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Insect Bite | RemedyConnect

Is this your symptom?

  • Itching, pain, or swelling from an insect bite

Some Basics…

  • There are many types of insects that can bite people.
  • In most cases, insect bites only cause a minor reaction at the bite site. These bites can be treated at home.
  • More serious reactions can happen to people who are allergic to insect bites. Serious reactions are medical emergencies.
  • Scratching at a bite only irritates the area even more. It is the saliva the insect leaves behind that makes the itchy bump. Scratching at it can make it worse. So, try not to scratch!
  • A tetanus shot is not needed after an insect bite.

Types of Insect Bites

  • Itchy Insect Bites: some insect bites cause itchy, red bumps. These include mosquitoes, chiggers (harvest mites), fleas, and bed bugs.
  • Painful Insect Bites: some insect bites cause painful red bumps or blisters. These include horseflies, black flies, deer flies, gnats, harvester ants, blister beetles, and centipedes. Within a few hours, fire ant bites can change to blisters or pimples.

What are No-See-Ums?

  • No-see-ums are tiny bugs that are about 1/10 – 1/15 of an inch (0.16 – 0.25 cm). They are so small that they can fly through normal screens. They are most active at dawn or at dusk. They are attracted to light.
  • Other names: they are also called biting midges, sand gnats, punkies, and granny nippers.
  • Where They Live: they are found near water where the sand or dirt is wet. They can live by rivers and ponds, ocean beaches and salt marshes. They are also found in puddles by fields or construction sites.
  • How They Bite: like the mosquito, only the female bites. She is actually sucking blood. She needs blood proteins to make her eggs. The males often fly to where the females are feeding in order to mate.
  • Symptoms: the bite is often painless or there may be a faint sting for just a second. Within 12 hours the bite mark becomes a small red spot. It will become extremely itchy. The spot can last 5-7 days. Some people can have a larger reaction. No-see-ums often fly in swarms. So a person can get bitten many times and have lots of itchy red spots.
  • Over-the-Counter (OTC) Treatment for Itching: hydrocortisone cream may help. Antihistamine drugs like Benadryl can help with the itching.
  • Prevention: they do not bite through clothes. Wear long sleeves and long pants, socks and shoes to prevent bites. An insect repellent made with DEET can also help. Smaller mesh for window screens can keep them out. They are not good fliers, and can’t fly in a strong wind. Fans can help blow them away.

What are Chiggers?

  • Chiggers are the larvae form of a type of mite. These are very tiny bugs that are about 1/150 of an inch (. 017 cm). They are too small to be seen.
  • Other Names: they are also called red bugs, harvest mites, or jiggers.
  • Where They Live: they are found in tall grass and brush.
  • How They Bite: a chigger can get onto the skin or clothing when a person walks past. It crawls along the person’s body looking for a spot to feed. The chigger attaches to the skin. It then begins to suck out fluids. When it is full, it drops off to the ground. Chigger bites are often found around the waist. This is because the tight waistband stops them from crawling farther.
  • Symptoms: severe itching is the most common symptom. This is often the worst 1-2 days after the bite. There may also be tiny red bumps or small hives. Itching and redness may last 1-3 weeks.
  • OTC Treatment: hydrocortisone cream may help. Antihistamine drugs help with the itching. Chiggers do not burrow under the skin. Putting nail polish onto the bites does not help.
  • Prevention: wash with soap and water after being outdoors. This can help remove chiggers that have not attached yet. Wear long pants, socks and shoes when hiking. Change clothes when you come inside. Insect repellant with DEET also seems to help prevent bites.

What are Bed Bugs?

  • Bed bugs are small, visible, blood-sucking bugs. They are about ¼ an inch (7 mm) in length.
  • Where They Live: during the day they hide in mattresses, beds, floors, and walls. At night, they come out of hiding and bite humans. Bed bugs are found worldwide.
  • Symptoms: there is no pain while the bed bug is biting. Small red bumps or large itchy wheals (2-20 cm) may later appear. Blisters can form on the bite site.
  • OTC Treatment: hydrocortisone cream and antihistamine drugs help with the itching. Watch for signs of infection.
  • Prevention: avoid hotels and hostels where bed bugs have been found. Check along corners of bedding or mattresses for these bugs. Wash linens once a week in hot water. Insect repellents such as DEET (used on the skin) and permethrin (used on clothes) do not prevent bed bug bites.

Can You Get Other Diseases from Insect Bites?

Insect bites are almost always harmless. Scratching a bite can cause a skin infection. Rarely, mosquito bites can spread viruses and parasites that cause serious diseases. A mosquito can get a virus or parasite by biting an infected person or animal. The mosquito can then pass the germ on in its saliva when it bites again. Some diseases mosquitos can spread are:

  • Dengue fever
  • Malaria
  • Viral encephalitis
  • West Nile virus
  • Yellow fever
  • Zika virus

When to Call for Insect Bite

Call 911 Now

  • Passed out (fainted)
  • Trouble waking up or acting confused
  • Trouble breathing or wheezing
  • Hoarseness, cough, or tightness in the throat or chest
  • Swollen tongue or trouble swallowing
  • Past severe allergic reaction to the same insect bite (not just hives or swelling)
  • You think you have a life-threatening emergency

Call Doctor or Seek Care Now

  • Hives or swelling all over the body
  • Severe bite pain that is not better 2 hours after pain medicine
  • Redness and sting area is tender to touch, and have a fever
  • You feel weak or very sick
  • You think you need to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Contact Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Sting site is red or very tender to touch and this started more than 24 hours after the bite
  • Sting site is red or very tender to touch and it is getting larger more than 48 hours after the bite
  • You think you need to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Contact Doctor During Office Hours

  • Scab drains pus or gets bigger and is not better after using antibiotic ointment for 2 days
  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Normal insect bite
  • Scab drains pus or gets bigger in size

Care Advice

Treatment for Insect Bites

  1. What You Should Know:
    • In most cases, insect bites only cause a minor reaction at the bite site.
    • Scratching at a bite only irritates the area even more. It is the saliva the insect leaves behind that makes the itchy bump. Scratching at it can make it worse. So, try not to scratch!
    • You can treat minor reactions at the bite site at home.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Treating Itchy Insect Bites:
    • Put calamine lotion or a baking soda paste on the bite.
    • If the itch is severe, put on 1% hydrocortisone cream. Do this 4 times a day until it is less itchy. Then switch to calamine lotion.
    • Try putting firm, sharp, steady pressure on the bite for 10 seconds. A fingernail, pen cap, or other object can be used.
  3. Antihistamine Medicine for Severe Itching:
    • You can take one of the following drugs for severe itching: diphenhydramine (Benadryl), cetirizine (Zyrtec), fexofenadine (Allegra) or loratadine (Claritin, Alavert).
    • They are over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. You can buy them at the drugstore.
    • Use the lowest amount of a drug that makes your itching feel better.
    • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) may make you feel drowsy. Loratadine, fexofenadine and cetirizine do not cause you to feel as sleepy. They are also long-acting so they last 24 hours.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package insert for all medicines you take.
  4. Warning – Antihistamine Medicines:
    • Do not drink, drive or use dangerous machinery while taking them.
    • Caution: antihistamines can make you feel sleepy.
    • Caution: do not use antihistamines if you have prostate problems.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package insert for all medicines you take.
  5. Treating Painful Insect Bites:
    • Rub the bite with a cotton ball soaked in a baking soda solution. Do this for 15 to 20 minutes. This will most often help with the pain. Do not use near the eye.
    • Another choice is to put an ice cube on the bite for 20 minutes.
  6. Pain Medicine:
    • You can take one of the following drugs if you have pain: acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve).
    • They are over-the-counter (OTC) pain drugs. You can buy them at the drugstore.
    • Use the lowest amount of a drug that makes your pain feel better.
    • Acetaminophen is safer than ibuprofen or naproxen in people over 65 years old.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package insert for all medicines you take.
  7. What to Expect:
    • Most insect bites itch or hurt for 1-2 days.
    • The swelling may last a week.
  8. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Severe pain lasts more than 2 hours after pain medicine
    • Infected scab is not better after 48 hours of antibiotic ointment
    • Bite looks infected (redness, red streaks, or is tender to touch)
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

Infected Sore or Scab

  1. What You Should Know:
    • Sometimes an insect bite can get infected a couple days after the bite. An infection does not start in the first 1-2 days.
    • Signs of an infection are redness, tenderness to touch, and a scab that does not go away. An infected sore is often covered by a soft, ‘honey-yellow,’ or yellow-brown crust or scab. Sometimes the scab may drain a tiny amount pus or yellow fluid. If there is pain, it is mild.
    • These sores should get better with daily cleaning and antibiotic ointment.
    • You can treat a minor infection of an insect bite at home.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Cleaning:
    • Wash the bite 2 to 3 times daily with antibacterial soap and warm water.
    • Gently remove any scab. The bacteria live under the scab. You may need to soak the scab off. Do this by placing a warm wet washcloth on the sore for 10 minutes. You can also use gauze.
  3. Antibiotic Ointment:
    • Put an antibiotic ointment on the sore 3 times per day.
    • Cover the sore with an adhesive bandage (Band-Aid) to avoid scratching and spreading.
    • Use Bacitracin ointment (OTC in the United States) or Polysporin ointment (OTC in Canada). You can also use one that you have.
  4. Avoid Picking: Avoid scratching and picking. This can worsen and spread a skin infection.

  5. How It Is Spread:
    • Infected sores can be spread by skin to skin contact.
    • Wash your hands often and avoid touching the sore.
    • Work and School: You can go if the sore is covered.
    • Sports: You need to get antibiotic treatment for 3 days before you can play. There can be no pus or drainage. You should check with your trainer, if there is one for your sports team.
  6. What to Expect:
    • The sore should stop growing in 1-2 days. It should start to get better within 2 to 3 days.
    • The sore should be healed in 7-10 days.
  7. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Have a fever
    • Spreading redness or a red streak
    • Sore gets bigger
    • Sore is not better after using antibiotic ointment for 2 days
    • Sore is not healed in 7 days (1 week)
    • New sore appears
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

Preventing Insect Bites

  1. Prevention:
    • Wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts.
    • Avoid being outside when the insect is most active. Many insects that cause itchy bites are most active at sunrise or sunset. These include Chiggers, No-See-Ums, and Mosquitoes.
    • Insect repellents with DEET in them work well to prevent many itchy insect bites.
  2. DEET:
    • DEET is a very strong insect repellent. It also repels ticks.
    • Higher strength DEET works better. All DEET over 50% works the same. For children and teens, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a maximum strength of 30%. Health Canada recommends using a strength of 5-30% for adults.
    • Spray on exposed areas of skin. Do not put near your eyes, mouth or any irritated skin. Do not put it on skin that is covered by clothing.
    • Always wash it off with soap and water when you return indoors.
    • DEET can damage clothing made of synthetic fibers, plastics, and leather.
    • Women that are breastfeeding and pregnant may use DEET. No problems have been found.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package inserts of all medicines you take.
  3. Picaridin (KBR 3023):
    • Research shows that it works just as well as DEET.
    • It has been used in other countries for years.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package inserts of all medicines you take.
  4. Permethrin – An Insect Repellent for your Clothing and Gear:
    • Products with permethrin in them are very strong mosquito repellents. These include Duranon, Permanone, and Congo Creek Tick Spray. They also repel ticks. You put permethrin on your clothing instead of your skin.
    • Spray it on your clothes before you put them on. You can also put it on other outdoor items (shoes, mosquito screen, sleeping bags).
    • It continues to work even after your clothes are washed several times.
    • Do not put this type of repellent on your skin.
    • Read and follow the package directions carefully.
  5. Call Your Doctor If:
    • You have more questions
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

West Nile Virus Information

  1. Symptoms of WNV:
    • No clinical symptoms: 80% of WNV cases.
    • Mild febrile illness: 20% of WNV cases. Symptoms include fever, headache, body aches, and sometimes a skin rash. These last 3-6 days and go away without any treatment. This is also called WNV fever.
    • Encephalitis or viral meningitis: 0.7% of WNV cases. Symptoms are high fever, stiff neck, confusion, coma, convulsions, muscle weakness, or paralysis. The muscle weakness is often on one side of your body. These symptoms are easy to see.
    • Fatal: 10% of those who are hospitalized will die.
    • Pediatric cases are most often mild. Most encephalitis and deaths happen to people over age 60.
  2. Diagnosis of WNV:
    • Mild cases do not need to be diagnosed.
    • Severe cases (with encephalitis and viral meningitis) will be hospitalized based on their symptoms. The disease is diagnosed by tests on the blood and spinal fluid. These tests are not used for the normal mild infections seen with this virus.
  3. Treatment of WNV:
    • No special treatment is needed after a mosquito bite.
    • There is no anti-viral agent for WNV.
    • WNV patients in the hospital are given IV fluids, airway control, and care.
    • There is no vaccine that can prevent WNV in humans.
  4. How WNV Is Spread:
    • The West Nile virus is spread by the bite of a mosquito. The virus comes from infected birds.
    • Even in an area with WNV, less than 1% of mosquitoes carry it.
    • The virus is spread from mosquito-to-human.
    • You cannot spread WNV to other people. It is not spread by kissing, touching, sex, or sharing glassware.
    • Mothers with mosquito bites can keep breastfeeding.
    • Symptoms will show 3-14 days after the mosquito bite.
  5. Call Your Doctor If:
    • You have more questions
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

And remember, contact your doctor if you develop any of the ‘Call Your Doctor’ symptoms.

Disclaimer: this health information is for educational purposes only. You, the reader, assume full responsibility for how you choose to use it.

Last Reviewed: 11/19/2021 1:00:47 AM
Last Updated: 10/21/2021 1:00:46 AM

Copyright 2021 Amazon.com, Inc., or its affiliates.

Insect Bite | Grayson Pediatrics

Is this your symptom?

  • Itching, pain, or swelling from an insect bite

Some Basics…

  • There are many types of insects that can bite people.
  • In most cases, insect bites only cause a minor reaction at the bite site. These bites can be treated at home.
  • More serious reactions can happen to people who are allergic to insect bites. Serious reactions are medical emergencies.
  • Scratching at a bite only irritates the area even more. It is the saliva the insect leaves behind that makes the itchy bump. Scratching at it can make it worse. So, try not to scratch!
  • A tetanus shot is not needed after an insect bite.

Types of Insect Bites

  • Itchy Insect Bites: some insect bites cause itchy, red bumps. These include mosquitoes, chiggers (harvest mites), fleas, and bed bugs.
  • Painful Insect Bites: some insect bites cause painful red bumps or blisters. These include horseflies, black flies, deer flies, gnats, harvester ants, blister beetles, and centipedes. Within a few hours, fire ant bites can change to blisters or pimples.

What are No-See-Ums?

  • No-see-ums are tiny bugs that are about 1/10 – 1/15 of an inch (0. 16 – 0.25 cm). They are so small that they can fly through normal screens. They are most active at dawn or at dusk. They are attracted to light.
  • Other names: they are also called biting midges, sand gnats, punkies, and granny nippers.
  • Where They Live: they are found near water where the sand or dirt is wet. They can live by rivers and ponds, ocean beaches and salt marshes. They are also found in puddles by fields or construction sites.
  • How They Bite: like the mosquito, only the female bites. She is actually sucking blood. She needs blood proteins to make her eggs. The males often fly to where the females are feeding in order to mate.
  • Symptoms: the bite is often painless or there may be a faint sting for just a second. Within 12 hours the bite mark becomes a small red spot. It will become extremely itchy. The spot can last 5-7 days. Some people can have a larger reaction. No-see-ums often fly in swarms. So a person can get bitten many times and have lots of itchy red spots.
  • Over-the-Counter (OTC) Treatment for Itching: hydrocortisone cream may help. Antihistamine drugs like Benadryl can help with the itching.
  • Prevention: they do not bite through clothes. Wear long sleeves and long pants, socks and shoes to prevent bites. An insect repellent made with DEET can also help. Smaller mesh for window screens can keep them out. They are not good fliers, and can’t fly in a strong wind. Fans can help blow them away.

What are Chiggers?

  • Chiggers are the larvae form of a type of mite. These are very tiny bugs that are about 1/150 of an inch (.017 cm). They are too small to be seen.
  • Other Names: they are also called red bugs, harvest mites, or jiggers.
  • Where They Live: they are found in tall grass and brush.
  • How They Bite: a chigger can get onto the skin or clothing when a person walks past. It crawls along the person’s body looking for a spot to feed. The chigger attaches to the skin. It then begins to suck out fluids. When it is full, it drops off to the ground. Chigger bites are often found around the waist. This is because the tight waistband stops them from crawling farther.
  • Symptoms: severe itching is the most common symptom. This is often the worst 1-2 days after the bite. There may also be tiny red bumps or small hives. Itching and redness may last 1-3 weeks.
  • OTC Treatment: hydrocortisone cream may help. Antihistamine drugs help with the itching. Chiggers do not burrow under the skin. Putting nail polish onto the bites does not help.
  • Prevention: wash with soap and water after being outdoors. This can help remove chiggers that have not attached yet. Wear long pants, socks and shoes when hiking. Change clothes when you come inside. Insect repellant with DEET also seems to help prevent bites.

What are Bed Bugs?

  • Bed bugs are small, visible, blood-sucking bugs. They are about ¼ an inch (7 mm) in length.
  • Where They Live: during the day they hide in mattresses, beds, floors, and walls. At night, they come out of hiding and bite humans. Bed bugs are found worldwide.
  • Symptoms: there is no pain while the bed bug is biting. Small red bumps or large itchy wheals (2-20 cm) may later appear. Blisters can form on the bite site.
  • OTC Treatment: hydrocortisone cream and antihistamine drugs help with the itching. Watch for signs of infection.
  • Prevention: avoid hotels and hostels where bed bugs have been found. Check along corners of bedding or mattresses for these bugs. Wash linens once a week in hot water. Insect repellents such as DEET (used on the skin) and permethrin (used on clothes) do not prevent bed bug bites.

Can You Get Other Diseases from Insect Bites?

Insect bites are almost always harmless. Scratching a bite can cause a skin infection. Rarely, mosquito bites can spread viruses and parasites that cause serious diseases. A mosquito can get a virus or parasite by biting an infected person or animal. The mosquito can then pass the germ on in its saliva when it bites again. Some diseases mosquitos can spread are:

  • Dengue fever
  • Malaria
  • Viral encephalitis
  • West Nile virus
  • Yellow fever
  • Zika virus

When to Call for Insect Bite

Call 911 Now

  • Passed out (fainted)
  • Trouble waking up or acting confused
  • Trouble breathing or wheezing
  • Hoarseness, cough, or tightness in the throat or chest
  • Swollen tongue or trouble swallowing
  • Past severe allergic reaction to the same insect bite (not just hives or swelling)
  • You think you have a life-threatening emergency

Call Doctor or Seek Care Now

  • Hives or swelling all over the body
  • Severe bite pain that is not better 2 hours after pain medicine
  • Redness and sting area is tender to touch, and have a fever
  • You feel weak or very sick
  • You think you need to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Contact Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Sting site is red or very tender to touch and this started more than 24 hours after the bite
  • Sting site is red or very tender to touch and it is getting larger more than 48 hours after the bite
  • You think you need to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Contact Doctor During Office Hours

  • Scab drains pus or gets bigger and is not better after using antibiotic ointment for 2 days
  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Normal insect bite
  • Scab drains pus or gets bigger in size

Care Advice

Treatment for Insect Bites

  1. What You Should Know:
    • In most cases, insect bites only cause a minor reaction at the bite site.
    • Scratching at a bite only irritates the area even more. It is the saliva the insect leaves behind that makes the itchy bump. Scratching at it can make it worse. So, try not to scratch!
    • You can treat minor reactions at the bite site at home.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Treating Itchy Insect Bites:
    • Put calamine lotion or a baking soda paste on the bite.
    • If the itch is severe, put on 1% hydrocortisone cream. Do this 4 times a day until it is less itchy. Then switch to calamine lotion.
    • Try putting firm, sharp, steady pressure on the bite for 10 seconds. A fingernail, pen cap, or other object can be used.
  3. Antihistamine Medicine for Severe Itching:
    • You can take one of the following drugs for severe itching: diphenhydramine (Benadryl), cetirizine (Zyrtec), fexofenadine (Allegra) or loratadine (Claritin, Alavert).
    • They are over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. You can buy them at the drugstore.
    • Use the lowest amount of a drug that makes your itching feel better.
    • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) may make you feel drowsy. Loratadine, fexofenadine and cetirizine do not cause you to feel as sleepy. They are also long-acting so they last 24 hours.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package insert for all medicines you take.
  4. Warning – Antihistamine Medicines:
    • Do not drink, drive or use dangerous machinery while taking them.
    • Caution: antihistamines can make you feel sleepy.
    • Caution: do not use antihistamines if you have prostate problems.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package insert for all medicines you take.
  5. Treating Painful Insect Bites:
    • Rub the bite with a cotton ball soaked in a baking soda solution. Do this for 15 to 20 minutes. This will most often help with the pain. Do not use near the eye.
    • Another choice is to put an ice cube on the bite for 20 minutes.
  6. Pain Medicine:
    • You can take one of the following drugs if you have pain: acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve).
    • They are over-the-counter (OTC) pain drugs. You can buy them at the drugstore.
    • Use the lowest amount of a drug that makes your pain feel better.
    • Acetaminophen is safer than ibuprofen or naproxen in people over 65 years old.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package insert for all medicines you take.
  7. What to Expect:
    • Most insect bites itch or hurt for 1-2 days.
    • The swelling may last a week.
  8. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Severe pain lasts more than 2 hours after pain medicine
    • Infected scab is not better after 48 hours of antibiotic ointment
    • Bite looks infected (redness, red streaks, or is tender to touch)
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

Infected Sore or Scab

  1. What You Should Know:
    • Sometimes an insect bite can get infected a couple days after the bite. An infection does not start in the first 1-2 days.
    • Signs of an infection are redness, tenderness to touch, and a scab that does not go away. An infected sore is often covered by a soft, ‘honey-yellow,’ or yellow-brown crust or scab. Sometimes the scab may drain a tiny amount pus or yellow fluid. If there is pain, it is mild.
    • These sores should get better with daily cleaning and antibiotic ointment.
    • You can treat a minor infection of an insect bite at home.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Cleaning:
    • Wash the bite 2 to 3 times daily with antibacterial soap and warm water.
    • Gently remove any scab. The bacteria live under the scab. You may need to soak the scab off. Do this by placing a warm wet washcloth on the sore for 10 minutes. You can also use gauze.
  3. Antibiotic Ointment:
    • Put an antibiotic ointment on the sore 3 times per day.
    • Cover the sore with an adhesive bandage (Band-Aid) to avoid scratching and spreading.
    • Use Bacitracin ointment (OTC in the United States) or Polysporin ointment (OTC in Canada). You can also use one that you have.
  4. Avoid Picking: Avoid scratching and picking. This can worsen and spread a skin infection.

  5. How It Is Spread:
    • Infected sores can be spread by skin to skin contact.
    • Wash your hands often and avoid touching the sore.
    • Work and School: You can go if the sore is covered.
    • Sports: You need to get antibiotic treatment for 3 days before you can play. There can be no pus or drainage. You should check with your trainer, if there is one for your sports team.
  6. What to Expect:
    • The sore should stop growing in 1-2 days. It should start to get better within 2 to 3 days.
    • The sore should be healed in 7-10 days.
  7. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Have a fever
    • Spreading redness or a red streak
    • Sore gets bigger
    • Sore is not better after using antibiotic ointment for 2 days
    • Sore is not healed in 7 days (1 week)
    • New sore appears
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

Preventing Insect Bites

  1. Prevention:
    • Wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts.
    • Avoid being outside when the insect is most active. Many insects that cause itchy bites are most active at sunrise or sunset. These include Chiggers, No-See-Ums, and Mosquitoes.
    • Insect repellents with DEET in them work well to prevent many itchy insect bites.
  2. DEET:
    • DEET is a very strong insect repellent. It also repels ticks.
    • Higher strength DEET works better. All DEET over 50% works the same. For children and teens, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a maximum strength of 30%. Health Canada recommends using a strength of 5-30% for adults.
    • Spray on exposed areas of skin. Do not put near your eyes, mouth or any irritated skin. Do not put it on skin that is covered by clothing.
    • Always wash it off with soap and water when you return indoors.
    • DEET can damage clothing made of synthetic fibers, plastics, and leather.
    • Women that are breastfeeding and pregnant may use DEET. No problems have been found.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package inserts of all medicines you take.
  3. Picaridin (KBR 3023):
    • Research shows that it works just as well as DEET.
    • It has been used in other countries for years.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package inserts of all medicines you take.
  4. Permethrin – An Insect Repellent for your Clothing and Gear:
    • Products with permethrin in them are very strong mosquito repellents. These include Duranon, Permanone, and Congo Creek Tick Spray. They also repel ticks. You put permethrin on your clothing instead of your skin.
    • Spray it on your clothes before you put them on. You can also put it on other outdoor items (shoes, mosquito screen, sleeping bags).
    • It continues to work even after your clothes are washed several times.
    • Do not put this type of repellent on your skin.
    • Read and follow the package directions carefully.
  5. Call Your Doctor If:
    • You have more questions
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

West Nile Virus Information

  1. Symptoms of WNV:
    • No clinical symptoms: 80% of WNV cases.
    • Mild febrile illness: 20% of WNV cases. Symptoms include fever, headache, body aches, and sometimes a skin rash. These last 3-6 days and go away without any treatment. This is also called WNV fever.
    • Encephalitis or viral meningitis: 0.7% of WNV cases. Symptoms are high fever, stiff neck, confusion, coma, convulsions, muscle weakness, or paralysis. The muscle weakness is often on one side of your body. These symptoms are easy to see.
    • Fatal: 10% of those who are hospitalized will die.
    • Pediatric cases are most often mild. Most encephalitis and deaths happen to people over age 60.
  2. Diagnosis of WNV:
    • Mild cases do not need to be diagnosed.
    • Severe cases (with encephalitis and viral meningitis) will be hospitalized based on their symptoms. The disease is diagnosed by tests on the blood and spinal fluid. These tests are not used for the normal mild infections seen with this virus.
  3. Treatment of WNV:
    • No special treatment is needed after a mosquito bite.
    • There is no anti-viral agent for WNV.
    • WNV patients in the hospital are given IV fluids, airway control, and care.
    • There is no vaccine that can prevent WNV in humans.
  4. How WNV Is Spread:
    • The West Nile virus is spread by the bite of a mosquito. The virus comes from infected birds.
    • Even in an area with WNV, less than 1% of mosquitoes carry it.
    • The virus is spread from mosquito-to-human.
    • You cannot spread WNV to other people. It is not spread by kissing, touching, sex, or sharing glassware.
    • Mothers with mosquito bites can keep breastfeeding.
    • Symptoms will show 3-14 days after the mosquito bite.
  5. Call Your Doctor If:
    • You have more questions
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

And remember, contact your doctor if you develop any of the ‘Call Your Doctor’ symptoms.

Disclaimer: this health information is for educational purposes only. You, the reader, assume full responsibility for how you choose to use it.

Last Reviewed: 11/19/2021 1:00:47 AM
Last Updated: 10/21/2021 1:00:46 AM

Copyright 2021 Amazon.com, Inc., or its affiliates.

Insect Bite | La Plata Pediatrics & Family Health

Is this your symptom?

  • Itching, pain, or swelling from an insect bite

Some Basics…

  • There are many types of insects that can bite people.
  • In most cases, insect bites only cause a minor reaction at the bite site. These bites can be treated at home.
  • More serious reactions can happen to people who are allergic to insect bites. Serious reactions are medical emergencies.
  • Scratching at a bite only irritates the area even more. It is the saliva the insect leaves behind that makes the itchy bump. Scratching at it can make it worse. So, try not to scratch!
  • A tetanus shot is not needed after an insect bite.

Types of Insect Bites

  • Itchy Insect Bites: some insect bites cause itchy, red bumps. These include mosquitoes, chiggers (harvest mites), fleas, and bed bugs.
  • Painful Insect Bites: some insect bites cause painful red bumps or blisters. These include horseflies, black flies, deer flies, gnats, harvester ants, blister beetles, and centipedes. Within a few hours, fire ant bites can change to blisters or pimples.

What are No-See-Ums?

  • No-see-ums are tiny bugs that are about 1/10 – 1/15 of an inch (0. 16 – 0.25 cm). They are so small that they can fly through normal screens. They are most active at dawn or at dusk. They are attracted to light.
  • Other names: they are also called biting midges, sand gnats, punkies, and granny nippers.
  • Where They Live: they are found near water where the sand or dirt is wet. They can live by rivers and ponds, ocean beaches and salt marshes. They are also found in puddles by fields or construction sites.
  • How They Bite: like the mosquito, only the female bites. She is actually sucking blood. She needs blood proteins to make her eggs. The males often fly to where the females are feeding in order to mate.
  • Symptoms: the bite is often painless or there may be a faint sting for just a second. Within 12 hours the bite mark becomes a small red spot. It will become extremely itchy. The spot can last 5-7 days. Some people can have a larger reaction. No-see-ums often fly in swarms. So a person can get bitten many times and have lots of itchy red spots.
  • Over-the-Counter (OTC) Treatment for Itching: hydrocortisone cream may help. Antihistamine drugs like Benadryl can help with the itching.
  • Prevention: they do not bite through clothes. Wear long sleeves and long pants, socks and shoes to prevent bites. An insect repellent made with DEET can also help. Smaller mesh for window screens can keep them out. They are not good fliers, and can’t fly in a strong wind. Fans can help blow them away.

What are Chiggers?

  • Chiggers are the larvae form of a type of mite. These are very tiny bugs that are about 1/150 of an inch (.017 cm). They are too small to be seen.
  • Other Names: they are also called red bugs, harvest mites, or jiggers.
  • Where They Live: they are found in tall grass and brush.
  • How They Bite: a chigger can get onto the skin or clothing when a person walks past. It crawls along the person’s body looking for a spot to feed. The chigger attaches to the skin. It then begins to suck out fluids. When it is full, it drops off to the ground. Chigger bites are often found around the waist. This is because the tight waistband stops them from crawling farther.
  • Symptoms: severe itching is the most common symptom. This is often the worst 1-2 days after the bite. There may also be tiny red bumps or small hives. Itching and redness may last 1-3 weeks.
  • OTC Treatment: hydrocortisone cream may help. Antihistamine drugs help with the itching. Chiggers do not burrow under the skin. Putting nail polish onto the bites does not help.
  • Prevention: wash with soap and water after being outdoors. This can help remove chiggers that have not attached yet. Wear long pants, socks and shoes when hiking. Change clothes when you come inside. Insect repellant with DEET also seems to help prevent bites.

What are Bed Bugs?

  • Bed bugs are small, visible, blood-sucking bugs. They are about ¼ an inch (7 mm) in length.
  • Where They Live: during the day they hide in mattresses, beds, floors, and walls. At night, they come out of hiding and bite humans. Bed bugs are found worldwide.
  • Symptoms: there is no pain while the bed bug is biting. Small red bumps or large itchy wheals (2-20 cm) may later appear. Blisters can form on the bite site.
  • OTC Treatment: hydrocortisone cream and antihistamine drugs help with the itching. Watch for signs of infection.
  • Prevention: avoid hotels and hostels where bed bugs have been found. Check along corners of bedding or mattresses for these bugs. Wash linens once a week in hot water. Insect repellents such as DEET (used on the skin) and permethrin (used on clothes) do not prevent bed bug bites.

Can You Get Other Diseases from Insect Bites?

Insect bites are almost always harmless. Scratching a bite can cause a skin infection. Rarely, mosquito bites can spread viruses and parasites that cause serious diseases. A mosquito can get a virus or parasite by biting an infected person or animal. The mosquito can then pass the germ on in its saliva when it bites again. Some diseases mosquitos can spread are:

  • Dengue fever
  • Malaria
  • Viral encephalitis
  • West Nile virus
  • Yellow fever
  • Zika virus

When to Call for Insect Bite

Call 911 Now

  • Passed out (fainted)
  • Trouble waking up or acting confused
  • Trouble breathing or wheezing
  • Hoarseness, cough, or tightness in the throat or chest
  • Swollen tongue or trouble swallowing
  • Past severe allergic reaction to the same insect bite (not just hives or swelling)
  • You think you have a life-threatening emergency

Call Doctor or Seek Care Now

  • Hives or swelling all over the body
  • Severe bite pain that is not better 2 hours after pain medicine
  • Redness and sting area is tender to touch, and have a fever
  • You feel weak or very sick
  • You think you need to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Contact Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Sting site is red or very tender to touch and this started more than 24 hours after the bite
  • Sting site is red or very tender to touch and it is getting larger more than 48 hours after the bite
  • You think you need to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Contact Doctor During Office Hours

  • Scab drains pus or gets bigger and is not better after using antibiotic ointment for 2 days
  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Normal insect bite
  • Scab drains pus or gets bigger in size

Care Advice

Treatment for Insect Bites

  1. What You Should Know:
    • In most cases, insect bites only cause a minor reaction at the bite site.
    • Scratching at a bite only irritates the area even more. It is the saliva the insect leaves behind that makes the itchy bump. Scratching at it can make it worse. So, try not to scratch!
    • You can treat minor reactions at the bite site at home.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Treating Itchy Insect Bites:
    • Put calamine lotion or a baking soda paste on the bite.
    • If the itch is severe, put on 1% hydrocortisone cream. Do this 4 times a day until it is less itchy. Then switch to calamine lotion.
    • Try putting firm, sharp, steady pressure on the bite for 10 seconds. A fingernail, pen cap, or other object can be used.
  3. Antihistamine Medicine for Severe Itching:
    • You can take one of the following drugs for severe itching: diphenhydramine (Benadryl), cetirizine (Zyrtec), fexofenadine (Allegra) or loratadine (Claritin, Alavert).
    • They are over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. You can buy them at the drugstore.
    • Use the lowest amount of a drug that makes your itching feel better.
    • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) may make you feel drowsy. Loratadine, fexofenadine and cetirizine do not cause you to feel as sleepy. They are also long-acting so they last 24 hours.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package insert for all medicines you take.
  4. Warning – Antihistamine Medicines:
    • Do not drink, drive or use dangerous machinery while taking them.
    • Caution: antihistamines can make you feel sleepy.
    • Caution: do not use antihistamines if you have prostate problems.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package insert for all medicines you take.
  5. Treating Painful Insect Bites:
    • Rub the bite with a cotton ball soaked in a baking soda solution. Do this for 15 to 20 minutes. This will most often help with the pain. Do not use near the eye.
    • Another choice is to put an ice cube on the bite for 20 minutes.
  6. Pain Medicine:
    • You can take one of the following drugs if you have pain: acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve).
    • They are over-the-counter (OTC) pain drugs. You can buy them at the drugstore.
    • Use the lowest amount of a drug that makes your pain feel better.
    • Acetaminophen is safer than ibuprofen or naproxen in people over 65 years old.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package insert for all medicines you take.
  7. What to Expect:
    • Most insect bites itch or hurt for 1-2 days.
    • The swelling may last a week.
  8. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Severe pain lasts more than 2 hours after pain medicine
    • Infected scab is not better after 48 hours of antibiotic ointment
    • Bite looks infected (redness, red streaks, or is tender to touch)
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

Infected Sore or Scab

  1. What You Should Know:
    • Sometimes an insect bite can get infected a couple days after the bite. An infection does not start in the first 1-2 days.
    • Signs of an infection are redness, tenderness to touch, and a scab that does not go away. An infected sore is often covered by a soft, ‘honey-yellow,’ or yellow-brown crust or scab. Sometimes the scab may drain a tiny amount pus or yellow fluid. If there is pain, it is mild.
    • These sores should get better with daily cleaning and antibiotic ointment.
    • You can treat a minor infection of an insect bite at home.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Cleaning:
    • Wash the bite 2 to 3 times daily with antibacterial soap and warm water.
    • Gently remove any scab. The bacteria live under the scab. You may need to soak the scab off. Do this by placing a warm wet washcloth on the sore for 10 minutes. You can also use gauze.
  3. Antibiotic Ointment:
    • Put an antibiotic ointment on the sore 3 times per day.
    • Cover the sore with an adhesive bandage (Band-Aid) to avoid scratching and spreading.
    • Use Bacitracin ointment (OTC in the United States) or Polysporin ointment (OTC in Canada). You can also use one that you have.
  4. Avoid Picking: Avoid scratching and picking. This can worsen and spread a skin infection.

  5. How It Is Spread:
    • Infected sores can be spread by skin to skin contact.
    • Wash your hands often and avoid touching the sore.
    • Work and School: You can go if the sore is covered.
    • Sports: You need to get antibiotic treatment for 3 days before you can play. There can be no pus or drainage. You should check with your trainer, if there is one for your sports team.
  6. What to Expect:
    • The sore should stop growing in 1-2 days. It should start to get better within 2 to 3 days.
    • The sore should be healed in 7-10 days.
  7. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Have a fever
    • Spreading redness or a red streak
    • Sore gets bigger
    • Sore is not better after using antibiotic ointment for 2 days
    • Sore is not healed in 7 days (1 week)
    • New sore appears
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

Preventing Insect Bites

  1. Prevention:
    • Wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts.
    • Avoid being outside when the insect is most active. Many insects that cause itchy bites are most active at sunrise or sunset. These include Chiggers, No-See-Ums, and Mosquitoes.
    • Insect repellents with DEET in them work well to prevent many itchy insect bites.
  2. DEET:
    • DEET is a very strong insect repellent. It also repels ticks.
    • Higher strength DEET works better. All DEET over 50% works the same. For children and teens, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a maximum strength of 30%. Health Canada recommends using a strength of 5-30% for adults.
    • Spray on exposed areas of skin. Do not put near your eyes, mouth or any irritated skin. Do not put it on skin that is covered by clothing.
    • Always wash it off with soap and water when you return indoors.
    • DEET can damage clothing made of synthetic fibers, plastics, and leather.
    • Women that are breastfeeding and pregnant may use DEET. No problems have been found.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package inserts of all medicines you take.
  3. Picaridin (KBR 3023):
    • Research shows that it works just as well as DEET.
    • It has been used in other countries for years.
    • Read the instructions and warnings on the package inserts of all medicines you take.
  4. Permethrin – An Insect Repellent for your Clothing and Gear:
    • Products with permethrin in them are very strong mosquito repellents. These include Duranon, Permanone, and Congo Creek Tick Spray. They also repel ticks. You put permethrin on your clothing instead of your skin.
    • Spray it on your clothes before you put them on. You can also put it on other outdoor items (shoes, mosquito screen, sleeping bags).
    • It continues to work even after your clothes are washed several times.
    • Do not put this type of repellent on your skin.
    • Read and follow the package directions carefully.
  5. Call Your Doctor If:
    • You have more questions
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

West Nile Virus Information

  1. Symptoms of WNV:
    • No clinical symptoms: 80% of WNV cases.
    • Mild febrile illness: 20% of WNV cases. Symptoms include fever, headache, body aches, and sometimes a skin rash. These last 3-6 days and go away without any treatment. This is also called WNV fever.
    • Encephalitis or viral meningitis: 0.7% of WNV cases. Symptoms are high fever, stiff neck, confusion, coma, convulsions, muscle weakness, or paralysis. The muscle weakness is often on one side of your body. These symptoms are easy to see.
    • Fatal: 10% of those who are hospitalized will die.
    • Pediatric cases are most often mild. Most encephalitis and deaths happen to people over age 60.
  2. Diagnosis of WNV:
    • Mild cases do not need to be diagnosed.
    • Severe cases (with encephalitis and viral meningitis) will be hospitalized based on their symptoms. The disease is diagnosed by tests on the blood and spinal fluid. These tests are not used for the normal mild infections seen with this virus.
  3. Treatment of WNV:
    • No special treatment is needed after a mosquito bite.
    • There is no anti-viral agent for WNV.
    • WNV patients in the hospital are given IV fluids, airway control, and care.
    • There is no vaccine that can prevent WNV in humans.
  4. How WNV Is Spread:
    • The West Nile virus is spread by the bite of a mosquito. The virus comes from infected birds.
    • Even in an area with WNV, less than 1% of mosquitoes carry it.
    • The virus is spread from mosquito-to-human.
    • You cannot spread WNV to other people. It is not spread by kissing, touching, sex, or sharing glassware.
    • Mothers with mosquito bites can keep breastfeeding.
    • Symptoms will show 3-14 days after the mosquito bite.
  5. Call Your Doctor If:
    • You have more questions
    • You think you need to be seen
    • You get worse

And remember, contact your doctor if you develop any of the ‘Call Your Doctor’ symptoms.

Disclaimer: this health information is for educational purposes only. You, the reader, assume full responsibility for how you choose to use it.

Last Reviewed: 11/19/2021 1:00:47 AM
Last Updated: 10/21/2021 1:00:46 AM

Copyright 2021 Amazon.com, Inc., or its affiliates.

Insect Bites and Stings and Spider Bites

Have you been bitten or stung by an insect or spider?

Yes

Insect or spider bite or sting

No

Insect or spider bite or sting

How old are you?

Less than 1 year old

Less than 1 year

1 to 11 years

1 to 11 years

12 years or older

12 years or older

Are you male or female?

Why do we ask this question?

  • If you are transgender or nonbinary, choose the sex that matches the body parts (such as ovaries, testes, prostate, breasts, penis, or vagina) you now have in the area where you are having symptoms.
  • If your symptoms aren’t related to those organs, you can choose the gender you identify with.
  • If you have some organs of both sexes, you may need to go through this triage tool twice (once as “male” and once as “female”). This will make sure that the tool asks the right questions for you.

Do you have a concern about a tick bite?

Did the bite or sting involve the eyeball?

Yes

Bite or sting to eyeball

No

Bite or sting to eyeball

Could you be having a severe allergic reaction?

This is more likely if you have had a bad reaction to something in the past.

Yes

Possible severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

No

Possible severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

Have you ever had a severe allergic reaction to a bite or sting?

A severe allergic reaction affects the whole body. Your doctor may have called it anaphylaxis.

Yes

History of severe allergic reaction to bite or sting

No

History of severe allergic reaction to bite or sting

In the past 2 days, were you exposed to that same allergen, and are you now having symptoms of an allergic reaction?

Even if the symptoms do not start right away or are mild at first, they may quickly become severe.

Yes

History of severe reaction with symptoms now

No

History of severe reaction with symptoms now

Is there any serious swelling?

This could include swelling that is not near the bite or sting area, or swelling that began at the bite or sting site but is expanding well beyond that area. (Some swelling at the site of the bite or sting is normal.)

Yes

New or expanding swelling not near bite or sting

No

New or expanding swelling not near bite or sting

Are the lips, tongue, mouth, or throat swollen?

Yes

Swelling of lips, tongue, mouth, or throat

No

Swelling of lips, tongue, mouth, or throat

Did the lips, tongue, mouth, or throat swell quickly?

Yes

Rapid swelling of lips, tongue, mouth, or throat

No

Rapid swelling of lips, tongue, mouth, or throat

Does swelling involve the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet, or the area from one large joint to another, such as from the ankle to the knee?

Yes

Swelling is across two joints, on soles of feet, or on palms of hands

No

Swelling is across two joints, on soles of feet, or on palms of hands

Is the swelling getting worse (over hours or days)?

Yes

Swelling is getting worse

No

Swelling is getting worse

Did you get an epinephrine shot to treat the reaction?

Yes

Has had epinephrine shot

No

Has had epinephrine shot

Have you been bitten or stung by a poisonous spider (such as a black widow or brown recluse spider), a scorpion, or a caterpillar?

Yes

Bitten or stung by poisonous spider, scorpion, or caterpillar

No

Bitten or stung by poisonous spider, scorpion, or caterpillar

Are there any hives?

Hives are raised, red, itchy patches of skin. They usually have red borders and pale centers. They may seem to move from place to place on the skin.

Do the hives cover many places on your body?

Did the hives appear within 3 hours after the bite or sting?

Yes

Hives developed within 3 hours of bite or sting

No

Hives developed within 3 hours of bite or sting

Do you think you may have a fever?

Are there red streaks leading away from the area or pus draining from it?

Do you have diabetes, a weakened immune system, peripheral arterial disease, or any surgical hardware in the area?

“Hardware” includes things like artificial joints, plates or screws, catheters, and medicine pumps.

Yes

Diabetes, immune problems, peripheral arterial disease, or surgical hardware in affected area

No

Diabetes, immune problems, peripheral arterial disease, or surgical hardware in affected area

Have you developed any flu-like symptoms after the bite or sting, such as fever, shaking chills, muscle or joint pain, headache, or a general feeling of illness?

This could happen within minutes of the bite or sting or up to 3 weeks later.

Did these symptoms begin within minutes after the bite or sting?

Yes

Flu-like symptoms began within minutes after bite or sting

No

Flu-like symptoms began within minutes after bite or sting

Do you have other symptoms, such as belly pain, vomiting, or diarrhea?

Yes

Has other symptoms, such as belly pain, vomiting, or diarrhea

No

Has other symptoms, such as belly pain, vomiting, or diarrhea

Did these symptoms begin within minutes after the bite or sting?

Yes

Other symptoms began within minutes after bite or sting

No

Other symptoms began within minutes after bite or sting

Have tiny red or purple spots or bruises appeared suddenly?

Yes

Sudden appearance of red or purple spots or bruising

No

Sudden appearance of red or purple spots or bruising

Is there a blister, a painful sore, or a purple discoloration at the site of a bite or sting?

Yes

Blister, painful sore, or purple discoloration at bite or sting site

No

Blister, painful sore, or purple discoloration at bite or sting site

Are you having new muscle spasms or stiffness?

Yes

Muscle spasms or stiffness after bite or sting

No

Muscle spasms or stiffness after bite or sting

Do you have pain at the site of the bite or sting?

The pain may feel like a burning pain. It may be very bad for several minutes right after the bite. You may still have some pain hours later.

Yes

Pain or burning pain at site of bite or sting

No

Pain or burning pain at site of bite or sting

Has the pain lasted for more than 8 hours?

Yes

Pain for more than 8 hours

No

Pain for more than 8 hours

Is the pain getting worse?

Yes

Pain is getting worse

Have you tried home treatment for more than 2 days?

Home treatment includes things like using ice on the area, taking an antihistamine, and taking pain medicine such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin).

Yes

Home treatment for more than 2 days

No

Home treatment for more than 2 days

Did you get more than one bite or sting?

This does not include mosquito bites.

Yes

More than 1 bite or sting

No

More than 1 bite or sting

Was there more than one bite or sting from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, or fire ants?

Yes

2 or more bites or stings from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, or fire ants

No

2 or more bites or stings from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, or fire ants

Did you get at least 5 bites or stings from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, or fire ants?

Yes

5 or more bites or stings from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, or fire ants

No

5 or more bites or stings from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, or fire ants

Did you get at least 10 bites or stings from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, or fire ants?

Yes

10 or more bites or stings from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, or fire ants

No

10 or more bites or stings from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, or fire ants

Do you think you may need a tetanus shot?

Yes

May need tetanus shot

Have symptoms lasted for more than a week after the bite or sting?

Yes

Symptoms for more than 1 week after bite or sting

No

Symptoms for more than 1 week after bite or sting

Many things can affect how your body responds to a symptom and what kind of care you may need. These include:

  • Your age. Babies and older adults tend to get sicker quicker.
  • Your overall health. If you have a condition such as diabetes, HIV, cancer, or heart disease, you may need to pay closer attention to certain symptoms and seek care sooner.
  • Medicines you take. Certain medicines, such as blood thinners (anticoagulants), medicines that suppress the immune system like steroids or chemotherapy, herbal remedies, or supplements can cause symptoms or make them worse.
  • Recent health events, such as surgery or injury. These kinds of events can cause symptoms afterwards or make them more serious.
  • Your health habits and lifestyle, such as eating and exercise habits, smoking, alcohol or drug use, sexual history, and travel.

Try Home Treatment

You have answered all the questions. Based on your answers, you may be able to take care of this problem at home.

  • Try home treatment to relieve the symptoms.
  • Call your doctor if symptoms get worse or you have any concerns (for example, if symptoms are not getting better as you would expect). You may need care sooner.

Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) may include:

  • The sudden appearance of raised, red areas (hives) all over the body.
  • Rapid swelling of the throat, mouth, or tongue.
  • Trouble breathing.
  • Passing out (losing consciousness). Or you may feel very lightheaded or suddenly feel weak, confused, or restless.

A severe reaction can be life-threatening. If you have had a bad allergic reaction to a substance before and are exposed to it again, treat any symptoms as an emergency. Even if the symptoms are mild at first, they may quickly become very severe.

Symptoms of infection may include:

  • Increased pain, swelling, warmth, or redness in or around the area.
  • Red streaks leading from the area.
  • Pus draining from the area.
  • A fever.

Pain in adults and older children

  • Severe pain (8 to 10): The pain is so bad that you can’t stand it for more than a few hours, can’t sleep, and can’t do anything else except focus on the pain.
  • Moderate pain (5 to 7): The pain is bad enough to disrupt your normal activities and your sleep, but you can tolerate it for hours or days. Moderate can also mean pain that comes and goes even if it’s severe when it’s there.
  • Mild pain (1 to 4): You notice the pain, but it is not bad enough to disrupt your sleep or activities.

Pain in children under 3 years

It can be hard to tell how much pain a baby or toddler is in.

  • Severe pain (8 to 10): The pain is so bad that the baby cannot sleep, cannot get comfortable, and cries constantly no matter what you do. The baby may kick, make fists, or grimace.
  • Moderate pain (5 to 7): The baby is very fussy, clings to you a lot, and may have trouble sleeping but responds when you try to comfort him or her.
  • Mild pain (1 to 4): The baby is a little fussy and clings to you a little but responds when you try to comfort him or her.

Certain health conditions and medicines weaken the immune system’s ability to fight off infection and illness. Some examples in adults are:

  • Diseases such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, and HIV/AIDS.
  • Long-term alcohol and drug problems.
  • Steroid medicines, which may be used to treat a variety of conditions.
  • Chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer.
  • Other medicines used to treat autoimmune disease.
  • Medicines taken after organ transplant.
  • Not having a spleen.

Shock is a life-threatening condition that may quickly occur after a sudden illness or injury.

Adults and older children often have several symptoms of shock. These include:

  • Passing out (losing consciousness).
  • Feeling very dizzy or lightheaded, like you may pass out.
  • Feeling very weak or having trouble standing.
  • Not feeling alert or able to think clearly. You may be confused, restless, fearful, or unable to respond to questions.

Shock is a life-threatening condition that may occur quickly after a sudden illness or injury.

Babies and young children often have several symptoms of shock. These include:

  • Passing out (losing consciousness).
  • Being very sleepy or hard to wake up.
  • Not responding when being touched or talked to.
  • Breathing much faster than usual.
  • Acting confused. The child may not know where he or she is.

You may need a tetanus shot depending on how dirty the wound is and how long it has been since your last shot.

  • For a dirty wound that has things like dirt, saliva, or feces in it, you may need a shot if:
    • You haven’t had a tetanus shot in the past 5 years.
    • You don’t know when your last shot was.
  • For a clean wound, you may need a shot if:
    • You have not had a tetanus shot in the past 10 years.
    • You don’t know when your last shot was.

Sudden tiny red or purple spots or sudden bruising may be early symptoms of a serious illness or bleeding problem. There are two types.

Petechiae (say “puh-TEE-kee-eye”):

  • Are tiny, flat red or purple spots in the skin or the lining of the mouth.
  • Do not turn white when you press on them.
  • Range from the size of a pinpoint to the size of a small pea and do not itch or cause pain.
  • May spread over a large area of the body within a few hours.
  • Are different than tiny, flat red spots or birthmarks that are present all the time.

Purpura (say “PURR-pyuh-ruh” or “PURR-puh-ruh”):

  • Is sudden, severe bruising that occurs for no clear reason.
  • May be in one area or all over.
  • Is different than the bruising that happens after you bump into something.

Seek Care Now

Based on your answers, you may need care right away. The problem is likely to get worse without medical care.

  • Call your doctor now to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don’t have one, seek care in the next hour.
  • You do not need to call an ambulance unless:
    • You cannot travel safely either by driving yourself or by having someone else drive you.
    • You are in an area where heavy traffic or other problems may slow you down.

Call 911 Now

Based on your answers, you need emergency care.

Call 911 or other emergency services now.

Sometimes people don’t want to call 911. They may think that their symptoms aren’t serious or that they can just get someone else to drive them. Or they might be concerned about the cost. But based on your answers, the safest and quickest way for you to get the care you need is to call 911 for medical transport to the hospital.

Seek Care Today

Based on your answers, you may need care soon. The problem probably will not get better without medical care.

  • Call your doctor today to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don’t have one, seek care today.
  • If it is evening, watch the symptoms and seek care in the morning.
  • If the symptoms get worse, seek care sooner.

Make an Appointment

Based on your answers, the problem may not improve without medical care.

  • Make an appointment to see your doctor in the next 1 to 2 weeks.
  • If appropriate, try home treatment while you are waiting for the appointment.
  • If symptoms get worse or you have any concerns, call your doctor. You may need care sooner.

Seek Care Now

Based on your answers, you may need care right away. The problem is likely to get worse without medical care.

  • Call your doctor now to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don’t have one, go to the emergency room now. You may have a reaction after the epinephrine wears off.
  • You do not need to call an ambulance unless:
    • You cannot travel safely either by driving yourself or by having someone else drive you.
    • You are in an area where heavy traffic or other problems may slow you down.

Eye Injuries

Tick Bites

Identifying Common Insect Bites and Stings

If you have ever experienced a bite or sting, you know it can be an unpleasant experience. Depending on the season, you may notice different activity from different insects, and each kind of insect bite or sting has a unique reaction to the human body. Just the thought of insects creeping and crawling around can make us feel uneasy, however, the bite or sting of one can bring along a variety of physical discomfort.

Once you’ve been bitten or stung, we often wonder what to expect. Here at Sentinel Pest Control, we’ve compiled some of the most common insect bites and stings in the Pacific Northwest to help you learn and identify what you can expect, and ways to prevent them from occurring:

Bed Bug Bites

Bed bugs bite the exposed skin of humans and animals to feed on their blood to survive, typically occurring at night. There are no known cases of disease spread from bed bugs; however, their bites can leave visible signs behind, and they can vary from person to person. In some cases, two people could be bitten by the same bed bugs and have completely different reactions to the bites.

A bed bug bite may consist of the following:

  • A raised, itchy bump with a clear center
  • Red itchy bump with a dark center and lighter around the surrounding area
  • Grouping in a straight line or zigzag pattern
  • Burning and itching sensation around the bite marks

In some cases, bites leave no visible marks, and may go completely unnoticed.

Other signs of bed bugs include the appearance of blood spots on clothing or bed sheets, as well as fecal matter, which appears as rust-colored spots on bedding and mattresses.

Bed bugs are a year-round pest. Although they do prefer the warmer temperatures, it is possible to bring bed bugs home any time of the year. There is a reason why it seems bed bug issues increase during the summer: the increase in travel! Bed bugs are the ultimate hitchhikers—they easily travel in suitcases or bags, clothing items, and bedding materials.

Stinging Insect Stings

Stinging insects such as bees, yellow jackets, hornets, and wasps are some of the most common summertime pests. They are very territorial about their nests, and are equipped with a stinger for self-defense. If approached, they may become very aggressive. A yellow jacket or hornet stinger contains venom, and they can sting multiple times; honey bees, on the other hand, can only sting one time.

A stinging insect sting is characterized by the following:

  • Instant, sharp burning pain at the sting site
  • Redness and welting
  • Swelling around the sting area
  • Tenderness near the area of the sting

There are different reaction classifications for stings. Normal local reactions, as mentioned above, are the most common reactions to a sting. Large local reactions are more pronounced symptoms from a sting, and can also include nausea and vomiting.

The most severe reaction to the venom from a sting is anaphylaxis, a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction which requires immediate medical attention.

Symptoms of anaphylaxis include:

  • Severe swelling to the face, lips, or throat
  • Breathing difficulties such as gasping or wheezing
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Hives or itching in areas of the body other than the sting site
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness
  • A sudden drop in blood pressure

Our best recommendation for prevention from a stinging insect sting would be to not approach a nest, and make sure to call a licensed professional such as Sentinel to have an experienced technician safely and effectively remove the nest.

Mosquito Bites

A mosquito bite reaction is caused by a mosquito piercing the skin and injecting saliva into the skin to siphon blood. The proteins from the saliva triggers a mild immune system reaction, which causes the classic bump and itch. Interestingly, only female mosquitoes can bite. This is because they have a mouthpart made to pierce skin and siphon blood, as is required for egg production.

Mosquito bites can show in a few different ways, including:

  • A puffy white and reddish bump
  • A hard-itchy red bump, or even multiple bumps
  • A hard blister instead of a bump

You’ll mainly see mosquitoes during the spring and summertime. They can produce more severe reactions in younger children, which can include a larger area of swelling, hives, a low-grade fever, and swollen lymph nodes. Children are more likely to have a severe reaction than adults, as adults may become desensitized through having several bites throughout their lives.

The best way to protect yourself against mosquitoes and the potential diseases they carry is to take the following steps:

  • Use insect repellent when you are outdoors
  • Wear a long-sleeve shirt, pants, and a hat when going into areas where mosquitoes are high in numbers, such as the woods or wetlands
  • Make sure windows and doors are sealed properly, and are screened when open
  • Eliminate standing water near your home in places such as clogged gutters, around leaking outdoor faucets and sprinklers, and old tires

Flea Bites

Fleas are small parasites that survive by sucking on the blood of their hosts, such as humans and pets. Adult fleas are wingless; however, they can jump up to one hundred times their body length making them able to travel far distances. Only adult fleas feed on blood, whilst the larvae feed on debris, dust, and lint in carpeting. Fleas can carry disease as well, such as cat-scratch disease (CSD) and, in rare cases, bubonic plague.

A flea bite is characterized as the following:

  • Red, swollen, intense itching and sometimes painful bumps
  • Bite marks that appear in clusters often around the legs or ankles
  • Possible bacterial infection from prolonged scratching

The best way to prevent your home from a flea infestation is by the following:

  • Keep up regular maintenance of your yard, such as keeping the grass mowed and any vegetation cut back
  • If you own pets, make sure to keep up their regular flea protection regime
  • Keep your home clean and vacuum at least once a week, as the larvae feed on debris, dust, and lint in carpeting

Spider Bites

In the Pacific Northwest, there are many different species of spiders. Only a few species of spiders have fangs long enough to pierce the human skin; the two here in the Pacific Northwest are the black widow spider and the yellow sack spider. Although spiders are usually not aggressive, they can bite if they feel trapped or accidentally disturbed.

A spider bite is characterized as the following:

  • Itching or rash forming at the location of the bite
  • Pain at the location of the bite
  • Redness, blisters or bumps
  • Look and feel similar to a bee sting

A severe reaction to a spider bite (such as the black widow) can include:

  • Muscle pain or cramping
  • Sweating
  • Difficulty breathing
  • High blood pressure
  • Fever
  • Headache

It is important that you seek medical attention immediately if you suspect you have been bitten by one of the following species:

  • Black Widow
  • Brown Recluse (do not live in Washington)
  • Hobo Spider (although found in Washington, there is no evidence that this species causes skin necrosis)

The best way to prevent a spider infestation in your home is by following these tips:

  • Remove any spider webs that you find in your shed or garage
  • Keep any woodpiles outside, and check them for spiders before bringing them inside your home
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and pants when you are accessing any wooded areas or clearing out any areas with potential spider activity
  • Remove any clutter from around or inside the home
  • Eliminate small cracks and openings to your home with a sealant
  • Make sure all doors and windows are snug fitting
  • If a spider is on you, brush it away and don’t crush it to decrease the chance of its fangs piercing your skin
  • Have your home treated regularly by a pest professional

We hope this information helps you to avoid bites or stings from the common pests we see here in the Pacific Northwest. If you’re noticing an abundance of these pests, give Sentinel a call for a free inspection!

From ticks to spiders… 11 pictures of common bug bites

BUG bites can be mildly itchy and sometimes incredibly painful.

Unless you catch the culprit in the act, it’s hard to know what insect decided to have you for lunch.

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Bites can be itchy and uncomfortable and it’s often impossible to know what has got youCredit: Alamy

Everyone’s immune system responds differently to bites and stings and some people may have more severe reactions than others – especially when it comes to stings from flying insects like bees.

Itching is common, and the area around the bite can often become tender and painful to touch.

If you’re symptoms persist it’s imperative you see a doctor to check that you haven’t been infected and that you aren’t suffering from an insect born disease.

But how do you work out what bit you in the first place?

Here are 11 of the most common bites and stings – along with their culprits.

1. Flea bite

Flea bites are small red bumps that appear in clusters. They are small and often have little red halos around them.

They usually prefer animals but can also go for warm areas like the groin and armpits.

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The bites above show someone who have been severely bitten by fleas Credit: Getty Images – Getty

Symptoms: They are usually itchy and will leave red marks.

How to treat: Try not to scratch the area, keep it clean and use antiseptic creams.

2. Tick bite

Ticks like to feed on your blood so it’s usually easy to find them as quite often they will still be attached to the area they have bitten.

They will usually leave a red spot but not all people will have this reaction.

Ticks like warm blood so they will look to feast on the warmer parts of the body like armpits, behind the knees and the groin.

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Image above shows Lyme Disease caused by a tick bite Credit: Getty – Contributor

Symptoms: If you have been bitten by a tick then it can usually be quite itchy.

The reaction you have will depend on the type of tick that decided to feast on you.

Lyme disease is one signal as well as other tick-borne illnesses include tularemia and anaplasmosis.

How to treat: Try not to itch the bite. If it gets uncomfortable you can use an ice pack or apply calamine lotion or antiseptic creams to stop the itching.

3. Spider bite

If you see a spider scurrying away or you have two tiny puncture wounds on your skin then it’s most likely a spider bite.

Most spiders only bite when they are provoked and their bites will usually leave your skin red and a bit swollen.

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Most spiders only bite when they are provoked so leave them alone Credit: curezone.org

Symptoms: Mild pain is to be expected but if you have been bitten by a black widow or brown recluses then you could experience tremors and nausea.

If you think you’ve been bitten by one of these spiders then you should seek help from a professional.

How to treat: Using an ice pack will help the swelling and if you have been bit on your leg it’s a good idea to keep it elevated.

4. Fly bite

Fly bites are common if you spend a lot of time outside and even more so if you spend time around horses and they can be pretty painful.

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Fly bites can be irritating and you can put ice on the area to helpCredit: Alamy

Symptoms: They are often raised and will be a little bit itchy but more are innocuous.

How to treat: To help soothe the bite you can apply ice and keep the area clean.

5. Mosquito bite

Mosquitoes like to go for the ankles, knees and the neck. Their bites form bumps that usually go red.

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As shown above, mosquito bites will usually be red around the area that has been bittenCredit: Alamy

Symptoms: You won’t feel much pain at first but these bites can become very itchy.

If you’re experiencing cold or flu symptoms then you may have contracted a disease as some mosquitoes carry Zika and West Nile viruses

How to treat: You can take an over the counter antihistamines and make sure you keep the area clean.

Top tips for bites and stings

While each bite and sting is different here are some simple steps that will help with any bite or sting.

Emma Blackman, CEO of Science of Skin said wearing long trousers when walking through fields is a great prevention method.

Having been bitten the following can help:

  • Remove the sting if it’s still in the skin. Try to scrape it out so you don’t squeeze the area and release more of the venom into the skin.
  • Wash the area of the bite with soap and water
  • Cover the sting with a cold compress or ice pack for about 15 minutes
  • Avoid scratching the bite as this can make it more itchy and swollen and raise the risk of infection

6. Bee sting

Bee stings can be fatal to some and there will usually be a white spot where they have stung.

Sometimes the barbed stinger is left attached and you need to pull this out.

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The barbed stinger from the bee can sometimes be left behindCredit: Alamy

Symptoms: You will have moderate pain which should go away within a few hours.

How to treat: You can use a cold compress to quell the swelling but if you think you’re having an allergic reaction then it’s best to go to A&E.

7. Bed bug bite

These can sometimes look like mosquito bites and appear as small, red, puffy lumps in a cluster of three or more.

They appear on skin that is exposed to your bed covers at night. Bed bugs often linger in your mattress in the corners.

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Bed bugs can linger so make sure you wash your bedding Credit: Getty Images – Getty

Symptoms: The bites can become itchy and swollen but they don’t spread disease.

How to treat: First you need to get rid of the bed bugs from your home. To do this you need to make sure you wash your bedding often and vacuum any areas around the bed.

You can also scrub the mattress seams to remove their eggs.

You can use over the counter pain relief and antihistamines to stop the itching.

8. Ant bite or sting

These can be a double whammy as some ants can bite and sting. Most will cause pimple-like spots.

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Close up of painful wounds on kid’s neck after bitten by ants Credit: Getty Images – Getty

Symptoms: If a fire ant has bitten you then it will be painful as they have strong venom, this can take weeks to go away.

How to treat: Ice the sting on and off and elevate the area. You can also take antihistamines.

9. Sand fly bite

Sand fly bites can transmit parasite infections that cause skin lesions and ulcers.

They will appear in small red clusters and can also cause blisters.

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Sand fly bites can be uncomfortable and you can use anti histamines to helpCredit: Getty Images – Getty

Symptoms: They will be painful and itchy.

How to treat: Antihistamines usually help.

10. Chigger bite

These bites are usually invisible to the naked eye and will create tiny little bumps.

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Chigger bites are usually very small but they will create bumpsCredit: Getty Images – Getty

Symptoms: You will feel severe discomfort but the mites don’t spread disease and do not burrow in your skin.

How to treat: They usually get better without treatment but if you’re struggling you can use antiseptic creams or calamine lotion.

11. Head lice bite

Head lice leave patches of red, abraded spots on the scalp.

The bites are small but the reaction your body has to them makes them grow.

You can also develop sores due to scratching.

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Head lice bites can be irritable Credit: Kosta Y. Mumcuoglu 2007

Symptoms: First you might see some eggs that then hatch into lice.

If you feel like something is moving your hair then it’s likely lice crawling.

How to treat: After washing the hair with shampoo and conditioner you need to comb through with a fine comb to remove lice and eggs.

Lice lotion can also be used to prevent them returning.

How to Treat a Bug Bite at Home (and When to Head to the Hospital)

Millions of Americans are bitten by mosquitos and other insects every year and most of those bites are itchy and painful, but not very serious.

If your camping trip or day at the beach has left you riddled with pink, itchy spots, you’ll want to know when to treat at home and when it’s better left to the professionals. To get the bottom of it, we teamed up with the special effects team at SyFy Channel’s Face Off and Dr. John Torres, NBC News Medical Correspondent, to create realistic bug bites, both minor and more severe, to show you how to treat a them at home — and when you should head to the hospital.

Dr. Torres says that the majority of the bites he sees in emergency rooms don’t actually need professional medical attention, but some do. “The number one thing you want to look for is any sign of infection,” says Dr. Torres. Here’s what you need to know:

When to Treat a Bug Bite at Home

  • The bite mark is red, but the redness hasn’t spread past the bite.
  • There’s no pus coming from the bite.
  • The number of bites is limited.

How to Treat a Bug Bite at Home

  • Step 1: Apply an ice pack to the affected area for 20 minutes.
  • Step 2: Apply an antihistamine cream to reduce itching.
  • Step 3: Use calamine lotion if the itching is more severe.
  • Step 4: Soak in a warm oatmeal bath.
  • Step 5: Apply bandages to the bug bites to avoid scratching and infection.

RELATED: How to Treat a Burn at Home (and When to Head to the ER)

When to Head to the ER to Treat a Bug Bite

  • There’s redness surrounding the entire bite and it seems to be spreading.
  • The bite is swollen.
  • The bite is oozing pus, a yellow or greenish fluid.

If you have any of the symptoms above, go to the ER immediately for professional treatment to avoid infections and scarring. “You want to get that redness and infection under control so it doesn’t spread and you can get back to normal,” says Dr. Torres.

Related

According to the Mayo Clinic, bites from mosquitoes carrying certain viruses, like West Nile or Zika, or parasites can cause severe illness. If you experience fever, body aches, headaches, please contact your doctor immediately or head to your local emergency room.

Want more tips like these? NBC News BETTER is obsessed with finding easier, healthier and smarter ways to live. Sign up for our newsletter.

“Insect Bites” – Yandex.Q

Insect bites are puncture wounds or incisions made by insects. The insect can bite for self-defense or in search of food.

When bitten, insects usually inject formic acid. This can lead to blistering, inflammation, redness, swelling, pain, itching, and irritation.

The reaction depends on the type of insect and the sensitivity of the person. Flea, tick, and mosquito bites usually cause itching rather than pain.

In this article, we will look at the types of insects that bite, how people react, and how to treat the bite.

What insects bite?

The effect of an insect bite can range from mild irritation to serious illness.

The following types of biting insects are most common:

Spiders, strictly speaking, are not insects, but they can also bite.

People react to bites in different ways.In one person, the bite may cause a slight itchy bump that goes away after a few days. In another, the same bite may cause a more severe reaction.

An infection may develop at the site of the bite, causing redness, local heat, and thickening of the skin around the area of ​​the bite with pus from the wound.

Combing the bite site can also lead to infection and hardening of the skin. This process is called lichenification.
People who work outdoors or regularly participate in outdoor activities have a higher risk of insect bites.

In colder climates, the risk of infection from insect bites is low. However, closer to the equator, the ambient temperature is much higher. Here, insect bites can lead to infection with malaria, sleeping sickness, dengue, or the Zika virus.

Reactions

Insect bites usually cause a slight itchy bump on the skin. Sometimes the bite itself can be seen as a tiny hole. The swelling may fill with fluid.Sometimes inflammation develops around the area of ​​the bite.

Insect bites usually resolve within a few days without the need for medical attention.

Some people have an allergic reaction to insect bites. However, bites rarely cause a severe allergic reaction, unlike insect stings.

The following signs may indicate a severe allergic reaction:

  • profuse patchy rash that can spread to other parts of the body
  • shortness of breath
  • chest pain
  • cramping abdominal pain
  • weakness or dizziness
  • nausea
  • heart palpitations
  • Severe edema that may develop in another part of the body, far from the area of ​​the bite, such as swelling of the tongue or lips
  • very severe itching
  • 90,040 wheezing when breathing.

These symptoms require immediate medical attention .
Some people may develop a stronger reaction when they are bitten by the same insect again. Sensitization may occur, in which a person becomes more sensitive to insect saliva.

If an insect bite area is infected, the following symptoms may appear:

  • pus in or around the bite wound
  • enlarged lymph nodes
  • fever
  • feeling unwell
  • Flu-like symptoms

Redness, pain and swelling in the area of ​​the bite may increase.
An itchy papule or blister sometimes develops and persists for several days. Ultimately, after a few bites, most people become immune and insensitive to insect saliva.

Allergic reactions to insect bites usually last no more than a few hours, but sometimes they can persist for months. In this case, you should consult your doctor.

Spider bites

Spiders are not insects, but they can bite too.Some spider bites are quite dangerous to humans.

Brown recluse spider bite

For example, the bite of a brown recluse spider causes only a slight burning sensation at the time of the bite. However, it can be very dangerous, causing tissue death and severe pain.

Redness appears in the area of ​​the bite. The pain may become intense over about 8 hours.

A fluid-filled bubble forms at the site of the bite.The bladder then disappears, leaving behind a deep, enlarging ulcer.

Sometimes this ulcer goes away without any additional complications. However, in other cases, the ulcer enlarges or bacteria begin to multiply in it.

Symptoms include mild fever, lethargy, nausea, and sometimes a rash. Fatalities are rare, but possible, especially in young children. If you have a growing sore or redness and infection after recent contact with a brown recluse spider, see your doctor.

Black widow bite

Black Widow – One of the most venomous spiders, but its bite is rarely fatal. The bite feels like a needle prick. There may be slight swelling and faded red spots, but after a few hours, cramping and severe pain occurs.

Also possible:

  • chills
  • fever
  • nausea
  • severe abdominal pain

If you suspect a black widow bite and severe pain and spasm in the area of ​​the bite, you should immediately seek medical attention.

Depending on the severity of the reaction to the venom, doctors may decide to administer a medicated serum against spider venom.

Black widow bites often leave marks and a person may experience swelling, muscle aches and spasms around the area of ​​the bite.

Brown widow

Brown widows are found in southern California and are often found in buildings, cars, and vegetation. They are generally less aggressive than black widows, but their venom is stronger.Brown widow bites are relatively harmless.

Funnel tarantulas (Dipluridae)

Funnel tarantulas weave characteristic funnel-shaped webs that make them easy to identify. They are found throughout North America and are one of the deadliest spider species in the world. An antidote has been developed, but it must be administered immediately after the bite.

Wolf spiders (Lycosidae)

Wolf spiders are distributed throughout the United States of America and are unique in that they do not weave webs.They are large and furry, and people often mistake them for tarantulas. Wolf spider bites are venomous and often very painful. However, they are not fatal.

Yellow-baked spider (Cheiracanthium inclusum)

Yellow sand spiders are common throughout the United States, often living indoors. After a bite of yellow sac spiders, redness and swelling usually appear.

Brown recluse spider

The brown recluse spider is most often found in the darkest parts of the house.It is attracted by the warm and dry climate, so recluse spiders are found mainly in the southern and central regions of the United States. Hermit spider bites usually do not cause symptoms, but in rare cases, hemolysis or destruction of red blood cells is possible.

American wandering spider

The American wandering spider first appeared in Europe, and now lives in various states of North America. It is most often found in hard-to-reach places and cracks, both inside and outside the house.After being bitten by a wandering spider, redness and swelling often appear in the affected area.

Solpuga

Solpugs are desert dwellers, and people often mistake them for scorpions. Despite the pain, their bites are not fatal to humans.

Tick ​​bites

The tick bite usually resolves within 3 weeks, but if parts of the insect’s mouth remain in the skin, symptoms may persist.Ticks are commonly found in tall grass and around deer habitats.
Tick bites are usually painless, but swelling may appear at the site of the bite. However, ticks can cause Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, babesiosis, and other diseases that can lead to serious health problems.

Abomination, mosquitoes and midges

Bites usually cause mild itchy bumps or papules.Sensitive people may develop blisters.
Mosquito bites can transmit diseases such as malaria, zika, dengue, yellow fever and encephalitis.

Fleas

A flea bite usually results in a blister that reaches its maximum severity after 5-30 minutes, and then turns into a dense papule within 12-24 hours. In people who are sensitive to insect bites, itching around the bite area may persist for a week or more.

Fleas can transmit diseases such as typhus and Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis) or plague.

Blind

Horsefly bites can be painful. The following symptoms are possible:

  • dizziness
  • itching of eyes and lips is possible, with the appearance of pink or red swelling
  • fatigue
  • general weakness
  • urticaria, blistering rash
  • wheezing on breathing

Horsefly bites can take a long time to heal, because when bitten, this insect cuts the skin.

Bed bugs

Initial bed bug bites usually do not cause a reaction, but people with high sensitivity may develop spots or papules after the next bite. Learn more about bedbugs – https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/158065.php

Bed bugs are a serious public health problem.

To get rid of bed bugs, throw away the mattress and wash sheets and clothes in very hot water.

Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes are very small flies that are found primarily in tropical and subtropical regions, from the rainforests of Brazil to the deserts of Western Asia.

They are approximately 3 millimeters (mm) long and are golden, brown or gray in color.

In the past, they were rarely seen in the United States, but can now be found in the southern states. In 2012, people reported mosquitoes in Kansas and Missouri.Mosquitoes prefer deciduous forests and usually bite from sunrise to sunset.

People can also be bitten by a mosquito while traveling or doing military service abroad.

Mosquito bites can be painful and itchy. Red papules and blisters may appear, in some cases ulcers.
Mosquitoes are also capable of carrying diseases such as leishmaniasis and Heartland virus. Leishmaniasis is a serious condition that can lead to skin ulcers, fever, and a decrease in the white blood cell count, depending on the type.

Heartland virus is another serious infection that usually requires hospitalization.

Risk factors

The risk of an insect bite depends on the environment.
Common sources of fleas are pets, populous communities with low hygiene standards and bird nests. Moving to a new home that has been empty for a while can activate sleeping fleas.

Bedbugs prefer old furniture and upholstery.They usually reside in rental properties and low-income hotels. They live in mattresses, clothes, and so on.

Some people have a higher risk of being bitten by ticks and mice because of their profession.

Travel and camping can also increase the risk of insect bites.

Diagnostics

Insect bites are usually easy to diagnose, but a person will only see a doctor if the reaction is severe.

Treatment

If symptoms persist or are severe, it is recommended to see a dermatologist.

Mild and limited reaction usually resolves within a few days.

Cold compress on the affected area, oral pain relievers, steroid cream, or anesthetic can reduce discomfort.

Antihistamines sometimes help. A variety of bite remedies can be purchased over the counter (OTC) or online.

A more serious local allergic reaction may require oral antihistamines or oral pain relievers.

For more severe cases of edema, your doctor may prescribe oral steroids.

Small, itchy papules or rashes near the bite can be treated with an oral corticosteroid, such as prednisolone, or an oral antihistamine.
Scratching the skin or opening the blister may introduce bacteria and cause infection.

For severe skin reactions and more general symptoms, the physician may refer the patient to a specialist for desensitization or treatment of the allergic reaction.

If symptoms worsen or do not improve, see a doctor.
For flea, tick, or bed bug bites, try to find a habitat. If the source of these insects comes from a pet, the pet will need treatment, and bedding, upholstered furniture, and carpets throughout the house will need to be cleaned.

Bed bugs require calling a pest control company to disinfect the home. To prevent bed bugs, wash your bedding at high temperatures and replace old pillows and mattresses.

Tick ​​bites

Remove the tick immediately to reduce the risk of contracting an infection such as Lyme disease.

The best way is to grab the tick as close to the skin as possible, preferably with tweezers, and gently pull it straight up, making sure that no parts are left in the skin.

Do not twist or jerk the tick, as this may cause parts of the insect to come off and remain in the skin. Petroleum jelly, rubbing alcohol, or a lit match are also ineffective.

After removing the tick, wash your hands and bite area with soap and water and apply an antiseptic.

Scratching increases the likelihood of edema and the risk of infection. In most cases, tick bites heal within 2-3 weeks.
If a rash develops around your armpits, thighs, or groin, or if you develop flu-like symptoms after a tick bite, see your doctor. The doctor will likely prescribe antibiotics to prevent Lyme disease.

Complications

A secondary bacterial infection such as cellulitis, lymphangitis or impetigo may develop if the bite is scratched and the skin is damaged.These infections are treated with antibiotics.
Some ticks carry diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme disease.

Borrelia burgdorferi, a bacteria that some ticks carry, causes Lyme disease. The person develops a red rash that spreads in breadth. Antibiotics can also help treat Lyme disease.

Without treatment, Lyme disease can lead to meningitis, facial paralysis, radiculopathy and, in rare cases, encephalitis.Other risks include joint damage leading to arthritis and heart problems.

Different types of mosquitoes carry various diseases, such as West Nile virus and malaria.

Prophylaxis

The following measures can help prevent insect bites, especially in warm weather:

  • Use mechanical barriers such as window screens or nets
  • avoid wooded, shrub and grassy areas
  • Avoid strong-smelling cosmetics and brightly colored clothing
  • Close drinks and trash cans
  • Wear long sleeves and long trousers tucked into shoes or socks, and wear a hat
  • Check for stagnant water in various containers as this creates a breeding ground for mosquitoes.

Insect repellent

Use of insect repellent or repellent may be required. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should have issued a permit to use the active ingredient in the spray. It is possible to spray repellent on clothing, but avoid contact with it on the face. Follow the instructions for use of the product carefully.
Insect repellent not suitable for babies.If the child is under 10 years of age, the repellent should contain no more than 10 percent DEET. Eucalyptus oil may be effective, but it is not suitable for children under 3 years of age.

Insect repellent can be purchased online. If repellents will be used on children, make sure they contain no more than 10 percent DEET.

Do not apply repellent to your child’s hands, eye area, cuts or irritated skin.

When using insect repellent and sunscreen, apply sunscreen first.

There are clothes, footwear and camping equipment on sale that were treated by manufacturers with permethrin. Permethrin spray is sold online. Set up your tents away from water or swamps.
Travelers should check for a risk of infection in the area they plan to visit and take the necessary precautions.

Local health authorities and park officials can provide information on tick habitats. If visiting such an area cannot be avoided, walk down the center of the paths to avoid contact with vegetation.

What to do if bitten by a wasp or bee – News of Tula and the region

An insect bite can lead to unpleasant consequences.

Wasp bite symptoms

After a wasp sting, a local reaction of the body is usually observed on the body. When bitten in the eyes, face, or other softer skin tissue, the swelling is more severe. It should also be taken into account that weakened people, allergy sufferers, children and women show a higher sensitivity to poison.

In addition to edema of the bite site, the human body may have the following symptoms:

– severe pain and burning;

– redness of the bite site;

– the bite site is swollen;

– rash all over the body;

– increased body temperature;

– headache;

– nausea and vomiting;

– body cramps.

When a wasp bites, in addition to urticaria and edema, in some cases shortness of breath, palpitations, dizziness, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, high fever, body cramps are observed, even a short-term loss of consciousness is possible. Swelling of the tongue and larynx is very dangerous, which can cause suffocation.

An allergic reaction does not occur when a person is first stung by a hymenoptera. However, the resulting allergic reaction after each subsequent bite will be more and more severe.

The most severe life-threatening allergic reaction is anaphylactic shock. In this case, immediately after the bite, the person loses consciousness, the activity of many organs and systems, primarily the cardiovascular system, is disrupted.

FIRST AID FOR THE BITE OF A WASP, BEE, BUMPER

1. Get rid of the sting. It must be remembered that when a wasp bites, you do not need to look for its sting on the body, because she does not leave him. It is quite another matter with a bee sting. The bee has a jagged sting, so it must be removed.This is a simple matter, the main thing is to disinfect the wound, as well as the bee sting extraction tool, so as not to infect the wound. This can be done with peroxide, ammonia diluted with water, iodine, alcohol solution, corticosteroid ointment – for a wound, ordinary rubbing alcohol – for a tool, such as tweezers.

Important! It is not worth squeezing out the poison, as you can easily infect an infection.

2. It is necessary to prevent the spread of poison in the body, as well as prevent an allergic reaction.

– In case of a general toxic reaction, the victim is advised to drink as much as possible. Preference – sweet water, hot sweet tea;

– Put a heating pad with cold water or a wet towel in place of the edema, which will slow down the absorption of the poison;

– Soak a cloth with a baking soda solution (1 teaspoon for 1 glass of water) and leave it on the sore spot for 15–20 minutes.

– A piece of moistened sugar attached to the wound helps to draw out the poison.

– An allergic reaction is prevented by taking antihistamines, such as Claritin, Suprastin or other similar drugs.

3. To relieve pain and swelling

– Apply a cold compress or ice wrapped in a cloth to the bite site for at least 30 minutes. You can also apply a compress from a cloth dipped in alcohol or vinegar and water;

– Make a compress from lemon juice. Eliminates pain and relieves swelling;

– You can make a compress from tincture of a golden mustache with vodka;

– Attach a cut onion, tomato or garlic to the bite;

– Attach a cut apple to the wound;

– Apply pounded or chewed fresh parsley leaves to the sore spot;

– Anoint the wound with Psilo-balm or Fenistil gel;

– Apply Validol tablet moistened with water to the bite site;

– Take diphenhydramine.It is necessary to take this remedy if the swelling is too large, i.e. if there is an allergic reaction;

– Soda gruel with water. Attach to the bite site. Relieves redness, and swelling, and pain;

– Attach a Kalanchoe or plantain leaf to the wound;

– Lubricate the skin at the site of the bite with a solution of calendula or plantain. They can be purchased at the pharmacy;

Important! Alcohol is contraindicated because it leads to increased edema.

To prevent a sharp drop in blood pressure caused by urticaria, the victim can be given 20-25 drops of cordiamine.

Important! People who are allergic to insect bites during the summer are advised to always have with them the so-called passport of an allergic patient issued by an allergist. The passport contains the name of the owner, his age, home address, phone number, diagnosis, phone number of the allergy office where the patient is observed, and the urgent measures that must be taken in case of a Hymenoptera bite. In addition to the passport, it is advisable to have a syringe and a set of medicines listed in the passport with you.In the event of anaphylactic shock, you must immediately call an ambulance or deliver the victim to a medical facility.

SOME FEATURES OF WASP BEHAVIOR

It must be remembered that wasps never attack people for no reason. They sting only when they are defending themselves, or when they feel aggression on your part. Of course, it is always unpleasant when a wasp buzzes over your head or near your face. People begin to wave their hands, trying to drive away an insect from themselves, which perceives your actions as aggression.Therefore, they sting.

Bees, unlike a wasp, can sting without a reason. Bees do not tolerate the smell of sweat, which in 99% of cases causes them to attack. In addition, when a bee stings, in addition to poison it injects a special substance, which is a signal for other bees to “attack this target”, so if you walk near the hives on a hot day and one bee attacked you, try to get away from apiaries.

Never panic and do not try to swing your arms, and especially do not try to swat a wasp or a bee with your hand.As a last resort, you can try to knock the insect to the ground using suitable means at hand, such as a towel, scarf, or other items of clothing. But this is only as a last resort. The ideal option is considered – just turn away and step aside.

Important! If you find that the bite site is gaining great swelling, fever, or other similar exacerbated symptoms, consult a doctor immediately, and do not wait until the critical point comes.

90,000 MDOU “Kindergarten No. 144”.Allergy to insect bites in a child. Treatment and prevention

During the summer, our children are very often faced with insect bites. For most children, these bites are painless, but a small percentage of the world’s population is allergic to the poisons that insects release when bitten.

Causes of an allergy to insect bites in a child

Causes of an allergic reaction:

1. Heredity .Very often, if a child has an allergic reaction to insect bites, a similar reaction is observed in one of his parents. The likelihood of an allergy to insect poisons is even greater if both parents have an allergic predisposition.

2. Sensitization of the child’s body . Since our ecology leaves much to be desired, and the food industry is trying to cram as many dyes and flavors into our body as possible, it is not surprising that our children are born with a tendency to exhibit allergies.The body of such children contains an increased level of IgE, which is responsible for the manifestations of allergic reactions. This immunoglobulin has specificity, that is, a strictly individual immunoglobulin is formed for each allergen. However, some antigens (substances that cause allergies) have a similar structure, so different allergens can cause similar reactions.

Insect bite allergy symptoms

An allergic reaction to insect bites has an immediate type of reaction.This means that after an insect bite, the reaction develops within a few hours, and sometimes minutes. In contrast, delayed-type allergic reactions can develop over several days.

In order for an allergy to occur, it is necessary that the body undergoes sensitization – specific receptors on mast cells are formed. This happens when the allergen enters the child’s body for the first time. Receptors formed on the surface of mast cells persist for a long time, however, with prolonged absence of contact with the allergen, they can disappear.This explains the fact that over time, allergic reactions can fade away and even completely disappear (the child, as it were, outgrows the allergy).

Mast cells contain very active substances, one of which is histamine. The allergen binds to IgE and binds to a receptor on the mast cell, which causes its destruction and the release of histamine into the blood. When the allergen enters the child’s body for the first time, the destruction of mast cells does not occur, since there are still no receptors on their surface.However, if the allergen re-enters the body, the reaction can be very violent and even lead to the death of the child. Histamine has a protective function, causing tissue edema at the site of the bite and, thus, reducing the absorption of the poison into the blood.

However, histamine does not have the selectivity of its action, that is, it cannot choose for itself where to exert this effect. Destruction of mast cells occurs throughout the body, where they are contained. The bulk of mast cells are found in the lungs and gastrointestinal tract, since these parts of the body are most often exposed to allergens.Also, a large amount of histamine enters the bloodstream, where it affects the muscle layer of the blood vessels. In all these organs and systems, histamine has its effect: it causes spasm of the bronchi, edema of the larynx, relaxation of the muscles of the blood vessels and a drop in blood pressure.

Normally, with insect bites and the ingress of poison into the child’s body, only a local reaction is observed at the site of the bite: redness, swelling, slight itching, slight swelling.This is a natural process associated with the penetration of a foreign agent into the body and the body’s attempt to protect itself from this agent. The body tries to make sure that this foreign agent (poison) does not penetrate into the deeper layers of the body and does not damage very important organs. However, if this process gets out of control, then a hyperreaction to a foreign agent develops, and such a process becomes pathological – an allergic reaction develops.

Various insects can cause an allergic reaction: bees, wasps, hornets, bumblebees, ants, mosquitoes.

Bee stings

Bee stings are distinguished by the fact that when a bee stings, it leaves its sting in the wound. The sting of the bee has jagged edges directed in the opposite direction from the direction of penetration of the sting, therefore, after an attack, the bee cannot pull the sting out of the wound, and, trying to fly away, it leaves the sting in the wound along with a small part of its intestines and a bag containing poison. This sac continues to contract for some time, squeezing the poison into the wound. After the attack, after a few minutes, the bee dies, so the bees do not attack just like that, but only if they are very angry or pose a threat to their hive.

A bee sting is characterized by redness, swelling at the site of the bite, and a sting is visible in the center of the bite.

Wasp sting

Wasps do not leave their sting in the wound, but they secrete a special enzyme that attracts other wasps and increases their aggression. Therefore, when a wasp bites, it is better to immediately leave the place where you were, especially if it is next to the hive.

Hornet bite

Hornets and bumblebees rarely attack and, like wasps, they do not leave a sting in the wound.

Ant bite

Ants usually attack in a group, single attacks are rare. Ants attack only if there is a threat to their anthill.

Mosquito bites

When a mosquito bites, an allergic reaction most often develops if a child has been exposed to a large number of bites. After being bitten by a mosquito, slight redness and swelling develops that itches. If a child has a tendency to be allergic to mosquito bites, a blister may develop at the site of the bite – a large fluid-filled mass raised above the surface of the skin.

Manifestations of an allergic reaction can be both local (redness, itching, swelling) and general (fever, headache, shortness of breath, feeling short of breath, lowering blood pressure). On the part of the skin, manifestations of an allergic reaction can be: itching, redness of the skin (urticaria), swelling. Edema is most dangerous if it is located in the face and neck, as it can cause swelling of the larynx and death of the child. On the part of the gastrointestinal tract, these can be: intestinal upset, nausea, vomiting.From the side of the lungs: shortness of breath, shortness of breath, due to spasm of the larynx and bronchi, it is difficult for the child to breathe. On the part of the circulatory system: a decrease in blood pressure, an increase in the pulse rate, however, the blood supply to the vessels decreases, therefore the pulse is weak. All this can lead to the development of such a state as shock.

Shock is a serious condition of the body when all systems are in imbalance and oxygen, along with nutrients, does not reach the organs. Because of this, oxygen and energy starvation occurs, systems and organs stop working, and eventually death can occur.

From the moment of an insect bite until the first clinical signs of allergy appear, it can take from several minutes to 1-2 hours. However, a lightning-fast development of the disease is possible when there is a sharp swelling of the face and larynx, pulmonary spasm. In this case, the probability of death is very high in the absence of qualified assistance.

With a massive attack of insects, the development of a toxic effect of the poison on the body is possible, even if the child is not allergic to insect bites.Most often, such conditions are observed with multiple stings of bees or wasps.

First aid for a child with insect bites

In case of insect bites and allergies to them, it is necessary to provide the child with first aid and seek medical help from a doctor as soon as possible.

The first step is to inspect the bite site. If a child has been stung by a bee, it is necessary to carefully remove the sting from the wound, since the bag containing the poison continues to shrink and secrete poison for a long time.The sting must be removed with care so as not to squeeze the bag of poison and not to provoke the release of poison into the wound. It is best to use tweezers, which are often found in women’s purses. An adrenaline solution must be injected into the site of the bite, which slows down the spread of the poison throughout the body. Epinephrine is administered at a dosage of 10 μg / kg (maximum up to 0.3 mg). Also, in order to slow down the absorption of the poison and reduce the swelling, you need to apply cold to the bite site (a bag with ice and water). Intramuscularly, it is necessary to inject an antihistamine drug (prednisolone).Prednisolone should be administered at a dosage of 2 mg / kg of the child’s weight. Prednisolone reduces the manifestation of allergies, as it counteracts histamine, which is the main cause of the onset of all symptoms of an allergic reaction. In extreme cases, if the bite is on one of the limbs (arm or leg), a tourniquet can be applied to reduce blood flow in it and thus reduce the spread of poison throughout the body. However, this must be done with caution, since if the tourniquet is applied incorrectly, this can cause problems with the nutrition of the tissues of the limb and lead to the death of these tissues.

For mild allergies such as mosquito bites and itching and swelling, topical preparations with a calming effect can be used. Preparations such as fenistil gel, or any sprays and ointments containing panthenol (panthenol spray, depanthenol, panthenol plus, and others).

It is very important that parents whose children are allergic to insect bites always have a small first aid kit with them, which would contain several syringes, adrenaline and prednisone.It is best to teach your child to inject themselves on their own so that he can always help himself. It is very good if in such a first-aid kit, instead of ordinary syringes, there will be a syringe-pen. Such pens are easy to fill with medicine, and it is much easier to give injections to yourself. Even children can easily learn how to use these pen pens.

Prevention of bites

For prophylaxis, it is necessary to use special sprays and ointments that repel insects when going out of town to nature.There are many such drugs in the pharmacy network, and any pharmacist will always help you choose the right one, which will be safe when used by children. The child needs to be told that it is impossible to approach bee hives, wasp hives, anthills. Tell your child that if a bee has landed on him, you cannot drive it away and wave your hands furiously, it is better to sit quietly and the bee will fly away by itself. Do not wear too bright clothes on your child, which can attract insects. Try to reduce the amount of sugary food in nature, which also attracts insects.Remember, the main way to avoid an allergic reaction to an insect bite is to avoid the bite.

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