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Gastrocrom side effects: ORAL (Gastrocrom) side effects, medical uses, and drug interactions.

Содержание

Cromolyn Sodium oral solution

What is this medicine?

CROMOLYN SODIUM (KROE moe lin SOE dee um) is used to treat the symptoms of mastocytosis. It helps to relieve stomach problems like diarrhea, pain, nausea, and vomiting. It also helps relieve flushing, headache, and itching.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Gastrocrom

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • liver disease
  • kidney disease
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to cromolyn, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take one-half hour before meals and at bedtime. Open the foil pouch and take out the ampule(s) you need for your dose. Open the ampule by twisting off the tab. Squeeze the medicine into a glass of water. Do not mix with other drinks or food. Stir well. Drink all of the mixture. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 2 years old for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Interactions are not expected.

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Your doctor may adjust your dose for best results. Talk to your doctor before you change your dose or stop taking this medicine.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue
  • breathing problems
  • burning, numbness, or tingling
  • changes in emotions or moods
  • discolored mouth or tongue
  • dizziness
  • fever
  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth
  • seizure
  • trouble swallowing
  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • bad taste
  • diarrhea
  • headache
  • increased sensitivity to sunlight
  • muscle aches
  • nausea, vomiting
  • stomach upset, gas
  • trouble sleeping

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from light. Keep in the foil pouch until ready to use. Do not use if medicine is cloudy, has solid pieces, or is discolored. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

Gastrocrom: Uses, Taking, Side Effects, Warnings

What is Gastrocrom used for?

  • Gastrocrom is used to treat mastocytosis.
  • Gastrocrom may be given to you for other reasons. Talk to your doctor.

Before taking Gastrocrom, tell your doctor:

  • If you are allergic to Gastrocrom; any part of this medicine; or any other drugs, foods, or substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had.

This medicine may interact with other drugs or health problems.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take Gastrocrom with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Gastrocrom?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take Gastrocrom. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan on getting pregnant, or are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks to you and the baby.

How is Gastrocrom best taken?

Use Gastrocrom as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Do not use if the solution is cloudy, leaking, or has particles.
  • Do not use if solution changes color.
  • Take 30 minutes before meals and at bedtime unless your doctor has told you otherwise.
  • Do not swallow ampul. Open it and empty liquid into a glass of water. Mix and drink.
  • Keep taking Gastrocrom as you have been told by your doctor or other health care provider, even if you feel well.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

What are the side effects of Gastrocrom that I need to call my doctor about immediately?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.

What are some other side effects of Gastrocrom?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-332-1088. You may also report side effects at https://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

If overdose is suspected:

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

How do I store and/or throw out Gastrocrom?

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Protect from light.
  • Store in foil pouch until ready for use.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

Consumer information use and disclaimer

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about Gastrocrom, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take Gastrocrom or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to Gastrocrom. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Source: Wolters Kluwer Health. Last updated August 20, 2020.

cromolyn sodium (oral) | Frankel Cardiovascular Center

What is the most important information I should know about cromolyn sodium?

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

What is cromolyn sodium?

Cromolyn sodium works by preventing the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Cromolyn sodium is used to treat the symptoms of a condition called mastocytosis, which can cause diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, headaches, stomach pain, itchy skin, and flushing (warmth or redness under the skin).

Cromolyn sodium may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking cromolyn sodium?

You should not use cromolyn sodium if you are allergic to it.

To make sure cromolyn sodium is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • kidney disease; or
  • liver disease.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It is not known whether cromolyn sodium passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Cromolyn sodium is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old.

How should I take cromolyn sodium?

Cromolyn sodium is usually taken 4 times per day. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Break open the cromolyn sodium ampule and squeeze the liquid into a glass of water. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. Do not save for later use.

Take this medicine 30 minutes before each meal, and at bedtime.

Take your doses at regular intervals to keep a steady amount of the drug in your body at all times.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 3 weeks of treatment.

Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Do not use cromolyn sodium if it looks cloudy, has changed colors, or has particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new medication.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking cromolyn sodium?

Follow your doctor’s instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

What are the possible side effects of cromolyn sodium?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • white patches or sores inside your mouth or on your lips;
  • swelling of your tongue;
  • trouble swallowing; or
  • tight feeling in the chest.

Common side effects may include:

  • headache, feeling irritable;
  • nausea, diarrhea, stomach pain;
  • rash, itching; or
  • muscle pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect cromolyn sodium?

Other drugs may interact with cromolyn sodium, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about cromolyn sodium.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. (‘Multum’) is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum’s drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum’s drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2021 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.02. Revision date: 9/22/2016.

Cromoglycate Disodium – an overview

General information

Cromoglicate disodium salt (cromoglicate sodium) is available as a powder for inhalation. Each capsule contains 20 mg. The usual dose is 1 capsule inhaled four times daily. It is also dispensed in a multidose-pressurized aerosol delivering 1 or 5 mg per actuation. A 1.0% nebulizer solution (20 mg dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water) is also available. It is nebulized over 15 minutes and has the same effect as 20 mg given as a powder [1]. Cromoglicate is taken regularly in chronic asthma and when it is effective it improves symptoms and lung function and reduces the need for bronchodilators. It has a steroid-sparing effect and should be tried before inhaled steroids are used, especially in children. It is a prophylactic drug and is not effective in acute asthma.

A liquid formulation is also available for use in rhinitis and ocular conditions. When applied topically to the eye cromoglicate is effective in the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (vernal catarrh, spring catarrh), allergic conjunctivitis, and hay fever.

Cromoglicate inhibits mast-cell degranulation and histamine release induced by phospholipase A2, but does not interfere with the interaction of antigen and reaginic antibodies. Evidence is accumulating that it has an important stabilizing action on leukocytes, apart from mast cells, such as neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes, and that it also affects nerve reflexes in the lung [2].

The overall incidence of adverse reactions was about 2% when using inhaled cromoglicate [3]. Most of the observed adverse reactions are mild and transient and do not require withdrawal of therapy. Adverse reactions such as laryngeal edema, swollen parotid glands, bronchospasm, joint swelling, nausea, cough, headache, nasal congestion, rash, and urticaria have been reported in only one in 10 000 patients [4]. The American Academy of Allergy and Immunology reported two 10-year safety reports involving 424 and 85 patients. These emphasized the safety of long-term treatment with cromoglicate. The only serious adverse effects were three cases of pulmonary infiltration and eosinophilia [5]. In another series of 375 patients, only eight experienced adverse reactions; these included dermatitis with pruritus, myositis, and gastroenteritis [6].

While no systemic or severe adverse reactions have been attributed to ocular cromoglicate even after as long as 8 months of therapy, transient local stinging and burning have been reported in 13–77% of patients who used the original formulation of this drug, which contained 2-phenylethyl alcohol as a preservative. These effects regressed during continued treatment and can vary greatly depending on both the individual and the underlying disease. Ocular cromoglicate without 2-phenylethyl alcohol has been reported to be more effective than formulations that contain this preservative; stinging, leading to increased lacrimation, dilutes the drug and reduces the time for which it is retained in the conjunctival sac. The desired topical effects of cromoglicate are therefore reduced if it is formulated with 2-phenylethyl alcohol.

Cromolyn Sodium, Oral – Tufts Medical Center Community Care

What are other names for this medicine?

Type of medicine: mast cell stabilizer

Generic and brand names: cromolyn sodium, oral; Gastrocrom

What is this medicine used for?

This medicine is taken by mouth to control mastocytosis, a medical condition that may cause diarrhea, flushed skin, headache, vomiting, hives, abdominal pain, nausea, or itching.

This medicine may be used to treat other conditions as determined by your healthcare provider.

What should my healthcare provider know before I take this medicine?

Before taking this medicine, tell your healthcare provider if you have ever had:

  • An allergic reaction to any medicine
  • Liver or kidney disease

Females of childbearing age: Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Do not breast-feed while taking this medicine without your healthcare provider’s approval.

How do I take it?

This medicine comes as a liquid in individual plastic ampules (small bottles) in a foil pouch. Check the label on the medicine for directions about your specific dose. Read and carefully follow the instructions in the medicine package. Use the exact number of ampules per dose prescribed by your healthcare provider. This medicine is usually taken half an hour before meals and at bedtime.

Do not use this medicine in children under age 2.

Prepare a solution with the number of ampules prescribed by your healthcare provider as follows:

  • Break open ampule(s) and squeeze the liquid contents into a glass of water. Do not use the liquid from the ampule if it looks cloudy or discolored. Do not mix this medicine with fruit juice, milk, or food because they may keep the medicine from working properly.
  • Stir until it is completely clear.
  • Drink all of the liquid.
  • Prepare the solution just before you take each dose.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember unless it is almost time for the next scheduled dose. In that case, skip the missed dose and take the next one as directed. Do not take double doses. If you are not sure of what to do if you miss a dose, or if you miss more than one dose, contact your healthcare provider.

What if I overdose?

An acute overdose of this medicine is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms. If you think that you or anyone else may have taken too much of this medicine, call the poison control center at 800-222-1222.

What should I watch out for?

Take this medicine exactly as your healthcare provider prescribes. Do not change your dose or stop taking this medicine without your healthcare provider’s approval. This medicine must be taken regularly to be effective.

If you need emergency care, surgery, or dental work, tell the healthcare provider or dentist you are taking this medicine.

What are the possible side effects?

Along with its needed effects, your medicine may cause some unwanted side effects. Some side effects may be very serious. Some side effects may go away as your body adjusts to the medicine. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effects that continue or get worse.

Life-threatening (Report these to your healthcare provider right away. If you cannot reach your healthcare provider right away, get emergency medical care or call 911 for help): Allergic reaction (hives; itching; rash; trouble breathing; tightness in your chest; swelling of your lips, tongue, and throat).

Serious (report these to your healthcare provider right away): Fast or irregular heartbeat, chest pain, mouth sores, trouble swallowing.

Other: Headache, nausea, muscle pain, stomach pain, irritability, diarrhea, constipation, ringing in the ears, dizziness, trouble sleeping.

What products might interact with this medicine?

No significant drug interactions have been reported.

If you are not sure if your medicines might interact, ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider. Keep a list of all your medicines with you. List all the prescription medicines, nonprescription medicines, supplements, natural remedies, and vitamins that you take. Be sure that you tell all healthcare providers who treat you about all the products you are taking.

How should I store this medicine?

Store this medicine at room temperature. Keep the ampules in the foil pouches until you use them. Protect the ampules from heat, high humidity, and bright light. Do not freeze this medicine.


This advisory includes selected information only and may not include all side effects of this medicine or interactions with other medicines. Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for more information or if you have any questions.

Ask your pharmacist for the best way to dispose of outdated medicine or medicine you have not used. Do not throw medicine in the trash.

Keep all medicines out of the reach of children.

Do not share medicines with other people.

Developed by RelayHealth.

This content is reviewed periodically and is subject to change as new health information becomes available. The information is intended to inform and educate and is not a replacement for medical evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a healthcare professional.

Copyright ©1986-2015 McKesson Corporation and/or one of its subsidiaries. All rights reserved.

Medications to Treat Mast Cell Diseases – TMS

ALL PATIENTS:

Self-Injectable Epinephrine (two doses; e. g., EpiPen®/EpiPen Jr®) should be carried by all patients with a mast cell disorder at all times, even if previous anaphylaxis has not occurred. Both the patient and family members/caregivers should be trained on administering the epinephrine!

Please visit the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) website for more information on anaphylaxis.

Basic Medications for Symptomatic Patients with Mast Cell Diseases1-4

  • h2 antihistamines: help with itching, abdominal pain, flushing, headaches, brain fog
  • h3 antihistamines: help with gastrointestinal symptoms and overall mast cell stability (all mast cell activation symptoms)
  • Mast cell stabilizers: help with stomach and intestinal symptoms and brain fog
  • Leukotriene inhibitors: help with respiratory symptoms and overall mast cell stability (all mast cell activation symptoms)
  • Aspirin therapy (under direct supervision of a physician): if tolerated and if prostaglandins are elevated, helps with flushing, brain fog and bone pain

Note: The h2 and h3 antihistamines are necessary to stabilize receptors on the mast cell. Therefore, if additional medication is required for control of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD), a proton pump inhibitor may be added to this protocol, but it cannot replace the h3 antihistamine.

Please see Tables 1-6 for lists of some specific drugs in these different categories.

Please see Table 7 for a list of some specific drugs for advanced systemic mastocytosis.

Table 1. Some First Generation h2 Antihistamines

Brand Name Generic Name
Atarax® Hydroxyzine hydrochloride
Benadryl® Diphenhydramine
Chlortrimeton® Chlorpheniramine
Doxepin®, Sinequan® Doxepin hydrochloride
Tavist® Clemastine


Table 2. Some Second Generation h2 Antihistamines (may tend to cause less drowsiness)

Brand Name Generic Name
Allegra® Fexofenadine
Claritin® Loratidine
Clarinex® Desloratidine
Zaditor®/Zaditen® (in Europe)* Ketotifen
Xyzal® Levocetirizine
Zyrtec® Cetirizine

*Zaditor® is only available in the US as eye drops; Zaditen® is available by prescription, but it must be obtained from a compounding pharmacy or from abroad.

Table 3. Some h3 Antihistamines

Brand Name Generic Name
Axid® Nizatidine
Pepcid® Famotidine
Tagament® Cimetidine
Zantac® Ranitidine


Table 4. Some Leukotriene Inhibitors

Brand Name Generic Name
Singulair® Montelukast
Accolate® Zafirlukast
Zyflo®/Zyflo CR® Zileuton


Table 5. Mast Cell Stabilizers

Brand Name Generic Name
Gastrocrom® Oral cromolyn sodium
Zaditor®/Zaditen® (in Europe)* Ketotifen
Algonot, Neuroprotect, etc. Food supplements containing bioflavonoids such as quercetin and luteolin
Bayer aspirin; Aspirin; ASA Aspirin, acetylsalicylic acid (for those with high prostaglandin levels; aspirin therapy must be initiated under the direct supervision of a physician!)

* Zaditor® is only available in the US as eye drops; Zaditen® is available by prescription, but it must be obtained from a compounding pharmacy or from abroad.

Table 6. Proton Pump Inhibitors to Help with GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux)

Brand Name Generic Name
Aciphex® Rabeprazole
Dexilant® Dexlansoprazole
Nexium® Esomeprazole
Prevacid® Lansoprazole
Prilosec® Omeprazole
Protonix® Pantoprazole


Table 7. Some Chemotherapy Drugs for Selected Patients with Smoldering and Advanced Variants of Systemic Mastocytosis
1, 5

Brand Name Generic Name
Gleevec® Imatinib
Masivet® Masitinib
Sprycel® Dasatinib
Tasigna® Nilotinib
Rydapt® (Midostaurin) PKC 412
Hydrea® Hydroxyurea
Leustatin®, Leustat®, Litak® Cladribine, 2-CDA
Intron® Interferon Alfa-2b

There are several more therapies in the pipeline, including additional tyrosine kinase inhibitors and other targeted therapies.

Sometimes symptoms change, and it becomes necessary to increase or decrease doses of medications, or to add additional medications to a patient’s prescribed protocol. The simplest change made in conjunction with your mast cell specialist can make such a difference in your symptoms! Although it is tempting to change dosing regimens on your own, please always work with your physician to achieve the safest, most effective outcome!

 

References

  1. Pardanani A. Systemic mastocytosis in adults: 2015 update on diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. Am J Hematol. 2015 Mar;90(3):250-62. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25688753
  2. Theoharides TC, Valent P, Akin C. Mast Cells, Mastocytosis, and Related Disorders. N Engl J Med. 2015 Jul 9;373(2):163-72. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26154789
  3. Akin C. Mast cell activation disorders. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2014 May-Jun;2(3):252-7 e1; quiz 8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24811013
  4. Picard M, Giavina-Bianchi P, Mezzano V, Castells M. Expanding spectrum of mast cell activation disorders: monoclonal and idiopathic mast cell activation syndromes. Clin Ther. 2013 May;35(5):548-62. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23642289
  5. Ustun C, DeRemer DL, Akin C. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of systemic mastocytosis. Leuk Res. 2011 Sep;35(9):1143-52. http://www. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21641642

Cromoline sodium (oral) (gastrocrom) – Allergies 2021

Brand names: Gastrocrom
Generic name: cromolyn sodium (oral)
  • What is sodium cromolyn (gastrocrom)?
  • What are the possible side effects of Cromolyn Sodium (Gastrocrom)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about Sodium Cromolyn (Gastrocrom)?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking cromolyn sodium (Gastrocrom)?
  • How should I take cromolyn sodium (gastrocrom)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (Gastrocrom)?
  • What happens if I overdose (Gastrocrom)?
  • What should I avoid while taking cromolyn sodium (Gastrocrom)?
  • What other drugs will affect cromolyn sodium (gastrocrom)?
  • Where can I get more information (Gastrocrom)?

What is sodium cromolyn (gastrocrom)?

Cromoline sodium works by preventing the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Cromoline sodium is used to treat symptoms of a condition called mastocytosis, which can cause diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, headaches, stomach pain, itchy skin, and flushing (warmth or redness under the skin).

Cromoline sodium may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of Cromolyn Sodium (Gastrocrom)?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; labored breathing; swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor right away if you have:

  • white patches or sores in the mouth or lips;
  • swelling of your tongue;
  • problems with swallowing; or
  • tight feeling in the chest.

Common side effects may include:

  • headache, feeling of irritability;
  • nausea, diarrhea, stomach pain;
  • rash, itching; or
  • muscle pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may arise. Ask your doctor about side effects. You can report side effects to the FDA at the 1-800-FDA-1088 level.

What is the most important information I should know about sodium cromolyn (Gastrocrom)?

Follow all directions on label and packaging. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all of your medical conditions, allergies, and any medications you use.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking cromolyn sodium (Gastrocrom)?

You should not use sodium cromolyn if you are allergic to it.

To make sure cromolyn sodium is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • Kidney disease; or
  • liver disease.

It is not known if this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant.

It is not known whether cromolyn sodium passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding.

Cromolyn Sodium is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old.

How should I take cromolyn sodium (gastrocrom)?

Cromoline sodium is usually taken 4 times a day. Follow all directions on the prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts, or for longer than recommended.

Unbend an ampoule of sodium cromolyn and squeeze the liquid into a glass of water. Stir this mixture and drink it immediately. Do not save for later use.

Take this medicine 30 minutes before meals and at bedtime.

Take your doses at regular intervals to maintain a constant amount of drug in the body at all times.

Call your doctor if your symptoms have not improved after 3 weeks of treatment.

Do not change doses or timing of medication without consulting your doctor.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat and light.

Do not use cromolyn sodium if it looks cloudy, discolored or has particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new drugs.

What happens if I miss a dose (Gastrocrom)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it’s almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take additional medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose (Gastrocrom)?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help Line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking cromolyn sodium (Gastrocrom)?

Follow your doctor’s instructions about any food, drink, or activity restrictions.

What other drugs will affect cromolyn sodium (gastrocrom)?

Other drugs may interact with cromolyn sodium, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all medicines you are using now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information (Gastrocrom)?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about sodium cromolyn.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and do not use this medicine only for an indication.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. (“Multum”) was accurate, current and complete, but there is no guarantee.The information contained herein about the drug may vary over time. Multum’s information has been collected for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States, and therefore Multum does not warrant that use outside the United States is appropriate unless specifically noted otherwise. Multum’s drug information does not support medications, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum Product Information is an information resource designed to assist licensed physicians in patient care and / or to serve consumers considering this service as a supplement to, rather than a replacement for, the knowledge, skills, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination should in no way be construed as indicating that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum accepts no responsibility for any aspect of health care administered through the information provided by Multum. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or side effects.If you have questions about any medications you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

90,000 ALLERGY OVERVIEW: SYMPTOMS, TREATMENT AND MUCH MORE – HEALTH

An allergy is a reaction of the immune system to a foreign substance that is not normally harmful to your body. These foreign substances are called allergens. They may include certain foods,

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Allergies

An allergy is a reaction of the immune system to a foreign substance that is not normally harmful to your body. These foreign substances are called allergens. These can include certain foods, pollen, or pet dander.

It is your immune system’s job to keep you healthy by fighting harmful pathogens. He does this by attacking anything he thinks could put your body in danger. Depending on the allergen, this reaction can include inflammation, sneezing, or a variety of other symptoms.

Your immune system usually adjusts to its environment.For example, when your body encounters something like pet dandruff, it needs to know it’s harmless. In people who are allergic to dandruff, the immune system perceives it as an external invader threatening the body and attacks it.

Allergies are common. Several treatments can help you avoid symptoms.

Allergy Symptoms

The symptoms you experience from an allergy are the result of several factors. These include the type of allergy you have and how severe it is.

If you take any medication before the expected allergic reaction, you may still experience some of these symptoms, but they may diminish.

For food allergies

Food allergies can cause swelling, hives, nausea, fatigue and more. It can take a while for a person to realize that they have a food allergy. If you have a serious reaction after eating and are not sure why, see your doctor immediately. They can find the exact cause of your reaction or refer you to a specialist.

For seasonal allergies

Symptoms of hay fever may mimic those of the common cold. These include nasal congestion, runny nose, and puffy eyes. In most cases, you can manage these symptoms at home using over-the-counter medications. See your doctor if your symptoms become unmanageable.

For severe allergies

Severe allergies can cause anaphylaxis. This is a life-threatening emergency that can lead to shortness of breath, dizziness, and loss of consciousness.If you experience these symptoms after coming into contact with a possible allergen, seek immediate medical attention.

Signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction are different for everyone. Learn more about allergy symptoms and what causes them.

Skin allergy

Skin allergy can be a sign or symptom of an allergy. They can also be a direct result of exposure to an allergen.

For example, eating foods to which you are allergic can cause several symptoms.You may feel a tingling sensation in your mouth and throat. A rash may also appear.

Contact dermatitis, however, is the result of direct skin contact with an allergen. This can happen if you touch something you are allergic to, such as cleaning products or plants.

Types of skin allergies include:

  • Rash. Areas of skin that are irritated, red, or swollen, and may be painful or itchy.
  • Eczema. Areas of skin become inflamed and may itch and bleed.
  • Contact dermatitis. Red, itchy patches of skin appear almost immediately after contact with an allergen.
  • Sore throat. The pharynx or throat is irritated or inflamed.
  • Hive. Red, itchy and raised scars of various sizes and shapes form on the surface of the skin.
  • Swollen eyes. Eyes may watery, itch, and appear “puffy”.
  • Itching. There is irritation or inflammation on the skin.
  • Combustion. Inflammation of the skin leads to discomfort and tingling of the skin.

Rash is one of the most common symptoms of skin allergies. Learn how to recognize a rash and how to treat it.

Causes of Allergies

Researchers are not entirely sure why the immune system triggers an allergic reaction when a normally harmless foreign substance is ingested.

Allergies have a genetic component.This means that parents can pass them on to their children. However, only a general predisposition to an allergic reaction is genetic. Specific allergies are not inherited. For example, if your mother is allergic to shellfish, this does not necessarily mean that you will also be allergic.

Common types of allergens include:

  • Animal products. This includes 90,040 pet dander, dust mite waste and cockroaches.
  • Drugs. Penicillin and sulfa drugs are common triggers.
  • Products. Allergies to wheat, nuts, milk, shellfish and eggs are common.
  • Insect bites. These include bees, wasps and mosquitoes.
  • Form. Airborne mold spores may cause reactions.
  • Plants. Grass, weed and tree pollen and the resin of plants such as poison ivy and poison oak are very common plant allergens.
  • Other allergens. Latex, which is often found in latex gloves and condoms, and metals such as nickel are also common allergens.

Seasonal allergy, also known as hay fever, is one of the most common allergies. It is caused by plant pollen. They cause:

  • itchy eyes
  • watery eyes
  • runny nose
  • coughing

Food allergies are becoming more common. Learn about the most common types of food allergies and the symptoms they cause.

Allergy Treatment

The best way to avoid allergies is to stay away from anything that triggers the reaction. If this is not possible, there are treatment options.

Medication

Allergy treatment often includes medications, such as antihistamines, to control symptoms. The medicine can be over-the-counter or with a prescription. What your doctor will recommend depends on the severity of your allergy.

Allergy medications include:

  • Antihistamines such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
  • Corticosteroids
  • Cetirizine (Zyrtec)
  • Loratadine (Claritin)
  • Cromootoline Sodium (Gastrokoline)
  • PE, Sudafed)

  • leukotriene modifiers (Singulair, Zyflo)

Singular should only be prescribed if no other appropriate treatment options are available.This is because 90,039 increases your risk of 90,040 major changes in behavior and mood, such as suicidal thoughts and actions.

Immunotherapy

Many people choose immunotherapy. This involves several injections over several years to help the body get used to your allergies. Successful immunotherapy can prevent allergy symptoms from returning.

Emergency Epinephrine

If you have a severe, life-threatening allergy, give an emergency epinephrine injection.The injection stops allergic reactions until a doctor arrives. Common brands for this treatment are EpiPen and Twinject.

Certain allergic reactions are a medical emergency. Prepare for these emergencies by knowing how to provide first aid for an allergic reaction.

Natural Allergy Remedies

Many natural remedies and supplements are marketed as treatments and even to prevent allergies. Discuss this with your doctor before trying.Some natural treatments can contain other allergens and worsen symptoms.

For example, some dried teas use flowers and plants that are closely related to plants that can cause severe sneezing. It’s the same with essential oils. Some people use these oils to relieve common allergy symptoms, but essential oils still contain ingredients that can cause allergies.

Every allergy type has a variety of natural remedies that can help speed up your recovery.There are also natural treatment options for childhood allergies.

How allergies are diagnosed

Your doctor can diagnose allergies in several ways.

First, your doctor will ask about your symptoms and perform a physical exam. They will ask you about anything out of the ordinary that you have eaten recently and any substances you may have come into contact with. For example, if you develop a rash on your hands, your doctor may ask if you have recently worn latex gloves.

Finally, a blood test and skin test can confirm or diagnose allergens that you think you have.

Allergy Blood Test

Your doctor may order a blood test. Your blood will be tested for allergy-causing antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE). These are cells that react to allergens. Your doctor will run a blood test to confirm the diagnosis if he is worried about the possibility of a serious allergic reaction.

Skin Test

Your doctor may also refer you to an allergist for testing and treatment. A skin test is a common type of allergy test done by an allergist.

During this test, your skin is tingled or scratched by small needles containing potential allergens. Your skin’s reaction has been documented. If you are allergic to a certain substance, your skin will turn red and inflamed.

Various tests may be required to diagnose all potential allergies. Start here to better understand how allergy testing works.

Prevention of symptoms

There is no way to prevent allergies.But there are ways to prevent the onset of symptoms. The best way to prevent allergy symptoms is to avoid the allergens that cause them.

Avoidance is the most effective way to prevent food allergy symptoms. An elimination diet can help you identify the cause of your allergy so you know how to avoid it. To avoid food allergens, read food labels carefully and ask questions while dining out.

Preventing seasonal, contact and other allergies comes down to knowing where the allergens are and how to avoid them.For example, if you are allergic to dust, you can reduce your symptoms by installing suitable air filters in your home, cleaning your air ducts professionally, and regularly dusting your home.

Proper allergy testing can help you pinpoint the exact triggers to avoid them. These other tips can also help you avoid dangerous allergic reactions.

Allergy Complications

While you may think of allergies as the annoying sniffing and sneezing that happens every new season, some of these allergic reactions can be life-threatening.

For example, anaphylaxis is a serious reaction to exposure to allergens. Most people associate anaphylaxis with food, but any allergen can cause obvious signs:

  • Suddenly narrowed airways
  • Increased heart rate
  • Possible swelling of the tongue and mouth

Allergy symptoms can cause many complications. Your doctor can help determine the cause of your symptoms, as well as the difference between sensitivity and complete allergies. Your doctor can also teach you how to manage allergy symptoms so you can avoid the worst complications.

Asthma and allergies

Asthma is a common respiratory illness. This makes breathing difficult and can narrow the airways in the lungs.

Asthma is closely related to allergies. Indeed, allergies can worsen pre-existing asthma. It can also cause asthma in someone who has never had the disease.

When these conditions occur together, the condition is called allergic asthma or allergic asthma. The Allergy and Asthma Foundation of America estimates that allergic asthma affects about 60 percent of people with asthma in the United States.

Many allergy sufferers can develop asthma. Here’s how to recognize it with you.

Allergy against cold

Runny nose, sneezing and coughing are common allergy symptoms. They are also common symptoms of colds and sinus infections. Indeed, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between common symptoms.

However, additional signs and symptoms of the condition can help you differentiate between the three conditions. For example, allergies can cause skin rashes and itchy eyes. Colds can cause body aches and even fever.A sinus infection usually causes a thick, yellow nasal discharge.

Allergies can affect your immune system for extended periods of time. When your immune system is compromised, you are more likely to be infected with the viruses you come into contact with. This includes the virus that causes the common cold.

In turn, the presence of allergies increases the risk of colds. Determine the differences between the two common conditions with this helpful table.

Cough allergy

Hay fever can cause symptoms including sneezing, coughing, and persistent, persistent cough. This is the result of your body’s overreacting to allergens. It is not contagious, but it can be frustrating.

Unlike chronic coughs, allergies and hay fever coughs are temporary. You may only experience symptoms of this seasonal allergy during certain times of the year, when the plants are just starting to bloom.

In addition, seasonal allergies can cause asthma and asthma can cause coughing.When a person with a common seasonal allergy is exposed to an allergen, the narrowing of the airways can cause a cough. Shortness of breath and chest tightness may also occur. Find out why hay fever coughs tend to get worse at night and what you can do to relieve it.

Allergies and bronchitis

Viruses or bacteria can cause bronchitis, and can be the result of allergies. The first type, acute bronchitis, usually goes away after a few days or weeks. However, chronic bronchitis can last for months and possibly longer.He may also return frequently.

Exposure to common allergens is the most common cause of chronic bronchitis. These allergens include:

  • cigarette smoke
  • air pollution
  • dust
  • pollen
  • chemical fumes

Unlike seasonal allergies, many of these allergens remain in areas such as homes or offices. This can make chronic bronchitis more persistent and more likely to return.

Cough is the only common symptom between chronic and acute bronchitis.Explore other symptoms of bronchitis to better understand what you may have.

Allergies and babies

Skin allergies are more common in young children today than they were several decades ago. However, skin allergies diminish as children get older. Respiratory and food allergies become more common as children get older.

Common skin allergies in babies include:

  • Eczema. This is an inflammatory skin disorder that causes a red rash and itching.These rashes can develop slowly but be persistent.
  • Allergic contact dermatitis. This type of skin allergy develops quickly, often right after your child comes into contact with an irritant. More severe contact dermatitis can develop into painful blisters and cracked skin.
  • Hive. Hives are red bumps or raised patches of skin that appear after exposure to an allergen. They don’t itch or crack, but if itching, the hives can bleed.

An unusual rash or hives on your child’s body may alert you. Understanding the differences in the types of skin allergies that babies commonly experience can help you find the best treatment.

Living with allergies

Allergies are common and have no life-threatening consequences for most people. People who are at risk of anaphylaxis can learn how to manage their allergies and what to do in an emergency.

Most allergies can be managed with avoidance, medication, and lifestyle changes.Working with your doctor or allergist can help reduce any serious complications and make life more enjoyable.

90,000 4 SALT WATER HAZARDS TO FACE YOU NEED TO KNOW

The face hazard of salt water may occur in some people with sensitive skin or certain skin conditions. Although it is believed that the benefits of salt water for the face are natural

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The face hazard of salt water may affect some people with sensitive skin or certain skin conditions.The facial benefits of salt water are believed to naturally support skin health. In fact, using salt water on your face isn’t necessarily without side effects.

Why is salt water dangerous for the face?

Although it is safe, some people may experience side effects from salt water on their face. Moreover, if its use is unsafe or your skin is too sensitive. Indeed, the benefits of salt water for the face can support skin health.The benefits of salt water for the face is to tighten dead skin cells to treat acne. However, the benefits of salt water for the face are not without side effects that can be caused. follows.

1. The skin appears dry.

Skin feels dry when salt water is used on the face. One of the dangers of facial exposure to salt water is that the skin appears dry. When using salt water on the face, the skin may appear dry due to this. This is especially noticeable for people with dry skin or in cold weather.In addition, there may be discomfort on the face due to the remaining salt residue, because it is not rinsed off.

2. Allergic reactions.

Salt water hazard to next person is an allergic reaction. For those of you with normal skin or no major skin problems on your face, using salt water on your face may be safe. Unfortunately, this is different for people with certain types of facial skin or skin problems, especially those with allergies.Allergic reactions can occur as a side effect of exposure to salt water on the face. Depending on the severity of the allergy, you may experience symptoms such as itching, rash, dizziness, or shortness of breath shortly after applying salt water to your face. Therefore, it is important to check if your skin is suitable for the benefits of salt water for the face.

3. Acne.

Acne can be caused by salt residues that clog the pores. Acne can also be dangerous because of the salt water on the face.Yes, although the benefits of salt water for the face are believed to heal acne, some people may indeed experience acne. Against. The side effects of salt water on your face can occur because it takes too long to use salt water on your face and you should not rinse your skin until it is completely cleansed. As a result, salt residues that still remain on the skin risk clogging the pores. which cause acne.

4. Skin irritation.

Skin irritation can also pose a risk of salt water splashing on the face for some people.As with exfoliating skin, the side effects of salt water on the face can cause irritated and red skin, according to one dermatologist at the Australasian College of Dermatology. using salt water to remove dead skin cells is too hard to irritate the skin. The side effects of the face salt above are not only felt when using the salt water directly to wash your face, but can also be felt when you are swimming in the sea.

How to Benefit from Salt Water for a Safe Face with No Side Effects

As mentioned earlier, for those of you with normal skin or no skin problems, you can benefit from salt water for your face.However, for those of you with certain types of facial skin or skin conditions, you have to be careful – the reason is that there may be side effects of salt water on the face. Therefore, it is important to first check if your skin is suitable for using salt water for your face by following these steps. below.

1. Apply salt water to other areas of the skin.

You can apply a small amount of warm salt water to other areas of your body. For example, the back of the hand, the skin under the chin, or the skin behind the ears.Then wait 24 to 48 hours to see the reaction to your skin.

2. Look at the reaction on the skin.

If your skin does not have an allergic reaction such as irritation, redness, swelling or other signs of skin allergy, you can safely use salt water on your face. Conversely, if an allergic reaction occurs, you should avoid using salt water. for face.

Notes from HealthyQ

If you are going to use salt water on your face, you must be careful before using it.There is nothing wrong with consulting a dermatologist before using any natural ingredients on your face, including salt. A dermatologist can help you determine if your facial skin is suitable for water use. face salt or not. Thus, you can safely get the benefits of salt water for your face and avoid the side effects caused. Consult your doctor directly via the SehatQ Family Health App to learn more about the dangers of salt water to your face.How to do it, download right now on the App Store and Google Play .

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