Stone

Surgery for tonsil stones: Causes, Symptoms, Removal & Treatment

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Causes, Symptoms, Removal & Treatment

Overview

What are tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are small lumps of hard material that form in the tonsils. Tonsil stones can cause bad breath though they’re usually not painful or harmful. They’re also called tonsilliths.

You can usually treat tonsil stones at home. But in some cases, you may need surgery to remove the tonsils.

What are tonsils?

The tonsils are a pair of small, oval-shaped bits of tissue at the back of your throat. They have folds, gaps and crevices called tonsillar crypts.

Tonsils are part of your immune system, which helps protect against infection. Tonsils filter bacteria and viruses that enter your body through your mouth. Removing the tonsils does not affect your immune system.

What do tonsil stones look like?

Tonsil stones look like little white or yellow pebbles on your tonsils. You may have one tonsil stone or many tonsil stones. They’re usually small, though sometimes people can get large tonsil stones.

What’s the difference between tonsil stones and tonsillitis?

Tonsillitis is a tonsil infection. Both conditions can cause bad breath and throat pain. Usually, if you have tonsillitis, you’ll also get red, inflamed tonsils along with a sore throat, fever and headache.

Who’s at risk of tonsil stones?

People who have more tonsillar crypts tend to get more tonsil stones. These are also more commonly found in people who have had a lot of tonsil infections in their life. Tonsilliths tend to happen more often in teens.

How common are tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are common. Many people get them and may not even know they have them.

Symptoms and Causes

What causes tonsil stones?

Materials and debris can get trapped in the tonsillar crypts. The material can harden or calcify, forming stones. Trapped material could include:

  • Minerals such as calcium.
  • Food or debris.
  • Bacteria or fungi.

What are the symptoms of tonsil stones?

Some tonsil stones don’t cause any symptoms. If you do have symptoms, they may include:

  • Bad breath (halitosis).
  • Cough.
  • Earache.
  • Sore throat.
  • Bad taste in your mouth.
  • Small white or yellow stones that you may spit up.

Other symptoms include:

  • Difficulty swallowing.
  • Feeling that something’s stuck in your throat.
  • Small white patches on your tonsils.
  • Throat infections that are hard to treat with antibiotics.

Diagnosis and Tests

How are tonsil stones diagnosed?

To diagnose tonsil stones, your provider may:

  • Do a physical exam, looking inside your mouth and throat.
  • Perform an imaging scan if they cannot see the stones easily.
  • Dislodge the stones using a dental pick.

Sometimes, a healthcare provider happens to notice tonsil stones during an exam. If you don’t have any symptoms, your provider might notice a stone during a scan or X-ray for a different problem. Or your dentist may see them during a dental exam.

Management and Treatment

How are tonsil stones treated?

Usually, treatment aims to manage tonsil stone symptoms. There isn’t a specific treatment method for stones. Make sure to:

  • Brush teeth regularly.
  • Gargle with warm salt water.

Can I remove the tonsil stones myself?

You can try these at-home methods to get rid of tonsil stones:

  • Gargling: Vigorous gargling using salt water has a few advantages. It helps your throat feel better, plus it can dislodge the tonsil stones. It may even get rid of the bad odor. This is particularly helpful when you gargle after eating to prevent food and debris from getting caught in the tonsil crypts.
  • Coughing: Some people find that a strong cough can loosen stones and bring them up.
  • Using an object: If gargling and coughing don’t dislodge the stones, it’s tempting to use your finger or a toothbrush to get rid of tonsil stones. But you can easily scratch your delicate tonsils. They can get infected. Instead, if you want to use an object, try a cotton swab.

Are medications used to treat tonsil stones?

Your healthcare provider will tell you if you need antibiotics to treat tonsil stones. In most cases, providers don’t use antibiotics. These medicines don’t treat the underlying cause of tonsil stones. But you may need antibiotics if you develop a bacterial infection.

Is there a way to remove tonsil stones surgically?

If tonsil stone symptoms are bothering you, talk to your provider. They may refer you to an ENT — an ear, nose and throat specialist. The ENT can discuss your surgical options with you.

Healthcare providers may recommend surgical tonsil stone removal if tonsil stones are:

  • Large.
  • Causing pain or other problems.
  • Causing recurrent tonsil infections or sore throats.

Will I need a tonsillectomy because of tonsil stones?

In some cases, healthcare providers recommend a tonsillectomy — having your tonsils removed. This procedure may help if tonsil stones keep coming back or if they are causing repeated infections.

Prevention

How can I prevent tonsil stones?

You can take steps to prevent tonsil stones:

  • Brush and floss regularly. Make sure to brush the front and back of your tongue, too.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Gargle with salt water after eating.
  • Use a water pick to clean your mouth and help dislodge any tonsil stones.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water.

Outlook / Prognosis

What’s the outlook for people with tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are common. They rarely cause serious health problems. Many people have tonsil stones and don’t even know they have them. You can treat them at home. If tonsil stones keep coming back, you and your healthcare provider can discuss a more permanent solution.

Living With

How do I take care of myself if I have tonsil stones?

If you have tonsil stones, these at-home remedies can help:

  • A warm saltwater gargle helps with swelling and discomfort. Gargling can even help dislodge the stone. Try a gargle of 1 teaspoon salt mixed with 8 ounces of water.
  • Use a cotton swab to remove a tonsil stone that’s bothering you.
  • Brush and floss regularly.

When should I see a healthcare provider about tonsil stones?

Talk to your provider if:

  • At-home remedies aren’t working as they should.
  • Tonsil stones keep coming back or are bothering you.
  • You want to discuss other treatment options.

What else should I ask my provider?

If you have tonsil stones, ask your provider:

  • How can I get rid of tonsil stones at home?
  • What can I do to improve my symptoms?
  • What should I do if tonsil stones come back?
  • Will I need surgery?

A note from Cleveland Clinic

Tonsil stones are small lumps of hardened material that form on your tonsils, in the back of your throat. They usually don’t cause serious health problems. The main sign of tonsil stones is bad breath. You can usually try to get rid of tonsil stones using at-home methods, such as saltwater gargles. If home tonsil stone removal doesn’t work, or the stones keep coming back, talk to your provider. If the issue is recurring infections, you may need a tonsillectomy to remove your tonsils.

Causes, Symptoms, Removal & Treatment

Overview

What are tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are small lumps of hard material that form in the tonsils. Tonsil stones can cause bad breath though they’re usually not painful or harmful. They’re also called tonsilliths.

You can usually treat tonsil stones at home. But in some cases, you may need surgery to remove the tonsils.

What are tonsils?

The tonsils are a pair of small, oval-shaped bits of tissue at the back of your throat. They have folds, gaps and crevices called tonsillar crypts.

Tonsils are part of your immune system, which helps protect against infection. Tonsils filter bacteria and viruses that enter your body through your mouth. Removing the tonsils does not affect your immune system.

What do tonsil stones look like?

Tonsil stones look like little white or yellow pebbles on your tonsils. You may have one tonsil stone or many tonsil stones. They’re usually small, though sometimes people can get large tonsil stones.

What’s the difference between tonsil stones and tonsillitis?

Tonsillitis is a tonsil infection. Both conditions can cause bad breath and throat pain. Usually, if you have tonsillitis, you’ll also get red, inflamed tonsils along with a sore throat, fever and headache.

Who’s at risk of tonsil stones?

People who have more tonsillar crypts tend to get more tonsil stones. These are also more commonly found in people who have had a lot of tonsil infections in their life. Tonsilliths tend to happen more often in teens.

How common are tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are common. Many people get them and may not even know they have them.

Symptoms and Causes

What causes tonsil stones?

Materials and debris can get trapped in the tonsillar crypts. The material can harden or calcify, forming stones. Trapped material could include:

  • Minerals such as calcium.
  • Food or debris.
  • Bacteria or fungi.

What are the symptoms of tonsil stones?

Some tonsil stones don’t cause any symptoms. If you do have symptoms, they may include:

  • Bad breath (halitosis).
  • Cough.
  • Earache.
  • Sore throat.
  • Bad taste in your mouth.
  • Small white or yellow stones that you may spit up.

Other symptoms include:

  • Difficulty swallowing.
  • Feeling that something’s stuck in your throat.
  • Small white patches on your tonsils.
  • Throat infections that are hard to treat with antibiotics.

Diagnosis and Tests

How are tonsil stones diagnosed?

To diagnose tonsil stones, your provider may:

  • Do a physical exam, looking inside your mouth and throat.
  • Perform an imaging scan if they cannot see the stones easily.
  • Dislodge the stones using a dental pick.

Sometimes, a healthcare provider happens to notice tonsil stones during an exam. If you don’t have any symptoms, your provider might notice a stone during a scan or X-ray for a different problem. Or your dentist may see them during a dental exam.

Management and Treatment

How are tonsil stones treated?

Usually, treatment aims to manage tonsil stone symptoms. There isn’t a specific treatment method for stones. Make sure to:

  • Brush teeth regularly.
  • Gargle with warm salt water.

Can I remove the tonsil stones myself?

You can try these at-home methods to get rid of tonsil stones:

  • Gargling: Vigorous gargling using salt water has a few advantages. It helps your throat feel better, plus it can dislodge the tonsil stones. It may even get rid of the bad odor. This is particularly helpful when you gargle after eating to prevent food and debris from getting caught in the tonsil crypts.
  • Coughing: Some people find that a strong cough can loosen stones and bring them up.
  • Using an object: If gargling and coughing don’t dislodge the stones, it’s tempting to use your finger or a toothbrush to get rid of tonsil stones. But you can easily scratch your delicate tonsils. They can get infected. Instead, if you want to use an object, try a cotton swab.

Are medications used to treat tonsil stones?

Your healthcare provider will tell you if you need antibiotics to treat tonsil stones. In most cases, providers don’t use antibiotics. These medicines don’t treat the underlying cause of tonsil stones. But you may need antibiotics if you develop a bacterial infection.

Is there a way to remove tonsil stones surgically?

If tonsil stone symptoms are bothering you, talk to your provider. They may refer you to an ENT — an ear, nose and throat specialist. The ENT can discuss your surgical options with you.

Healthcare providers may recommend surgical tonsil stone removal if tonsil stones are:

  • Large.
  • Causing pain or other problems.
  • Causing recurrent tonsil infections or sore throats.

Will I need a tonsillectomy because of tonsil stones?

In some cases, healthcare providers recommend a tonsillectomy — having your tonsils removed. This procedure may help if tonsil stones keep coming back or if they are causing repeated infections.

Prevention

How can I prevent tonsil stones?

You can take steps to prevent tonsil stones:

  • Brush and floss regularly. Make sure to brush the front and back of your tongue, too.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Gargle with salt water after eating.
  • Use a water pick to clean your mouth and help dislodge any tonsil stones.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water.

Outlook / Prognosis

What’s the outlook for people with tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are common. They rarely cause serious health problems. Many people have tonsil stones and don’t even know they have them. You can treat them at home. If tonsil stones keep coming back, you and your healthcare provider can discuss a more permanent solution.

Living With

How do I take care of myself if I have tonsil stones?

If you have tonsil stones, these at-home remedies can help:

  • A warm saltwater gargle helps with swelling and discomfort. Gargling can even help dislodge the stone. Try a gargle of 1 teaspoon salt mixed with 8 ounces of water.
  • Use a cotton swab to remove a tonsil stone that’s bothering you.
  • Brush and floss regularly.

When should I see a healthcare provider about tonsil stones?

Talk to your provider if:

  • At-home remedies aren’t working as they should.
  • Tonsil stones keep coming back or are bothering you.
  • You want to discuss other treatment options.

What else should I ask my provider?

If you have tonsil stones, ask your provider:

  • How can I get rid of tonsil stones at home?
  • What can I do to improve my symptoms?
  • What should I do if tonsil stones come back?
  • Will I need surgery?

A note from Cleveland Clinic

Tonsil stones are small lumps of hardened material that form on your tonsils, in the back of your throat. They usually don’t cause serious health problems. The main sign of tonsil stones is bad breath. You can usually try to get rid of tonsil stones using at-home methods, such as saltwater gargles. If home tonsil stone removal doesn’t work, or the stones keep coming back, talk to your provider. If the issue is recurring infections, you may need a tonsillectomy to remove your tonsils.

Causes, Symptoms, Removal & Treatment

Overview

What are tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are small lumps of hard material that form in the tonsils. Tonsil stones can cause bad breath though they’re usually not painful or harmful. They’re also called tonsilliths.

You can usually treat tonsil stones at home. But in some cases, you may need surgery to remove the tonsils.

What are tonsils?

The tonsils are a pair of small, oval-shaped bits of tissue at the back of your throat. They have folds, gaps and crevices called tonsillar crypts.

Tonsils are part of your immune system, which helps protect against infection. Tonsils filter bacteria and viruses that enter your body through your mouth. Removing the tonsils does not affect your immune system.

What do tonsil stones look like?

Tonsil stones look like little white or yellow pebbles on your tonsils. You may have one tonsil stone or many tonsil stones. They’re usually small, though sometimes people can get large tonsil stones.

What’s the difference between tonsil stones and tonsillitis?

Tonsillitis is a tonsil infection. Both conditions can cause bad breath and throat pain. Usually, if you have tonsillitis, you’ll also get red, inflamed tonsils along with a sore throat, fever and headache.

Who’s at risk of tonsil stones?

People who have more tonsillar crypts tend to get more tonsil stones. These are also more commonly found in people who have had a lot of tonsil infections in their life. Tonsilliths tend to happen more often in teens.

How common are tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are common. Many people get them and may not even know they have them.

Symptoms and Causes

What causes tonsil stones?

Materials and debris can get trapped in the tonsillar crypts. The material can harden or calcify, forming stones. Trapped material could include:

  • Minerals such as calcium.
  • Food or debris.
  • Bacteria or fungi.

What are the symptoms of tonsil stones?

Some tonsil stones don’t cause any symptoms. If you do have symptoms, they may include:

  • Bad breath (halitosis).
  • Cough.
  • Earache.
  • Sore throat.
  • Bad taste in your mouth.
  • Small white or yellow stones that you may spit up.

Other symptoms include:

  • Difficulty swallowing.
  • Feeling that something’s stuck in your throat.
  • Small white patches on your tonsils.
  • Throat infections that are hard to treat with antibiotics.

Diagnosis and Tests

How are tonsil stones diagnosed?

To diagnose tonsil stones, your provider may:

  • Do a physical exam, looking inside your mouth and throat.
  • Perform an imaging scan if they cannot see the stones easily.
  • Dislodge the stones using a dental pick.

Sometimes, a healthcare provider happens to notice tonsil stones during an exam. If you don’t have any symptoms, your provider might notice a stone during a scan or X-ray for a different problem. Or your dentist may see them during a dental exam.

Management and Treatment

How are tonsil stones treated?

Usually, treatment aims to manage tonsil stone symptoms. There isn’t a specific treatment method for stones. Make sure to:

  • Brush teeth regularly.
  • Gargle with warm salt water.

Can I remove the tonsil stones myself?

You can try these at-home methods to get rid of tonsil stones:

  • Gargling: Vigorous gargling using salt water has a few advantages. It helps your throat feel better, plus it can dislodge the tonsil stones. It may even get rid of the bad odor. This is particularly helpful when you gargle after eating to prevent food and debris from getting caught in the tonsil crypts.
  • Coughing: Some people find that a strong cough can loosen stones and bring them up.
  • Using an object: If gargling and coughing don’t dislodge the stones, it’s tempting to use your finger or a toothbrush to get rid of tonsil stones. But you can easily scratch your delicate tonsils. They can get infected. Instead, if you want to use an object, try a cotton swab.

Are medications used to treat tonsil stones?

Your healthcare provider will tell you if you need antibiotics to treat tonsil stones. In most cases, providers don’t use antibiotics. These medicines don’t treat the underlying cause of tonsil stones. But you may need antibiotics if you develop a bacterial infection.

Is there a way to remove tonsil stones surgically?

If tonsil stone symptoms are bothering you, talk to your provider. They may refer you to an ENT — an ear, nose and throat specialist. The ENT can discuss your surgical options with you.

Healthcare providers may recommend surgical tonsil stone removal if tonsil stones are:

  • Large.
  • Causing pain or other problems.
  • Causing recurrent tonsil infections or sore throats.

Will I need a tonsillectomy because of tonsil stones?

In some cases, healthcare providers recommend a tonsillectomy — having your tonsils removed. This procedure may help if tonsil stones keep coming back or if they are causing repeated infections.

Prevention

How can I prevent tonsil stones?

You can take steps to prevent tonsil stones:

  • Brush and floss regularly. Make sure to brush the front and back of your tongue, too.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Gargle with salt water after eating.
  • Use a water pick to clean your mouth and help dislodge any tonsil stones.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water.

Outlook / Prognosis

What’s the outlook for people with tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are common. They rarely cause serious health problems. Many people have tonsil stones and don’t even know they have them. You can treat them at home. If tonsil stones keep coming back, you and your healthcare provider can discuss a more permanent solution.

Living With

How do I take care of myself if I have tonsil stones?

If you have tonsil stones, these at-home remedies can help:

  • A warm saltwater gargle helps with swelling and discomfort. Gargling can even help dislodge the stone. Try a gargle of 1 teaspoon salt mixed with 8 ounces of water.
  • Use a cotton swab to remove a tonsil stone that’s bothering you.
  • Brush and floss regularly.

When should I see a healthcare provider about tonsil stones?

Talk to your provider if:

  • At-home remedies aren’t working as they should.
  • Tonsil stones keep coming back or are bothering you.
  • You want to discuss other treatment options.

What else should I ask my provider?

If you have tonsil stones, ask your provider:

  • How can I get rid of tonsil stones at home?
  • What can I do to improve my symptoms?
  • What should I do if tonsil stones come back?
  • Will I need surgery?

A note from Cleveland Clinic

Tonsil stones are small lumps of hardened material that form on your tonsils, in the back of your throat. They usually don’t cause serious health problems. The main sign of tonsil stones is bad breath. You can usually try to get rid of tonsil stones using at-home methods, such as saltwater gargles. If home tonsil stone removal doesn’t work, or the stones keep coming back, talk to your provider. If the issue is recurring infections, you may need a tonsillectomy to remove your tonsils.

Causes, Symptoms, Removal & Treatment

Overview

What are tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are small lumps of hard material that form in the tonsils. Tonsil stones can cause bad breath though they’re usually not painful or harmful. They’re also called tonsilliths.

You can usually treat tonsil stones at home. But in some cases, you may need surgery to remove the tonsils.

What are tonsils?

The tonsils are a pair of small, oval-shaped bits of tissue at the back of your throat. They have folds, gaps and crevices called tonsillar crypts.

Tonsils are part of your immune system, which helps protect against infection. Tonsils filter bacteria and viruses that enter your body through your mouth. Removing the tonsils does not affect your immune system.

What do tonsil stones look like?

Tonsil stones look like little white or yellow pebbles on your tonsils. You may have one tonsil stone or many tonsil stones. They’re usually small, though sometimes people can get large tonsil stones.

What’s the difference between tonsil stones and tonsillitis?

Tonsillitis is a tonsil infection. Both conditions can cause bad breath and throat pain. Usually, if you have tonsillitis, you’ll also get red, inflamed tonsils along with a sore throat, fever and headache.

Who’s at risk of tonsil stones?

People who have more tonsillar crypts tend to get more tonsil stones. These are also more commonly found in people who have had a lot of tonsil infections in their life. Tonsilliths tend to happen more often in teens.

How common are tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are common. Many people get them and may not even know they have them.

Symptoms and Causes

What causes tonsil stones?

Materials and debris can get trapped in the tonsillar crypts. The material can harden or calcify, forming stones. Trapped material could include:

  • Minerals such as calcium.
  • Food or debris.
  • Bacteria or fungi.

What are the symptoms of tonsil stones?

Some tonsil stones don’t cause any symptoms. If you do have symptoms, they may include:

  • Bad breath (halitosis).
  • Cough.
  • Earache.
  • Sore throat.
  • Bad taste in your mouth.
  • Small white or yellow stones that you may spit up.

Other symptoms include:

  • Difficulty swallowing.
  • Feeling that something’s stuck in your throat.
  • Small white patches on your tonsils.
  • Throat infections that are hard to treat with antibiotics.

Diagnosis and Tests

How are tonsil stones diagnosed?

To diagnose tonsil stones, your provider may:

  • Do a physical exam, looking inside your mouth and throat.
  • Perform an imaging scan if they cannot see the stones easily.
  • Dislodge the stones using a dental pick.

Sometimes, a healthcare provider happens to notice tonsil stones during an exam. If you don’t have any symptoms, your provider might notice a stone during a scan or X-ray for a different problem. Or your dentist may see them during a dental exam.

Management and Treatment

How are tonsil stones treated?

Usually, treatment aims to manage tonsil stone symptoms. There isn’t a specific treatment method for stones. Make sure to:

  • Brush teeth regularly.
  • Gargle with warm salt water.

Can I remove the tonsil stones myself?

You can try these at-home methods to get rid of tonsil stones:

  • Gargling: Vigorous gargling using salt water has a few advantages. It helps your throat feel better, plus it can dislodge the tonsil stones. It may even get rid of the bad odor. This is particularly helpful when you gargle after eating to prevent food and debris from getting caught in the tonsil crypts.
  • Coughing: Some people find that a strong cough can loosen stones and bring them up.
  • Using an object: If gargling and coughing don’t dislodge the stones, it’s tempting to use your finger or a toothbrush to get rid of tonsil stones. But you can easily scratch your delicate tonsils. They can get infected. Instead, if you want to use an object, try a cotton swab.

Are medications used to treat tonsil stones?

Your healthcare provider will tell you if you need antibiotics to treat tonsil stones. In most cases, providers don’t use antibiotics. These medicines don’t treat the underlying cause of tonsil stones. But you may need antibiotics if you develop a bacterial infection.

Is there a way to remove tonsil stones surgically?

If tonsil stone symptoms are bothering you, talk to your provider. They may refer you to an ENT — an ear, nose and throat specialist. The ENT can discuss your surgical options with you.

Healthcare providers may recommend surgical tonsil stone removal if tonsil stones are:

  • Large.
  • Causing pain or other problems.
  • Causing recurrent tonsil infections or sore throats.

Will I need a tonsillectomy because of tonsil stones?

In some cases, healthcare providers recommend a tonsillectomy — having your tonsils removed. This procedure may help if tonsil stones keep coming back or if they are causing repeated infections.

Prevention

How can I prevent tonsil stones?

You can take steps to prevent tonsil stones:

  • Brush and floss regularly. Make sure to brush the front and back of your tongue, too.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Gargle with salt water after eating.
  • Use a water pick to clean your mouth and help dislodge any tonsil stones.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water.

Outlook / Prognosis

What’s the outlook for people with tonsil stones?

Tonsil stones are common. They rarely cause serious health problems. Many people have tonsil stones and don’t even know they have them. You can treat them at home. If tonsil stones keep coming back, you and your healthcare provider can discuss a more permanent solution.

Living With

How do I take care of myself if I have tonsil stones?

If you have tonsil stones, these at-home remedies can help:

  • A warm saltwater gargle helps with swelling and discomfort. Gargling can even help dislodge the stone. Try a gargle of 1 teaspoon salt mixed with 8 ounces of water.
  • Use a cotton swab to remove a tonsil stone that’s bothering you.
  • Brush and floss regularly.

When should I see a healthcare provider about tonsil stones?

Talk to your provider if:

  • At-home remedies aren’t working as they should.
  • Tonsil stones keep coming back or are bothering you.
  • You want to discuss other treatment options.

What else should I ask my provider?

If you have tonsil stones, ask your provider:

  • How can I get rid of tonsil stones at home?
  • What can I do to improve my symptoms?
  • What should I do if tonsil stones come back?
  • Will I need surgery?

A note from Cleveland Clinic

Tonsil stones are small lumps of hardened material that form on your tonsils, in the back of your throat. They usually don’t cause serious health problems. The main sign of tonsil stones is bad breath. You can usually try to get rid of tonsil stones using at-home methods, such as saltwater gargles. If home tonsil stone removal doesn’t work, or the stones keep coming back, talk to your provider. If the issue is recurring infections, you may need a tonsillectomy to remove your tonsils.

How to Prevent Tonsil Stones

The most effective way to permanently prevent tonsil stones from forming is to get a tonsillectomy, or surgical removal of the tonsils. “Tonsillectomy is a very painful procedure, and it can involve at least two weeks of moderate or severe pain,” says Thatcher. “There is also a risk of bleeding.” (1,2)

Another procedure is laser tonsil cryptolysis, in which a laser is used to remove the tonsil crypts and resurface the troublesome areas. (4) A newer surgical option is coblation cryptolysis, a procedure that uses lower temperatures and utilizes radio frequency and saline to smooth out crevices in the tonsils, Thatcher says. (5)

As with any surgery, these procedures are not without risks. That’s why many people opt to take measures to prevent tonsil stones from forming and deal with tonsil stones when they crop up rather than go under the knife (or laser or radio waves).

But some people may be so bothered by tonsil stones symptoms, like bad breath or persistent and frequent stones, that they may opt for surgery, Thatcher says. Some people may cough up irksome stones every couple of days. (1,2) And for others it’s how the stones and symptoms affect their career or social life. If your job requires you to interact with people frequently, for example, or if you’re a dentist who needs to be in close proximity to patients, chronic bad breath can be problematic, says Thatcher.

RELATED: What’s Causing Your Bad Breath?

In some cases, frequent tonsil stones may increase your risk of tonsillitis, or infection of the tonsils, says Setlur. (1)

When deciding whether or not to choose tonsillectomy to prevent tonsil stones, the key, says Thatcher, is to understand the risks and go over your options with your doctor. “Discuss the benefits and complications,” says Thatcher. “It’s very personal. Weigh and balance how deeply it affects your life.”

RELATED: Everything You Should Know About Home and Other Remedies for Tonsil Stones

When Is Tonsil Removal Surgery Recommended?

Tonsil removal surgery is a very common procedure that can be performed for a variety of different reasons.

What Is Tonsil Removal Surgery?

Tonsil removal surgery is commonly called a tonsillectomy. It’s a surgical removal of the tonsils, which are two pads located in the back of your throat. Although your tonsils are part of your body’s immune system, having them removed won’t make you more likely to get an infection.

The adenoids, which are located near the tonsils and perform a similar function, are also frequently removed during the same procedure.

The surgery is frequently thought of as being performed on children, but adults also often need a tonsillectomy.

How Is the Procedure Performed?

A tonsillectomy is performed under general anesthesia, so you won’t have any awareness or pain during the surgery.

Your doctor can remove your tonsils by using a scalpel or with a surgical tool that uses heat or sound waves to destroy tissue. The procedure will take about an hour, and you’ll typically be able to go home the same day.

Who Makes a Good Candidate for a Tonsillectomy?

This procedure is often performed for one of the following reasons:

  • Snoring – Enlarged tonsils can block your airways during sleep, causing chronic snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. This dangerous disorder causes repeated pauses in breathing as you sleep.
  • Infections – Recurring throat infections that occur six or more times a year can cause your tonsils to become infected and swollen. A tonsillectomy can be performed if antibiotics aren’t effective or for patients who can’t take antibiotics.
  • Abnormal growths – Tonsil stones (tonsilloliths) may also form and make removal of the tonsils necessary.

What Symptoms Indicate You May Need a Tonsillectomy?

Although some of the following symptoms can also accompany other health issues, they can also be a sign of tonsillitis (inflamed tonsils):

  • Pain that’s on one side of your throat
  • Painful or difficult swallowing
  • Fever
  • Swollen lymph nodes in your neck
  • Severe or recurring sore throat
  • White or yellow coating on your tonsils

What is Involved with the Recovery of a Tonsillectomy?       

Most people experience some pain after a tonsillectomy, so you’ll probably be advised to take pain medication. The pain may get worse 3 or 4 days after your surgery, especially when you first wake up, and it can last for up to two weeks.

The following can help make your recovery easier while preventing complications:

  • Rest – Staying on bed rest for a few days and avoiding strenuous activities for about two weeks
  • Fluids – Drinking plenty of fluids to avoid getting dehydrated
  • Easy-to-swallow foods – Choosing bland, easy-to-swallow, soft, or cool foods immediately after surgery, such as ice cream, yogurt, pudding, applesauce and scrambled eggs; avoiding crunchy, spicy, or acidic foods

If you’re experiencing any symptoms that could indicate the need for tonsil removal surgery, make an appointment today for an evaluation with Lakeside Allergy ENT. We have three convenient locations in Rockwall, Wylie, and Forney, TX, and our staff is pleased to provide compassionate, personalized care for patients of all ages.

Tonsil Stones | Tonsil Stone Treatment

Tonsil stones, or tonsilloliths, are formed in the tonsils of affected adults. The stones can arise from material, such as food, mucous and bacteria, that collects in the crypts(holes) of tonsils. The can also be formed from a strain of bacteria, actinomycoses, that are found in the tonsils and produce sulfur granules. The stones are typically white or yellow in color, and either hard or cheesy in consistency. The usually have a foul smell which is due to the presence of sulfurous compounds.

Symptoms of tonsil stones(tonsilloliths) include bad breath(halitosis), sore throats, difficulty swallowing, and the sensation of a foreign body in the throat. Bad breath, or halitosis is the symptom that usually drives people to seek medical treatment.

Tonsil stones can be removed at home using a swab, pick(gently) or water pik. Daily gargling may help to clear the tonsils of debris and prevent the formation of stones. While antibiotics may provide short term relief, they do not ‘cure’ the condition.

Tonsillolithiasis, or tonsil stones can be effectively treated with an office procedure, laser cryptolysis. Using a carbon dioxide laser and local anesthesia, portions of the tonsil are vaporized, eliminating the crypts and therefore the source of the stones. Laser cryptolysis is not painful, has minimal risk of bleeding, and pain medication is not necessary.

The ultimate treatment for tonsil stones is a tonsillectomy, when the entire tonsil is removed. This is an outpatient procedure, performed in the hospital under general anesthesia, with a 1-2 week recovery due to throat pain and risk of post-operative bleeding.

If you are tortured by tonsil stones, make an appointment to see the doctors at Great Neck ENT to see if you are a candidate for laser cryptolysis.

Learn more about our Tonsil Stone Treatments here

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Removal of purulent plugs from the tonsils in the throat


Treatment of tonsil plugs in ENT clinic №1

Article rating

3.20 (Voted: 5)

What are tonsils?

Tonsils are lymph nodes superficially located in the oropharynx between the palatine arches.They are an organ of immune defense against the threat of pathogens entering the lower respiratory tract, that is, an organ designed to cleanse the inhaled air from infection, or to localize this infection (take fire on itself) in order to prevent its spread below.

Healthy tonsils are formations permeated with “lacunae” and “crypts” (folds and passages), this is intended to multiply the surface of the working epithelium, which produces protective antibodies and immunoglobulins. That is, the intentions to have such a “multi-pass” structure are absolutely good. But, as you know, all our advantages are also our disadvantages. So in this case, if the healthy tissue of the amygdala should cleanse itself, and the lacunae (pockets) and crypts (passages) should not accumulate any content, then the amygdala, exhausted by work, cannot cope with this function and accumulates desquamated epithelium in its “feed”, and sometimes food remains in the form of whitish-yellowish masses, which are an excellent environment for the development of bacteria, as evidenced by the unpleasant odor from these accumulations.

The patients themselves notice that some kind of content accumulates in the tonsils, either by determining it visually, or by the feeling of a foreign body on the right or left, “tingling” when swallowing, sometimes this discharge can be coughed up and spit out or is detected as an accidental finding when examining the throat by a doctor – otorhinolaryngologist.

In this case, the amygdala no longer works as an organ of defense and is rather a focus of infection.

Why are tonsil plugs dangerous?

It is impossible to ignore such a process in the tonsils, in some cases the discharge in the lacunae populates hemolytic streptococcus , the antigenic structure of which is very similar to the antigenic structure of a number of tissues of our body, namely: heart muscle, kidney parenchyma, synovial bursa (articular tissue) …Antibodies that the body diligently produces, not coping with the infection in the tonsils, can attack its own tissues, leading to rheumatic pathology: rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis, etc. And these are only the most formidable complications, most often, having such a focus in the oropharynx, we feel it on the quality of life. Any hypothermia leads to inflammation of the tonsils of the posterior pharyngeal wall: pains in the throat, nasal congestion may appear, otitis media, sinusitis may join, that is, an infection that has found a refuge in the tonsils, if possible, and a decrease in the body’s resistance: hypothermia under air conditioning, with active rest in the cold season and. etc., begins active reproduction and seeding of mucous membranes with its pathogenic flora.

What to do in case of congestion in the tonsils?

Of course, consult an otorhinolaryngologist at a specialized ENT office, in Moscow this can be done at ENT clinic number 1 , where you will receive treatment, including the sanitation of the tonsils ( washing the tonsil plugs ). Of great importance in treatment is the availability of this organ for washing with drugs, both by the manual method (with special instruments) and by physiotherapy.

The tonsil tissue heals very well during treatment with the “Tonsillor” apparatus, when ultrasonic washing of the tonsils takes place, followed by phonophoresis of the drug substance into the tonsil tissue. When treating with tonsillor, both the cleansing of the tonsils and a significant reduction in their diameter, the removal of inflammation, and the destruction of pathogenic microflora occur. In addition to this technique, the non-contact method of treating tonsils USOL-therapy, endolacunar laser therapy, photochromotherapy is widely used.

ENT specialists – doctors ENT clinic number 1 will individually select the method of treatment and take it for dispensary dynamic observation. The course of treatment is usually 8-10 procedures. Since the process of inflammation in the tonsils in this case is chronic, it is advisable to repeat the course of treatment once every half a year, which will help you maintain the protective function of the tonsils, significantly improve the quality of life (reduce morbidity), and prevent the development of formidable complications.

It should be noted that against the background of regular treatment for 2-3 years in some patients, complete recovery and restoration of tonsil function is possible, which does not require further courses of anti-relapse therapy.

Surgical removal of tonsils (tonsillectomy) for chronic or recurrent tonsillitis

Review Question

This review compared the clinical efficacy and safety of surgery (removal of tonsils – tonsillectomy, or adenotonsillectomy – removal of tonsils and adenoid tissues) with nonsurgical management in adults and children with frequent or chronic tonsillitis.

Relevance

Surgical removal of the tonsils is a frequently performed procedure for patients with chronic or recurrent infections of the tonsils (tonsillitis) or other tissues in the back of the throat (pharyngitis). Sometimes, the adenoid tissue is also removed during surgery. However, opinions vary widely on whether the benefits of these operations outweigh the risks.

Characteristics of research

This review included available evidence up to 30 June 2014.Seven trials with low to moderate risk bias were included: five trials in children (987 participants) and two trials in adults (156 participants). An eighth trial in 40 adults was at high risk of bias and provided no data for analysis.

Although some studies in children have followed study participants for two or three years, reliable information is only available for about one year after surgery due to the large number of participants (children) missing follow-up after the first year (after surgery). Some studies included children who had more severe tonsillitis than other studies (for example, they had tonsillitis more often or with more severe symptoms). Therefore, we categorized the children into the subgroups “severely injured” and “less severely injured”.

In two studies, adults had a short follow-up period (5-6 months after surgery).

Key Findings

We found that, in general, children with recurrent tonsillitis may have little benefit from adeno- / tonsillectomy: this procedure avoids 0.6 episodes of any type of sore throat in the first year after surgery, compared to nonsurgical treatment.Children who underwent surgery had three episodes of sore throat, on average, compared to 3.6 episodes experienced by other children. One in three episodes is an episode of pain caused by surgery.

To avoid severe sore throat, children with more severe or frequent episodes of tonsillitis may benefit from surgery more than children with less severe tonsillitis. In children with less severe disease, the potential benefit of adeno / tonsillectomy is more uncertain.There are no good qualitative data to determine the effects of surgery in the second and subsequent years after surgery.

We did not find sufficient evidence to draw definitive conclusions about the effectiveness of tonsillectomy in adults with chronic / recurrent tonsillitis. Evidence is only available for a short time and is of poor quality. These findings are also difficult to interpret, as studies do not take into account the days of pain that follow after surgery.Based on two small trials, tonsillectomy appears to result in fewer days of sore throat in the first six months after surgery.

Two studies in children said they could not find a difference in quality of life outcomes, and one study could not find a difference in the number of pain relievers the children took to relieve their sore throat.

Bleeding immediately after tonsillectomy or within two weeks after surgery is an important complication. These studies did not provide useful information to enable us to accurately assess the risk of these complications.

Quality of evidence

We concluded that the quality of the evidence was moderate for the pediatric data (meaning that further research is likely to have an important impact on our confidence in the results and may change those results). Quality was influenced by the large number of children who were “lost to follow-up” after the first year of the study.In addition, some of the children who were assigned to the “non-surgical” group ended up undergoing surgery.

The quality of the evidence for tonsillectomy in adults is low.

As usual, any potential benefits of surgery should be carefully weighed against possible harms, as the procedure is associated with a small but significant incidence of bleeding (both during and after surgery).In addition, even with good pain relief, surgery is not particularly comfortable for adults.

Breath odor? Tonsillitis is to blame

Lacunotomy

Dear readers of this “note” and site visitors!

Bad breath is not a separate disease. But the increasing number of patients with this complaint speaks of the urgency of the problem and the need for me, as an ENT doctor, to help these patients.

In the literature on ENT diseases, bad breath is one of the symptoms of ENT diseases and is not singled out as a separate problem.The most common causes: chronic rhinitis, adenoiditis, chronic tonsillitis, gastrosophageal reflux disease. A lot has been written on the Internet about other causes of bad breath in tonsillitis, methods of treatment and prevention.

In this article, I consider the problem of unpleasant odor and ways of solving it, as a concomitant complaint in tonsillitis and, in rare cases, as an anatomical feature of the tonsils. I will start with a clinical case, which is typical, both in terms of complaints and in terms of the therapy I am conducting.

A 29-year-old girl applied with complaints of single plugs in the tonsils, which arise periodically and have an unpleasant odor. Attempts to remove these plugs on their own – did not bring a persistent and long-term effect. Bad breath has been troubling the girl for three years. Repeatedly consulted an ENT doctor.

Diagnosed with : chronic compensated tonsillitis. The girl has a history of sore throats and infrequent exacerbations. The doctor several times carried out a course of treatment with washing the tonsils and prescribing courses of physiotherapy, prescribed to take tonsillotren for a month.According to the patient, the smell decreased or disappeared, the discomfort in the throat decreased, but after 2-3 months the complaints appeared again.

Treatment scheme for bad breath, tonsillitis and conclusions

The patient’s main question when she approached was whether it was necessary to remove the tonsils in order to solve the problem? On examination of the nose, there were no visible problems on the side of the nose. X-ray of the paranasal sinuses was performed without pathology. Consulted by a dentist, the oral cavity was sanitized.The gastroenterologist did not reveal any problems with the gastrointestinal tract.

Pharyngoscopic : the mucous membrane of the pharynx is pink, the palatine tonsils are not enlarged, the anterior palatine arches are hyperemic. When rotating and pressing on the tonsils, a cheesy discharge was released from 2 large lacunae, according to the patient, having exactly “that smell”.

My treatment regimen:

  1. The tonsils were washed with octenisept solution and Triderm ointment was injected into the tonsils for 7 days.
  2. Phonophoresis was performed on the submandibular region, the area of ​​projection of the palatine tonsils.
  3. After cleansing the gaps, a week later the radio wave “sealing” of the gaps was performed using the “Surgitron” radio wave apparatus. The purpose of the performed procedure was to exclude lacunae from the process of accumulation and production of caseous masses by means of their “gluing”.

In some patients, he used other methods: cryolacunotomy – he froze the lacunae, if the size allowed, which led to the expansion of the lacunae, the healing of the tonsils and further to their self-cleaning. In some cases, the expansion of the outlet of the lacuna was carried out by removing the “interfering” section, which led to the formation of a wide outlet.

90,000 Which doctor should I go to when purulent plugs appear in my throat

Laura (otolaryngologists) Moscow – latest reviews

Overall, I really liked the doctor! A good, qualified doctor and pleasant person to talk to. Alexander Nikolaevich carefully examined and sent for an x-ray.The doctor also told what to do next, how to be treated and when to come next time. Although little time has passed, there is already a positive result. I will recommend the specialist to my friends and I will re-register myself soon!

Moderation,

October 22, 2021

Alik Gadelyanovich has prescribed medications, but I have doubts about them either.We were not determined which drops for what and how to take them. But there is definitely a divorce for money. Nothing can be said about efficiency either.

Moderation,

October 23, 2021

Vadim Vyacheslavovich explained everything quite clearly, prescribed treatment tactics for the child and explained how the disease would proceed. A very good doctor. We liked it. We underwent another X-ray and the reception lasted about half an hour. We will contact you again.

Faith,

October 20, 2021

Everything is fine, the best ENT of all with whom I spoke! I explained everything and solved my problem.

Moderation,

October 23, 2021

At the reception, Elena Sergeevna listened to me, explained everything, explained everything and prescribed the treatment, which is already helping me. The doctor is attentive, unobtrusive, gentle, explains everything clearly and easily.

Valentine,

October 21, 2021

On the whole, Sergei Mikhailovich’s reception went well.But the doctor immediately told me that I needed to do an operation for that, an operation for this. And as a result, I need 150 thousand. Of course, he examined me and said that there was no point in treatment, you still use drops, prescribed a medicine, I bought it, but I will not use it. This all frightened me off and I will go to a regular hospital, attach myself and go to another specialist to double-check the appointment of this doctor. I felt that it was too intrusive, right on the go, the doctor prescribes the removal of the tonsil and immediately announces the price tag.

Yuliya,

October 20, 2021

At first I thought the reception went well.I was prescribed treatment, as I later found out, correct, but the diagnosis was incorrect. Sorry

Moderation,

October 22, 2021

At the reception, Vakhtang Vasilyevich listened to me, conducted an examination, answered all the questions and explained everything in detail according to the treatment regimen, which is already helping me. The reception lasted about twenty minutes. This time was enough to resolve my question. I plan to come to this specialist again. The doctor is attentive, tactful, explains everything clearly and easily.

Moderation,

October 22, 2021

A wonderful doctor.Everything was attentive and professional. The doctor examined the child, made the correct diagnosis and prescribed the necessary treatment. We were pleased with the reception. Would contact this specialist again, if necessary.

Svetlana,

October 20, 2021

The reception went well. We liked the doctor! He communicated very well with the child, examined him, explained everything in an accessible manner and prescribed treatment. The consultation lasted about 20 minutes. A sociable specialist who behaves very well with children. If necessary, I would go to this doctor again, because we did not find any complaints about his admission. The treatment is working.

Catherine,

October 21, 2021

Show 10 reviews of 15,015 90,000 Removal of tonsils and adenoids – Prof.Dr. Teoman Dal KBB Uzmanı

Removal of tonsils and adenoids (Tonsilectomy and adenoidectomy)

The decision on surgical removal of tonsils and adenoids may be made depending on the different situations presented below.

Situations requiring removal of tonsils

  • Recurrent acute tonsillitis (more than five times a year, two years in a row with an intensity of the disease more than three times a year)

    • Accompanied with recurrent acute tonsillitis

    o Heart valve diseases

    o Febrile cramps at high temperature

    • Lack of response to treatment for chronic tonsillitis

    o Odor from the mouth

    o Persistent sore throat

    o Painful swelling of the lymph nodes in the neck

    o Presence of infectious agents that do not respond for treatment

    • The appearance of an abscess around the tonsils

    • Increased obstruction of the respiratory tract (obstruction)

    • Snoring and chronic breathing through the mouth

    • Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (upper airway obstruction syndrome)

    a • Together with an increase in size denoids and tonsils

    o Disease of high blood pressure of the lungs – Insufficiency of the right ventricle of the heart

    o Difficulty swallowing

    o Speech disorder

    o Developmental delay

    • Violation of the functionality of the jaw (mouth occlusion)

    development of facial bones

    • Suspicion of a tumor (malignant neoplasm) (asymmetric development)

Situations requiring removal of adenoids

Reasons of an infectious nature:

• Infectious diseases of adenoids, the treatment of which requires more than 5 times a year of use antibiotics

• Lingering inflammation of the adenoids that does not respond to treatment (adenoiditis)

effusion)

o Frequent otitis media

o Patients with holes in the tympanic membrane and persistent accumulation of fluid

• Chronic sinusitis that cannot be treated

Obstruction-related causes – blockage of the airways:

• snoring and persistent mouth breathing during sleep

• Obstructive sleep apnea

• Accompanied by adenoid hypertrophy

o Chronic lung disease, developmental delay, speech disorders

o Occlusion and dental problems caused by breathing through the mouth

o Violation of the development of facial bones

When deciding on the appointment of surgery to remove adenoids caused by recurrent infections, such determining factors as the general condition of patients, the spread of infections in their daily life, the degree of impact of diseases on working capacity and the process with patient education, whether they have allergies and the time of year they are diagnosed. The occurrence of these infections is markedly reduced in the summer, so patients diagnosed in the spring are advised to wait until the fall. Thus, during this period of time, the strengthening of the body’s immune system is ensured through the use of vaccines and appropriate treatment, and in the presence of allergies, preference will be given to establishing control over it. Although antibiotic treatment has always been an alternative to surgery, sustained gastrointestinal exposure and allergic reactions caused by frequent antibiotic use must be considered.Because of the pain and serious risk of allergies, penicillin is not the preferred treatment option.

In children who have been prescribed the insertion of a ventilation tube into the ear canal due to fluid that constantly accumulates in the middle ear cavity and does not pass through treatment, the removal of existing adenoid growths during this operation significantly reduces the frequency of infection in this area.

Removal of tonsils (Tonsillectomy)

Given the importance of the importance of the tonsils in the development of the body’s defense system (immune system), especially in the first 3 years, in the absence of a significant increase in almond growths that impede the functions of the respiratory tract, it may be preferable to postpone the operation for later or reduce their size by partial removal or radio frequency exposure.

Operation to remove tonsils is performed under general anesthesia, and the average duration of the operation is about 10-20 minutes, however, the total time for preparing the patient for anesthesia, postoperative monitoring for bleeding and recovery from anesthesia is 45-60 minutes. Given the average blood loss during standard tonsil surgery, it is not recommended to remove tonsils for young children weighing less than 10 kg.

After the introduction of the ThermalWelding technology, the patient’s weight is not a criterion influencing the decision on the operation to remove the tonsils, because there is practically no bleeding during the operation using this technique.

Surgical removal of tonsils using ThermalWelding, together with the absence of bleeding during surgery, also minimizes pain, which is largely felt during standard operations. In addition, health recovery is faster and patients can return to their normal lifestyle in a shorter time.

During the operation, the tonsils and tonsils are not completely removed.In some patients, the lymphatic tissue at the root of the tongue may begin to increase in size, spreading to the area where the tonsils are concentrated, and may cause the formation of lymphatic tissue in the lower pole of the tonsil. There is a rather small probability of concentration of an infectious focus in this area, due to the fact that this tissue does not contain crypts.

Patients under 10 years of age are usually discharged 2-3 hours after outpatient follow-up. Children or very young children who have undergone surgery and live away from the hospital, as well as adults and other patients of all age groups who have any pathological abnormalities (diabetes, heart disease, seizures, obstructive sleep apnea, etc.)must be in the hospital under medical supervision for at least one day after the operation.

Complications

Despite the fact that tonsil removal is accompanied by such rare complications as trauma to the vessels and nerves around the tonsils, trauma to the jaw joint, trauma to the cervical vertebra, the most common complication is postoperative bleeding.

Bleeding is most often observed in the first 24 hours. Another risky period is the first 7-14 days, during which abscesses appear on the healed tissue. Therefore, the first 2 weeks after surgery are critical in terms of diet. It is important that patients are informed of the need to go to the hospital at any time in the event of bleeding.

Postoperative period of tonsillectomy

Pain

Painful sensations may appear within 2 weeks after the operation. In general, painful sensations in children are much weakened, while their intensity decreases noticeably within 3-4 days. Most often, pain can occur during swallowing and swallowing.

The intensity of pain may vary from person to person, usually simple pain relievers are sufficient, but some people may need to use stronger pain relievers.

Nutrition

The diet of patients in the first two days after surgery includes warm, liquid, lump-free foods. Then you can switch to mushy soft food, and after 4-5 days patients can switch to normal food. It is recommended that you avoid hard and crunchy foods such as chips and crackers for two weeks.

Speech

Usually, in the postoperative period, speech becomes a gundoza, acquiring a “nasal sound”. This situation can last up to 3 weeks. A certain role in the formation of speech sounds is played by the volume of air space in the throat, therefore, after the operation, depending on the size of the tonsils, a slight change in the tone of the voice may remain unchanged.

Odor from the mouth

A dirty gray film may form in the operated area, which most often can cause bad breath in patients who drink little or do not regularly eat.This film is part of the natural healing process and disappears on average within 2 weeks.

Surgical removal of adenoids (Adenoidectomy)

Adenoid formations usually begin to grow after 1 year, and after 10 years, noticeably decreasing in size, during the examination are no longer observed in most patients who have reached the age of 13-15 years. As a result of frequent upper respiratory tract infections, most often occurring in children who begin to attend kindergarten or primary school for the first time, adenoid formations begin to develop rapidly during this period, the presence of which is especially pronounced in sleep and which causes nasal obstruction, breathing through the mouth while sleeping and snoring.In addition, most often in patients with enlarged tonsils, adenoids can cause obstructive sleep apnea. Adenoid tissue, acting on the functional state of the Eustachian tube, can act as an infectious focus of damage to the nasal cavity, disrupting normal ventilation and drainage of the sinuses, and can cause chronic sinus infections and diseases of the middle ear. Other disadvantages include the need for constant mouth breathing and negative effects on dental health and facial bone development.In addition, inadequate oxygen consumption has negative effects on growth, development and mental function.

Unlike the tonsils, an enlarging adenoid tissue, which does not particularly make a significant contribution to the formation of the body’s protective immune system, and the treatment of a bacterial infection of which does not improve breathing, it is preferable to remove it. Adenoid lesions are unencapsulated lymphoid tissue that is difficult to completely remove during surgery.As a result, a certain amount of adenoid tissue remains in the nasal passages. Thus, although rare, some patients who have had their adenoids removed at a very early age may also need re-surgery in subsequent years.

How is adenoids removed?

The operations are always performed under general anesthesia, and the total duration is about 45-60 minutes.

Currently, operations to remove adenoids are performed using an endoscope inserted through the nose or throat, which ensures the visibility of the operated area.The most important advantage of the operation performed using the endoscopic examination method is that the adenoid tissue can be removed in the most optimal way without damaging the adjacent anatomical structures.

Recently widely used, the Coblasyon technology allows adenoidectomy operations to be performed without blood loss.

Recommendations after adenoidectomy

In the first 2-3 days after the operation, a slight light pink bleeding mixed with saliva may be observed.Contact your healthcare professional if you find a discharge of fresh red blood or vomit of blood.

Patients who have an ear tube inserted during this operation or who have an incision of the tympanic membrane (paracentesis) may experience a small amount of slightly bleeding discharge from the ear in the first few days after the operation. In case of prolonged or intense yellow-green discharge, be sure to inform your doctor.

Pain

There is usually no overt pain after surgery.For mild or severe sore throat, simple pain relievers such as paracetamol are used.

Nutritional information

During the first 3-4 hours after the operation, the patient should not eat or drink because he is under the influence of anesthesia. Your nurse will tell you when you can eat by mouth.

In general, it is recommended to drink plenty of warm liquids and eat foods that are soft, mushy, warm and not irritating to the throat.It is recommended to eat warm food for the first three days after surgery, then you can switch to normal food.

Speech

Usually, in the postoperative period, speech becomes a gundoza, acquiring a “nasal sound”. This situation can last up to 3 weeks. A certain role in the formation of speech sounds is played by the volume of air space in the throat, therefore, after an operation to remove the adenoids, a slight change in the tone of the voice may remain unchanged.

High temperature

It is considered normal to increase the temperature in the postoperative period by 0.5-1 degrees. Higher and longer temperatures usually cause dehydration. It is recommended to contact your doctor if you have a fever despite the large amount of fluid you have drunk.

Odor from the mouth

In rare cases, inflammation may occur in the operated area, which can cause bad breath, especially in patients who are not drinking enough fluids or eating irregularly.Be sure to inform your doctor about this.

Postoperative period of the patient

Children after surgery should be in complete rest at home for 1-2 days. After 4-5 days after the operation, it will be possible to attend school classes. Exercise is not recommended for at least 7 days.

It is not recommended to take a bath for 3-4 days after the operation. A warm bath can be taken 15 days after the operation. Until directed by your doctor, it is recommended that you protect your surgically treated ear canals from water ingress while bathing, swimming in the pool or at sea. To prevent the ingress of water, it is enough to put a small amount of cotton wool, previously lubricated with petroleum jelly, in the center of the ear canal. Except in the event of contact with water, the ear canals should remain open.

Consult your doctor for alternative protection methods (headbands, earplugs, etc.)

“The content of this page is for information only, consult your doctor for diagnosis and treatment.”

Smoking greatly increases the likelihood of postoperative complications

Compared to non-smokers, smokers have a significantly higher risk of postoperative complications, including cardiac dysfunction

However, new data indicate that smoking cessation four or more weeks before surgery can significantly reduce the risk of postoperative complications and improve the dynamics of recovery in the first six months after surgery.Compared to smokers, patients who quit smoking are less likely to experience complications from anesthesia.

According to a new collaborative study by the World Health Organization (WHO), the University of Newcastle (Australia) and the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists (WFSA), after four weeks of quitting smoking, each subsequent week without tobacco increases the likelihood of a favorable outcome by 19%. with an improvement in the blood supply to vital organs.

“According to the data presented in the report, postponing small or non-urgent surgeries to a later date to give the patient time to quit smoking is the key to a more favorable outcome of the surgery,” explained the head of the World Health Organization’s Tobacco Control Department. Dr. Vinayak Prasad.

Nicotine and carbon monoxide contained in tobacco smoke can lead to a decrease in the level of oxygen in the blood and dramatically increase the risk of postoperative cardiac complications.Smoking also harms the lungs, impairing airway patency and increasing the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. Smoking also disrupts the patient’s immune system and can slow down wound healing, which increases the risk of infection in the surgical wound. Just one cigarette smoked reduces the body’s ability to deliver nutrients to damaged tissues for postoperative recovery.

“Postoperative complications are a big problem for both hospitals and patients.At every stage of care, and especially before surgery, primary care physicians, surgeons, nursing staff and families can play an important role in convincing patients to quit smoking and providing them with the support they need, ”explained WHO Quality of Care Coordinator Dr Shams Syed. WHO encourages countries to implement smoking cessation assistance programs and education campaigns at the health system level to raise awareness and support cessation of tobacco use.

Price list

Day hospital
Intravenous injection 250.00
Intramuscular injection 150.00
Dropper 250 ml 400.00
Dropper 250 ml + 1 IV 500.00
Dropper 250 ml + 2 IV injections 600.00
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Dropper 750 ml 900.00
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Driving Commission (categories A, A1, B, B1, M) 1 500.00
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Carboxyteratia (price for 1 session)
Thigh (both) 1 100.00
Hairy 800.00
Whole back 1 100.00
Ankle and foot (1 limb) 800.00
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Back of the neck and shoulder girdle (1 area) 800.00
Back of the neck and shoulder girdle (2 areas) 1 100.00
Bikini area 800.00
Neckline 900.00
Belly area 800.00
Buttock area 1 100.00
Hands and wrists 1 100.00
Knee joint (1 limb) 800.00
Knee joint (2 limbs) 1 100.00
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Laboratory research (Alternative)
R-factor Rheumatoid factor 290.00
RW.Microreaction to syphilis 130.00
ALT. Study of the level of alanine transaminase in the blood 140.00
AST. Study of the level of aspartate transaminase in the blood 120.00
APTT. Determination of activated partial thromboplastin time 190.00
Direct bilirubin in blood 250.00
Taking blood from a vein 130.00
GGT.Study of the level of gamma-glutamyltransferase in the blood 260.00
Histological examination (two samples) 2 250.00
Histological examination (one sample) 1,700.00
Histological examination (three or more samples) 3 300.00
Blood glucose test 140.00
Study of the level of creatinine in the blood 110.00
Study of the level of urea in the blood 110.00
Study of the level of uric acid in the blood 260.00
Study of the level of total protein in the blood 100.00
Study of the level of total bilirubin in the blood 105.00
Study of the level of reticulocytes in the blood 420.00
Investigation of the level of triglycerides in the blood 270.00
Investigation of the level of fibrinogen in the blood 190.00
Investigation of blood cholesterol level 140.00
Study of the level of alkaline phosphatase in the blood 250.00
HDL.Study of high density cholesterol level in blood 340.00
LDL. Study of low-density cholesterol in blood 440.00
General (clinical) blood test with ESR 330.00
General urinalysis 260.00
Determination of the main blood groups (A, B, 0) and Rh factor 315.00
Calculation of the leukocyte formula with a description of the morphology of blood corpuscles 290.00
PTI, Determination of prothrombin (thromboplastin) time in blood or plasma 125.00
CRP C-reactive protein 350.00
Multispiral computed tomography (MSCT)
Restoration of the study on film 1 400.00
MSCT of the temporal bones (2 units., paired) 4 500.00
MSCT of the chest (lungs and mediastinum) 5 500.00
MSCT – angiography of one anatomical region (upper, lower limb – 1 unit) with 3D reconstruction 10,000.00
MSCT – angiography of one anatomical region (upper, lower limb – 2 units, paired) with 3D reconstruction 11,000.00
MSCT – angiography (vessels) of the brain with 3D reconstruction 10,000.00
MSCT – angiography of the neck (precerebral / brachiocephalic vessels) with 3D reconstruction 12,500.00
MSCT – aortography (1 section – thoracic or abdominal) with 3D reconstruction 10,000.00
MSCT – coronary angiography (heart vessels) with 3D reconstruction 12,500.00
MSCT of the abdominal cavity (liver and gallbladder, pancreas, spleen, lymph nodes) 5 500.00
MSCT of the abdominal cavity (liver and gallbladder, pancreas, spleen, lymph nodes) with iv contrasting 10,000.00
MSCT of the brain 4 500.00
MSCT of the brain with IV contrast enhancement 10,000.00
MSCT of the larynx 4 500.00
MSCT of the larynx with iv contrasting (with functional tests) 10 300.00
MSCT of the retroperitoneal space (adrenal glands, kidneys, upper urinary tract) 4 500.00
MSCT of the retroperitoneal space (adrenal glands, kidneys, upper urinary tract) with iv (bolus) contrast 10,000.00
MSCT of bones (extremities – 2 units., paired) 7 200.00
MSCT of bones (parts of the limbs – 2 units, paired) with 3D reconstruction 8 200.00
MSCT of the bones of the facial skull (assessment of the structure of the zygomatic bones, upper and lower jaw) with 3D reconstruction 4 700.00
MSCT of the bones of the facial skull (assessment of the structure of the zygomatic bones, upper and lower jaw) with intravenous contrast and 3D reconstruction 10,000.00
MSCT of the pelvic and hip bones (complex) 5 200.00
MSCT of the pelvis and hip joints (complex) with 3D reconstruction 5 800.00
MSCT of bone (part of the limb – 1 unit.) 3 200.00
MSCT of bone (part of the limb – 1 unit) with 3D reconstruction 4,000.00
MSCT of soft tissues of the neck (muscle structures, salivary glands, thyroid gland, neck lymph nodes) 4 200.00
MSCT of soft tissues of the neck (muscle structures, salivary glands, thyroid gland, lymph nodes of the neck) with intravenous contrasting 10,000.00
MSCT of the paranasal sinuses 3 200.00
MSCT of orbits (eye sockets) 3 600.00
MSCT of the abdominal and retroperitoneal organs (complex) 7 200.00
MSCT of the abdominal and retroperitoneal organs (complex) with iv contrasting 15 500.00
MSCT of the chest organs (lungs and mediastinum) with angiography of the pulmonary arteries and 3D reconstruction 12,500.00
MSCT of the chest organs (lungs and mediastinum) with iv contrasting 12 300.00
MSCT of the pelvic organs (bladder, prostate, lymph nodes, fluid in the pelvis, large tumors in gynecology) with contrast 10,000.00
MSCT of the spine 4 800.00
MSCT of the spine with 3D reconstruction 5 200.00
MSCT of the joint (1 unit) 4 200.00
MSCT of the joint (1 unit) with 3D reconstruction 5,000.00
MSCT of joints (2 units, paired) 7 200.00
MSCT of joints (2 units., paired) with 3D reconstruction 8 200.00
Printing of MSCT images on film 200.00
X-ray
Write exam to disk 100.00
Mammography 980.00
Plain urography 700.00
Description and interpretation of radiographic images (single image) 400.00
Printing pictures on film (one image) 340.00
Printing pictures on photo paper (one image) 150.00
Radiography of the shoulder joint (1 image) 550.00
Skull X-ray (2 images) 750.00
X-ray of the skull (Turkish saddle) (1 image) 550.00
X-ray of 1 finger (2 images) 650.00
X-ray of the ankle joint (2 images) 650.00
GOP X-ray (in two projections) 800.00
GOP X-ray (in one projection) 650.00
X-ray of the sternum (2 images) 800.00
Hand radiography (1 image) 600.00
X-ray of the hands to determine bone age and growth zone (1 image) 550.00
Hand X-ray (2 images) 700.00
Clavicle X-ray (1 image) 550.00
X-ray of the knee joint (2 images) 650.00
X-ray of the nasal bones (2 images) 600.00
X-ray of the pelvic bones (1 image) 700.00
X-ray of the sacrum (coccyx) (2 images) 750.00
X-ray of the sacroiliac joints (2 images) 900.00
Radiography of the lungs (1 image) 500.00
Radiography of the lungs (2 images) 700.00
X-ray of the elbow joint (2 images) 650.00
X-ray of the scapula (2 images) 650.00
Radiography of the wrist joint (2 images) 650.00
Radiography of the OBP (1 image) 700.00
Radiography of the shoulder joint (1 image) 550.00
Radiography EPP (1 image) 650.00
POP X-ray (2 images) 800.00
POP X-ray with VFR (2 images) 1 100.00
X-ray of the paranasal sinuses (1 image) 600.00
Calcaneus X-ray (1 image) 550.00
Calcaneus X-ray (2 images) 650.00
Radiography of the ribs (straight, oblique) (2 images) 800.00
Exercise foot X-ray (2 images) 1 100.00
Feet X-ray (1 image) 600.00
Foot X-ray (2 images) 700.00
X-ray of the hip joint (1 image) 650.00
Lunstein X-ray of the hip joint (1 image) 750.00
X-ray of the hip joints (1 image) 750.00
X-ray of the tubular bone (2 images) 700.00
Radiography SHOP (1 image) 650.00
Radiography SHOP (2 images) 800.00
Radiography SHOP 3/4 (2 images) 1 100.00
Radiography SHOP with FRI (2 images) 1 100.00
X-ray SHOP C1-C2 (through the mouth) (1 image) 700.00
Fluorography (1 image) 500.00
Fluorography (2 images) 700.00
Excretory urography (1 or more images) 3 200.00
Ultrasound
Doppler ultrasound of renal vessels 2 200.00
Ultrasound examination of the uterus and appendages (transabdominal and transvaginal) 1 300.00
Ultrasound examination of the uterus and appendages (transvaginal) 1,000.00
Ultrasound examination of the bladder with determination of residual urine 550.00
Ultrasound examination of the kidney with vascular dopplerometry 1 200.00
Color Doppler ultrasound of the kidney 1 100.00
Screening of children under one year old 5,000.00
Ultrasound of the arteries and veins of the upper extremities with color Doppler mapping 4 300.00
Ultrasound of the arteries and veins of the lower extremities with color Doppler mapping 4 500.00
Doppler ultrasound of the abdominal aorta and its branches 1 400.00
Ultrasound examination of upper limb arteries with color Doppler mapping 2 400.00
Ultrasound examination of lower limb arteries with color Doppler mapping 2,500.00
Ultrasound examination of the arteries of the ilio-femoral segment 1 500.00
Ultrasound examination of the veins of the lower extremities with color Doppler mapping 2,500.00
Ultrasound examination of bracheocephalic vessels with color Doppler mapping (triplex) 2,500.00
Ultrasound examination of upper limb veins with color Doppler mapping 2,500.00
Thymus ultrasound 500.00
Ultrasound examination of the brain with Doppler measurements for children under one year old (neurosonography) 1 200.00
Complex ultrasound examination (liver, gallbladder, pancreas, spleen) 1 650.00
Complex ultrasound examination (liver, gallbladder, pancreas) 1 400.00
Ultrasound examination of lymph nodes (one group) 700.00
Ultrasound examination of the uterus and appendages (transabdominal) 850.00
Ultrasound examination of the breast with lymph nodes 1,000.00
Ultrasound examination of the bladder with examination of ureteral emissions 1,000.00
Ultrasound examination of the scrotum with vascular dopplerometry 1 100.00
Ultrasound examination of soft tissues with vascular dopplerometry 950.00
Ultrasound examination of the liver, gallbladder 800.00
Ultrasound examination of the pleural cavity 700.00
Ultrasound examination of the shoulder joint (1 joint) 700.00
Ultrasound examination of superficial formations 1,000.00
Pancreatic ultrasound 500.00
Prospecting ultrasound 2,000.00
Kidney + adrenal ultrasound 1,000.00
Ultrasound examination of the prostate gland (transrectal) 1 200.00
Ultrasound examination of the prostate gland (abdominal) 900.00
Ultrasound examination of the prostate gland (abdominal) + urinary bladder with determination of residual urine 1 300.00
Ultrasound examination of the prostate gland (abdominal + transrectal) 1 500.00
Ultrasound examination of the prostate gland (abdominal + transrectal) and urinary bladder with determination of residual urine 1 950.00
Spleen ultrasound 500.00
Ultrasound examination of the salivary gland 650.00
Joint ultrasound (1 joint) 700.00
Joint ultrasound (paired) 1 200.00
Ultrasound examination of the cervical spine 800.00
Ultrasound examination of the thyroid gland with vascular dopplerometry 1 200.00
Folliculometry (primary) 1,000.00
Folliculometry (repeated) 550.00
Echocardiography with color mapping, with Doppler analysis 2 300.00
Gynecologist services
Anesthetic aid 3 700.00
Biopsy 500.00
Bougie of the cervical canal 850.00
Introduction of obstetric and gynecological pessaries 800.00
Intrauterine device insertion 1,000.00
Taking a smear for cytology 800.00
Taking a sample for histological examination 1,700.00
Lancing of the Bartholin gland abscess (under general anesthesia) 8 200.00
Lancing, drainage of the Bartholin gland (under local anesthesia) 3,500.00
Curettage of the cervical canal 2 750.00
Hysteroscopy (under general anesthesia) 13 500.00
Diagnostic puncture of the posterior vaginal fornix 850.00
Diathermoexcision of the cervix 3,000.00
Punctate survey 400.00
Colposcopy 500.00
Consultation of a gynecologist of the highest category (primary) 1 500.00
Consultation with a gynecologist of the highest category (repeated) 1 300.00
Swabs for ATI 300.00
Medical abortion up to 12 weeks 11 500.00
Pipel endometrial biopsy 2,000.00
Cauterization of genital warts 1,700.00
Puncture of the abdominal cavity through the posterior vaginal fornix 850.00
Separate diagnostic curettage (under general anesthesia) 11 500.00
Separate diagnostic curettage under the control of hysteroscopy (under general anesthesia) 19 500.00
Removal of IUD with separate diagnostic curettage 8 200.00
Removal of the intrauterine device, instrumental 750.00
Lipoma removal up to 5 cm 4 900.00
Surgical defloration 8 800.00
Surgery.Hymenoplasty (under intravenous anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 28 660.00
Surgery. Hymenoplasty (under intravenous anesthesia) with supervision “until the evening” 22 360.00
Surgery. Labioplasty (under general anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 37 790.00
Surgery. Labioplasty (under general anesthesia) with supervision “until evening” 31 200.00
Surgery.Supravaginal amputation of the uterus with left appendages (under general anesthesia) with 5-day inpatient observation 92 950.00
Surgery. Oophorectomy (removal of the ovary) endoscopically (under general anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 43 290.00
Surgery. Endoscopic surgery for infertility on the uterine appendages (under general anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 43 290.00
Surgery.Plastic surgery of the vagina (anterior, posterior wall) (under general anesthesia) with 5-day inpatient observation 88 450.00
Surgery. Ovarian resection laparoscopic (under general anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 45 290.00
Surgery. Ovarian resection laparotomy (under general anesthesia) with 5-day inpatient observation 86 450.00
Surgery.Sterilization of fallopian tubes laparoscopic (under general anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 43 290.00
Surgery. Subtotal hysterectomy (uterus amputation) laparotomy (under general anesthesia) with 5-day inpatient observation 86 450.00
Surgery. Subtotal hysterectomy (amputation of the uterus) with appendages, laparotomic (under general anesthesia) with 5-day inpatient observation 88 450.00
Surgery.Removal of fallopian tubes laparoscopic (under general anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 45 290.00
Surgery. Removal of fallopian tubes laparotomy (under general anesthesia) with 5-day inpatient observation 86 450.00
Surgery. Removal of appendages laparoscopic (under general anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 45 290.00
Surgery.Removal of appendages laparotomic (under general anesthesia) with 5-day inpatient observation 86 450.00
Infectionist services
Consultation with an infectious disease doctor (primary) 1 200.00
Consultation of an infectious disease doctor (repeated) 1,000.00
Colonoscopy Services
Anesthetic aid for endoscopic examinations 3 700.00
Taking biopsy material for histological examination 1,700.00
Taking a smear for cytology 800.00
Write to disc 100.00
Diagnostic colonoscopy 2 700.00
Treatment and diagnostic colonoscopy 3 800.00
Colonoscopy with foreign body removal in the colon 3 100.00
Colonoscopy with electroresection of the mucous membrane for epithelial formations of the colon 17 500.00
Endoscopist consultation (primary) 1,000.00
Endoscopist consultation (repeated) 800.00
Applying clips (1 pc.) 2 300.00
Applying clips (2 pcs.) 3 600.00
Applying clips (3 units) 4 900.00
Applying clips (5 units) 7 500.00
Polypectomy. Removal of polyps of the colon and rectum (over 5 polyps). Primary 14 700.00
Polypectomy. Removal of polyps of the colon and rectum (over 5 polyps).Re 12,000.00
Polypectomy. Removal of polyps of the colon and rectum (up to 5 polyps), Primary 12,000.00
Polypectomy. Removal of polyps of the colon and rectum (up to 5 polyps). Re 9 500.00
Coloproctology services
Consultation with a coloproctologist (primary) 1 500.00
Consultation with a coloproctologist (repeated, after surgery) 1,000.00
Consultation with a coloproctologist (repeated) 1 300.00
Surgery.Opening, drainage of the abscessing furuncle of the perianal region (under local anesthesia) 9 500.00
Surgery. Opening, drainage of acute paraproctitis (submucosal, subcutaneous) (under intravenous anesthesia) 15 600.00
Surgery. Desarterization, mucopexy of I degree of complexity (under SMA, with 1-day stationary observation) 51,000.00
Surgery.Desarterization, mucopexy of II degree of complexity (under SMA, with 1-day stationary observation) 55,000.00
Surgery. Desarterization, mucopexy of III degree of complexity (under SMA, with 1-day stationary observation) 60,000.00
Surgery. Excision of the fistula of the anal region (under the MCA, with 3-day inpatient observation) 51,000.00
Surgery. Anal fissure excision, simple (under local anesthesia) 18,000.00
Surgery.Excision of two uncomplicated external hemorrhoids (under local anesthesia) 18,000.00
Surgery. Excision of an uncomplicated external hemorrhoid (under local anesthesia) 15,000.00
Surgery. Excision of uncomplicated anal fistula (under local anesthesia) 14,000.00
Surgery. Excision of three uncomplicated external hemorrhoids (under local anesthesia) 21,000.00
Surgery.Excision of anal fissure with dosed sphincterotomy (under local anesthesia, with 2-day inpatient observation) 33,000.00
Surgery. Excision of anal fissure with dosed sphincterotomy (under MCA, with 2-day inpatient observation) 43,000.00
Surgery. Excision of the thrombosed external hemorrhoid up to 1.5 cm (under local anesthesia) 11,000.00
Surgery.Excision of a thrombosed external hemorrhoid up to 4 cm (under local anesthesia) 14,000.00
Surgery. Coccygeal cyst simple (under local anesthesia, with 1-day inpatient observation) 25,000.00
Surgery. Coccygeal cyst simple (under MCA, with 2-day stationary observation) 35,000.00
Surgery. Complex coccygeal cyst (under MCA, with 3-day stationary observation) 51,000.00
Surgery.Open hemorrhoidectomy, stage 4 (under MCA, with 3-day inpatient observation) 62,000.00
Surgery. Open hemorrhoidectomy, 3 stages (under MCA, with 3-day inpatient observation) 58,000.00
Surgery. Removal of warts of the perianal region more than 7 cm (under local anesthesia) 20,000.00
Surgery. Removal of warts of the perianal region more than 7.5 cm (under MCA.with 1-day stationary observation) 51,000.00
Surgery. Removal of genital warts up to 1 cm (under local anesthesia) 12,000.00
Surgery. Removal of genital warts from 1 to 3 cm (under local anesthesia) 14,000.00
Surgery. Removal of genital warts from 3 to 5 cm (under local anesthesia) 16,000.00
Surgery.Removal of genital warts from 5 to 7 cm (under local anesthesia) 18,000.00
Surgery. Removal of nevus, fibroids, perianal atheroma more than 2 cm (under local anesthesia) 12,000.00
Surgery. Removal of nevus, fibroids, atheroma of the perianal region up to 1-2 cm (under local anesthesia) 11,000.00
Surgery. Removal of perianal fringes (under local anesthesia) 20,000.00
Surgery.Removal of the polyp of the anal canal 1 pc. (under local anesthesia) 12,000.00
Surgery. Removal of anal canal polyps more than 3 pcs. (under local anesthesia) 18,000.00
Surgery. Removal of anal canal polyps 1-5 pcs. (under MCA, with 1-day stationary observation) 35,000.00
Surgery. Removal of anal canal polyps 2-3 pcs. (Under local anesthesia) 14,000.00
Surgery.Epithelial-coccygeal passage (under local anesthesia, with 1-day inpatient observation) 25,000.00
Surgery. Epithelial-coccygeal course (under local anesthesia) 20,000.00
Surgery. Epithelial-coccygeal passage simple (under MCA, with 1-day inpatient observation) 35,000.00
Surgery. Complex epithelial-coccygeal course (under MCA, with 3-day inpatient observation) 51,000.00
Neurologist services
Visit of a neurologist at home (Dzemgi) 2 300.00
Visit of a neurologist at home (Central District) 2 100.00
Consultation with a neurologist (primary) 1 300.00
Consultation with a neurologist (repeated) 1 100.00
Drug blockade 1,000.00
Drug blockade with diprospan 640, 00
Nephrology services
Nephrology consultation (primary) 1 300.00
Nephrology consultation (repeated) 1 100.00
Oncologist services
Skin biopsy 1 100.00
Lymph node biopsy 2 200.00
Ultrasound-guided breast biopsy 3,000.00
Breast biopsy, percutaneous 500.00
Thyroid biopsy 1 350.00
Ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy 3,000.00
Taking a sample for histological examination. 1,700.00
Consultation with an oncologist (primary) 1 200.00
Consultation with an oncologist (repeated) 1,000.00
Skin scraping 110.00
Lipoma removal from 5 cm (under local anesthesia) 6 800.00
Removal of papillomas, kandilom, keratomas (7-9 pieces) 1 800.00
Removal of papillomas, kandilom, keratomas (from 10 or more pieces) 2 100.00
Removal of papillomas, kandilom, keratomas (1-3 pieces) 1 200.00
Removal of papillomas, kandilom, keratomas (1-3 pieces) on the eyelids 1 500.00
Removal of papillomas, kandilom, keratomas (4-6 pieces) 1 500.00
Removal of papillomas, kandilom, keratomas (4-6 pieces) on the eyelids 1 800.00
Removal of papillomas, kandilom, keratomas (7-9 pieces) on the eyelids 2 100.00
Removal of papillomas, kandilom, keratomas (10 or more pieces) on the eyelids 2 400.00
Removal of breast cyst contents 900.00
Cytological examination of punctates (lymph node, mammary gland, cysts, metastases, basaliomas) 800.00
Orthopedic services
Intraosseous anesthesia (during surgical treatment) 800.00
Intra-articular anesthesia for traumatic injuries 500.00
Intra-articular oxygen therapy (knee joint) 800.00
Closed manual reduction for fractures (no cost of anesthesia): distal forearm 700.00
Closed manual reduction for fractures (excluding the cost of anesthesia): metacarpal bones 500.00
Closed manual reduction for fractures (without cost of anesthesia): phalanges of fingers 400.00
Closed manual reduction for bone fractures (without the cost of anesthesia): distal tibia (ankle) 1 400.00
Infiltration anesthesia for traumatic injuries 200.00
Orthopedic consultation (primary) 1 300.00
Orthopedic consultation (repeated) 1 100.00
Medical blockade of the knee joint 800.00
Medical block of the elbow joint 500.00
Medication blockade for “heel spur” 500.00
Medication blockade for humeral-scapular periarthritis 1 100.00
Drug blockade with diprospan 640.00
Applying / changing a soft dressing DEZO 400.00
Applying / changing the DEZO plaster cast (modifications) 800.00
Stitching / Stitching 400.00
Applying and modeling of bandages from polymer bandages “Scotchcast” – lower limb (including material cost) 2,500.00
Application and modeling of dressings from polymer bandages “Scotchcast” – upper limb (including material cost) 1 500.00
Applying soft fixation bandages 100.00
Applying / changing plaster casts with modeling (upper limb) 800.00
Applying / changing plaster casts with modeling (lower limb) 1,000.00
Surgical opening and drainage of subcutaneous hematomas 1 500.00
Surgical excision of the hygroma of the wrist joint (excluding the cost of intraosseous anesthesia) 3,500.00
Surgical treatment of ingrown toenail 1 500.00
Primary surgical debridement (per 1 cm): within the skin 300.00
Primary surgical debridement of the wound (per 1 cm): within the skin and subcutaneous tissue 500.00
Primary surgical debridement (for 1 cm): with damage to the superficial fascia 800.00
Puncture of the knee joint (joint cavity) 450.00
Puncture of the knee joint (prepatellar bursa) 300.00
Puncture of the elbow joint (precubital bursa) 350.00
Dissection of the annular ligament in Knott’s disease 3,000.00
Regional oxygen therapy (upper limb) 350.00
Regional oxygen therapy (lower limb) 500.00
Traction therapy session (spinal traction) 1 300.00
Removal of tense subungual hematoma 400.00
Removal of superficial foreign bodies (under local anesthesia): splinter, fish hook 700.00
Removal of superficial foreign bodies (under local anesthesia): needle, glass, scale 1 500.00
Elimination of dislocations (excluding blockade): in the elbow joint 1 300.00
Elimination of dislocations (without taking into account the blockade): in the interphalangeal joints of the fingers 500.00
Elimination of dislocations (excluding blockade): humerus head 1 500.00
Otolaryngologist services
Analysis of smear for microflora 310.00
Anemization of the nasal mucosa 30.00
Anesthesia spray (eiimucous) 150.00
Infusion into the larynx 200.00
Lancing of the hematoma of the nasal septum 2,000.00
Sampling for microbiological inoculation (excluding the cost of analysis) 250.00
Infiltration Anesthesia 700.00
Excision of synechia of the nasal cavity with anesthesia (1 side) 3,000.00
Coagulation of nasal septum capillaries with laser 2,500.00
Consultation with an otolaryngologist (primary) 1 500.00
Consultation with an otolaryngologist (repeated) 1 300.00
Laser vasotomy of the inferior turbinate (1 side) 5,000.00
Laser lacunotomy of palatine tonsils (1 side) 6,000.00
Applying / changing dressing 400.00
Endoscopically guided laser surgery: Nasal synechia excision with anesthesia (1 side) 4,000.00
Endoscopically guided laser surgery: Uvulopalatoplasty (anti-snoring surgery) 20,000.00
Endoscopically guided laser surgery: Removal of benign tumors (nose, pharynx) 7 500.00
Stopping nosebleeds using nasal tamponade (on one side) 700.00
Pneumatic massage of tympanic membranes 300.00
Blowing out auditory tubes according to Politzer 200.00
Proetz Flush 360.00
Proetz flush with anemization 380.00
Sanitation of the nasal cavity 260.00
Removal of atheroma 7 500.00
Removal of single nasal polyps with video support on one side (without anesthesia) 8,000.00
Removal of a foreign body from the external auditory canal (one side) 900.00
Removal of a foreign body from the nasal cavity (on one side) 900.00
Removal of foreign body from the oropharynx 900.00
Removal of auricular keloid scar 8,000.00
Removal of a cyst on the tonsil 2,000.00
Removing the sulfur plug (one side) 400.00
Ultrasound washing of palatine tonsils (apparatus) 1 procedure 500.00
Ultrasound lavage of the palatine tonsils (hardware).Course 10-12 procedures 5,000.00
Fibrolaryngoscopy 1 500.00
Phonophoresis of the posterior pharyngeal wall (1 procedure) 500.00
Phonophoresis of the posterior pharyngeal wall. Course 10-12 procedures 5,000.00
Phonophoresis of the palatine tonsils (1 procedure) 500.00
Phonophoresis of the tonsils.Course 10-12 procedures 5,000.00
Phonophoresis of the nose (1 procedure) 500.00
Phonophoresis of the nose. Course 10-12 procedures 5,000.00
Surgery. Submucosal correction of the nasal septum (under general anesthesia) with 2-day inpatient observation 61 890.00
Surgery. Microhymorotomy (1 side) (under general anesthesia) with 1 day inpatient observation 43 760.00
Surgery.Microhymorotomy (1 side) (under general anesthesia) with 3-day inpatient observation 51 220.00
Surgery. Microhymorotomy (2 sides) with one-stage submucosal correction of the nasal septum (under general anesthesia) with a 5-day hospital 99 860.00
Surgery. Plastic surgery of protruding protruding) auricles (behind 1 ear) (under general anesthesia) with 1 day inpatient observation 36 380.00
Surgery.Plastic surgery of protruding protruding) auricles (behind 2 ears) (under general anesthesia) with 1 day inpatient observation 55 450.00
Surgery. Plastic nose surgery (under general anesthesia) with 2 day inpatient observation 98 600.00
Surgery. Polypoetmoidotomy (under general anesthesia) with 1 day inpatient observation 43 250.00
Ophthalmologist services
A-scan method (add.peaks) 250.00
Aberrometry 1 150.00
Autokeratometry (ophthalmometry) 250.00
Accommodation (study of the volume and reserve of accommodation) 750.00
Analysis of eyelashes for demodenosis 500.00
Biomicroscopy 400.00
Fundus biomicroscopy 600.00
Visometry 750.00
Diaphanoscopy 250.00
Corneal diameter measurement 250.00
Measurement of strabismus angle Hirshberg 250.00
Study of visual fixation 250.00
Ophthalmologist consultation (general) 2 200.00
Consultation with an ophthalmologist (on inflammatory processes) 1 900.00
Consultation with an ophthalmologist (for glaucoma) 3 400.00
Consultation with an ophthalmologist (on cataracts) 2 200.00
Consultation with an ophthalmologist (on diabetes mellitus) 3,000.00
Consultation with an ophthalmologist.Re-examination within 1 month after initial admission 1 500.00
Consultation with an ophthalmologist. Postoperative follow-up examination more than 3 months after surgery 2 200.00
Consultation with an ophthalmologist. Repeated postoperative examination in the period from 2 to 3 months after surgery 1 500.00
Laser. YAG laser activation of trabecula 16 150.00
Laser.The second stage of restrictive and peripheral retinal laser coagulation 16 150.00
Laser. Gonioplasty 13 350.00
Laser. Gonioplasty + Goniopuncture 16 150.00
Laser. Goniopuncture 13 350.00
Laser. Gonioscopy 750.00
Laser. Iridotomy + gonioplasty + goniopuncture 16 150.00
Laser.Iridotomy + goniopuncture 16 150.00
Laser. Iridotomy + iris reposition 16 150.00
Laser. Iridotomy + Gonioplasty 16 150.00
Laser. Coagulation cyst 13 350.00
Laser. Coagulation of the iris 13 350.00
Laser. Coreopraxia 13 350.00
Laser.Laser iridectomy 16 150.00
Laser. Micropulse lattice coagulation 16 150.00
Laser. Restrictive laser coagulation of the retina 16 670.00
Laser. Panretinal laser coagulation 22 230.00
Laser. Paravasal retinal laser coagulation 16 670.00
Laser.Dissection of the secondary cataract 16 150.00
Laser. Pupillary film dissection 16 150.00
Laser. Dissection of the anterior lens capsule 16 150.00
Laser. Dissection of retrolental film 16 150.00
Laser. Dissection of the strands of the anterior chamber 16 150.00
Laser.Dissection of the vitreous strands 16 150.00
Laser. Lattice laser coagulation of retina 16 670.00
Laser. Selective trabeculoplasty 16 150.00
Laser. Trabeculospasis 16 150.00
Laser. Removal of precipitates from IOL 13 350.00
Laser. Panretinal laser coagulation stage 16 670.00
Optical coherence tomography of the anterior segment of the eye 2 700.00
Fundus examination with a contact lens 500.00
Ophthalmoscanning (B-method) 1,700.00
Perimetry 500.00
Color perimetry 750.00
Peripheral retinal laser coagulation 16 670.00
Pneumotonometry 400.00
Selection of difficult glasses 500.00
Selection of glasses for glasses (spherical) 500.00
Retinal visual acuity 400.00
Refractometry 250.00
Refractometry (wide pupil) 250.00
Refractometry with cycloplegic 250.00
Orbit scan 2 200.00
Daily tonometry (twice a day) 500.00
Removal of a foreign body from the eye 1,000.00
General practitioner
General practitioner consultation (primary) 1 200.00
Consultation with a general practitioner (repeated) 1,000.00
Urological services
Bladder biopsy 6 100.00
Cystostomy replacement 1 950.00
Instillation of the bladder 700.00
Consultation with a urologist (primary) 1 500.00
Consultation with urologist (repeated) 1 300.00
Urethral swab 300.00
Prostatic juice swab + diagnostic gland massage 700.00
Therapeutic prostate massage 600.00
Imposition (change of dressing) 400.00
Polyfocal biopsy of the prostate 6 500.00
Removal of the stent from the ureter 5,000.00
Uroflowmetry 1,000.00
Cystoscopy 3,000.00
FGDS services
Taking biopsy material for histological examination 1,700.00
Taking a smear for cytology 800.00
Biopsy sampling for Helicobacter pylori (Helicobacter pylori) during gastroenterological examination 1 100.00
Write exam to disk 100.00
Consultation with an endoscopist 1,000.00
Applying clips (1 pc.) 2 300.00
Applying clips (2 pcs.) 3 600.00
Applying clips (3 units) 4 900.00
Applying clips (5 units) 7 500.00
Polypectomy. Removal of polyps (esophagus, stomach, duodenum) 8 500.00
Foreign body removal 3,000.00
Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (diagnostic) 1 500.00
Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (diagnostic and treatment) 1 800.00
Electroresection of the gastric mucosa 17 500.00
Surgeon’s services
Anesthetic aid 3 700.00
Visit of a surgeon at home (Dzemgi) 2 300.00
Home visit of a surgeon (Central District) 2 100.00
Consultation with a surgeon (primary) 1 200.00
Consultation with a surgeon (repeated) 1,000.00
Applying / changing dressing 400.00
Surgical treatment of ingrown toenail 1 500.00
Stitching 400.00
Removing stitches. 400.00
Surgery. Autopsy boil 8,000.00
Surgery. Lipoma removal from 5 cm 6 800.00
Functional Diagnostics
Daily blood pressure monitoring 2 100.00
Treadmill test 2 100.00
Holter monitoring (duration up to 24 hours.) continuous recording 2,500.00
12-lead ECG without decoding 350.00
12-lead ECG with stress with decoding 800.00
12-lead ECG with decoding 500.00
Electroencephalography (EEG) 1 500.00
Surgery
Varicocele (under general anesthesia) with 2-day inpatient observation 52 900.00
Varicocele laparoscopically (under general anesthesia) with 3-day inpatient observation 71 390.00
Hydrocele (under local anesthesia) with 2-day inpatient observation 38 600.00
Hydrocele (under general anesthesia) with 2-day inpatient observation 45 600.00
Kidney cyst laparoscopically (under general anesthesia) with 3-day inpatient observation 69 890.00
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (under general anesthesia, with the application of 4 clips) with 3-day inpatient observation 76 160.00
Surgical treatment of hernia (under local anesthesia, with plastic surgery with own tissues) with 3-day inpatient observation 45 900.00
Surgical treatment of hernia from both sides (under local anesthesia, with plastic surgery with own tissues) with 3-day inpatient observation 55 900.00
Surgical treatment of large hernias (after surgery, ventral, under general anesthesia, with the installation of a mesh prosthesis) with 5-day inpatient observation 80 600.00
Surgical treatment of hernia (under general anesthesia, with plastic surgery with own tissues) with 3-day inpatient observation 52 990.00
Surgical treatment of umbilical and inguinal hernias simultaneously (under general anesthesia) with 3-day inpatient observation 62 990.00
Orchiectomy (testicle removal) (under general anesthesia) with 2-day inpatient observation 45 700.00
Removal of a stone from the ureter (under general anesthesia) with 2-day inpatient observation 52 990.00
Removal of the spermatic cord cyst (under local anesthesia) with 2-day inpatient observation 35 280.00
Removal of the spermatic cord cyst (under general anesthesia) with 2-day inpatient observation 43 380.00
Lipoma removal from 20 cm (under general anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 34 190.00
Removal of oleogranuloma (under general anesthesia) with 2-day inpatient observation 42 380.00
Circumcisio (under local anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 26 390.00
Circumcisio (under general anesthesia) with 1-day inpatient observation 35 490.00
Allergist services
Consultation with an allergist (primary) 1 200.00
Consultation with an allergist (repeated) 1,000.00
Endocrinologist services
Consultation with an allergist (primary) 1 300.

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