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Child hair falling out: Hair Loss in Children: Causes and Treatment

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Hair Loss in Children: Causes and Treatment

Hair loss, or alopecia, isn’t just a problem for adults. Hair loss in children is responsible for an estimated 3% of pediatric office visits in the U.S. Whether your child has thinning hair or distinct bald spots, the loss of hair can be frightening. The good news is that, with a proper diagnosis, most cases of hair loss can be treated successfully.

Medical Causes of Hair Loss in Children

For the majority of children 26 months or older suffering hair loss, one of the following conditions is the cause. Your child’s pediatrician or a pediatric dermatologist should be able to diagnose these conditions and prescribe the appropriate treatment.

Tinea capitis. Tinea capitis, commonly known as ringworm of the scalp, is a fungal infection often seen in children. It can show up in a number of ways, but often as scaly patches of hair loss on the head. The patches are usually round or oval. The hairs may be broken off at the surface of the skin and look like black dots on the scalp.

If your child’s doctor suspects tinea capitis, a microscopic examination can confirm the diagnosis. Treatment usually involves an oral antifungal, such as griseofulvin taken by mouth for eight weeks. Your child should also use an antifungal shampoo such as selenium sulfide or ketoconazole to decrease shedding of the fungus.

Because ringworm is contagious, your child should be careful not to share any objects that touch the head such as hats, pillow cases, hair clippers, or brushes.

Alopecia areata. Alopecia areata is a non-contagious condition of hair loss thought to be caused by the body’s immune system attacking the hair follicles. It is characterized by the sudden appearance of round or oval patches of hair loss. The patches are slick or smooth, without scaling or broken hairs. About 25% of children also have pitting and ridging of the nails.

While there is no cure for alopecia areata, treatment can control the disease in some children. Many have their hair back within a year, although regrowth is unpredictable and many will lose hair again. For about 5% of children the disease progresses to alopecia totalis — loss of all of the hair on the scalp. Some of these will develop alopecia universalis — a total loss of body hair.

For younger children, treatment consists primarily of strong corticosteroid ointments or creams applied to the bald areas. Teenagers, who may be sufficiently motivated to have their hair return, may tolerate steroid injections into the scalp. Minoxidil (Rogaine) is often used in additional to topical steroid treatment. Anthralin applied to the skin for a short time and then washed off may also be used. Hair growth may come back in 8-12 weeks.

Trichotillomania. Trichotillomania is hair loss caused by the child pulling, plucking, twisting, or rubbing their hair. The hair loss is patchy and characterized by broken hairs of varying length. Patches are typically seen on the side of the child’s dominant hand.

Trichotillomania may be triggered by a stressor or anxiety in your child’s life at home such as the loss of a grandparent, birth of a sibling, or a divorce or a school stressor. If you notice your child pulling hair, scolding will not likely be helpful. However, counseling to help your child deal with the source of stress or anxiety that triggered the habit may help stop it .

There is another condition called traction alopecia that occurs when braids or pony tail holders are put in too tightly resulting in loss of hair at the hair line. It may present with inflammed follicles at the area of irritation. It can be treated with a topical antibiotic ointment and loosening of braids or ponytail

Telogen effluvium. Telogen effluvium is a condition in which a sudden or severe stress — such as extremely high fever, surgery under general anesthesia, the death of a loved one, a severe injury, or the use of certain prescription medications — interrupts the normal cycle of hair growth. The hair follicles stop growing prematurely and enter a resting phase (called the telogen phase). Between six and 16 weeks later, hair sheds excessively, leading to partial or complete baldness.

There are no conclusive tests to diagnose telogen effluvium; there is also no treatment for it. However, once the stressful event is over, full hair growth usually returns within six months to a year.

Nutritional deficiency. Though less common, hair loss can be a symptom of deficiencies in certain nutrients, including:

  • Vitamin H, or biotin, one of the B complex of vitamins, which help the body to convert carbohydrates into glucose to fuel the body.
  • Zinc, an essential mineral involved in numerous aspects of cellular metabolism. It also supports normal growth and development during pregnancy, childhood, and adolescence.

In some cases, hair loss can be a symptom of too much vitamin A.

With a healthy, varied diet, most children will not experience nutritional deficiencies that lead to hair loss. However, if you suspect a problem, speak to your child’s doctor before giving nutritional supplements.

Endocrine problems. In some children the cause of hair loss is hypothyroidism, a condition in which the thyroid is underactive and is producing an insufficient amount of thyroid hormones required for regulating metabolism.

A diagnosis of hypothyroidism is made by a blood test.Treatment may involve medication prescribed by the endocrinologis to replace deficient hormones but will depend on a number of factors including:

  • Your child’s age, overall health, and medical history
  • Extent of the disease
  • Your child’s tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies
  • Expectations for the course of the disease
  • Your opinion or preference

Nonmedical Causes of Hair Loss

While many causes of hair loss require a doctor’s attention, others will resolve on their own with time. These include.

  • Newborn hair loss. Many newborns lose their hair during the first few months of life, and baby hair is replaced by permanent hair.
  • Rubbing. Between 3 and 6 months of age, many babies have a bald spot resulting from friction with the crib mattress or car seat. Once your child starts sitting up, any lost hair should return.
  • Hair abuse. Vigorous brushing or pulling the hair into tight pony tails or braids can cause it to fall out. Being more gentle with the hair will allow it to grow back.

There are many reasons for hair loss in children. If you suspect a medical problem or have any concerns about hair loss, it’s important to call your child’s pediatrician.

Hair Loss

Is this your child’s symptom?

  • Hair loss in patches or throughout the scalp
  • The missing hairs can be broken off or just fall out
  • The medical term for hair loss is alopecia

Causes

Common causes of hair loss are listed below. Most don’t usually require medical treatment.

  • Ringworm of the Scalp. This is the main cause of patchy hair loss that needs medical treatment. Your child’s doctor will prescribe a medicine to treat ringworm of the scalp. It’s taken by mouth.
  • Newborn Hair Loss. The hair of many newborns falls out during the first few months of life. This baby hair is replaced by permanent hair.
  • Rubbing or Friction. Babies can rub off a patch of hair on the back of the head. This most commonly occurs in infants 3 to 6 months old. It is a result of friction during head-turning against a firm surface. Examples are crib mattresses, playpens, and infant seats. The hair grows back once the baby starts sitting up. Also called friction alopecia or pressure alopecia. Repeated or severe friction can cause hair loss at any age.
  • Tight Hair Styles. If hair is pulled too tight, it will eventually break. Mostly seen with tight braids, pony tails or dreadlocks (especially corn row styles). Hair can also be lost because of vigorous hair-brushing or back combing. Hot hairstyling tools can also cause hair damage. Also known as traction alopecia, mechanical alopecia, or “hair abuse.
  • Twisting or Pulling Out the Hair. This is a nervous habit called trichotillomania. Frequent twisting of the hair results in broken hairs of different lengths. The missing hair occurs in patches of different shapes. This creates bald spots. Rarely, it can include plucking of the eyebrows or eyelashes. Can occur with nail biting, lip biting or sucking, and sore picking habits. In older children, may be associated with OCD.
  • Stress. Hair follicles are very sensitive to physical or emotional stress. The hair begins to fall out about 3-4 months after a severe stress. Reason: Hair follicles are very sensitive to physical or emotional stress. Examples are a high fever, severe illness or surgery. Also, an emotional crisis or a crash diet can be triggers. In pregnant teens, the stress can be childbirth. After hair stops shedding, the hair will slowly grow back. This can take 6 to 8 months for all the hair to grow back. The whole cycle takes about 12 months. This type of hair loss is called telogen effluvium.

When to Call for Hair Loss

Call Doctor or Seek Care Now

  • Your child looks or acts very sick
  • You think your child needs to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Contact Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Scalp is red and very swollen in area of hair loss
  • You think your child needs to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Contact Doctor During Office Hours

  • Scabs or crusts are present in the hair
  • Ringworm of the scalp suspected. (Round patch of hair loss with scales, rough surface, redness or itching)
  • Broken hairs from tight hair style and pimples are present in scalp
  • Patch of hair loss and cause not known
  • Widespread hair thinning and cause not known
  • Hair loss from nervous habit of twisting the hair (needs counseling)
  • Hair loss is a chronic problem
  • Normal hair loss suspected, but doesn’t grow back within 6 months
  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Newborn normal hair loss in infancy
  • Hair loss on back of head from chronic rubbing and friction
  • Hair loss from tight hair style
  • Widespread hair thinning follows a major stress about 3 months ago

Seattle Children’s Urgent Care Locations

If your child’s illness or injury is life-threatening, call 911.

Care Advice

Newborn Normal Hair Loss in Infancy

  1. What You Should Know About Newborn Normal Hair Loss:
    • Newborns are born with varying amounts of hair.
    • The baby hair of many newborns falls out during the first 6 months of life. Hair loss peaks at 3 months old. The mother may also lose some of her hair at this time.
    • This baby hair is then replaced by permanent hair.
    • The normal hair comes in between 6 and 12 months.
    • This shedding phase in newborns is always normal.
    • Hair loss is not caused by shampoos.
  2. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Hair does not grow back by 12 months old
    • You have other questions or concerns

Hair Loss on Back of Head from Chronic Rubbing and Friction

  1. What You Should Know About Rubbing Off Hair on Back of Head:
    • Babies can rub off a patch of hair on the back of the head. This most commonly occurs in infants 3 to 6 months old.
    • The hair loss is from friction during head-turning against a firm surface. Examples are crib mattresses, playpens, activity mats and infant seats.
    • The hair grows back once the baby starts to sit up.
    • This may take 6 to 12 months.
    • Can also occur in any bedridden child (e.g., severe cerebral palsy).
  2. Treatment for Hair Loss from Friction and Too Much Time on Back:
    • After 1 month old, give your baby more tummy time.
    • Caution: Tummy time should always occur under adult supervision. Reason: Risk of suffocation until child reaches an age when can turn over.
    • Tummy time has many benefits.
    • It will help the back of head become more rounded and less flat.
    • It will also build up strength in shoulder muscles.
  3. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Hair does not grow back by 6 months after learning to sit
    • You have other questions or concerns

Hair Loss From Tight Hair Style

  1. What You Should Know About Hair Loss from Tight Hair Style:
    • Symptoms: Broken hairs are seen at the hairline or where the hair is parted. It’s usually the same on both sides of the head.
    • Cause: If hair is pulled too tight, it will eventually break. This gives a frizzy look from hairs broken off at various lengths.
    • Examples: It’s most commonly seen with tight braids, pony tails or dreadlocks. Hair can also be lost because of vigorous hair-brushing or back combing. Hot hairstyling tools can also cause hair damage. Can also occur during exercise while wearing head phones.
    • Hair loss is not caused by shampoos.
  2. Treatment of Broken Hairs from Tight Hair Style:
    • Change the hair style to one that doesn’t put tension on the hair.
    • If that is not acceptable, loosen the ponytail or braids.
    • These hair styles are at risk if they feel tight or cause any pain.
    • Outcome: If tight hair styles are avoided, the hair will return to normal.
    • Warning: If tight braiding continues over 10 years, permanent hair loss can occur.
  3. Pimples in the Hair and on the Scalp:
    • Cause: Most pimples are caused by blocked hair follicles.
    • Treatment: Stop using any ointments or oils in the hair. Reason: they block the hair follicles.
    • Stop any hair style that puts tension on the hair. Reason: damages the hair follicle and makes it prone to infection.
    • Wash any ointment or greasy pomade off the scalp with soap and water.
    • Antibiotic Cream: Apply an antibiotic cream to the pimples. Do not use ointment. Use it 2 times a day for 3 days. No prescription is needed.
    • Outcome: Most pimples will clear up in 3 days.
  4. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Hair does not grow back by 6 months after hair style changed
    • You have other questions or concerns

Widespread Hair Thinning Following Major Stress About 3 Months Ago

  1. What You Should Know About Hair Loss after Stress:
    • Symptoms: Lots of hair is noticed in a comb or brush. The hair falls out from all parts of the scalp. This leads to major thinning of the hair, but no bald spots.
    • Cause: Severe stressful event. Hair follicles are very sensitive to physical or emotional stress. Examples are a high fever, severe illness or surgery. Also, an emotional crisis or a crash diet can be triggers. In pregnant teens, the stress can be childbirth. Hair loss is not caused by shampoos.
    • Time Frame: The hair begins to fall out about 3-4 months after a severe stress. It continues to fall out excessively over the next 3 or 4 months. After hair stops shedding, the hair will slowly grow back. This can take 6 to 8 months for all the hair to grow back. The whole cycle takes about 12 months.
    • There’s no way to hurry the process. The hair growth cycle needs to run its course.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Hair Care:
    • Treat the hair gently.
    • Wash the hair no more than once per day. Always use a hair conditioner.
    • Comb the hair rather than brushing it.
    • Be careful at combing out any tangled hair.
    • Avoid any tight hair styles such as braids or a pony tail.
    • Don’t put tension on the hair.
    • No special shampoo or cream is needed or helpful.
  3. What to Expect:
    • No more than 50% of the hair will be lost.
    • Once it starts to regrow, all the hair will grow back in about 6 months.
    • The new hair will look normal.
  4. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Hair does not grow back by 12 months after stressful event
    • You have other questions or concerns

And remember, contact your doctor if your child develops any of the ‘Call Your Doctor’ symptoms.

Disclaimer: this health information is for educational purposes only. You, the reader, assume full responsibility for how you choose to use it.

Last Reviewed: 11/18/2021

Last Revised: 10/21/2021

Copyright 2000-2021. Schmitt Pediatric Guidelines LLC.

Common causes of paediatric alopecia

Background

Hair loss in children aged 12 years and younger is most often due to a benign or self-limiting condition. This article presents a review of the assessment of common causes of paediatric alopecia and outlines the implications for general practice.

Objective

The objective of this article is to help readers systematically assess a child presenting with alopecia, manage the most common diseases of paediatric alopecia and identify patients requiring referral to a dermatologist.

This article is the fourth in a series on paediatric health. Articles in this series aim to provide information about diagnosis and management of presentations in infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers in general practice.

Hair loss in children aged 12 years and younger encompasses a number of common and rare conditions that may be congenital or acquired. Differentiation of alopecia due to benign causes from that due to serious illness is important for reducing patient and parent distress and offering adequate and prompt diagnosis and treatment. Hair loss disorders are a large, heterogeneous group of conditions that have various clinical features, pathological findings and expected outcomes.

Alopecia in children can be characterised as:

  • disorders of hair loss and aberrant hair growth
  • hereditary and congenital alopecia
  • hair shaft abnormalities
  • traumatic alopecia
  • infections of the hair.1

The most common causes of paediatric alopecia are tinea capitis, alopecia areata, trauma secondary to traction or trichotillomania, and telogen effluvium.2 The diagnosis is generally established through directed patient history, scalp and hair examination, trichoscopy and basic laboratory studies. Additional pathological and laboratory investigations may be required after referral to a dermatologist.

Management of paediatric alopecia requires holistic care of the child, parents and any siblings. The clinical manifestation may be subtle or disfiguring and may lead to low self-esteem, depression and social isolation. It is important that parents are given clear information about the expected clinical course and prognosis. Referral to a dermatologist is necessary in cases when the diagnosis is uncertain, treatment is failing or there is evidence of scarring alopecia. 

Causes

The causes of paediatric alopecia include many common and uncommon conditions and syndromes. Alopecia may be due to congenital or acquired conditions. The most common causes of paediatric alopecia seen in general practice are listed in Table 1. This article will discuss the diagnosis and management of these conditions. Scarring alopecia and hair shaft abnormalities are less common and require further investigation by a dermatologist.
 








Table 1. Common causes of paediatric alopecia
Condition Clinical presentation Distribution
Tinea capitis Most commonly scaly patches of alopecia or patches of alopecia with small black dots.

Pruritus is common.

Cervical and occipital lymphadenopathy may be seen in inflammatory cases.

Children may be asymptomatic carriers.

Dermoscopic features include broken hairs, comma hairs and corkscrew hairs. 
Single or multiple scaly patches with alopecia: patches enlarge centrifugally over weeks to months.

Patches of alopecia with black dots: black dots are broken hair follicles.

Widespread scaling of the scalp with subtle hair loss.

Kerion: an inflammatory plaque with pustules, crusting and sinus drainage.29 Tender and painful. Potential for scarring.

Favus: infection with Trichophyton schoenleinii, perifollicular erythema and cup-shaped yellow crusts.30 May progress to scarring alopecia.
Alopecia areata Patchy or confluent hair loss occurring on the scalp or any hair-bearing area of the body.

Typically a circular patch with normal-appearing scalp skin.

Dermoscopic features include exclamation point hairs, yellow dots and black dots.

Correlation with atopic dermatitis, hypothyroidism, vitiligo.

Nail changes (especially pitting and ridging) are common.
Patchy alopecia areata: most common form, with oval and round patches.1

Reticular alopecia areata: irregular pattern in a net-like fashion (reticular).1

Ophiasis alopecia areata: band-like pattern of hair loss, most commonly on the temporal or occipital regions.1 Poor prognostic feature.

Diffuse alopecia areata: generalised reduction in hair density over the entire scalp.1

Alopecia totalis: complete absence of hair on the scalp.1

Alopecia universalis: complete absence of hair on the scalp and the entire body, including eyebrows, eyelashes, underarms and pubic hair. 1
Traction alopecia Due to constant tension on the hair due to styling, ponytails, braiding, use of hair rollers and weaving.1,31

Fringe sign: retention hair along the frontotemporal hairline.

Long-standing, may cause scarring when chronic.
Depends on hair care practice and use of hair products.

Most commonly presents with frontotemporal hair loss.

May present with patchy hair loss over the scalp in no specific pattern of distribution.
Trichotillomania Impulse disorder with compulsion to pull or pluck hair.1,32

More common in girls than boys.1,32

May present in childhood due to habit or in adolescence as a sign of underlying psychological issues.1,32

May be associated with other self-harm.
Unusual pattern of hair loss, most commonly affecting the scalp and eyebrows.

Patchy and non-confluent.

May spare peripheral hairs (‘Friar Tuck sign’/tonsure pattern).
Telogen effluvium Occurs approximately three months after an inciting event (eg medical illness, stress, medication, nutritional disorder).

Shedding generally resolves within three to six months, then may take six months for density to improve.

Chronic telogen effluvium if shedding beyond six months.
Diffuse decreased hair density, often characterised by decreased density of ponytail.1,15

Increased hair shedding.

Rarely patchy, unless concomitant patchy alopecia is present.

 

Epidemiology

Tinea capitis is a common condition to which prepubertal children are predisposed (Figure 1A).3–5 The prevalence of positive fungal cultures in children is estimated to be 4–13%.2,6

The point prevalence of alopecia areata is approximately 1 in 1000 people, with a lifetime risk of approximately 2% (Figure 1B). 7,8 Most cases occur before age 30 years. Males and females are affected equally.

The prevalence of traction alopecia and trichotillomania is not easily estimated because of underdiagnosis and secretive behaviours. One study of a college student population estimated a lifetime prevalence of trichotillomania of 0.6%.9 Hair loss secondary to pulling and plucking, but not satisfying the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria, was reported in 1.5% of males and 3.4% of females surveyed.9

Acute telogen effluvium may occur at any age, including infants and children.10 A study investigating causes of paediatric alopecia found that 2.7% of children presented with acute telogen effluvium.11 Chronic telogen effluvium is less common, typically affecting women aged 30–60 years.12

 

Figure 1. Examples of paediatric alopecia.

A. Tinea capitis presenting with a solitary circular area of hair loss. Note there is a short stubble of broken hairs and the skin is inflamed.

B. Two circumscribed circular areas of alopecia areata. Note the area is completely bald and the skin is normal.

C. Severe alopecia areata. Note a small number of remaining terminal hairs. These would generally also be lost over ensuing months.

D. Traction alopecia caused by repeatedly pulling the hair tightly back into a pony tail over many months.

E. Trichotillomania producing an area of diffuse thinning. Within the area there are numerous broken hairs. The borders are angular.



Assessment and diagnosis

The ability to differentiate children with easily managed causes of alopecia from those requiring referral and intensive management is an important skill for the general practitioner.

History

Children and their parents most often present with complaints of increased hair shedding or patterns of hair loss. A systematic and thorough history will aid diagnosis (Table 2). It is crucial to differentiate between hair shedding and hair breakage.
 










Table 2. Patient history
History Significance
Duration and rate of hair loss The duration and rate of hair loss helps differentiate congenital (from a young age) and acquired (due to an inciting factor or behaviour). This also determines acute, chronic or transient conditions.
Location of hair loss Determine whether the alopecia is focal, diffuse or patterned. Determine, in conjunction with physical examination, whether other hair-bearing body areas are involved.
Extent of hair loss A degree of hair shedding is normal, with normal hair loss of 50–150 hairs per day. 33 The use of a hair shedding assessment chart quantifies hair shedding and allows for objective assessment of improvement. Determine whether patients or parents have noticed reduction in ponytail density, although this may only be noticeable after 30% decrease in density.34
Associated symptoms The presence of associated symptoms, including pain, tenderness, pruritus and burning sensation, are associated with certain diagnoses. Symptoms may be present due to concomitant diseases (eg seborrhoeic dermatitis).
Differentiation of hair loss versus hair breakage Determining true hair shedding versus hair breakage helps differentiate causes of alopecia from hair shaft disorders or traumatic causes of alopecia. Enquire about the presence of pain when removing hairs (painless extraction of hairs from the scalp is characteristic of loose anagen hair syndrome).
Hair care behaviour The use of hair care products and grooming behaviour is important for diagnosing traction alopecia or hair care that damages the hair shaft (eg use of chemicals).
Medical and family history Questions about past medical history and family history of alopecia (often undiagnosed) may assist diagnosis. In adolescent females, enquire about menarche. A diagnosis of telogen effluvium is often made when an inciting factor is identified (eg medical illnesses, stress, poor diet, medications).

 

Examination

Assessment of a child with alopecia involves examination of the scalp, hair and other body sites.13 Examination of the hair and scalp is best performed from above, with adequate lighting. Examine the scalp for evidence of erythema, scales, pustules or papules, erosions and excoriation. These findings may be associated with alopecia or signs of a concomitant scalp disorder (eg seborrhoeic dermatitis or folliculitis). The lack of pinpoint openings (follicular ostia) on the scalp, associated with pustules and ulceration, suggests a scarring alopecia. A kerion is an abscess caused by fungal infection and is characterised by a painful, boggy, inflammatory mass from which any remaining hairs can be pulled out painlessly. 1

Examination of the hair begins with visual inspection of distribution and density over the scalp. Identify the pattern of hair loss to narrow the differential diagnosis. Hair density is best examined by parting the hair with combs and measuring the distance between the parts.13 The hair shafts are examined for length, calibre, fragility and texture. Broken and rough hairs may suggest a disorder of the hair shaft or traumatic alopecia.

Dermoscopy can aid the diagnosis of alopecia in children. Table 3 outlines typical dermoscopic findings that are associated with certain conditions.14

 










Table 3. Dermoscopic findings of alopecia
Finding Associated condition
Absence of follicular ostia Destruction of follicle opening due to scarring alopecia
Fibrotic white dots Fibrosis associated with scarring alopecia
Black dots Broken hairs at the scalp surface – alopecia areata, tinea capitis
Yellow dots Accumulation of sebum and keratin – alopecia areata
Exclamation points Associated with alopecia areata and trichotillomania
Comma hairs Associated with tinea capitis
Medical and family history Questions about past medical history and family history of alopecia (often undiagnosed) may assist diagnosis. In adolescent females, enquire about menarche. A diagnosis of telogen effluvium is often made when an inciting factor is identified (eg medical illnesses, stress, poor diet, medications).

 
A hair pull test identifies active hair shedding and should be performed on all patients presenting with alopecia. Approximately 50 hairs are grasped at the skin surface and consistent pressure is applied from the proximal to distal ends. The easy extraction of more than six hair fibres suggests increased hair shedding. A specialist may examine the proximal ends of the hairs to identify the predominant hair cycle and characteristics.

Examine other hair-bearing areas to determine the distribution of hair loss. Additional hair, skin, nail and mucosal abnormalities may be present, depending on the condition.

Investigation

In the majority of cases, scalp biopsy is unnecessary and is traumatic for the child. The diagnosis of alopecia areata, telogen effluvium, traction alopecia and hair shaft abnormalities often does not require investigation. If a scalp biopsy is considered, refer to a dermatologist for further assessment and management. In cases of suspected tinea capitis, scalp scrapings and six to eight hairs should be taken from the affected scalp for fungal microscopy and culture to confirm the diagnosis.1 Do not await the results of fungal cultures prior to commencing appropriate systemic therapy. Repeat fungal cultures may be performed after four weeks of treatment.

Management

The general management of alopecia in children includes managing the underlying cause, providing support and reassurance for the child and parents, camouflage and other cosmetic measures, and psychological support. The psychological effects of hair loss in children can be profound, leading to social isolation, low self-esteem, depression and humiliation.15,16 Consider referral to a child and adolescent psychologist or psychiatrist if appropriate. Children with extensive hair loss may require a wig, hairpiece or false eyelashes.

Treatment of tinea capitis must begin once the clinical diagnosis is made, without awaiting fungal culture results. Oral antifungal treatment is required for tinea capitis, as topical antifungal treatment has inadequate penetration into the hair follicles. Oral griseofulvin is the first-line therapy on the basis of efficacy in randomised control trials.17 The typical starting dose is 20–25 mg/kg/day for six to 12 weeks.18 Terbinafine is an alternative first-line agent, with data suggesting it is at least as effective as griseofulvin.17 A high incidence of tinea capitis is found among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, with Trichophyton tonsurans often implicated. This organism is more sensitive to systemic terbinafine, and resistance to griseofulvin is common. Systemic antifungal therapy is generally well tolerated, with gastrointestinal distress, headache and skin eruptions the most common side effects. Laboratory investigations and monitoring are not required unless treatment extends beyond eight weeks. If a prolonged course is required, monitor liver and renal function for toxicity. Treatment of kerion and favus require referral to a dermatologist for systemic glucocorticoids and close monitoring. The prognosis for children with tinea capitis is excellent, with complete clearance seen in most patients who are adequately treated. Failure to identify the diagnosis or prolonged infection confers the greatest risk of irreversible alopecia.

Family members and close contacts should be examined for tinea capitis and should be treated simultaneously if detected. Given the risk of asymptomatic carrier status, family members should use antifungal hair shampoo for two to four weeks and avoid sharing hair products or other equipment (eg helmets or hats). Pets may be reservoirs for dermatophytes, so assessment by vets is advised if multiple members of a household are affected.

Therapeutic options for alopecia areata in children are limited because of concerns about treatment tolerability. Referral of children with alopecia areata to a dermatologist is appropriate (Figure 1C). Intralesional glucocorticoids are often used, but low tolerability as a result of pain and anxiety during injections is a limiting factor.19 Potent topical glucocorticoids are the first-line treatment.1,20,21 Topical minoxidil and topical immunotherapy are also treatment options.22 The use of systemic glucocorticoids may induce hair growth, but children most often relapse on cessation of treatment.23 Long-term use of glucocorticoids is not indicated in children. Treatment with ultraviolet therapy has seen variable results.21

Traction alopecia may be reversible if identified and if the hairstyle or behaviour is modified (Figure 1D). Prolonged traction on the hair may lead to irreversible scarring.1 Childhood trichotillomania is often a benign inadvertent behaviour that children may outgrow (Figure 1E). Counselling the patient and parents about the behaviour and modifications can occasionally be successful. 1

Management of adolescent trichotillomania is more difficult and may represent underlying psychological distress. Adolescents are often more secretive with behaviours, and the diagnosis is difficult to determine. Psychological therapy and counselling may identify the underlying problem and modify behaviour1. Referral to a psychiatrist for recalcitrant cases is advised.24 When pharmacotherapy is selected for treatment, serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants may be effective in treating obsessive-compulsive disorder.25 N-acetylcysteine has been used alone or in combination with antidepressants for treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder with good effect.26,27

Given that telogen effluvium is generally a reactive and self-limiting condition, few treatment options exist.28 Treatment of telogen effluvium is generally reassurance and avoidance of triggers.1 Most patients are reassured that complete baldness is not possible (unless concomitant hair disorder exists), telogen effluvium is temporary and regrowth is likely. The management approach for telogen effluvium includes identification and removal of the inciting factor, camouflaging hair loss and psychological support. The efficacy of topical minoxidil in telogen effluvium is unclear. Theoretically, minoxidil should hasten resolution of hair growth by prolonging anagen and stimulating telogen hairs to re-enter anagen.1,28 However, it is not considered first-line therapy.

Indications for referral

Refer any case of paediatric alopecia to a dermatologist for further assessment and treatment if the diagnosis is uncertain or the case is not a typical presentation of a particular condition. Obtaining appropriate basic investigations (eg fungal cultures) in general practice prior to review may expedite diagnosis and treatment. Refer any children requiring scalp biopsy to mitigate the need for repeat biopsies and unnecessary investigations.

Other indications for referral include:

  • tinea capitis with severely inflamed scalp skin, evidence of a kerion or failure to respond to treatment (either treatment-resistant or alternative diagnosis)
  • alopecia areata, particularly if rapid hair shedding, totalis or universalis are present
  • cases requiring intralesional steroid injection and systemic therapy
    • refer to a dermatologist with experience in alopecia
  • suspected telogen effluvium persisting longer than three months
  • all suspected cases of scarring alopecia, characterised by alopecia accompanied with papules or pustules, erythematous plaques and atrophy, telangiectasia, follicular hyperkeratosis and ulceration
    • these children are likely to require scalp biopsy and further investigations.
Conclusion

Paediatric alopecia is an uncommon but important presentation in general practice. Alopecia may be focal, diffuse or patterned. A number of conditions cause significant morbidity and contribute to significant psychosocial stress for patients and parents. A systematic approach to assessment, including a thorough history, full-body examination and investigations guided by clinical presentation, leads to accurate diagnosis and early referral to appropriate specialists. Treatment of typical cases of tinea capitis with oral antifungal treatment is indicated in general practice. Consider referral to a dermatologist if the diagnosis is unclear, treatment is failing or there is evidence of scarring alopecia.

Competing interests: None.

Provenance and peer review: Commissioned, externally peer reviewed.

Hair Loss – Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital

Baldness or hair loss is usually something only adults need to worry about. But sometimes teens lose their hair, too — and it may be a sign that something’s going on.

Hair loss during adolescence can mean a person may be sick or just not eating right. Some medicines or medical treatments (like

chemotherapy
) also cause hair loss. People can even lose their hair if they wear a hairstyle (like braids) that pulls on the hair for a long time.

Losing hair can be stressful. Most of the time, hair loss during the teen years is temporary. With temporary hair loss, the hair usually grows back after the problem that causes it is corrected.

Hair Basics

Hair is made of a kind of protein called keratin. A single hair has a hair shaft (the part that shows), a root below the skin, and a follicle. The follicle is the place the hair root grows from. At the lower end of the follicle is the hair bulb. This is where the hair’s color pigment, or melanin, is produced.

Most people lose about 50 to 100 head hairs a day. These hairs are replaced — they grow back in the same follicle on your head. This amount of hair loss is totally normal and no cause for worry. If you’re losing more than that, though, something might be wrong.

If you have hair loss and don’t know what’s causing it, talk to your doctor. A doctor can determine why the hair is falling out and suggest a treatment that will correct the underlying problem, if necessary.

What Causes Hair Loss?

Here are some of the things that can cause hair loss in teens:

  • Illnesses or medical conditions. Endocrine (hormonal) conditions, such as uncontrolled diabetes or thyroid disease, can interfere with hair production and cause hair loss. People with lupus can also lose hair. The hormone imbalance that happens in polycystic ovary syndrome can cause hair loss in teen girls as well as adult women.
  • Medicines. Sometimes doctors prescribe medicines that have hair loss as a side effect. Chemotherapy drugs for cancer are probably the medicines most known for causing hair loss. But hair loss also can be a side effect of some medicines used to treat acne, bipolar disorder, and ADHD. Diet pills that contain amphetamines also can cause hair loss.
  • Alopecia areata (pronounced: al-uh-PEE-shuh air-ee-AH-tuh). This skin disease causes hair loss on the scalp and sometimes elsewhere on the body. About 1 in 50 people get this type of alopecia at some point in life. Scientists think alopecia areata is an

    autoimmune_disorder
    and that the hair follicles are damaged by the person’s own immune system.

    Alopecia areata usually starts as one or more small, round bald patches on the scalp. These can get bigger. In a small number of cases, the person loses all hair. Both guys and girls can get it, and it often begins in childhood. The hair usually grows back within a year, but not always. Sometimes people with alopecia areata lose their hair again.

  • Trichotillomania (pronounced: trik-o-til-uh-MAY-nee-uh). Trichotillomania is a psychological disorder in which people repeatedly pull their hair out, often leaving bald patches. That can leave areas of baldness and damaged hairs of different lengths. People with trichotillomania usually need help from a therapist or other mental health professional before they can stop pulling their hair out.
  • Hair treatments and styling. Treatments that use chemicals, like hair color, bleach, straightening, or perms can cause hair damage that makes the hair break off or fall out temporarily. The same can happen when using too much heat on your hair (like using a hot iron or hot blow drying).

    Another type of baldness that goes with hair styling can be permanent: Wearing your hair in a style that pulls too tightly can cause something called traction alopecia. Traction alopecia can permanently damage the hair follicles if you wear a style that pulls on your hair for a long time. if you are getting your hair styled and it hurts, ask the stylist to redo it so that it is no longer painful. Pain is a sign of too much traction on the hair.

  • Poor nutrition. Not eating enough healthy food can contribute to hair loss. This is why some people with eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia lose their hair: The body isn’t getting enough protein, vitamins, and minerals to support hair growth. Some teens who are vegetarians also lose their hair if they don’t get enough protein from non-meat sources. And some athletes are at higher risk for hair loss because they may be more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia.
  • Disruption of the hair growth cycle. Some major events can alter the hair’s growth cycle temporarily. For example, delivering a baby, having surgery, going through a traumatic event, or having a serious illness or high fever can temporarily cause shedding of large amounts of hair. Because the hair we see on our heads has actually taken months to grow, a person might not notice any disruption of the hair growth cycle until months after the event that caused it. This type of hair loss corrects itself.
  • Androgenetic alopecia. Among adults, the most common cause of hair loss is androgenetic (pronounced: an-druh-juh-NEH-tik) alopecia. This is sometimes called male- or female-pattern baldness. This condition is caused by a combination of things, including a person’s

    genes
    and hormones called androgens. This kind of hair loss can sometimes start as early as the mid-teen years. It also can happen to people who take steroids like testosterone to build their bodies.

What Can Doctors Do?

If you see a doctor about hair loss, he or she will ask questions about your health and family health (your medical history). The doctor will check your scalp, and might take hair samples and test for certain medical conditions that can cause hair loss.

If medicine is causing your hair loss, ask the doctor if you can switch to a different medicine. If your hair loss is due to an endocrine condition, like diabetes or thyroid disease or female-pattern baldness, proper treatment and control of the underlying disorder is important to reduce or prevent hair loss.

If your doctor recommends it, a product like minoxidil can increase hair growth in male- and female-pattern baldness. Alopecia areata can be helped by treatment with corticosteroid creams or injections on the scalp. If your doctor thinks that nutritional deficiencies are causing your hair loss, he or she might refer you to a dietitian or other nutrition expert.

Catastrophic Hair Loss

Hair loss can be the first outward sign that a person is sick, so it can feel scary. Teens who have cancer and lose their hair because of chemotherapy treatments might go through a difficult time.

It can help to feel like you have some control over your appearance when you’re losing your hair. When getting chemo, some people like to cut their hair or shave their heads before the hair falls out. Some even take the hair they cut off and have it made into a wig.

Many options can help disguise hair loss — such as wearing wigs, hair wraps, hats, and baseball caps. For most teens who lose their hair, the hair does return — including after chemotherapy.

Taking Care of Your Hair

Eating a balanced, healthy diet is important for a lot of reasons. Healthy foods can really benefit your hair.

If you’re losing hair, some doctors recommend using baby shampoo, washing your hair no more than once a day, and lathering gently. Don’t rub your hair too vigorously with a towel, either. Many hair experts suggest putting away the blow dryer and air drying your hair instead. If you can’t live without your blow dryer, use it on a low-heat setting.

Styling your hair while it’s wet can cause it to stretch and break. So style your hair when it’s dry or damp. Avoid teasing or back-combing your hair because they can cause damage. Finally, be careful when using chemicals — such as straighteners or color treatments. Don’t get any kind of chemical treatment done too often.


Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.
© 1995-2021 KidsHealth® All rights reserved. Images provided by iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

Hair loss in children | BabyCenter

My child seems to be losing his hair. Why is this happening?

There are a handful of possibilities, each with its own symptoms, causes, and treatments. It’s not uncommon for young children to develop isolated bald spots. Your child may have developed a bare patch from sleeping in the same position night after night or from rubbing his head against the mattress.

Your child’s doctor has probably already explained if your child’s hair loss is the result of a medical treatment (a side effect of medication or radiation treatment, for example). Some of the other types of hair loss:

  • Patchy bald spots with red, flaky scaling (and sometimes black dots where the hair has broken off) may mean that your child has a contagious fungal infection called tinea capitis, or ringworm. This is the most common cause of hair loss in children.
  • Physical damage — from ponytails or braids that are too tight, for example — can result in hair loss called traction alopecia.
  • Irregular patches of hair may fall out if your child twirls or pulls his hair compulsively. This is called trichotillomania.
  • If your child has smooth, round, totally bald areas, he may have alopecia areata, a condition in which the immune system attacks the hair follicles, drastically slowing hair growth. This type of hair loss usually appears in isolated patches, but it can affect all of the hair on the body.
  • Some medical conditions — like hypothyroidism (a thyroid disorder) or hypopituitarism (an underactive pituitary gland) — can also cause hair loss all over your child’s head, although this is uncommon.

Another cause of all-over thinning (rather than patches of hair loss) is a condition called telogen effluvium. Here’s what happens: Hair has a growth stage and a resting stage. The growth stage lasts about three years, and the resting stage lasts about three months (although anywhere from one to six months is normal). During the resting stage, the hair remains in the follicle until the new hair starts coming in.

Usually, about 5 to 15 percent of hair on the scalp is in the resting phase at any one time, but stress, fever, or a change in hormone levels can cause a large number of hairs to enter the resting phase all at once. The shedding begins when new hairs start coming in about three months later, when the growth stage starts up again. (The drop in hormone levels after delivery is what causes hair loss in many new moms and infants, by the way.)

What can I do about it?

Talk with your child’s doctor. She’ll want to determine what’s causing the hair loss so you can start the proper treatment. If your child has ringworm, for example, the doctor will prescribe an antifungal medication.

If your child has alopecia areata, she may prescribe medication to try to stimulate his hair growth, or she may refer you to a dermatologist for further evaluation. (Some children simply outgrow alopecia areata without treatment. )

If your child’s hair loss is due to physical damage, you’ll just have to treat his hair and scalp tenderly for a while until it grows back again. (Keep in mind that most children’s hair is more fine and delicate than an adult’s. Opt for natural styles and brush very gently.)

If restless sleep habits are causing the problem, the condition will probably clear up on its own as your child gets older and settles down at night.

If an illness caused your child’s hair loss, you don’t need to do anything but be patient while it grows back over the next few months.

Resist the urge to focus on your child’s behavior if he habitually pulls on it. Instead, work with your doctor to get to the bottom of your child’s anxiety, nervousness, or frustration. Once that’s alleviated, he’s likely to drop the habit and his hair will return.

There are no guarantees, but in most cases a child’s hair loss is temporary. There’s a good chance your child will sport a full head of hair within a year.

Alopecia Areata (AA) – Alopecia Areata Symptoms

Overview

What is alopecia areata?

Alopecia areata is a form of alopecia (hair loss). It’s a non-life-threatening disease of your immune system that affects the hair on your scalp. With this condition, your body mistakenly views your hair follicles as an enemy. Your body attacks the hair follicles. This causes some or all of your hair to fall out. It usually begins with the hair on your head. There are three severe forms of alopecia, including:

  • Areata (patchy hair loss on your head)
  • Totalis (complete hair loss on your head)
  • Universalis (the loss of all body hair)

Alopecia is not contagious. It occurs in people of all ages. However, it is more common in children and adults in their early 20s.

Alopecia is different than telogen effluvian, which is hair loss that can be caused by physical stress such as rapid weight loss or pregnancy. Telogen effluvian is more common and usually, your hair does grow back after this type of hair loss.

Symptoms of alopecia areata

The main symptom of alopecia areata is hair loss that occurs in small, round patches on your head. This leaves smooth, peach-colored areas of scalp exposed. A mild case of alopecia areata starts with one to two coin-size hairless patches. In many instances, it stops after that. Sometimes, the hair will grow back. However, there’s no guarantee. The condition is unpredictable, and the cycle of hair loss and regrowth can repeat itself.

Alopecia areata can grow into another form of alopecia. In its worst form, alopecia universalis causes you to lose all body hair. This includes eyebrows, eyelashes, arms, legs, underarms, pubic, and chest and back hair for men. Rarely, people who have alopecia may feel burning or itching in the areas where they once had hair.

Some people with alopecia areata see changes in their fingernails and toenails. Nails can have tiny dents (pitting), have white spots or lines, and be rough.

What causes alopecia areata?

There is no known cause for alopecia areata. It is an autoimmune disease. This means your immune system attacks part of your body by mistake. Scientists think the cause of the disease may be related to a person’s genes. In that case, they believe a virus or something in your environment may trigger the disease.

Diagnosis

How is alopecia areata diagnosed?

See your doctor if you are experiencing significant hair loss. There are many reasons for hair loss. Your doctor will look at your hair loss pattern. He or she will review your medical history. They will check to see if the hairless areas of your scalp are smooth and peach-colored. Sometimes, the remaining hair in alopecia areata has a specific shape. Your doctor may pull a couple of hairs from your head to examine under a microscope. If your doctor can’t confirm a diagnosis, he may send you to a lab for a test. They will scrape a small sample of skin from your scalp and look at it under a microscope. This can help them rule out other conditions that cause hair loss. You may also have a blood test to look for other autoimmune diseases.

Prevention

Can alopecia areata be prevented or avoided?

The condition cannot be prevented or avoided. The cause is unknown and varies by person. Alopecia areata is not tied to stress, as some people believe. Some people have a family history of alopecia areata. Having a family member with alopecia areata and another immune system disease can raise your risk of having it. Other immune system diseases include type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, lupus, Addison’s disease, and atopic dermatitis. It is rare for a parent to pass the condition onto a child.

Alopecia areata treatment

There is no cure for alopecia areata. If you have a few, small patches of hair loss on your head, it’s likely your hair will grow back within a few months. Your doctor may not prescribe treatment in those cases.

For larger areas of hair loss, your doctor may prescribe steroid injections under your scalp. This could help regrow your hair. Other treatments include hair growth medicines that contain steroids that you apply to your skin.

Contact immunotherapy is another treatment. It purposely causes an allergic reaction on your scalp that could trigger hair growth. With this treatment, the medicine that is applied to your scalp irritates your skin, making it red and scaly. It could take as long as three months to see hair growth if this treatment works. Contact immunotherapy does have side effects, including a severe rash and swollen lymph nodes in your neck.

No matter what therapy you try, hair loss usually returns when you stop treatment.

Living with alopecia areata

The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recognizes that living with alopecia areata can be emotionally difficult. It affects social interaction and self-confidence, as people are embarrassed to let others see their hair loss. It can also be frustrating to not know if your hair is going to grow back or fall out again.

Consider joining a patient support group for people who have alopecia areata. Support groups give you a chance to talk about your condition. They help you realize you are not alone in your frustration with alopecia areata. A support group can be a good resource for practical tips to deal with the condition.

Hairstyling techniques or hair care products can help to cover bare patches on your head. But some products can be harsh on your hair. This could cause additional damage and loss. You might want to talk with your doctor about what products to avoid. People who have alopecia areata are encouraged to be creative with hats, scarves, and wigs.

Losing your eyelashes, eyebrows, and the hair in your nose and ears also can be a problem. Hair protects your eyes, nose, and ears from the irritation of dust, germs, and small, foreign particles. Wear eyeglasses or sunglasses to protect your eyes. You can use antibiotic ointment inside your nose to help keep germs out.

Be sure to cover areas of exposed scalp with a hat or sunscreen to reduce your risk of sunburn and skin cancer.

Questions to ask your doctor

Hair Loss (Alopecia Areata) Condition, Treatments, and Pictures for Parents – Overview

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Information for
ChildAdultTeen

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Images of Alopecia Areata

Overview

Alopecia areata is caused by a reaction from a person’s own immune system (an autoimmune condition) resulting in hair loss. The immune system of the body, for unknown reasons, mistakenly stops growing hair. Hair usually grows back on its own (spontaneously), though the hair loss often happens again. Hair loss may be patchy or more widespread (diffuse) and may affect the scalp as well as the body. Hair loss may be seasonal. There is no long-term cure for hair loss, and the causes can be both family-related (genetic) and related to outside (environmental) exposures.

Who’s at risk?

Hair loss is seen in people of all ages. It most often occurs in people with thyroid disease, although people with lupus, lichen planus, vitiligo, and Down syndrome are also more likely than others to experience hair loss.

Signs and Symptoms

Hair loss most commonly occurs on the scalp, but it can affect the eyebrows, eyelashes, beard, and other body areas.

Alopecia areata appears as patchy areas of non-scarring hair loss and may be considered:

  • Mild – 1–5 scattered areas of hair loss on scalp (and beard of adults)
  • Moderate – More than 5 scattered areas of hair loss on the scalp (and beard of adults)
  • Severe – Loss of all of the hair on the scalp and body

Scalp burning, without redness, may also occur.

Hairs that grow back often have less color (hypopigmented or white) either temporarily or permanently. This hypopigmentation is not seen in other forms of alopecia.

Pits and ridges in the fingernails can also occur.

Self-Care Guidelines

It is important to encourage your child and provide emotional support. Wigs or caps may be worn to hide the hair loss.

When to Seek Medical Care

See your child’s primary care doctor or a dermatologist if you notice areas of patchy hair loss anywhere on your child’s body.

Treatments Your Physician May Prescribe

The doctor may prescribe topical or oral (systemic) medications as well as injections. Steroid injections may help speed up hair regrowth in children with mild-to-moderate conditions:

  • A powerful (potent) topical steroid (Clobetasol propionate gel or solution) can be applied twice daily, with or without covering the area (occlusion) overnight.
  • Anthralin cream 1%, a topical medicine, can activate (stimulate) the immune system to speed up healing. Apply this medication to the affected area and about 1 cm beyond the border for 10–20 minutes, and then wash it off with shampoo.

For more extensive disease, your doctor may expose the affected area to light or apply topical steroids plus minoxidil, each used twice daily. This treatment must be used carefully if minoxidil is used in young children because of the risk of extensive side effects.

Oral of injected (systemic) steroids, such as prednisone, may be effective, but they do not provide long-lasting improvement.

Other treatments, currently in clinical studies, may be recommended.

Trusted Links

Clinical Information and Differential Diagnosis of Alopecia Areata

References

Bolognia, Jean L., ed. Dermatology, pp.1035-1038. New York: Mosby, 2003.

Freedberg, Irwin M., ed. Fitzpatrick’s Dermatology in General Medicine. 6th ed, pp. 641-643, 647. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2003.

90,000 Hair loss in children

It so happens that hair begins to fall out in very young children for unknown reasons. Alopecia in children or, as the common people say, baldness is rare, but the disease progresses very quickly. If you notice even a small amount of hair loss, it is better to see a doctor in time.

Alopecia in newborns and infants:

Physiological hair loss occurs in many babies shortly after birth.Zones of “defeat” – the occipital and frontal regions. This happens as a result of constant friction of the baby’s head against a pillow or stroller, because at this age the child lies for most of the day, but is already actively turning his head.

Moreover, in newborns, under the influence of hormonal changes, premature cessation of hair growth is observed. This is not a problem at all, as this does not damage the hair follicles and normal hair growth is restored during the first year of life.

It happens that a baby is born without hair, which subsequently does not grow. Firstly, such cases are very rare, and, secondly, they are combined with other developmental defects: congenital epidermolysis, folded skin and endocrine disorders. If before the age of two the treatment does not bring results, and the hair does not begin to grow, then, most likely, this defect will remain for life.

Toddlers and older children:

Some children have a habit of winding their hair around their finger and pulling it when they are thinking, nervous, or confused about something.This is just a nervous tic that doctors have endowed with the lush name of trichotillomania, and if left untreated, the child may develop bald patches. Another cause of partial baldness is neurogenic alopecia, in other words, baldness.

This is a much more serious condition in which several completely naked areas appear on the head. This condition can occur after some completely ordinary illness or after a strong emotional shock.Of course, this phenomenon looks daunting.

But it goes away within a few months and the hair grows back. Partial baldness can occur due to a fungal disease. In this case, small bald patches appear on the child’s head, on which the skin peels off, reddens and itches a little.

It also happens that hair grows poorly for hereditary reasons. Sometimes hair loss is triggered by chemotherapy for serious blood diseases and malignant conditions.Any serious illness, especially when accompanied by high fever, leads to hair loss and temporary deterioration of their structure.

Alopecia areata

With alopecia areata, baldness can occur in a matter of days, and sometimes even hours. In the evening, the child went to bed, and in the morning he woke up with lost hair. In this case, not the entire part of the head is affected, but its separate areas of a round or oval shape – “nests”. They are completely smooth and have no signs of inflammation or flaking.

Also, unlike ringworm, broken hair is not observed. By the way, you can find out if the affected area will grow. For this, the hairs located on the edge of the “nest” are pulled. If they are easily pulled out, then the area will continue to expand.

The reason for this phenomenon cannot be named with one hundred percent accuracy. The situation is complicated by the fact that there are still no tests that would accurately identify the presence of alopecia areata.But, in most cases, it is accurately diagnosed by visual examination.

To date, several reasons have been identified that are considered when making a diagnosis and deciding on treatment. One of the most common is an attack by the body’s immune system on hair follicles. In addition, it has already been proven that the disease often develops after nervous and mental trauma, as well as with dysfunction of the thyroid gland.

The most unpleasant condition of alopecia areata is alopecia totalis.In this case, the hair on the head falls out completely. An equally unpleasant form of the disease is universal, when hair falls out on all parts of the body, including eyebrows and eyelashes. These children sometimes have thinning and brittle nails.

In any case, before starting treatment for alopecia in a child, you need to fully examine him in order to find out the causes of the disease. When the doctor finds out and eliminates the symptoms of the disease, against the background of which alopecia has arisen, it will be possible to begin its treatment.

A sick child is prescribed a general strengthening course of therapy, which includes vitamins A and E, iron preparations, vitamins B1, B6 and B12. Also, the doctor may prescribe the rubbing of tinctures or, if necessary, hormonal preparations. With the correct diagnosis, treatment gives positive results.

90,000 Hair loss in children and adolescents: causes, treatment

Such a problem as untimely hair loss, of course, is most often found in adult men and it is usually associated with an excess of androgens in the body.But practice shows that talking about baldness as an exclusively male problem would be fundamentally wrong. It occurs not only among men, but also among women and even among the younger generation.

However, hair loss in children has its own characteristics, and its symptoms should, at a minimum, alert parents. And this applies not only to problems in babies, but also in adolescents.

As a rule, hair loss on the head in children and adolescents is rarely an independent disease, and most often indicates that there is another problem in a growing body, and hair loss in children is only a symptom of it.That is why it is fundamentally important to identify it as early as possible and consult a doctor who could prescribe adequate treatment.

At the same time, specialists dealing with children’s baldness distinguish several main categories of causes. In any case, it will not be superfluous for parents to familiarize themselves with this information, although it should be remembered that in no case should resort to self-medication, so as not to provoke additional health problems in your child.

We identify risk factors and deal with them with adequate methods

A number of factors that can trigger hair loss in young children are similar to those in adults, and some will be age specific.Let’s take a closer look at the main ones.

1) Diseases associated with disorders of the endocrine system , disorders in the functioning of the liver, adrenal glands or kidneys may, among other symptoms, manifest themselves in hair loss. It should be remembered that if an adult is immediately able to pay attention to changes in the state of health, then children, especially young children, even a doctor can often explain something with difficulty. Therefore, even if you do not notice, apart from hair loss in children, any changes in the child’s behavior, this is still a reason to consult a pediatrician.Especially close medical and parental attention should be in the event that the child has undergone a course of hormonal treatment.

2) Telogen Alopecia is a type of baldness that occurs especially frequently in young children. The name of this cause of hair loss in children is taken from the name of the stage of hair growth, namely the period when the hair stops growing for about three months, as if it “falls asleep”. This is the final stage of the cycle for one hair.Next comes the repetition of an identical cycle, when the new hair replaces the old one. We can talk about telogen alopecia in the event that the hair does not “wake up” in a timely manner. Sometimes, when it comes to a very small child, this process can improve on its own (but you still need to consult a doctor), but more often the condition indicates an excess of vitamin A in the baby’s body.

3) Injury to the hair shaft is a cause of hair loss in children, which may be related to the effects of chemicals on the scalp or too much mechanical pressure on the hair.Often, girls face this when their parents braid their hair too tightly or use rubber bands and hairpins that injure their hair.

4) Often the hair in children begins to thin and fall out due to neurotic disorder called trichotillomania. This disease manifests itself in the child’s desire to constantly pull and pull himself by the hair, and quite strongly. If the problem is not identified in a timely manner, it can have far-reaching consequences not only for the mental health of the baby, but also for hair growth as such.With a systematic mechanical effect on the hair, their growth can slow down and even stop altogether, especially if mini-scars appear as a result of pulling out.

5) Dermatological diseases , in particular ringworm, is another characteristic “childish” cause of hair loss in children. The clinical picture in this case is characterized by the presence of first broken off hair in the affected area, and then the formation of bald spots, on which there is inflammation, peeling and severe itching.This disease is a fungal disease, so a dermatologist should treat it.

6) Puberty is one of the most difficult periods for a child’s body, when hormonal changes in the whole body take place on the “adult track”. And this can also cause hair loss in teens. Increased emotionality often leads to stress, which is known to negatively affect hair follicles.

What treatment measures should be taken

Any treatment can only take place as directed by a doctor.And it will depend directly on the diagnosis. So, the timely detection and treatment of endocrine disorders most often leads to a positive result, since when the root cause is eliminated, the symptoms go away, and the hair begins to grow normally. The same applies to telogen alopecia.

In the same case, when it comes to mechanical damage to the hair, it is enough to weaken the braiding or even abandon it at least for a while and choose more comfortable soft elastic bands – and the problem will be solved by itself.

Ringworm involves treatment with antifungal drugs, usually no longer than eight weeks. You need to wash your hair during this period with a special therapeutic shampoo.

Trichotillomania requires an integrated approach. This is the area of ​​competence of psychologists and psychiatrists who conduct conversations with children, specialized trainings, and also conduct relaxation therapy sessions. There is no clinic for hair loss in children.As soon as the child stops pulling out the hair, hair growth will return to normal.

Deputy Chief Physician, trichologist

Kachanova Tatyana Aleksandrovna

Qualification

In 2012 she graduated from DonNMU named after Gorky with a degree in Dentistry.

Since 2007-2011, he has been attending a circle in the specialty “Surgery” on the basis of the Department of “Operative Surgery” of DonNMU.

Clinical residency in the specialty “Surgery” on the basis of the Federal State Budgetary Institution named after Burnazyan with a degree in Surgical Dentistry.

In 2018, a course of professional retraining on the basis of the Training Center for Additional Professional Education “Educational Standard” in the specialty “Organization of health care and public health”.

Applicant for the degree of candidate of medical sciences.

Certified specialist, a regular participant in international and Russian thematic professional seminars, forums, congresses on aesthetic medicine.

Hair loss in children and adolescents

Such a problem as untimely hair loss, of course, is most often found in adult men and it is usually associated with an excess of androgens in the body.But practice shows that talking about baldness as an exclusively male problem would be fundamentally wrong. It is found not only in men , but also in women and even among the younger generation.

Hair loss in children and adolescents

However, hair loss in children has its own characteristics, and its symptoms should, at a minimum, alert parents. And this applies not only to problems in babies, but also in adolescents.

As a rule, hair loss on the head in children and adolescents is rarely an independent disease, and most often indicates that there is another problem in a growing body, and hair loss in children is only a symptom of it. That is why it is fundamentally important to identify it as early as possible and consult a doctor who could prescribe adequate treatment.

At the same time, specialists dealing with children’s baldness distinguish several main categories of causes. In any case, it will not be superfluous for parents to familiarize themselves with this information, although it should be remembered that in no case should resort to self-medication, so as not to provoke additional health problems in your child.

We identify risk factors and fight them with adequate methods

A number of factors that can trigger hair loss in young children are similar to those in adults, and some will be age specific.Let’s take a closer look at the main ones.

1) Diseases associated with disorders of the endocrine system , disorders of the liver, adrenal glands or kidneys may, among other symptoms, manifest in hair loss. It should be remembered that if an adult is immediately able to pay attention to changes in the state of health, then children, especially young children, even a doctor can often explain something with difficulty. Therefore, even if you do not notice, apart from hair loss in children, any changes in the child’s behavior, this is still a reason to consult a pediatrician.Particularly close medical and parental attention should be in the event that the child has undergone a course of hormonal treatment.

2) Telogen Alopecia is a type of baldness that occurs especially frequently in young children. The name of this cause of hair loss in children is taken from the name of the stage of hair growth, namely the period when the hair stops growing for about three months, as if it “falls asleep”. This is the final stage of the cycle for one hair.Next comes the repetition of an identical cycle, when the new hair replaces the old one. We can talk about telogen alopecia in the event that the hair does not “wake up” in a timely manner. Sometimes, when it comes to a very small child, this process can improve on its own (but you still need to consult a doctor), but more often the condition indicates an excess of vitamin A in the baby’s body.

3) Injury to the hair shaft is a cause of hair loss in children, which may be related to the effects of chemicals on the scalp or too much mechanical pressure on the hair.Often, girls face this when their parents braid their hair too tightly or use rubber bands and hairpins that injure their hair.

4) Often, children’s hair begins to thin and fall out due to a neurotic disorder called trichotillomania. This disease manifests itself in the child’s desire to constantly pull and pull himself by the hair, and quite strongly. If the problem is not identified in a timely manner, it can have far-reaching consequences not only for the mental health of the baby, but also for hair growth as such.With a systematic mechanical effect on the hair, their growth can slow down and even stop altogether, especially if mini-scars appear as a result of pulling out.

5) Dermatological diseases , in particular ringworm, is another common “childish” cause of hair loss in children. The clinical picture in this case is characterized by the presence of first broken off hair in the affected area, and then the formation of bald spots, on which there is inflammation, peeling and severe itching.This disease is a fungal disease, so a dermatologist should treat it.

6) Puberty is one of the most difficult periods for a child’s body, when hormonal changes in the whole body take place on the “adult track”. And this can also cause hair loss in teens. Increased emotionality often leads to stress, which is known to negatively affect hair follicles.

What treatment should be done

Any treatment can only take place as directed by a doctor.And it will depend directly on the diagnosis. So, the timely detection and treatment of endocrine disorders most often leads to a positive result, since when the root cause is eliminated, the symptoms go away, and the hair begins to grow normally. The same applies to telogen alopecia.

In the same case, when it comes to mechanical damage to the hair, it is enough to weaken the braiding or even abandon it at least for a while and choose more comfortable soft elastic bands – and the problem will be solved by itself.

Ringworm involves treatment with antifungal drugs, usually no longer than eight weeks. You need to wash your hair during this period with a special therapeutic shampoo.

Trichotillomania requires an integrated approach. This is the area of ​​competence of psychologists and psychiatrists who conduct conversations with children, specialized trainings, and also conduct relaxation therapy sessions. There is no clinic for hair loss in children.As soon as the child stops pulling out the hair, hair growth will return to normal.

2015-12-02

Tatiana

Alexandrovna

Kachanova

Deputy Chief Physician, Trichologist

Clinic HFE

Hair transplant using HFE technology is a non-surgical medical outpatient procedure for hair restoration, when the transplantologist works with the finest micro-instruments-needles, which have no analogues in Russia.

129110

Russia

Russia

Moscow

Moscow, m. Prospekt Mira (radial) st. Schepkina d.58 p.3

+7 (800) 777-59-59

90,000 Hair loss: what tests will a trichologist ask for?

Why does hair fall out? What if care and vitamins don’t work? And what organs can be “guilty” of baldness?

When to sound the alarm

Hair loss is a natural and safe process.However, if the hair falls out in “clumps”, together with the bulb, or breaks off at the very scalp – a visit to the trichologist is no longer worth postponing.

The fact is that normally each individual hair grows for 2-7 years before entering the resting phase, which lasts only 3 months. Then the hair falls out and a new one grows from the bulb. And only about 10% of all hair on the head is in this stage.

The remaining 90% are growing well (or not). Therefore, it is not surprising that a bunch of hair in the hands after shampooing is not a variant of the norm.

Why do they fall out

Hair dryers, curling irons, improper care, hard water and the scorching sun can make hair dull, dry, split ends, but they are still not capable of provoking hair loss.

Loss of the density of the “hair” begins with the scalp, or rather with the nutrition of the bulb. And here vitamins are not the only thing that matters.

1. Vessels

It is no secret that the capillaries have a very small lumen, and in case of vasospasm, they literally “collapse”, depriving the “target” cells of nutrition.

This situation is due to the influence of stress and its main hormone (cortisol). However, with a quick solution to the problem, blood flow returns to normal.

Another thing is when stress is chronic or the level of cortisol is constantly increased due to certain diseases (adrenal glands, thyroid gland and others). And then the nutrition of the bulb is drastically depleted and the hair falls out.

By the way, the same applies to damage to the vessels themselves, both in the form of an independent pathology (vasculitis), and complications of certain diseases (diabetes mellitus, gout).

Therefore, before visiting a trichologist, it is recommended to check the level of cortisol in the blood, as well as the level of sugar.

2. Liver

Liver functions in relation to hair are relevant in context:

  • accumulation of vitamins (A, D, B12, B9) and microelements (especially iron),
  • detoxification, with a decrease in the effectiveness of which nutrition and hair growth are disturbed,
  • protein synthesis, as the main building and “repair” material,
  • metabolism of hormones capable of both stimulating and inhibiting hair growth.

Any disturbances in the work of this organ invariably affect the condition of the hair, nails and skin. Therefore, a basic liver examination + total protein and cholesterol is recommended in a comprehensive examination for hair loss.

3. Hormones

According to statistics, up to 28% of patients suffering from baldness have thyroid pathologies of an autoimmune nature. And to exclude them, a blood test is shown for free T4 and T3, TSH, antibodies to TPO and TG, which can be taken separately or in the complex “Examination of the thyroid gland.Screening “

The level of sex hormones is also important for hair density, at least estradiol and progesterone, as well as prolactin.

4. Iron deficiency states

“Banal” anemia is so often the cause of diffuse baldness that a clinical blood test (assessment of the level of hemoglobin and erythrocytes) is included in the clinical guidelines for alopecia. And, for a more accurate assessment of iron deficiency, a blood test for iron and ferritin levels is shown.

Of course, there are many more reasons for baldness, but it is these factors that are statistically more common and are included in the Russian clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of alopecia.

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90,000 Hair loss – hormonal fluctuations or stress? How to deal with hair loss and specialist help in MEDSI

Contents

Hair loss is a completely natural and natural phenomenon.So there is no reason to panic at the sight of hairs on a comb. But if you frankly began to go bald, then there is no time for thought: an urgent need to treat alopecia. But in order to cure, it is necessary to establish the cause of hair loss. And there may be several of them.

Hormonal fluctuations

Probably the most difficult case is a change in the normal hormonal background. This most often happens in women during puberty, during pregnancy, before and during menstruation, during menopause, while taking hormonal contraceptives and other drugs.There may be other reasons as well.

Regarding pregnancy, it often happens the other way around: the hair becomes thicker and more beautiful. Not least due to the increase in the level of female hormones. But at the end of pregnancy, this “effect” often disappears, and the previously lost dead hairs (which were retained in the skin thanks to estrogen) all immediately begin to leave your head. This is not baldness, soon (when all the dead hairs fall out) the process will end and everything will fall into place.

In all other cases, increased hair loss is caused by an increase in the male hormone testosterone. Often this is indicated by irregular menstruation, acne, seborrhea, galactorrhea, infertility. This situation requires correction, so you can’t do without an experienced endocrinologist.

Disturbances in the functioning of the thyroid gland can also cause baldness. Again, it is necessary to solve the problem with an endocrinologist.

Deficiency of vitamins and minerals

Only a regular intake of all the necessary substances in the body can ensure you well-being and a harmonious appearance.If vitamins and minerals are lacking, problems begin. Including hair loss.

Iron is especially important for normal hair growth. Therefore, first of all, it is necessary to regulate its level in the body.

Vitamin deficiency can be the result of chaotic malnutrition or insufficient nutrition, the consumption of poor quality foods, the result of prolonged fasting or strict unbalanced diets.

Impact of stress

The body reacts in a certain way to any stress or experience.Hair loss is one of the consequences of what has been experienced: anxiety, failure, overwork, worries, nervous breakdowns … If this is an isolated case, then soon after restoration, hair growth is improving naturally. But if depression and stress have become your companions in life, then you can hardly do without qualified treatment.

Internal medicine

Physical stress is also not displayed in the best way on the condition of the hair. Exhaustion, past illness, radiation exposure, chemotherapy.Often, hair can fall out violently due to the development of a severe allergic reaction, for example.

And many diseases can also be reflected in the condition of the hair. Among them are diabetes, anemia, chronic constipation, adrenal enlargement, cervical osteochondrosis, pneumonia, polycystic ovary disease, venereal, dermatological and other diseases.

Taking certain medications

Not only diseases can lead to hair loss, but also treatment.In addition to hormonal contraceptives, a number of other medications can affect hair growth. Many of them aggravate or provoke alopecia: always read the annotation to medications, pay attention to contraindications and side effects, consult your doctor.

Often these “bad” drugs are diuretics, antifungals, antidepressants, steroids, pills for high blood pressure and hepatitis … Of the most popular is Aspirin.

Wrong hair care

Well, let’s not forget about the most elementary – daily hair care.Remember that all chemical (curling, dyeing) and thermal (blow drying, styling with thermal devices, the same curling) procedures greatly weaken and damage the hair, as a result of which it can begin to fall out intensively.

Also, try not to overuse your hair styling products. Or choose quality products that do not harm your hair.

In addition, tight braids and tails, regular wearing of wigs and hairpieces, attaching hair in the same place, and parting hair in a permanent place can lead to hair loss.

Violation of blood circulation in blood vessels

If the blood vessels do not circulate well, the nutrition of the hair follicles is immediately disrupted. This naturally affects the growth and condition of the hair. There can be various reasons for the violation of the blood supply to the vessels. But the most common are drinking large amounts of coffee and alcohol.

Genetics

Genetic predisposition may also lie at the root of the problem. Most often, such alopecia (called androgenic) occurs after forty and is manifested by a noticeable thinning in the crown area.

The established cause of hair loss in women is half the battle. Therefore, try to find and eliminate it all the same. And our qualified specialist – a trichologist-endocrinologist will help you with this.

Hair loss after childbirth | Pampers

During pregnancy and in the postnatal period, many changes occur in a woman’s body. Hair loss is one of the manifestations of hormonal changes.

After giving birth, many women complain that their hair is falling out, but this is usually a temporary phenomenon.Pregnancy and childbirth are a big burden for the body. It will take time for it to fully recover, after which your hair will return to its previous appearance.

In this article, you will find out what causes hair loss in the postnatal period, how long it lasts, and what you can do if this happens.

What is postnatal hair loss?

A few months after giving birth, mothers often complain of hair loss.You may notice that they fall out evenly over the entire head or along the hairline on the forehead.

Of course, this may bother you, but postpartum hair loss is common. When the hormonal background gradually stabilizes, the hair will return to its normal state.

Why does hair fall out after childbirth?

Pregnancy hormones act differently on your body. For example, your hair may become thicker during pregnancy. Thanks for this is the hormone estrogen, which accelerates hair growth and slows down hair loss.But after giving birth (and sometimes after completing breastfeeding), you may find that your hair begins to fall out profusely. This is the hair that did not fall out during pregnancy.

Thus, your head of hair simply returns to its original state, although it may look like you are about to be left without hair.

By the way, because of the same hormones during pregnancy and after, you may notice that your hair has become more oily or, conversely, dry, and maybe even slightly changed its color.

When does hair fall out after childbirth?

Typically, hair begins to fall out a few months after childbirth,
after about three months.

How long does it take for hair to fall out?

Typically, hair falls out for no longer than three months, but this process can take place differently for every woman. Hair begins to grow back about six months after the baby is born. And by his first birthday, your hair may already be the way it was before pregnancy.

How to stop or prevent hair loss after childbirth

If hair loss is caused by hormonal changes during pregnancy and childbirth, it can stop by itself without any intervention.

But, you may want to partially prevent hair loss, so we have put together a few ways for you that can help you with this:

  • Eat lots of fruits and vegetables to get enough vitamins and nutrients (your doctor may recommend specific foods you need to add to your diet).

  • Wash and comb your hair with gentle strokes.

  • Avoid tight elastic bands or bobby pins so that your hair is not pulled tight.

  • Use only cold air mode for blow drying.

And most importantly, be patient and condescending to yourself. You have enough worries, and most likely the best solution is to simply wait for your hair to return to normal naturally. In the meantime, use the tricks for hair care and hairstyles.

When to see a doctor

If you are experiencing too much hair loss for more than six months, it may be time for you to see a doctor.

In some cases, the cause may be hypothyroidism, which can develop during pregnancy. Your doctor will be able to diagnose thyroid dysfunction, and he will prescribe the necessary treatment for you.

You already know very well that during pregnancy and after childbirth, many amazing (and not so) changes take place in your body.Sometimes it may seem like the period of change is endless, but soon everything will return to normal, including hair loss.

Bald nape

On the face of children, hair follicles begin to form even during intrauterine development, at about 9-12 weeks of pregnancy. Between the 16th and 20th week, they appear on other parts of the body. After the baby is born, the formation of new hair follicles stops.

Physiological hair change

Newborn babies have hairs on the scalp.Unlike the hair of adults, they are in the same phase of their life cycle. But during the first four months, or shortly before the birth of a child, rapid baldness is observed. Such a process is physiological, in which actively growing hairs pass into a state of rest, and after a while they fall out almost instantly. Studies have shown that in children with red hair, this process occurs before birth and after the birth of the child, rare vegetation is observed on the head.As for dark-skinned babies, synchronous hair loss occurs during the first months of life.

Physiological hair change is clearly visible in the occipital region, which is why parents begin to panic and try to find the cause. However, there is no need to worry, as this baldness is considered normal, in which the fluff is replaced by terminal hair. Such a process is not associated with a deficiency in the child’s body of vitamins and minerals, with the use of poor-quality water, poisoning with heavy metals or improper position of the child’s body during sleep.It is worth noting that a baby, often lying on his back, has hair loss much faster, while new ones will grow back within a few months.

There are many myths about nape baldness in young children. One of the most common is the opinion that hair loss is associated with a lack of vitamin D. Parents should be aware that children may have two completely normal physiological conditions in which baldness is observed:

  • transitory – temporary;
  • Neonatal occipital alopecia.

Previously, there was an opinion regarding the mechanical causes of the appearance of neonatal occipital alopecia. Many believed that baldness in this part of the head occurs against the background of rubbing against a pillow or mattress, since newborns spend most of the day in a horizontal position. Because of this, parents were advised to turn their babies over on their stomach or on their side during sleep. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 1992 made clear recommendations that babies should only sleep on their backs.Resting in this position is seen as an effective prevention of sudden death syndrome. In 2005, a study was conducted to determine the incidence of neonatal alopecia before and after the implementation of the AAF recommendations. Scientists have found that its frequency is slightly higher among children who prefer to sleep on their backs. It was this fact that formed the basis for the experts’ conclusion that the position of the child does not affect the course of the normal process of physiological hair change.

Stages of hair development

The number of hair follicles in each person is laid even during intrauterine development and remains unchanged throughout life. That is why many people are interested in why the hairstyle on the head becomes thicker or less often. This is due to the fact that hair goes through several stages during growth:

1. Anagenesis.

2. Catagenesis.

3.Telogenesis.

Upon reaching 16-20 weeks of intrauterine development in the fetus, vellus hairs, called lanugo, appear on the surface of the skin. From the 26th to the 28th week, they are replaced by thicker terminal hairs. The replacement speed is different for each baby. This process starts from the frontal zone and moves in waves to the back of the head. By the 32-36th week of pregnancy, the number of fine hairs on the fetus’s body is rapidly decreasing. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

In some babies, the hairs located in the back of the head do not fall out before birth, as they do not enter the telogenetic stage.They can be observed on the head of the crumbs within 8-12 weeks after birth. After this, synchronous baldness will begin in the occiput, which will give rise to a feeling of the development of a pathological process. But one fact will indicate the naturalness of the process. Hair in this place will begin to grow on its own, a few months after falling out. In the event that the parents do not find signs of growth, the child should be shown to a doctor.

90,000 Hair loss after COVID-19. What to do?

COVID-19 patients around the world face long-term consequences: new symptoms appear even several months after recovery.Hair loss is one of the most serious problems.

Scientists from Japan initiated a study involving people who have recovered from a new infection. They set a task – to find out if hair falls out after coronavirus. During the experiment, it was found that 24.1% of the respondents complained of alopecia. The problem arose 55 days after the penetration of the pathogen into the body and persisted for 76 days.

The Japanese National Center for Global Health confirmed that the pathological changes were only temporary.In most cases, patients manage to stop the hair loss process after coronavirus. After 3-4 months, dormant follicles are activated. In place of the lost hair, new ones grow – healthy and strong.

How can hair fall out after suffering COVID-19?

After the coronavirus, people are more likely to experience diffuse (gradual) hair loss rather than nest hair loss (when hair falls out in patches), although both options are quite possible.

Normally, a person drops out about 80-100 hairs a day: we see this when we comb, wash – and we treat it normally.When 200-300 or more hair begins to fall out, it is difficult not to notice in comparison with previous experience. Until all the hairs that have entered the telogen stage have fallen out, the process will continue. It is useless not to wash your hair, not to comb in order to preserve your hair. You must continue your usual way of life, while some procedures that strongly affect the scalp can be abandoned for a while – this is the frequent use of an iron, a hair dryer, braiding tight braids, going to bed with a wet head, etc.etc.

For women

Hair loss in women after COVID-19 is associated with a whole range of factors:

  • stress due to illness;
  • lack of body resources;
  • vitamin deficiency;
  • circulatory disorders in the scalp;
  • exposure to toxins produced by the virus.

Another common female problem is endocrine disorders.Against the background of a coronavirus infection, the normal functioning of the thyroid gland may be disrupted, even if such pathologies have not previously been observed. With hypofunction and excessive secretion of hormones, hair loss is possible.

For men

Men are less stressed. Their hair is more often renewed, so they do not suffer so much from a deficiency of minerals and vitamins, however, alopecia after coronavirus is also possible. The cause of the pathology is most often associated with intoxication.Due to the waste products of the pathogen, the base of the hair weakens. They do not break off, but fall out together with the root.

Another reason for hair loss after coronavirus is long-term medication. To eliminate the pathogen, doctors prescribe powerful antiviral drugs, to activate immunity – interferons, and to combat bacterial complications – antibiotics. All of them shorten the life of the hair and lead to massive hair loss.

How to stop hair loss?


For a quick recovery, you will need to establish the cause of hair loss after COVID-19.

Laboratory tests will help with this:

1. General clinical blood test. It will help to identify the level of hemoglobin and understand whether the scalp suffers from hypoxia.

2. Biochemical blood test. Particular attention is paid to determining the concentration of bilirubin. It will show whether the functions of the liver and gallbladder are impaired and how severe the intoxication is.

3. Hormonal research – determination of the level of TSH, T3, T4.The concentration of these compounds will tell you about the current state of the thyroid gland.

Trichoscopy – an instrumental examination of the scalp to assess the structure of the follicles, the state of the capillaries, the life phase of the hair – will help to diagnose the cause.

There are several ways to stop hair loss and restore healthy beauty and strength to your hair.

Traditional methods


Masks awaken dormant follicles, strengthen the root zone and improve the structure of the hair, making it shiny, soft and smooth.Most of the recipes are easy to make at home.

1. Combine three tablespoons of honey, the same amount of olive oil and one capsule of vitamin E.

2. Prepare chamomile broth. Two tablespoons of dried flowers are enough for a glass of boiling water. Pour fine oatmeal with strained hot liquid.

3. In a water bath, heat a mixture of two yolks and two tablespoons of burdock oil. Add 2-3 drops of lemon juice and a teaspoon of honey.

All masks are applied from root to tip. Hair is wrapped in plastic wrap and insulated with a towel. The mixture is washed off after 20-30 minutes. To achieve the effect, you will need to repeat the procedures every week for 2-3 months.

Power supply


COVID-19 provokes mineral deficiencies. To treat hair after coronavirus, you need to restore hair shortage. The main trace element responsible for the beauty of curls is zinc.

The diet includes:

  • beef;
  • hard cheese;
  • pumpkin seeds;
  • 90,173 eggs;

  • beans;
  • buckwheat;
  • Hercules.

Medications

Medications are selected based on the reason why hair is growing after COVID-19.

The doctor may prescribe:

  • hormonal preparations for the normal functioning of the thyroid gland;
  • vitamin complexes for general strengthening of the body;
  • Eubiotics for recovery from antibiotic treatment.


The most effective remedies for hair loss

Having studied a fairly wide range of drugs, we have compiled a rating of the best remedies for hair loss and hair growth.

Vichy Dercos Aminexil Intensive 5 ( ampoules )

Anti-hair loss complex for women

Specialists of the French brand Vichy have released a professional Dercos Aminexil Intensive for women.The formula contains 1.5% aminexil, which strengthens the follicles, herbal extracts, arginine, amino acids and vitamins.

The drug supplies nutrients to the bulbs, fights hair loss, stimulates collagen production and protects strands from aggressive environmental influences.

Advantages:

  • restores volume, elasticity and shine to curls;
  • softens and moisturizes hair, eliminating breakage;
  • “wakes up” the follicles, promotes the appearance of new hair.

Vichy Dercos Aminexil Intensive 5 ( ampoules )

Complex hair loss treatment for men


A complex treatment that works on the hair roots, scalp and hair fiber to effectively fight hair loss.

For the first time, the experts of VICHY Laboratories have established that in order to solve the problem of hair loss, it is necessary to act not only on the hair root, but also on the scalp, which can be weakened under the influence of negative external and internal factors.AMINEXIL INTENSIVE 5 is the first complex product that acts on all levels: on the hair roots, scalp and hair fiber, helping to effectively fight hair loss.

The main component is aminexil (analogue of minoxidil). This is a baldness medication with proven effectiveness, which helps in 90% of cases (with the exception of individual resistance to aminexil).

EFFECTIVENESS proved by men:

  • 91% less hair loss after shower.
  • 89% less hair loss during the day.
  • optimal portability.
  • is hypoallergenic.
  • paraben free.

Tested on sensitive scalp.

Vichy Dercos Aminexil Men Anti Hair Loss Foam


Innovation from VICHY – a triple action remedy for the fight against hair loss, thinning and thinning of hair in men in an innovative foam texture.An effective combination of active ingredients: [AMINEXIL 1.5%] combats hair loss + [NATURAL YEAST EXTRACT] stimulates hair growth and increases hair density + [BAMBOO EXTRACT] has an antioxidant effect. The lightweight foam texture ensures quick and easy application without leaving the hair feeling sticky and greasy. Foam instantly plumps and structures hair – for noticeably fuller, thicker hair. Promotes easy styling after application.Suitable for sensitive scalp. Dermatologically tested.

EFFICIENCY

  • instantly plumps hair.
  • denser hair after just one application.
  • reduces hair loss after 6 weeks.

Vichy Dercos Aminexil Toning Shampoo

Dercos Aminexil Toning Shampoo is designed to combat hair loss and thinning.The shampoo’s nourishing formula is enriched with the patented Aminexil molecule and vitamins PP, B5 and B6. The effectiveness of the product has been clinically proven:

  • Works on the scalp and hair roots, transforming the quality of the hair.
  • Hair looks stronger and denser.
  • Hair is strengthened along its entire length.

Use Dercos Aminexil Shampoo in combination with Aminexil Intensive 5 Ampoules for maximum effectiveness.

Hair loss in both men and women can be associated with both premature aging of the hair roots and increased fragility of the hair shaft. Dercos Aminexil Shampoo is specially formulated to solve the problem of hair loss caused by various factors. Amineskil works equally effectively for seasonal, stressful and deficient hair loss, that is, almost all types of telogenous alopecia.

EFFICIENCY

  • Thick and strong hair.
  • 78% of consumers said their hair was stronger.
  • 76% of consumers confirmed that hair had acquired vitality. (Consumer test, 154 people, 3 weeks).

LIBREDERM MEZOLUX shampoo strengthening roots and stimulating new hair growth


Designed for gentle cleansing of sensitive scalp and weakened, damaged, thinning hair prone to hair loss.The luxurious formula of the shampoo creates volume, delicately smoothes hair texture, making it easier to comb. A complex based on a biomimetic peptide of red clover extract strengthens hair follicles, thickens fine hair, stimulates their growth and significantly reduces hair loss. The moisturizing complex revives the strength and elasticity of the hair, restoring its shine, reliably protects it from brittleness and stretching when exposed to heat during drying and styling. A special conditioning polymer provides gentle and easy brushing.With regular use, the hair becomes thicker, healthy and well-groomed.

EFFICIENCY

  • Complex based on biomimetic peptide extract of red clover nourishes the scalp, stimulates the production of its own collagen, stops hair loss, while stimulating hair growth.
  • Moisturizing complex helps to restore damaged cuticles, significantly increasing the strength and elasticity of the hair; restores shine to hair, makes it easier to comb.
  • Conditioning polymer increases the moisture resistance factor of the hair, makes the hair manageable, and increases its resistance to frizz.

LIBREDERM FOR MEN hyaluronic shampoo for hair loss and hair growth

Hyaluronic shampoo for hair loss and hair growth “FOR MEN” is developed taking into account the characteristics of men’s hair. Gently cleanses, restores hair, stimulates hair growth.With regular use of the shampoo, the hair follicles are strengthened, the hair is filled with vitality, looks healthy and shiny. The shampoo adds volume to the hair, creating visible thickness. A sophisticated woody-spicy composition that emphasizes masculinity and individuality. Suitable for all hair types. Does not contain silicones.

EFFICIENCY

  • A high-tech complex based on arginine, Baikal skullcap extract, soybean and wheat germ activates “dormant” hair follicles, increases the phase of active growth of new hair, protecting them from hair loss.
  • Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronic Acid retains moisture inside the hair, preventing hair dryness, breakage and flaking.
  • Panthenol (provitamin B5) nourishes and strengthens hair roots, restores the structure of damaged hair, making it strong and strong.

L’Oreal Professionnel Aminexil (ampoules)


The French brand L’Oreal Professionnel has released an innovative remedy for alopecia Aminexil.The formula contains omega fatty acids and vitamins that provide the follicles with adequate nutrition and stimulate intense hair growth. The products are available in 6 ml ampoules – this is an effective product that nourishes and moisturizes hair. Hair becomes stronger, softer and shinier, easier to comb and style. Aminexil Edvanst has a delicate fruity aroma, dries quickly and is completely invisible on the hair.

Pluses:

  • improves hair structure;
  • blocks hair loss;
  • nourishes the roots;
  • moisturizes the skin;
  • is evenly distributed;
  • gives excellent results.

Regaine foam for external use 5%


Foam REGINE is the first and only medicinal product in Russia in the form of anti-hair loss foam with clinically proven efficacy. REGAIN increases blood flow to the hair follicle area, which is likely to help strengthen existing hair and stimulate new hair growth. The easy-to-use foam is quick to apply and will easily become a part of your daily routine.

EFFICIENCY

REGAIN foam contains minoxidil at a concentration of 5%:

  • Helps stop hair loss and restore hair growth;
  • The first signs of halting hair loss and hair regrowth can be seen as early as 8 weeks;
  • The drug should be applied to the scalp 2 times a day;
  • Easy to apply and dry quickly.


Spray ALERANA 2% for external use

Spray ALERANA is recommended for the treatment of intense hair loss and stimulation of hair growth. The spray acts directly on the hair roots, increases microcirculation in the scalp, restores normal nutrition to the hair follicles. Thanks to this, it stops intense hair loss and stimulates the growth of new hair.

EFFICIENCY

  • restores the normal development of hair follicles;
  • stops intense hair loss;
  • stimulates the growth of new hair;
  • increases the duration of the phase of active hair growth;
  • helps to increase hair thickness;
  • increases hair density;
  • the drug is effective in the treatment of androgenic alopecia

ALERANA vitamin and mineral complex day / night (tablets)


Aleran’s products, in addition to cosmetics, have growth vitamins in their arsenal. The preparation contains 18 active ingredients to strengthen, nourish and improve the quality of curls. Among them are B vitamins, zinc, chromium, pantothenic and folic acids, thiamine and a number of other valuable substances. The recommended course is 30 days; if necessary, the vitamin complex can be drunk up to 3 times a year.

EFFICIENCY

  • provides hair follicles with substances necessary for growth and development;
  • reduces hair loss;
  • improves the condition of the hair and scalp;
  • Promotes a healthy shine;
  • has a tonic antioxidant effect.

Pantovigar (tablets No. 90, No. 300)


Pantovigar Capsules is a drug approved by for the treatment of diffuse hair loss . It contains only the components necessary for hair growth and health, in therapeutic doses, which provides the therapeutic effect of Pantovigar in relation to the problem of hair loss and growth. contributes to the correction of disturbances in the hair growth cycle by increasing the number of hairs in the anagen (intensive growth) phase and reducing hair in the telogen (resting) phase, when the hair no longer grows, but remains on the head for some time before finally falling out …

Pantovigar
LOTION for hair restoration and growth

Treatment of hair loss from the inside, with the help of medicines, is recommended to be supplemented with external agents for proper hair and scalp care. For this, a line of specialized products from the expert brand Pantovigar has been created.

PANTOVIGAR GROWTECT FORMULA lotion for restoration and intensive growth of hair for women contains an enhanced concentration of the active AnaGain ™ complex, which targets the most important part of the hair follicle, due to which:

  • hair loss is reduced;
  • the hair growth cycle is normalized;
  • hair density increases.

Selencin (tablets No. 60)


Selencin is the first natural drug formulated specifically to treat hair loss and eliminate all possible causes of hair loss, with clinically proven efficacy. Therefore, unlike many other products that act only temporarily, Selencin will stop hair loss and increase new hair growth in just 2 months and without withdrawal syndrome!

Its healing components penetrate into the deepest layers of the scalp, which are inaccessible with the use of external agents, and help restore the structure of hair follicles and hair shaft, increase hair density, saturate hair roots with substances that contribute to the strengthening, development and growth of healthy hair.

The advantage of Selencin in comparison with the basic therapy, which includes multivitamin complexes and external agents, is a reduction in the duration of treatment by as much as 2 months!

In addition, Selencin has sebum-regulating and moisturizing effects on the scalp.

EFFICIENCY

  • Actively acting on the hair follicles from the inside, directly eliminates the causes of hair loss.
  • Stops hair loss after 2 months of use.
  • Stimulates new hair growth by 30%.
  • Increases hair quantity by 42%.
  • Restores the structure of the hair follicles and hair shaft.
  • Increases hair diameter by 40%.
  • Nourishes and strengthens hair from within, restores shine, density, healthy texture and vitality.

It is important that Selencin does not affect hormonal balance and therefore does not cause hair growth on the face and body.

Selencin Hair Therapy


Selencin “Hair Therapy” shampoo is the only shampoo that includes the French patented ingredient Anageline to effectively fight hair loss and a powerful beauty cocktail of components to restore hair beauty and health.

Therefore, Selencin shampoo has a dual function. Firstly, unlike conventional shampoos, it helps prevent hair loss and thinning, restores the structure and density of hair, strengthens and nourishes it along its entire length – from roots to ends. Secondly, it perfectly rinses and cleanses the hair and scalp, lathers well, has a pleasant texture and delicate aroma, suitable for frequent use. With Selencin shampoo, hair gets a healthy and well-groomed look, keeping it clean and fresh longer.

Shampoo provides especially gentle hair care in combination with Selencin “Hair Therapy” conditioner. From the first days of use:

  • + 25% volume using shampoo only
  • + 37% of the volume when shampoo and balm are used together
  • 3.5 times shine when combined with shampoo and balm

EFFICIENCY

  • Prevents hair loss and stimulates new hair growth.
  • Slows down the aging process of hair follicles, prolongs the life cycle of each hair.
  • Strengthens blood microcirculation in hair follicles, strengthening them and improving their nutrition.
  • Stimulates the synthesis of collagen and elastin, actively restoring the hair structure and strengthening it along its entire length.