prostate cancer, while they are waiting to see if their incontinence goes away. This method doesn’t treat the incontinence but instead manages the problem. In general, absorbent products should only be used along with a more specific treatment, because use of absorbent products can hide a more serious condition that may be curable.

References

Citations

  1. Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (2011). Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines For Adults. Available online: http://www.csep.ca/CMFiles/Guidelines/CSEP_PAGuidelines_adults_en.pdf. Accessed October 28, 2014.

Other Works Consulted

  • Chapple CR, Milson I (2012). Urinary incontinence and pelvic prolapse: Epidemiology and pathophysiology. In AJ Wein et al., eds., Campbell-Walsh Urology, 10th ed., vol. 3, pp. 1871–1895. Philadelphia: Saunders.
  • Herschorn S (2012). Injection therapy for urinary incontinence. In AJ Wein et al., eds., Campbell-Walsh Urology, 10th ed., vol. 3, pp. 2168–2185. Philadelphia: Saunders.
  • Naumann M, et al. (2008). Assessment: Botulinum neurotoxin in the treatment of autonomic disorders and pain (an evidence-based review): Report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology, 70(19): 1707–1714.
  • Resnick, NM (2012). Incontinence. In L Goldman, A Shafer, eds., Goldman’s Cecil Medicine, 24th ed., pp. 110–114. Philadelphia: Saunders.
  • Silva LA, et al. (2011). Surgery for stress urinary incontinence due to presumed sphincter deficiency after prostate surgery. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (4).
  • Wadie BS (2010). Retropubic bulbourethral sling for post-prostatectomy male incontinence: 2-year followup. Journal of Urology, 184(6): 2446–2451.

Credits

Adaptation Date: 7/17/2020

Adapted By: HealthLink BC

Adaptation Reviewed By: HealthLink BC

Urinary retention – symptoms, treatment, causes of the disease, the first signs

Description

Urinary retention (ishuria) – is a complete or partial (intermittent urination) inability to empty the bladder caused by various factors.

Urinary retention is now a fairly common condition. It is believed that young women and men suffer from this ailment in approximately the same way, however, as the age category increases, ishuria is much more common among the male population.This pattern is associated with a common pathology of the prostate gland among elderly men. It should be noted that in 85% of cases, urinary retention among elderly men is caused by diseases of the prostate gland.

When urination is delayed, urine produced by the kidneys accumulates in the bladder cavity, which leads to a gradual expansion of its walls, resulting in the urge to urinate.

There are two forms of urinary retention:

  • Sharp (develops in a few hours).The person has a strong urge to urinate, but cannot urinate on his own. This is accompanied by pain and anxiety;
  • In the chronic form, a person urinates on their own, but the bladder does not empty completely. In this case, as a rule, there is no acute urge to urinate.

The causes of urinary retention are varied. Often this condition occurs when there is a mechanical obstruction to the outflow of urine from the bladder.The following diseases can act as a mechanical obstacle:

  • urolithiasis;
  • cancer or benign tumor of the prostate gland;
  • narrowing of the lumen of the urethra, which is called a stricture;
  • urethral tumor;
  • acute prostatitis, in which there is an increase in the volume of the prostate gland, which, in turn, interferes with the normal outflow of urine from the bladder;
  • neoplasms of the rectum;
  • phimosis – narrowing of the foreskin.

In addition, it is not uncommon to detect urinary retention in various diseases of the nervous system, for example, with a tumor of the brain or spinal cord, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis. Also, the development of ischuria is possible with fright, prolonged lying position, in a state of alcoholic intoxication, as a result of severe psychoemotional stress or prolonged use of certain drugs (hypnotics, cholinergic receptor blockers, narcotic analgesics).

Urinary retention rarely occurs in isolation, in most cases it is a manifestation of a disease. That is why it is necessary to carefully monitor your health and timely treat diseases that can lead to the development of urinary retention. The prognosis is usually favorable, with the elimination of the cause that caused the development of ischuria, relapses are extremely rare.

Symptoms

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First of all, a person pays attention to the absence of urination.In rare cases, when acute urinary retention begins abruptly, there is an interruption of the stream during urination, while further outflow of urine becomes impossible.

Since the walls of the bladder are stretched, which leads to irritation of the receptors, pain in the lower abdomen is observed. Initially, the pain has a pulling character, but as the process progresses, the pain intensifies and becomes excruciating. In addition, in the clinical picture of ischuria there are frequent urge to urinate, pain in the groin areas.If there is partial ischuria, there is still the possibility of slight urination. In this case, this can be achieved with pressure on the suprapubic region, as well as with strong tension in the muscles of the abdominal wall. In this case, a weak, thin stream of urine is formed. Against the background of acute urinary retention, which is accompanied by severe pain, changes in human behavior appear. He is excited, rushes about the room, does not find a comfortable position.

Chronic urinary retention often develops gradually.A person retains the ability to urinate independently, while paying attention to a decrease in the amount of urine excreted, which occurs due to a large amount of urine in the bladder. As a rule, there is no strong urge to urinate, but there is a feeling of incomplete emptying of the bladder.

It is important to be able to distinguish between ishuria and anuria, which occurs as a result of impaired renal function, as a result of which urine is not produced by the kidneys and does not enter the bladder.In this case, the urge to urinate may be absent or not as pronounced as with urinary retention. Also notes the absence of pain in the lower abdomen. As a rule, anuria is a manifestation of acute or chronic renal failure, therefore, symptoms of the disease that caused the development of failure will be present in the clinical picture.

Diagnostics

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The diagnosis of urinary retention is based on the collection of patient complaints and anamnesis of the disease.It is important to clarify when the patient last went to the toilet on a small scale, when characteristic pains in the lower abdomen appeared. Next, the doctor proceeds to examine the patient. During palpation, an enlarged bladder is noted. In the absence of urination, which occurs due to the cessation of the flow of urine into the bladder, palpation of the bladder becomes impossible, since the bladder cavity in this case is not filled.

After the examination, the doctor prescribes general laboratory tests (general blood test, general urine test, biochemical blood test), which are necessary to assess the state of the body.So, for example, in the presence of an inflammatory process in the body in the general blood test, an increase in the number of leukocytes and an increase in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate occur. A general urinalysis also allows you to identify signs of a pathological process in the kidneys and urinary tract. This will be evidenced by the detection of leukocytes, erythrocytes, bacteria, protein, etc. in urine. In the biochemical analysis of blood, special attention is paid to an increase in the end products of protein metabolism, namely creatinine, urea and uric acid.The detection of an increase in C-reactive protein indicates the presence of an inflammatory process in the body.

Of the instrumental diagnostic methods, ultrasound of the kidneys and bladder is of particular importance. This study allows you to assess the structure of the kidneys, as well as the volume and contents of the bladder. Also, in the diagnosis of urinary retention, ultrasound of the prostate gland is important, since its enlargement often leads to some problems with urination. Thanks to ultrasound examination, it is possible to assess the structure of the prostate gland, as well as its volume and shape.

Cystoscopy is also performed – an endoscopic diagnostic method that allows you to visualize the inner surface of the bladder. This examination is carried out using a rigid or flexible cystoscope, which is inserted into the bladder cavity through the urethra. Since the study is accompanied by some discomfort, it is advisable to pre-apply anesthesia. In addition, to facilitate the introduction of the cystoscope, special gels are used to moisturize the urethra. In turn, the cystoscope is lubricated with glycerin, the transparency of which does not disturb the optical observation environment.If necessary, a biopsy is performed, which is performed using an additional instrument.

In addition, in some cases, retrograde cystography is prescribed, which is carried out by introducing 200-300 ml of a urographic contrast agent into the bladder through a urethral catheter, after which X-rays are taken in frontal and oblique projections. There is also a method in which not only a contrast agent is injected, but also air or oxygen.This combination allows better visualization of pathological changes.

Treatment

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Elimination of the cause of urinary retention leads to the elimination of the pathological condition, resulting in the disappearance of disturbing symptoms. Acute urinary retention requires immediate assistance, which consists in restoring urodynamics. The simplest and most affordable method of restoring urodynamics is bladder catheterization.This manipulation promotes the outflow of urine from the bladder. During catheterization, the following rules should be observed:

  • to prevent the development of an ascending bladder infection, the skin and visible mucous membranes in the urethra should be pretreated with an antiseptic;
  • To avoid damage to the mucous membrane of the bladder, it is necessary to carry out the manipulation carefully and without sudden movements.

There are the following contraindications for bladder catheterization:

  • rupture of the urethra;
  • acute infectious and inflammatory diseases of the urinary system;
  • urethral fistula;
  • priapism (involuntary painful erection, not associated with sexual arousal, the duration of which is 4 hours or more).

If bladder catheterization is not possible, for example, with severe strictures, “impacted” calculus, tumors of the urethra and prostate gland, cystostomy is resorted to for help. This is a surgical way to solve the problem, which consists in the formation of an external bladder fistula. This operation allows you to ensure the outflow of urine from the bladder, bypassing the urethra. After the establishment of cystostomy drainage in the early postoperative period, it is strongly recommended to train the bladder, which is necessary to maintain the functioning of the organ volume.The training consists in periodically clamping the drainage with the subsequent release of the drainage from the clamp and emptying the bladder. The clamp is removed from the drainage when the urge to urinate occurs or no later than 2 hours after the drainage is clamped. This workout should be done 2 times a day. Failure to comply with this recommendation leads to the loss of reservoir function of the bladder.

With the development of ischuria against the background of psychoemotional stress, sedatives are prescribed.In some cases, stress retention of urination is eliminated after exposure to the sound of flowing water, washing the genitals.

Medicines

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Sedatives are prescribed when urinary retention occurs due to psycho-emotional stress on the body. As a rule, after the elimination of urinary retention, sedatives are used to create a favorable psycho-emotional background. The duration of the course varies from 1 to 2 months.This group includes bromine preparations and herbal preparations. The sedative effect of drugs is to reduce the body’s response to various external stimuli. Currently, the prescription of sedatives is widely practiced in various fields of medicine. The main indications for their appointment are:

90 014 90 015 sleep disorders;

  • nervous excitability;
  • irritability;
  • neuroses;
  • neurosis-like states.
  • Compared to other drugs, for example, tranquilizers, sedatives, especially of plant origin, have a weak sedative effect, however, they are well tolerated and almost never cause the development of side effects.

    In some cases, antispasmodics are used to reduce the tone of smooth muscles. The following subgroups of antispasmodics are distinguished:

    • myotropic antispasmodics (drotaverine, papaverine), the action of which is to act on smooth muscle cells;
    • neurotropic antispasmodics (atropine, platifillin).Their action is based on the obstruction of the transmission of nerve impulses to the smooth muscles of the internal organs.

    In case of urinary retention, it is not recommended to prescribe any medications on your own. It is necessary to immediately consult a doctor, who, in turn, determine the need for certain drugs.

    Folk remedies

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    Urinary retention is a medical emergency that requires immediate medical attention.In the absence of timely medical care, acute delay can lead to the development of hydronephrosis or acute renal failure. In turn, chronic urinary retention significantly increases the risk of developing an infection of the urinary system, and also creates favorable conditions for the formation of calculi (stones) in the bladder cavity. That is why it is important to understand that when symptoms appear that indicate urinary retention, you must immediately seek help from a medical institution, since the lack of specialized treatment leads to the development of complications.It is also strongly recommended not to use traditional medicine, since ishuria requires the attention of a specialist with medical education.

    To prevent the development of urinary retention, it is necessary to timely identify and correctly treat the pathological processes that lead to the condition in question.

    The information is for reference only and is not a guide to action. Do not self-medicate. At the first symptoms of the disease, see your doctor.

    Your comments on symptoms and treatment

    Urinary retention. Alternative treatment of urinary retention with alternative methods and means. – Andrology, urology – Andrology, urology – Traditional treatment with folk remedies. Folk methods. – FOLK WITCHER


    Retention of urination – cessation of urine excretion by the kidneys into the bladder in case of their disease or impaired outflow of urine from the kidney due to blockage of the ureters by stones, squeezing them by a tumor, scars, etc.n. Less commonly, this is observed with dehydration, blood loss or fever. Urinary retention can occur as a result of damage to the central nervous system, as well as in inflammatory processes in the rectum and perineum, with injuries of the pelvic bones, accompanied by damage to the urinary tract.
    Urinary retention is acute and chronic.
    At acute urinary retention , the ability to urinate suddenly disappears against the background of frequent, painful urge to urinate, there are sensations of overflow of the bladder, pain in the suprapubic region and perineum.In an effort to avoid pain, the patient takes a forced posture – bends, tries to breathe shallowly. Often, at the same time, the skin becomes covered with a sticky cold sweat, there is a chill.
    In acute urinary retention, that is, when the patient is unable to urinate on his own, a serious condition may occur. Retention of urine causes a distension of the bladder and rather severe abdominal pain, which in turn can reflexively cause dysfunction of other organs (intestines, heart, lungs, etc.)).
    The following is suggested as a first aid to relieve spasm and thereby enable spontaneous urination. Give the patient a drink of cold water, put a warm heating pad on the perineum, create the sound of a falling stream of water (with a water tap), put a small cleansing enema, give candles with belladonna. If all these measures do not work, the patient must be urgently taken to the hospital, where urine will be released using a catheter.
    The main symptom of chronic urinary retention is a weakened stream of urine, longer urination, incomplete emptying of the bladder during urination.
    When urinary retention in old people is constant due to weakness of the muscles of the bladder, the following remedy can be used: put the patient under the back for 45 minutes. a sheet folded several times, dipped in warm water and wrung out. After that, put the same compress-poultice on the stomach for 1 hour. First, do this 2 times a day, then once. Usually these compresses work well. Inside, it is recommended to give an infusion of horsetail or an infusion of elderberry root a cup a day in a warm form.
    In case of chronic urinary retention, it is imperative to be examined by a urologist in order to determine the cause of the delay and to treat the underlying disease.

    Folk remedies used for urinary retention
    Medicinal Burnet ►► Pour 1 tablespoon of raw materials with 1 glass of hot water, boil for 30 minutes, leave for 2 hours, drain. Take 1 tablespoon 5 times daily before meals. Apply with urinary retention, convulsions.
    It should be noted that burnet is contraindicated during pregnancy!
    May lily of the valley ►► Take 15 g of flowers in 200 ml of boiling water.Insist. Take 2 teaspoons 3 times a day. Use as a diuretic.
    Cloudberry ►► Brew a tablespoon of leaves with 1 cup boiling water, leave for 30 minutes, drain. Drink 1/4 cup 4 times a day daily with paralytic urinary retention.
    Fresh cloudberries also have a diuretic effect.
    Parsley ►►
    A Wash thoroughly 80 g of parsley, pour over boiled water and chop. Fold in a saucepan and pour over the milk so that it covers all the grass. Put in a cool oven and let the milk melt, but do not boil over; strain.Take 1 – 2 tablespoons every hour. The patient should drink all the prepared medicine in 1 day. The remedy was used by village healers as a strong diuretic.
    B In case of urinary retention, take an infusion of parsley roots: 100 g of roots per 1 liter of boiling water, leave for 1 hour; drink this portion per day for 0.5 cups. Improvement occurs in 10 to 12 days.
    Celery ►► Grate fresh roots or mince and squeeze. Take 1 – 2 teaspoons 2 – 3 times a day half an hour before meals.Celery juice has a very strong diuretic effect.
    Common chicory ►► Pour 1 teaspoon of the herb with 1 cup boiling water, insist and sweeten. Drink in 2 divided doses before meals. Use for inflammation of the bladder and difficulty urinating.
    Rosehip ►► Pour half a bottle of seedless fruit with vodka or alcohol, leave for 3 – 6 days until light brown. Take 2 times a day, a few drops in a tablespoon of water.
    Collection ►► Take 1/2 teaspoon of birch buds (when still sticky) and 1/2 teaspoon of crushed dill seeds.Brew with 1 glass of boiling water, steam for 1.5 hours, drain. Drink 1 glass during the day in small sips every half hour.
    Articles on kidney stones, kidney inflammation, and uremia also provide helpful advice.

    The site Witch Doctor was created to help find the best way to treat diseases using folk methods and means, to get acquainted with the recipes of traditional medicine. Be sure to consult your doctor!

    90,000 Folk remedies for urinary retention in men and women

    With ischuria, the inability to empty the bladder, many people turn to alternative medicines. Folk remedies for urinary retention will help to cope with the problems that have arisen and not cause significant harm to the body.

    Buy a course of treatment for urinary retention at Travomarket

    Urinary retention in men, causes and treatment with folk remedies

    The causes of the disease are different. Among them, the most common is the clogging of the urethra with stones or compression by a tumor.In the acute stage of ischuria, urinary retention occurs. A person has a constant feeling of a full organ and acute pain.

    The disease provokes:

    • adenoma and accumulation of pus in the prostate
    • inflammation of the prostate gland in the acute and chronic stages;
    • trauma to the urinary tract or spine;
    • the presence of stones in the ureter and kidneys;
    • cancer of the prostate.
    • Typical signs of the disease are:
    • disgust and vomiting;
    • migraine;
    • high blood pressure and temperature;
    • false and persistent urge to urinate;
    • the presence of blood clots in the urine;
    • sharp pain in the lumbar region;
    • sluggish urine stream;
    • feeling of incomplete release of the organ;
    • pain with urine discharge.

    The most common cause is prostate adenoma. With the development of a tumor, the urethra is transformed, this worsens the outflow of fluid. Swelling of the gland leads to the development of urine retention. Other factors include:

    • trauma to the head or spinal receptors;
    • spinal surgery;
    • intoxication with drugs, alcohol or drugs;
    • stress, physical strain, hypothermia;
    • trauma to the bladder or canal.

    Acute urinary retention in women and treatment with folk remedies are similar, but the reasons differ as a result of the physiological structure:

    • surgical operations of the genital organ, rectum;
    • spinal cord injury;
    • neurological diseases;
    • cancerous tumor of the urinary organ, uterus;
    • difficult pregnancy;
    • prolapse of the bladder, uterus;
    • a cyst of a paraurethral nature or urethra.

    Traditional recipes for treatment

    To your attention are presented popular and effective folk treatment recipes:

    1. Cover the rose hips in the amount of 1 glass with vodka and stand for 7 days. As a result, the infusion will turn brownish. Dilute 10 drops in liquid and use twice.
    2. Grind the celery rhizome, squeeze out the liquid.Consume half an hour before meals in 2 divided doses.
    3. Pour a little lily of the valley color into a glass of very hot liquid. Take several times a day for 2 tsp.
    4. Take 1 tsp. chicory, pour hot liquid and let it brew. Apply up to twice a day before meals.
    5. Take 3 servings of rue and Potentilla, 2 servings of valerian, lemon balm. Mix the composition and to 1 tbsp. pour hot liquid, stand for half an hour.
    6. Pour 40 g of dry oat herb into 1 liter of hot liquid and cook over low heat for about a quarter of an hour.Then filter and take 200 ml daily.
    7. Take 2 servings of bear ears, hernia, cornflower, elderberry rhizome. Add 3 servings of corn silk and birch buds and 1 serving of horsetail. Put 1 tablespoon in a glass of water. collection and stand for a quarter of a day, then boil for a quarter of an hour.
    8. Pour 200 ml of hot liquid to 1 tbsp. l. rowan berries and let it brew, drink 30 ml three times a day.
    9. Take 1 dec.l. horsetail, lingonberry and bear ears. Add 1 tbsp. juniper fruits, birch leaves and licorice rhizomes. Pour the composition into 600-700 ml of hot liquid and boil a little. Filter and take 15 ml, which is equal to one tablespoon, three times a day.
    10. Chopped birch buds in the amount of 0.5 tsp. combine with fennel and pour 400 ml of hot liquid. Withstand the composition for 1.5 hours and filter. Throughout the day, consume 200 ml of broth with interruptions.
    11. Take a serving of juniper fruits, black currant leaves, dog mint, birch, lavender and tea rose.Add 2 servings of knotweed, bear’s ears, lingonberry and cranberry, 3 servings of nettle and 6 servings of horsetail. Pour 400 ml of hot liquid with a little of the resulting composition and stand for half an hour. Take 1/5 of a glass.
    12. Take the fruits of caraway seeds, dill, the color of the medicinal plant, the adonis in one portion. Add 3 servings of parsley seeds and juniper fruits. Pour a glass of hot liquid to 1 tbsp. composition and withstand a quarter of a day. Then simmer for a quarter of an hour. Consume throughout the day.
    13. Insist 1 tbsp in a glass of hot liquid. hop fruits, drink 15 ml three times a day a day.
    14. Pour 1 tbsp. bear ears with hot liquid, take 15 ml three times a day.

    Alternative treatment for urinary retention will not cure the disease in one go, but will help to quickly eliminate pain and improve well-being. In addition, traditional healers advise using the Far Eastern trepang tincture in the treatment.The product has a rejuvenating effect, stimulates blood circulation and metabolism, helps to get rid of a variety of health problems, including urinary retention.

    90,000 Treatment of urinary incontinence. How to treat urinary incontinence in women

    Urinary incontinence in women is a serious illness that affects the quality of life and causes severe mental discomfort. If a woman has problems with this disease, the doctors of our clinic are ready to help her.

    Our specialists are proficient in methods of not only operative, but also conservative treatment of incontinence.

    What is cough incontinence?

    Coughing incontinence, or in other words, stress urinary incontinence (stress) is a condition in which involuntary urine leakage occurs with any increase in intra-abdominal pressure: lifting weights, coughing, sneezing, playing sports.

    In milder forms of incontinence, leakage can occur only with excessive, extreme stress.In more severe cases, even normal walking or changes in body position can provoke incontinence, requiring compulsory treatment.

    What causes urinary incontinence?

    The main cause is dysfunction of the anatomical structures that support the urethra. In this case, the provoking factors are birth trauma, hormonal changes during menopause, hard physical work, overweight, chronic cough and other conditions associated with increased intra-abdominal pressure.

    Can Pelvic Floor Exercise Cure Urinary Incontinence?

    Pelvic floor muscle training (Kegel exercises) can be beneficial in young women who begin to experience urinary leakage after childbirth.

    In this case, it is important to start training no later than 6 weeks after childbirth, train daily for at least 6 months, preferably under the supervision of a specialist. In the case of a long-standing disease, as well as with a pronounced degree of urine leakage, exercises are ineffective.

    What are the treatments for urinary incontinence?

    The main treatment for stress urinary incontinence is surgery. To date, the “gold standard” and at the same time the most studied operation is the installation of a synthetic mid-urethral sling.

    Other existing methods, such as the introduction of bulking substances under the urethra, colposuspension according to Birch, plastic surgery of the anterior vaginal wall, etc., are less effective and can lead to serious side effects, the main of which is a violation of normal urination.

    Ask a question anonymously to the doctor, through the feedback form, we will try to help you.

    ASK A QUESTION

    How is a mid-urethral sling (TVT, TOT) surgery performed?

    This operation is performed under intravenous anesthesia. Through a small (1-1.5 cm) incision on the anterior wall of the vagina, a synthetic sling is placed under the middle third of the urethra.

    The sling replaces the damaged structures that support the urethra, creating the necessary conditions for urinary retention. The ends of the sling are brought out through small punctures in the skin in the groin folds or above the bosom. The duration of the operation, as a rule, does not exceed 10-15 minutes

    How many days is hospitalization? How is the postoperative period?

    The standard hospitalization period is 2-3 days.The next day after the operation, the doctor evaluates the effectiveness of the treatment and, if necessary, adjusts the tension of the sling, setting it in such a way as to achieve complete urinary retention without affecting the quality of urination.

    This procedure is performed under local anesthesia. The adjustable tension significantly reduces the risk of postoperative urinary retention and helps to achieve optimal results.

    What is the effectiveness of surgical treatment for urinary incontinence?

    The efficiency of the operation is up to 90%.There are diseases, the presence of which aggravates the course of the disease and can reduce the effectiveness of treatment – these are concomitant overactive bladder (the so-called mixed form of urinary incontinence), diabetes mellitus, chronic lung diseases (COPD, bronchial asthma), chronic constipation, obesity.

    In patients with a complicated form of stress urinary incontinence (hypomobility of the urethra, insufficiency of the urethral sphincter, previous surgery on the pelvic organs), the effectiveness of treatment may also be lower.

    What are the risks and side effects of surgery?

    Complications associated with the installation of a suburethral sling are extremely rare in expert clinics. Among them – damage to nearby organs (bladder, urethra, abdominal organs), trauma to large vessels, pain syndrome, functional disorders (hyperactivity or atony of the bladder, difficulty urinating), the appearance of discomfort during intercourse, erosion of the vaginal mucosa.

    In specialized centers, due to the high qualifications of surgeons and the use of modern materials, the number of complications is minimized (less than 1%)

    What are the restrictions after the operation?

    As a rule, within 5-7 days after discharge from the hospital, women can return to their daily activities – go to work, do housework. For 1-1.5 months after the operation, patients are advised to lead a sparing lifestyle: avoid heavy lifting, active sports, sex life, and also refrain from visiting saunas, swimming pools, bathing.

    It is recommended to pay attention to behavioral habits: avoid smoking, adhere to a balanced diet, normalize body weight.

    Will the operation help if urine leakage occurs at rest, when you urge to go to the toilet, the sound of bubbling water, etc.?

    Such complaints require a more thorough additional examination, since indicate the presence of overactive bladder (OAB). Based on the results of the examination, treatment is selected: OAB is treated with medications that block nerve endings in the wall of the bladder.

    Sling implantation for OAB is not effective. With a combination of urinary incontinence with cough and OAB, treatment should be combined: surgical and medication.

    I have urinary incontinence and uterine prolapse, what should I do?

    With a pronounced degree of prolapse of the pelvic organs, the first stage is always the elimination of prolapse. Surgery for stress urinary incontinence can be performed as early as 1.5-2 months after surgical reconstruction of the pelvic floor using mesh implants.

    Is it possible to simultaneously eliminate urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse?

    Concurrent surgeries carry an increased risk of postoperative complications such as postoperative urinary retention and overactive bladder. It also increases the risk of recurrence of urinary incontinence. We do not recommend the simultaneous surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence.

    Is it possible to insert a mid-urethral sling if I am planning a pregnancy?

    After implantation of the prosthesis, you can safely plan a pregnancy and give birth through the natural birth canal.At the same time, the risk of recurrence of the disease does not exceed 20% (regardless of whether the Cesarean section was performed or the delivery went through natural routes).

    Bibliography

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2014). Prevalence of Incontinence Among Older Americans (PDF, 1.3 MB). National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Statistics; 3 (36).
    2. Reddy, J., & Paraiso, M.F.R. (2010). Primary Stress Urinary Incontinence: What to Do and Why. Reviews in Obstetrics & Gynecology; 3 (4): 150-155.
    3. Stewart, W. F., et al. (2003). Prevalence and Burden of Overactive Bladder in the United States. World Journal of Urology; 20 (6): 327-336.
    4. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2016). Urinary Incontinence (PDF, 84 KB). (link is external)
    5. Altman, D., Granath, F., Cnattingius, S., & Falconer, C. (2007). Hysterectomy and Risk of Stress-Urinary-Incontinence Surgery: Nationwide Cohort Study. (link is external) Lancet; 370 (9597): 1494-1499.
    6. Gleason, J.L., Richter, H.E., Redden, D.T., Goode, P.S., Burgio, K.L., & Markland, A.D. (2013). Caffeine and Urinary Incontinence in Women. International Urogynecology Journal; 24 (2): 295-302.
    7. Sangsawang, B., & Sangsawang, N. (2013).Stress Urinary Incontinence in Pregnant Women: A Review of Prevalence, Pathophysiology, and Treatment. International Urogynecology Journal; 24 (6): 901-912.
    8. Kim, D.K., & Chancellor, M.B. (2006). Is Estrogen for Urinary Incontinence Good or Bad? Reviews in Urology ; 8 (2): 91–92.
    9. Health Resources and Services Administration, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2012). Nonsurgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Adult Women: Diagnosis and Comparative Effectiveness (PDF, 12.9 MB). Comparative Effectiveness Review ; 36.
    10. U.S. National Library of Medicine. (2017). Kegel exercises – self-care.
    11. Institute of Medicine. (2004). Dietary References Intakes: Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate (link is external).
    12. Rosinger, A. and Herrick, K. (2016). Daily water intake among U.S. men and women, 2009–2012. National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief ; 242.
    13. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.(2017). Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence (PDF, 85 KB). (link is external)
    14. Food and Drug Administration. (2018). Considerations about surgical mesh for SUI.

    90,000 Difficulty, frequent or painful urination, inability to empty the bladder

    What is the reason for this?

    In most cases, increased urination, when the dog almost constantly feels the need to empty the bladder, while excreting separate drops of urine, is associated with infectious and inflammatory processes in the lower urinary tract: the bladder and urethra.

    However, the causes of this inflammation vary. So urocystitis (inflammation of the bladder), urethritis (inflammation of the urethra), tumors of the urinary tract, urolithiasis and some others can manifest.

    The structure of the lower urinary tract in bitches and males is significantly different. The urethra (the channel through which urine from the bladder goes out) in bitches is wide and short, therefore, no blockage occurs in any inflammatory processes, it is limited to frequent and painful urination, sometimes with an admixture of blood.It is important to understand that in this case, as a rule, there is no danger to the life of the animal (although there are exceptions).

    Another thing is similar phenomena in males: their urethra is long, narrow and curved. Therefore, with any inflammatory processes in the lower urinary tract, there is always a risk of complete or partial blockage of the urethra. Of course, this risk is not as significant as in cats, which, with any, even the most insignificant inflammation, are threatened by a blockage of the urethra. In the practice of a veterinarian, males with a blockage of the urethra are quite rare, and cats with a similar problem – perhaps every shift.However, if a dog has, for example, urolithiasis, then the risk of getting a blockage of the urethra is quite real.

    How does it look?

    As a rule, symptoms of increased frequency and pain during urination can be noted first. Sometimes an admixture of blood appears in the urine.

    Immediately, as soon as you notice such symptoms, you should consult a doctor. If you have not done this, then such phenomena can continue for a long time, however, if we are talking about a dog with urolithiasis, sooner or later there comes a moment when several stones of a suitable size clog the urethra and the count begins to go for hours.Now it is impossible to pull, urgent help from a veterinarian is required, since there is a real threat to the dog’s life.

    In bitches, urethral obstruction, as a rule, does not occur, however, with untreated urinary tract inflammations, the kidneys are very soon involved in the inflammatory process, and the process becomes much more serious and difficult to cure. In addition, one should not forget about the possible development of tumor processes in the urinary system, the clinical signs of which can mimic “banal inflammation”.

    However, back to our acute situation with a male dog that cannot pee at all.

    What can you do at home?

    At home, you can give an antispasmodic pill, for example, no-shpy. It will not fix the problem, but it may slightly reduce the pain. Call the clinic in advance and check the dosage for your pet!

    What cannot be done at home?

    Do not attempt to pressurize urine with a bladder massage or place a urinary catheter yourself if you have never done so and are not qualified to do so.
    Do not try, on the advice of your omniscient neighbors, to use diuretics! This is not your case! Do not waste time, if there is no urination for more than a day, the animal may die!

    What will the doctor do?

    To find out the cause of the disease, the doctor, in addition to examining the dog and talking with the owner, will probably need to look into the bladder using an ultrasound scan and evaluate the composition of the patient’s urine analysis. If we are not talking about acute urinary retention, then, as a rule, home treatment with pills is prescribed, this is the simplest case when you only need to strictly adhere to the doctor’s prescription regarding the duration of treatment.

    If we are talking about a blockage of the urethra, it is impossible to hesitate. First of all, it is required to restore the outflow of urine. Most often, this is achieved under the influence of sedatives and pain relievers using bladder catheterization. Unfortunately, in such a situation, it is not always possible to install a urinary catheter, and then, unfortunately, surgical intervention is required. But this is not often the case.

    Delayed urination (ishuria) – treatment, causes, symptoms in the URO-PRO clinic in Rostov-on-Don, Yekaterinburg, Krasnodar, Sochi.

    Retention of urination (ishuria) is a failure in the healthy functioning of the human body due to the inability to consciously urinate on its own (or it does not occur in full). At the same time, urine accumulates in the bladder, causing serious discomfort and pain.

    Reasons

    Urinary retention can be provoked by:

    • embarrassment, inability to go to the toilet on time (outlasting need)
    • mechanical obstacle (enlarged prostate gland, etc.)
    • injuries of the spinal cord, perineum, lumbar, pelvic nerves
    • weak bladder muscles (mainly in the elderly)
    • pharmacological reasons, taking certain medications
    • compression of the ureter by tumors, scars
    • physical and emotional stress
    • obstruction of the mouth of the urethra with a blood clot
    • bed rest after surgery
    • consumption of alcoholic beverages
    • phlebitis of hemorrhoidal veins
    • neurological factors
    • dehydration
    • febrile condition
    • stones in the bladder
    • renal deficiency
    • food too spicy
    • development of infections
    • blood loss
    • inflammation.

    Symptoms

    With urinary retention, urination is either completely absent, or the bladder is not completely emptied (excessive amount of residual urine), or there is drip of urine, although the bladder is full.

    When a person has a prolonged urinary retention, his general condition becomes severe due to the poisoning of the body with metabolic products that need to be excreted in the urine. Edema, headache, nausea, vomiting appear, the tongue becomes dry, sometimes consciousness is lost, there are convulsions, diarrhea, blood pressure rises.

    Gradually, a distension of the bladder and rather severe abdominal pains are added to this. Such symptoms, in turn, provoke dysfunction and performance of other organs: heart, intestines, lungs, etc.

    Help with urinary retention

    If a person has such an ailment, then you need to seek professional examination and treatment from good, experienced doctors as soon as possible. Delay is not appropriate here, because urinary retention , in addition to the above problems, can even lead to death due to poisoning of the body with uric acid, etc.d.

    If the patient is in such a serious condition that he cannot get to the hospital on his own, call the doctor as soon as possible, and in the meantime provide him with first aid:

    • put a warm heating pad
    • on the lower abdomen for a person suffering from urinary retention

    • Create the sound of falling water (e.g. audio tapes, faucet)
    • Give the person cold water to drink, herbal diaphoretic tea
    • put the patient in a warm bath, where add chamomile broth.

    These procedures sometimes help relieve spasms and thus can help a person go to the toilet “in a small way” on their own.

    Make an appointment now

    Make an appointment by calling

    (863) 227-72-72

    or by filling out the online form.

    Order a call ← Our specialists can call you back at a convenient time for you. The call is free!

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    urinary incontinence folk remedies reviews

    urinary incontinence folk remedies reviews

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    painful to write to a woman at the end of urination These folk remedies will help cure urinary incontinence in women and men in old age. Urinary incontinence in old age – causes, treatment. Based on materials from the newspaper Bulletin of Healthy Lifestyle 2012, No. 12. 14-15. Nocturnal urinary incontinence can be caused by a combination of several factors – this is deep sleep, and hereditary characteristics, and pathology of the genitourinary system.Therapy for nocturnal enuresis is aimed at eliminating the causes that caused it. In modern urology, both traditional and unusual are used. Treatment of urinary incontinence in women with folk remedies. Traditional medicine does not stand aside when such problems arise. For incontinence during menopause, labor and other ailments, natural medicines can help. If we talk about the treatment of urinary incontinence in a woman. Non-drug treatments for urinary incontinence. Treatment of bedwetting with folk remedies.Does it work or not? Folk remedies for the treatment of various diseases do not lose their popularity, despite the fact that not all. Urinary incontinence began immediately after childbirth. A characteristic feature of stress urinary incontinence is the absence of urge. However, you should not resort to folk remedies for home treatment. If consciousness is lost, the person is treated in intensive care with help. Enuresis in children is quite common. Bedtime urinary incontinence can be treated not only with traditional medication, but also with folk remedies.Candidate of Medical Sciences, gynecologist-endocrinologist, reproductologist, ultrasound specialist, head of the department of gynecology in the group of clinics Altermed First, you need to find out whether urinary incontinence is due to urological reasons or a problem from gynecology. To do this, it is necessary to cure children’s nocturnal enuresis with a folk remedy, with dill seeds. How long did it take to cure night enuresis. What else. Folk remedies will not help. Sometimes organic matter, there is generally a serious treatment. (Added after 6 minutes).Treating urinary incontinence with folk remedies is a popular method. Alternative treatment at home is also not able to bring the desired results, not a single folk remedy will help with mental illness. Urinary incontinence is a condition in which a woman may pass urine a little or not hold back completely. While you are going through folk remedies, time is passing, which is priceless in cases of cancerous tumors, prolapse (prolapse) of the uterus, etc. Such treatment is effective only if it is. Urinary incontinence (enuresis) is a common and delicate problem that causes severe psychological and physical discomfort.The severity of bedwetting is different: from a slight leak of urine during coughing or sneezing to a sudden and very strong urge. ➤ Methods of treating urinary incontinence with folk remedies. Effective preparations based on herbs and natural products. Folk remedies for the treatment of urinary incontinence. No one is immune from nighttime or daytime urinary incontinence. The unpleasant condition most often occurs in children. Therapy with folk remedies. Involuntary urination is a problem that has been familiar to mankind for a long time.The safest folk remedies for treating urinary incontinence in women are the gifts of nature – herbs and their fruits. Urinary incontinence is the involuntary flow of urine in the absence of the urge to urinate. Traditional medicine for the treatment of urinary incontinence in elderly people Plantain large Take 3-4 times a day on the tip of a knife powder from plantain seeds. mucus during urination urination after cesarean section toilet paper after urination

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    A large-scale campaign has already been launched against this drug, initiated by the largest pharmacy chains in the country.Perhaps very soon it will also disappear from sale. We recommend buying URINARY Meridian for all men while it is still possible to do so. Now the drug is on sale for a promotion! Never buy medicines hand-held. I paid for my carelessness with money, and I could have paid for my health. They slipped me pills with a long expired shelf life, well at least I noticed it on time. After the second birth, I began to suffer from urinary incontinence and recently discovered Urinary Meridian capsules to combat this problem. Surprisingly, they really helped me.They act gently and safely. I have not experienced any side effects from their use. Now I am no longer afraid of embarrassment and can lead a more active lifestyle. Why hot urine when urinating in women and men. What is the normal urine temperature. If we talk about hot urine when urinating in women what reasons it may have, then in this case one should not forget about possible infectious processes. Infectious process. Normally, a person’s urine temperature should correspond to body temperature.Hot urine when urinating. The sensation of hot urine can occur as a result of hypothermia of the body, low ambient temperatures, and also during an infectious or viral disease. Normally, a person’s urine temperature should correspond to body temperature. In addition to the symptom of hot urine, there is a burning sensation, cutting pains during urination and general weakness of the body. Normally, a person’s urine temperature should correspond to body temperature. In a healthy state it is temperature-sensitive.However, the temperature of the skin is lower than 37 degrees, so when urinating, the person feels that the urine is slightly warm. Video: What does your urine say about you? What your urine can do. Urine is a fluid excreted by the body. It does not have its own mechanisms of thermoregulation, it is just an aqueous solution of urea and some salts. Inside the bladder, the temperature of urine is the same as that of the body; in the environment, it is the same as the temperature of the environment. If the temperature. Home ›Human temperature› What is the temperature of a person’s urine when urinating.If we talk about what is the normal temperature of urine in a person, then this will be an indicator similar to body temperature. At low temperatures, a person can observe the release of steam from urine. Noticing that the urine feels warm or hot. A hot sensation when urinating can be painful and can even cause a person to have urinary retention. Normal urine temperature – corresponds to the temperature of the human body and is equal to 36.9 degrees. At home, it is quite difficult to determine the reason why urine is like boiling water when urinating.When diagnosing, the results of urine analysis are evaluated. Since most often the temperature and kidneys hurt with pyelonephritis, namely in an acute form, the question arises of what to do with this ailment.

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    I often have problems with the bladder, and here the composition is good and effective, so I decided to drink it. I like the first impression, the body reacted well to the new remedy. Urination is an arbitrary process.It is controlled by the central nervous system and occurs only at the will of the person. Normally, urination occurs easily and freely, without difficulty, painful sensations, after which a person. Difficulty urinating is a symptom that indicates that some pathological processes have arisen in the body, and is characterized by a violation of the outflow of urine through the urethra. It can be encountered by both men and women. Difficulty urinating. Violation of the process of urination in medicine is also called dysuria.They talk about this ailment when a person has. Difficulty urinating in women appears against the background of various gynecological diseases in almost 35% of cases. Diagnosis of urinary disorders in men and women. Modern diagnostic methods can quickly establish the cause of the disorder. The urologist begins the diagnosis with a survey, collecting patient complaints. Difficulty urinating in women is one of the most frequent complications of various pathologies in women. It most often develops in elderly women against the background of chronic diseases of the genitourinary system.Causes of difficulty urinating in women. Delayed urine excretion in the elderly and during pregnancy. Diagnosing the problem. Folk remedies and other types of treatment for dysuria in women. Violation of urination, reasons and which doctor to go to. Find out how urination disorder is treated, modern methods. Violation of urination or dysuria is a symptom accompanied by pain and burning sensation in the urethra. It can signal serious bladder problems. Urinary incontinence in women is a violation of urination, accompanied by the inability to voluntarily regulate the emptying of the bladder.Depending on the form, it manifests itself as uncontrolled leakage of urine with tension or at rest, sudden and n. Frequent urination in women is common. It may be associated with any pathology or manifestation of a special physiological condition. Frequent urge to urinate is indicated by the term pollakiuria. With such a delicate problem in the modern world. Causes of uncontrolled urination in women after 40, 50, 60 years. Urinary incontinence is an unintentional passage of urine and is a very common problem in women in their 40s and 50s. urinary incontinence folk remedies responses . urinating after a cesarean section. Reviews, instructions for use, composition and properties. Why does frequent urination appear? What disease symptom is frequent urination, causes and treatment of the disease, list. Frequent urination during the daytime is called pollakiuria. Increased urination may be due to more urine being excreted. If the total amount of urine exceeds 1.8 liters, then such a condition. Time of urinary retention.Graph – decoding of the curve configuration. Time of urinary retention. This is the name of the period from the beginning of the process until the first portion of urine enters the container. The body needs time. And normally how much time should pass, Between urination? For example, today I woke up at 14:00 at the moment 23:50. Frequent urination can also be caused by external factors, in which case the symptom goes away on its own in a short time. Frequent urination (frequent urge to urinate). The need to empty the bladder more often than normal (for an adult – more often 8-10 times a day), while there may be more urine than usual, or she.Urination is an arbitrary process. It is controlled by the central nervous system and occurs only at the will of the person. Frequent urination in women without pain. All of the above reasons for pollakiuria and risk factors for its development apply to women.

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