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Is a ct scan and cat scan the same: The request could not be satisfied

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Purpose, Procedure, Risks, Side-Effects, Results

A computed tomography (CT or CAT) scan allows doctors to see inside your body. It uses a combination of X-rays and a computer to create pictures of your organs, bones, and other tissues. It shows more detail than a regular X-ray.

You can get a CT scan on any part of your body. The procedure doesn’t take very long, and it’s painless.

How Do CT Scans Work?

They use a narrow X-ray beam that circles around one part of your body. This provides a series of images from many different angles. A computer uses this information to create a cross-sectional picture. Like one piece in a loaf of bread, this two-dimensional (2D) scan shows a “slice” of the inside of your body.

This process is repeated to produce a number of slices. The computer stacks these scans one on top of the other to create a detailed image of your organs, bones, or blood vessels. For example, a surgeon may use this type of scan to look at all sides of a tumor to prepare for an operation.

How Are CT Scans Done?

You’d probably get a scan at a hospital or radiology clinic. Your doctor might tell you not to eat or drink for a few hours before the procedure. You may also need to wear a hospital gown and remove any metal objects, such as jewelry.

A radiology technologist will perform the CT scan. During the test, you’ll lie on a table inside a large, doughnut-shaped CT machine. As the table slowly moves through the scanner, the X-rays rotate around your body. It’s normal to hear a whirring or buzzing noise. Movement can blur the image, so you’ll be asked to stay very still. You may need to hold your breath at times.

How long the scan takes will depend on what parts of your body are being scanned. It can take anywhere from a few minutes to a half-hour. In most cases, you’ll go home the same day.

What Is It Used For?

Doctors order CT scans for a long list of reasons:

  • CT scans can detect bone and joint problems, like complex bone fractures and tumors.
  • If you have a condition like cancer, heart disease, emphysema, or liver masses, CT scans can spot it or help doctors see any changes.
  • They show internal injuries and bleeding, such as those caused by a car accident.
  • They can help locate a tumor, blood clot, excess fluid, or infection.
  • Doctors use them to guide treatment plans and procedures, such as biopsies, surgeries, and radiation therapy.
  • Doctors can compare CT scans to find out if certain treatments are working. For example, scans of a tumor over time can show whether it’s responding to chemotherapy or radiation.

What Is a CT Scan with Contrast?

In a CT scan, dense substances like bones are easy to see. But soft tissues don’t show up as well. They may look faint in the image. To help them appear clearly, you may need a special dye called a contrast material. They block the X-rays and appear white on the scan, highlighting blood vessels, organs, or other structures.

Contrast materials are usually made of iodine or barium sulfate. You might receive these drugs in one or more of three ways:

  • Injection: The drugs are injected directly into a vein. This is done to help your blood vessels, urinary tract, liver, or gallbladder stand out in the image.
  • Orally: Drinking a liquid with the contrast material can enhance scans of your digestive tract, the pathway of food through your body.
  • Enema: If your intestines are being scanned, the contrast material can be inserted in your rectum.

After the CT scan, you’ll need to drink plenty of fluids to help your kidneys remove the contrast material from your body.

Are There Any Risks?

CT scans use X-rays, which produce ionizing radiation. Research shows that this kind of radiation may damage your DNA and lead to cancer. But the risk is still very small — your chances of developing a fatal cancer because of a CT scan are about 1 in 2,000.

But radiation’s effect adds up over your lifetime. So your risk increases with every CT scan you get. Talk to your doctor about the procedure’s potential dangers and benefits, and ask why the CT scan is necessary.

Ionizing radiation may be more harmful in children. That’s because they’re still growing. They also have more years to get exposed to radiation. Before the procedure, you may want to ask the doctor or technician if the CT machine’s settings have been adjusted for a child.

Tell your physician if you’re pregnant. If you need imaging for your stomach area, your doctor may recommend an exam that doesn’t use radiation, such as an ultrasound.

What Are the Side Effects?

Some people are allergic to the contrast materials. Most of the time, the reaction is mild. It can lead to itchiness or a rash. In very few cases, the dye may trigger a life-threatening reaction. For this reason, your health care provider may want to monitor you for a short period after your CT scan. Tell your doctor about any allergies you have to medications, seafood, or iodine.

Your doctor should know, too, if you have diabetes and are taking the drug metformin. They’ll let you know if you should stop taking your medication before or after your procedure.

Although it’s rare, contrast materials can lead to kidney problems. Let your doctor know if you have any kidney issues before the CT scan.

Purpose, Procedure, Risks, Side-Effects, Results

A computed tomography (CT or CAT) scan allows doctors to see inside your body. It uses a combination of X-rays and a computer to create pictures of your organs, bones, and other tissues. It shows more detail than a regular X-ray.

You can get a CT scan on any part of your body. The procedure doesn’t take very long, and it’s painless.

How Do CT Scans Work?

They use a narrow X-ray beam that circles around one part of your body. This provides a series of images from many different angles. A computer uses this information to create a cross-sectional picture. Like one piece in a loaf of bread, this two-dimensional (2D) scan shows a “slice” of the inside of your body.

This process is repeated to produce a number of slices. The computer stacks these scans one on top of the other to create a detailed image of your organs, bones, or blood vessels. For example, a surgeon may use this type of scan to look at all sides of a tumor to prepare for an operation.

How Are CT Scans Done?

You’d probably get a scan at a hospital or radiology clinic. Your doctor might tell you not to eat or drink for a few hours before the procedure. You may also need to wear a hospital gown and remove any metal objects, such as jewelry.

A radiology technologist will perform the CT scan. During the test, you’ll lie on a table inside a large, doughnut-shaped CT machine. As the table slowly moves through the scanner, the X-rays rotate around your body. It’s normal to hear a whirring or buzzing noise. Movement can blur the image, so you’ll be asked to stay very still. You may need to hold your breath at times.

How long the scan takes will depend on what parts of your body are being scanned. It can take anywhere from a few minutes to a half-hour. In most cases, you’ll go home the same day.

What Is It Used For?

Doctors order CT scans for a long list of reasons:

  • CT scans can detect bone and joint problems, like complex bone fractures and tumors.
  • If you have a condition like cancer, heart disease, emphysema, or liver masses, CT scans can spot it or help doctors see any changes.
  • They show internal injuries and bleeding, such as those caused by a car accident.
  • They can help locate a tumor, blood clot, excess fluid, or infection.
  • Doctors use them to guide treatment plans and procedures, such as biopsies, surgeries, and radiation therapy.
  • Doctors can compare CT scans to find out if certain treatments are working. For example, scans of a tumor over time can show whether it’s responding to chemotherapy or radiation.

What Is a CT Scan with Contrast?

In a CT scan, dense substances like bones are easy to see. But soft tissues don’t show up as well. They may look faint in the image. To help them appear clearly, you may need a special dye called a contrast material. They block the X-rays and appear white on the scan, highlighting blood vessels, organs, or other structures.

Contrast materials are usually made of iodine or barium sulfate. You might receive these drugs in one or more of three ways:

  • Injection: The drugs are injected directly into a vein. This is done to help your blood vessels, urinary tract, liver, or gallbladder stand out in the image.
  • Orally: Drinking a liquid with the contrast material can enhance scans of your digestive tract, the pathway of food through your body.
  • Enema: If your intestines are being scanned, the contrast material can be inserted in your rectum.

After the CT scan, you’ll need to drink plenty of fluids to help your kidneys remove the contrast material from your body.

Are There Any Risks?

CT scans use X-rays, which produce ionizing radiation. Research shows that this kind of radiation may damage your DNA and lead to cancer. But the risk is still very small — your chances of developing a fatal cancer because of a CT scan are about 1 in 2,000.

But radiation’s effect adds up over your lifetime. So your risk increases with every CT scan you get. Talk to your doctor about the procedure’s potential dangers and benefits, and ask why the CT scan is necessary.

Ionizing radiation may be more harmful in children. That’s because they’re still growing. They also have more years to get exposed to radiation. Before the procedure, you may want to ask the doctor or technician if the CT machine’s settings have been adjusted for a child.

Tell your physician if you’re pregnant. If you need imaging for your stomach area, your doctor may recommend an exam that doesn’t use radiation, such as an ultrasound.

What Are the Side Effects?

Some people are allergic to the contrast materials. Most of the time, the reaction is mild. It can lead to itchiness or a rash. In very few cases, the dye may trigger a life-threatening reaction. For this reason, your health care provider may want to monitor you for a short period after your CT scan. Tell your doctor about any allergies you have to medications, seafood, or iodine.

Your doctor should know, too, if you have diabetes and are taking the drug metformin. They’ll let you know if you should stop taking your medication before or after your procedure.

Although it’s rare, contrast materials can lead to kidney problems. Let your doctor know if you have any kidney issues before the CT scan.

Purpose, Procedure, Risks, Side-Effects, Results

A computed tomography (CT or CAT) scan allows doctors to see inside your body. It uses a combination of X-rays and a computer to create pictures of your organs, bones, and other tissues. It shows more detail than a regular X-ray.

You can get a CT scan on any part of your body. The procedure doesn’t take very long, and it’s painless.

How Do CT Scans Work?

They use a narrow X-ray beam that circles around one part of your body. This provides a series of images from many different angles. A computer uses this information to create a cross-sectional picture. Like one piece in a loaf of bread, this two-dimensional (2D) scan shows a “slice” of the inside of your body.

This process is repeated to produce a number of slices. The computer stacks these scans one on top of the other to create a detailed image of your organs, bones, or blood vessels. For example, a surgeon may use this type of scan to look at all sides of a tumor to prepare for an operation.

How Are CT Scans Done?

You’d probably get a scan at a hospital or radiology clinic. Your doctor might tell you not to eat or drink for a few hours before the procedure. You may also need to wear a hospital gown and remove any metal objects, such as jewelry.

A radiology technologist will perform the CT scan. During the test, you’ll lie on a table inside a large, doughnut-shaped CT machine. As the table slowly moves through the scanner, the X-rays rotate around your body. It’s normal to hear a whirring or buzzing noise. Movement can blur the image, so you’ll be asked to stay very still. You may need to hold your breath at times.

How long the scan takes will depend on what parts of your body are being scanned. It can take anywhere from a few minutes to a half-hour. In most cases, you’ll go home the same day.

What Is It Used For?

Doctors order CT scans for a long list of reasons:

  • CT scans can detect bone and joint problems, like complex bone fractures and tumors.
  • If you have a condition like cancer, heart disease, emphysema, or liver masses, CT scans can spot it or help doctors see any changes.
  • They show internal injuries and bleeding, such as those caused by a car accident.
  • They can help locate a tumor, blood clot, excess fluid, or infection.
  • Doctors use them to guide treatment plans and procedures, such as biopsies, surgeries, and radiation therapy.
  • Doctors can compare CT scans to find out if certain treatments are working. For example, scans of a tumor over time can show whether it’s responding to chemotherapy or radiation.

What Is a CT Scan with Contrast?

In a CT scan, dense substances like bones are easy to see. But soft tissues don’t show up as well. They may look faint in the image. To help them appear clearly, you may need a special dye called a contrast material. They block the X-rays and appear white on the scan, highlighting blood vessels, organs, or other structures.

Contrast materials are usually made of iodine or barium sulfate. You might receive these drugs in one or more of three ways:

  • Injection: The drugs are injected directly into a vein. This is done to help your blood vessels, urinary tract, liver, or gallbladder stand out in the image.
  • Orally: Drinking a liquid with the contrast material can enhance scans of your digestive tract, the pathway of food through your body.
  • Enema: If your intestines are being scanned, the contrast material can be inserted in your rectum.

After the CT scan, you’ll need to drink plenty of fluids to help your kidneys remove the contrast material from your body.

Are There Any Risks?

CT scans use X-rays, which produce ionizing radiation. Research shows that this kind of radiation may damage your DNA and lead to cancer. But the risk is still very small — your chances of developing a fatal cancer because of a CT scan are about 1 in 2,000.

But radiation’s effect adds up over your lifetime. So your risk increases with every CT scan you get. Talk to your doctor about the procedure’s potential dangers and benefits, and ask why the CT scan is necessary.

Ionizing radiation may be more harmful in children. That’s because they’re still growing. They also have more years to get exposed to radiation. Before the procedure, you may want to ask the doctor or technician if the CT machine’s settings have been adjusted for a child.

Tell your physician if you’re pregnant. If you need imaging for your stomach area, your doctor may recommend an exam that doesn’t use radiation, such as an ultrasound.

What Are the Side Effects?

Some people are allergic to the contrast materials. Most of the time, the reaction is mild. It can lead to itchiness or a rash. In very few cases, the dye may trigger a life-threatening reaction. For this reason, your health care provider may want to monitor you for a short period after your CT scan. Tell your doctor about any allergies you have to medications, seafood, or iodine.

Your doctor should know, too, if you have diabetes and are taking the drug metformin. They’ll let you know if you should stop taking your medication before or after your procedure.

Although it’s rare, contrast materials can lead to kidney problems. Let your doctor know if you have any kidney issues before the CT scan.

What is It, Preparation & Test Details

Overview

Patient Entering CT Scanner.

What is a CT scan?

Medical professionals use computed tomography, also known as CT scan, to examine structures inside your body. A CT scan uses X-rays and computers to produce images of a cross-section of your body. It takes pictures that show very thin “slices” of your bones, muscles, organs and blood vessels so that healthcare providers can see your body in great detail.

Traditional X-ray machines use a fixed tube to point X-rays at a single spot. As X-rays travel through the body, they are absorbed in different amounts by different tissues. Higher density tissue create a whiter image than other tissues against the black background of the film. X-rays produce 2D images. CT scans have a doughnut-shaped tube that rotates the X-ray 360 degrees around you. The data captured provides a detailed 3D view of the inside of your body.

Are a CT scan and CAT scan the same thing?

CT scans and CAT scans describe the same imaging test. CAT scan stands for computed axial tomography.

Test Details

Patient Fully Inside a CT Scanner.

What is a CT scan with contrast?

Sometimes, your scan uses a contrast agent. This contrast agent, sometimes called a dye, improves the images by highlighting certain features. Your healthcare provider will either have you drink a special liquid containing the contrast agent or give you an IV injection with the contrast or both depending on the type of CT scan and the reason for the scan. The contrast agent is cleared from your body through your urine, first rapidly then more slowly over the next 24 hours.

How do I prepare for a CT scan?

Your healthcare provider will give you instructions on how to prepare for your CT scan. On the day of the exam, you should pay attention to:

  • Arrival: You should plan to arrive early, depending on your healthcare provider’s instructions. Arriving early helps the testing stay on schedule.
  • Diet: Avoid eating and drinking for four hours before your exam.
  • Medications: Ask your healthcare provider if you should take your regular medicines before the CT scan.
  • Comfort: You should wear comfortable clothes. You may need to change into a gown before the exam and remove your watch and jewelry, including any piercings you can remove. You may need to remove dentures and hearing aids, too. Zippers and metal objects can obstruct the scan.

If your CT scan uses dye or contrast, your provider may give you some specific preparation guidelines:

  • Blood test: You may need a blood test before your scheduled CT scan. The blood test will make sure the healthcare provider chooses the right dye.
  • Diet restrictions: You will need to watch what you eat and drink for the four hours before your CT scan. Consuming only clear liquids helps prevent nausea when you receive the contrast dye. You can generally have broth, tea or black coffee, strained fruit juices, plain gelatin and soft drinks, like ginger ale.
  • Allergy medication: If you are allergic to the contrast agent used for CT (which contains iodine), you may need to take a steroid medication the night before and morning of your procedure along with an antihistamine, such as benedryl, before the exam. Be sure to check with your healthcare provider and have them order these medications for you if needed. Contrast agents for MRI and CT are different; being allergic to one doesn’t mean you are allergic to the other.
  • Preparation solution: You should drink the oral contrast solution as instructed by your technologist or nurse.

What happens during the test?

During the test, you will lie on your back on a table (like a bed). If your test requires it, a healthcare provider may inject the contrast dye intravenously (into your vein). This dye can make you feel flushed or have a metallic taste in your mouth.

When the scan begins:

  1. The bed slowly moves into the doughnut-shaped scanner. At this point, you will need to stay as still as possible because movement can create blurry images.
  2. The scanner takes pictures of the area the healthcare provider needs to see. Unlike an MRI scan, a CT scan is silent.
  3. When the exam is over, the table moves back out of the scanner.

How long does the test take?

Typically, you should plan for an hour for a CT scan. Most of that time is for preparation. The scan itself takes between 10 and 30 minutes or less. Generally, you can resume your activities after a healthcare provider says it is safe to do so — usually after they complete the scan and verify clear images.

Results and Follow-Up

How long does it take to get results?

The results of the scan usually take 24 hours. A radiologist, a physician who specializes in reading and interpreting CT scan and other radiologic images, will review your scan and prepare a report that explains them. In an emergency setting, such as a hospital or emergency room, healthcare providers often receive results within an hour.

Once a radiologist and your healthcare provider have reviewed the results, you will either have another appointment or receive a call. Your healthcare provider will discuss the results with you.

Additional Details

What does a CT scan show?

Your healthcare provider will order a CT scan to help make a diagnosis of your health. The scan enables providers to closely examine bones, organs and other soft tissues, blood vessels and suspicious growths. Things that a CT scan can find include:

Healthcare providers can also see organs and tissues on X-rays. But on X-rays, body structures appear to overlap, making it difficult to see everything. The CT scan shows spaces between organs for a clearer view.

Are CT scans safe?

Healthcare providers consider CT scans generally safe. CT scans for children are safe, too. For children, your CT technician may use machines adjusted for children to reduce their radiation exposure.

CT scans, like other diagnostics, use a small amount of ionizing radiation to capture the image. Some risks associated with CT scans include:

  • Cancer risk: All types of imaging using radiation, such as X-rays, cause a small increase in your risk of developing cancer. The difference is too tiny to measure effectively.
  • Allergic reactions: Occasionally, people have a minor or more serious allergic reaction to the contrast agent.

If you have concerns about the health risks of CT scans, talk to your healthcare provider. They will discuss your concerns and help you make an informed decision about the scan.

Can I have a CT scan if I’m pregnant?

If you are or might be pregnant, you should tell the CT technician. CT scans of the pelvis and abdomen can subject the unborn baby to radiation, but it’s not enough to cause actual harm. CT scans in other parts of the body don’t put your baby at any risk.

A note from Cleveland Clinic

CT scans are an excellent diagnostic tool. You may have worries when your provider orders a CT scan. But this safe, painless test is noninvasive and has very little risk. The reward is that a CT scan can help your providers accurately diagnose a health concern and provide the right treatment for you. Talk to your healthcare provider about any concerns you may have, including other options for testing.

Computed Tomography (CT or CAT) Scan of the Abdomen

What is a CT scan of the abdomen?

Computed tomography (CT scan or CAT scan) is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce horizontal, or axial, images (often called slices) of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones, muscles, fat, organs, and blood vessels. CT scans are more detailed than standard X-rays.

In standard X-rays, a beam of energy is aimed at the body part being studied. A plate behind the body part captures the variations of the energy beam after it passes through skin, bone, muscle, and other tissue. While much information can be obtained from a standard X-ray, a lot of detail about internal organs and other structures is not available.

In computed tomography, the X-ray beam moves in a circle around the body. This allows many different views of the same organ or structure. The X-ray information is sent to a computer that interprets the X-ray data and displays it in a two-dimensional (2D) form on a monitor.

CT scans may be done with or without “contrast.” Contrast refers to a substance taken by mouth or injected into an intravenous (IV) line that causes the particular organ or tissue under study to be seen more clearly. Contrast examinations may require you to fast for a certain period of time before the procedure. Your doctor will notify you of this prior to the procedure.

CT scans of the abdomen can provide more detailed information about abdominal organs and structures than standard X-rays of the abdomen, thus providing more information related to injuries and/or diseases of the abdominal organs.

CT scans of the abdomen may also be used to visualize placement of needles during biopsies of abdominal organs or tumors or during aspiration (withdrawal) of fluid from the abdomen. CT scans of the abdomen are useful in monitoring tumors and other conditions of the abdomen before and after treatment.

Other related procedures that may be used to diagnose abdominal problems include abdominal X-rays, pancreas scan, liver scan, gallbladder scan, kidney scan, endoscopy procedures such as colonoscopy, abdominal ultrasound, and abdominal angiogram.

What are the reasons for a CT scan of the abdomen?

The abdomen contains organs of the gastrointestinal, urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems. A CT scan of the abdomen may be performed to assess the abdomen and its organs for tumors and other lesions, injuries, intra-abdominal bleeding, infections, unexplained abdominal pain, obstructions, or other conditions, particularly when another type of examination, such as X-rays or physical examination, is not conclusive.

A CT scan of the abdomen may also be used to evaluate the effects of treatment on abdominal tumors. Another use of abdominal CT is to provide guidance for biopsies and/or aspiration of tissue from the abdomen.

There may be other reasons for your doctor to recommend a CT scan of the abdomen.

What are the risks of a CT scan?

You may want to ask your doctor about the amount of radiation used during the CT procedure and the risks related to your particular situation. It is a good idea to keep a record of your past history of radiation exposure, such as previous CT scans and other types of X-rays, so that you can inform your doctor. Risks associated with radiation exposure may be related to the cumulative number of X-ray examinations and/or treatments over a long period of time.

If you are pregnant or suspect that you may be pregnant, you should notify your health care provider. Radiation exposure during pregnancy may lead to birth defects.

If contrast media is used, there is a risk for allergic reaction to the media. Patients who are allergic to or sensitive to medications should notify their doctor. You will need to let your doctor know if you have ever had a reaction to contrast media, or kidney problems. A reported seafood allergy is not considered to be a contraindication for iodinated contrast. If you take metformin/Glucophage, or a related medication, you may be asked to stop taking the medication for at least 48 hours after the contrast is administered, as it may cause a condition called metabolic acidosis, or an unsafe change in your blood pH.

Patients with kidney failure or other kidney problems should notify their doctor. In some cases, the contrast media can cause kidney failure, especially if the person is dehydrated or already has underlying kidney disease.

There may be other risks depending on your specific medical condition. Be sure to discuss any concerns with your doctor prior to the procedure.

Certain factors or conditions may interfere with the accuracy of a CT scan of the abdomen. These factors include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Metallic objects within the abdomen, such as surgical clips

  • Barium in the intestines from a recent barium study

  • Stool and/or gas in the bowel

  • Total hip replacement

How do I prepare for a CT scan?

If you are having a computed tomography angiography (CTA) or virtual colonoscopy with Johns Hopkins radiology, you will be given specific instructions when you make your appointment.

PRECAUTIONS: If you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, please check with your doctor before scheduling the exam. Other options will be discussed with you and your doctor.

CLOTHING: You may be asked to change into a patient gown. If so, a gown will be provided for you. A locker will be provided to secure personal belongings. Please remove all piercings and leave all jewelry and valuables at home.

CONTRAST MEDIA: CT scans are most frequently done with and without a contrast media. The contrast media improves the radiologist’s ability to view the images of the inside of the body.

  • Some patients should not have an iodine-based contrast media. If you have problems with your kidney function, please inform the access center representative when you schedule the appointment. You may be able to have the scan performed without contrast media or have an alternative imaging exam.

  • The most common type of CT scan with contrast is the double contrast study that will require you to drink a contrast media before your exam begins in addition to the IV contrast. The more contrast you are able to drink, the better the images are for the radiologist to visualize your digestive tract.

ALLERGY: Please inform the access center representative when you schedule your CT scan if you have had an allergic reaction to any contrast media. IV contrast will not be administered if you have had a severe or anaphylactic reaction to any contrast media in the past. If you had mild to moderate reactions in the past, you will likely need to take medication prior to the CT scan. These plans will be discussed with you in detail when you schedule your exam. Any known reactions to a contrast media should be discussed with your personal physician.

EAT/DRINK: If your doctor ordered a CT scan without contrast, you can eat, drink and take your prescribed medications prior to your exam. If your doctor ordered a CT scan with contrast, do not eat anything three hours prior to your CT scan. You are encouraged to drink clear liquids. You may also take your prescribed medications prior to your exam.

DIABETICS: Diabetics should eat a light breakfast or lunch three hours prior to the scan time. Depending on your oral medication for diabetes, you may be asked to discontinue use of the medication for 48 hours after the CT scan. If you have a CT scan with Johns Hopkins radiology, detailed instructions will be given following your examination.

MEDICATION: All patients can take their prescribed medications as usual.

Based on your medical condition, your doctor may request other specific preparation.

What happens during a CT scan?

CT scans may be performed on an outpatient basis or as part of your stay in a hospital. Procedures may vary depending on your condition and your physician’s practices.

Generally, a CT scan follows this process:

  1. You may be asked to change into a patient gown. If so, a gown will be provided for you. A locked will be provided to secure all personal belongings. Please remove all piercings and leave all jewelry and valuables at home.

  2. If you are to have a procedure done with contrast, an intravenous (IV) line will be started in the hand or arm for injection of the contrast media. For oral contrast, you will be given a liquid contrast preparation to swallow. In some situations, the contrast may be given rectally.

  3. You will lie on a scan table that slides into a large, circular opening of the scanning machine. Pillows and straps may be used to prevent movement during the procedure.

  4. The technologist will be in another room where the scanner controls are located. However, you will be in constant sight of the technologist through a window. Speakers inside the scanner will enable the technologist to communicate with and hear you. You may have a call button so that you can let the technologist know if you have any problems during the procedure. The technologist will be watching you at all times and will be in constant communication.

  5. As the scanner begins to rotate around you, X-rays will pass through the body for short amounts of time. You will hear clicking sounds, which are normal.

  6. The X-rays absorbed by the body’s tissues will be detected by the scanner and transmitted to the computer. The computer will transform the information into an image to be interpreted by the radiologist.

  7. It will be important that you remain very still during the procedure. You may be asked to hold your breath at various times during the procedure.

  8. If contrast media is used for your procedure, you may feel some effects when the dye is injected into the IV line. These effects include a flushing sensation, a salty or metallic taste in the mouth, a brief headache, or nausea and/or vomiting. These effects usually last for a few moments.

  9. You should notify the technologist if you feel any breathing difficulties, sweating, numbness or heart palpitations.

  10. When the procedure has been completed, you will be removed from the scanner.

  11. If an IV line was inserted for contrast administration, the line will be removed.

While the CT procedure itself causes no pain, having to lie still for the length of the procedure might cause some discomfort or pain, particularly in the case of a recent injury or invasive procedure such as surgery. The technologist will use all possible comfort measures and complete the procedure as quickly as possible to minimize any discomfort or pain.

What happens after a CT scan?

If contrast dye was used during your procedure, you may be monitored for a period of time for any side effects or reactions to the contrast dye, such as itching, swelling, rash, or difficulty breathing.

If you notice any pain, redness, and/or swelling at the IV site after you return home following your procedure, you should notify your doctor as this could indicate an infection or other type of reaction.

Otherwise, there is no special type of care required after a CT scan of the abdomen. You may resume your usual diet and activities unless your doctor advises you differently. Your doctor may give you additional or alternate instructions after the procedure, depending on your particular situation.

Computed Tomography (CT or CAT) Scan of the Bones

What is a CT scan of the bones?

(CT Scan of the Skeleton)

Computed tomography (CT scan or CAT scan) is a noninvasive diagnostic
imaging procedure that uses a combination of

X-rays

and computer technology to produce horizontal, or axial, images (often
called slices) of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of different
parts of the body, including the bones, muscles, fat, and organs. CT scans
are more detailed than standard X-rays.

In standard X-rays, a beam of energy is aimed at the body part being
studied. A plate behind the body part captures the variations of the energy
beam after it passes through skin, bone, muscle, and other tissue. While
much information can be obtained from a standard X-ray, a lot of detail
about internal organs and other structures is not available.

In computed tomography, the X-ray beam moves in a circle around the body.
This allows many different views of the same organ or structure. The X-ray
information is sent to a computer that interprets the X-ray data and
displays it in a two-dimensional (2D) form on a monitor.

CT scans may be done with or without “contrast.” Contrast refers to a
substance taken by mouth or injected into an intravenous (IV) line that
causes the particular organ or tissue under study to be seen more clearly.
Contrast examinations may require you to fast for a certain period of time
before the procedure. Your doctor will notify you of this prior to the
procedure.

CT scans of the bones can provide more detailed information about the bone
tissue and bone structure than standard X-rays of the bone, thus providing
more information related to injuries and/or diseases of the bone.

Other related procedures that may be used to diagnose bone problems include
X-rays of the bones,

magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the bones,

bone scan, and

bone densitometry.

What are the reasons for a CT scan of the bones?

A CT scan of the bones may be performed to assess bones, soft tissues, and
joints for damage, lesions, fractures, or other abnormalities, particularly
when another type of examination, such as X-rays or physical examination
are not conclusive.

There may be other reasons for your doctor to recommend a CT scan of the
bones, joints, or soft tissues.

What are the risks of a CT scan?

You may want to ask your doctor about the amount of radiation used during
the CT procedure and the risks related to your particular situation. It is
a good idea to keep a record of your past history of radiation exposure,
such as previous CT scans and other types of X-rays, so that you can inform
your doctor. Risks associated with radiation exposure may be related to the
cumulative number of X-ray examinations and/or treatments over a long
period of time.

If you are pregnant or suspect that you may be pregnant, you should notify
your health care provider. Radiation exposure during pregnancy may lead to
birth defects. If it is necessary for you to have a CT of the bones,
special precautions will be made to minimize the radiation exposure to the
fetus.

If contrast media is used, there is a risk for allergic reaction to the
media. Patients who are allergic to or sensitive to medications should
notify their doctor. You will need to let your doctor know if you have ever
had a reaction to any contrast media, and/or any kidney problems. A
reported seafood allergy is not considered to be a contraindication for
iodinated contrast.

Patients with kidney failure or other kidney problems should notify their
doctor. In some cases, the contrast media can cause kidney failure. Also,
patients taking the diabetes medication metformin (Glucophage) should alert
their doctor before having IV contrast, as it may cause a rare condition
called metabolic acidosis. If you take metformin, you will be asked to stop
taking it at the time of the procedure and to wait for 48 hours after your
injection. A blood test to check kidney function may be required before you
can start taking metformin again.

There may be other risks depending on your specific medical condition. Be
sure to discuss any concerns with your doctor prior to the procedure.

How do I prepare for a CT scan?

If you are having a

computed tomography angiography (CTA)

with Johns Hopkins radiology, you will be given specific instructions when
you make your appointment.

PRECAUTIONS: If you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, please check with your
doctor before scheduling the exam. Other options will be discussed with you
and your doctor.

CLOTHING: You may be asked to change into a patient gown. If so, a gown will be
provided for you. A locker will be provided to secure personal belongings.
Please remove all piercings and leave all jewelry and valuables at home.

CONTRAST
MEDIA: CT scans are most frequently done with and without a contrast media. The
contrast media improves the radiologist’s ability to view the images of the
inside of the body.

  • Some patients should not have an iodine-based contrast media. If
    you have problems with your kidney function, please inform the
    access center representative when you schedule the appointment. You
    may be able to have the scan performed without contrast media or
    have an alternative imaging exam.

  • The most common type of CT scan with contrast is the double
    contrast study that will require you to drink a contrast media
    before your exam begins in addition to the IV contrast. The more
    contrast you are able to drink, the better the images are for the
    radiologist to visualize your digestive tract.

ALLERGY: Please inform the access center representative when you schedule your CT
scan if you have had an allergic reaction to any contrast media. IV
contrast will not be administered if you have had a severe or anaphylactic
reaction to any contrast media in the past. If you had mild to moderate
reactions in the past, you will likely need to take medication prior to the
CT scan. These plans will be discussed with you in detail when you schedule
your exam. Any known reactions to a contrast media should be discussed with
your personal physician.

EAT/DRINK: If your doctor ordered a CT scan without contrast, you
can eat, drink and take your prescribed medications prior to your exam. If
your doctor ordered a CT scan with contrast, do not eat anything three hours prior to your CT scan. You are
encouraged to drink clear liquids. You may also take your prescribed
medications prior to your exam.

DIABETICS: Diabetics should eat a light breakfast or lunch three hours prior to the
scan time. Depending on your oral medication for diabetes, you may be asked
to discontinue use of the medication for 48 hours after the CT scan.
If you have a CT scan with Johns Hopkins radiology, detailed instructions
will be given following your examination.

MEDICATION: All patients can take their prescribed medications as usual.

Differences Between an MRI and a CT Scan

When you have a medical issue that requires diagnostic imaging, your doctor may recommend an MRI or CT scan. Both are non-invasive, low-risk ways of finding out what’s going on inside your body. One test might make more sense than the other, depending on your situation.

What is an MRI?

MRI stands for magnetic resonance imaging. It uses a magnetic field and radio waves to capture detailed images of the structures inside your body. MRIs are typically used to diagnose issues with the brain, heart, blood vessels, breasts, spine, and joints.

An MRI machine works by bouncing a constant magnetic field and pulsing radio frequencies off of the fat tissue and water molecules in your body. Radio waves transmit to a receiver, which translates them into images of the body that your doctor can use to diagnose health problems.

What is a CT Scan?

CT stands for computed tomography. You may have also heard of a CAT scan, which stands for computer axial tomography. This technology is one and the same; CT scan is simply a more modern term for CAT scan.

CT scans are a type of x-ray that captures multiple detailed pictures of the inside of your body, one layer at a time. A sophisticated x-ray machine transfers those images to a computer, which arranges each cross-sectional picture into a rotatable 3D model. CT scans are effective for diagnosing bone fractures, internal bleeding, tumors, and cancer.

MRI vs. CT Scan

Technology & Costs

To the untrained eye, MRI machines and CT scanners look very similar. They both have donut-shaped holes with a scan table sticking out of them. However, the technology used to achieve the scans is quite different.

MRIs are considered the superior option because magnets and radio waves provide more detailed imaging than x-rays. However, MRIs are more costly, and the scan takes about 20 minutes for each body area being imaged.

CT scans, which are the less expensive option, are more widely used than MRIs. They are also fast, taking less than 20 seconds to scan you from head to toe once you’re situated on the scan table. Be aware that some procedures require two passes across the body, which doubles the scan time.

Risks

While both imaging methods are considered safe, there are some risks involved.

MRIs have the following risks:

  • Possible feelings of claustrophobia
  • Chance of increased body temperature during long procedures
  • Potential adverse reaction to any metal in the body (consult a doctor before receiving an MRI if you have artificial joints, an IUD, eye implants, or a pacemaker)

CT scans have the following risks:

  • Harm to unborn babies
  • Exposure to a low dose of radiation, just like ordinary x-rays
  • Potential reaction to the dyes sometimes used to enhance the scan

Preparation & Procedure

What to expect from an MRI:

No preparation is required for an MRI. For your safety, simply tell your doctor if you are pregnant or have implants of any kind.

You must lie still while receiving an MRI. Since the procedure is much longer than a CT scan, this may be challenging for some patients.

Rest assured that an MRI is painless. You don’t feel the magnetic field or radio waves passing through your body, and there are no moving parts around you. However, MRI machines are loud, with repetitive tapping, thumping, and other noises. You may be offered earplugs or headphones to make the procedure more pleasant.

What to expect from a CT scan:

If you receive a scan without contrast materials, minimal preparation is necessary. Plan to wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothes that contain no metal zippers or snaps. You have the choice to change into a medical gown if you wish. You should also remove any body piercings, jewelry, glasses, and metal hair accessories.

In some cases, a dye or other contrast material is needed to make your blood vessels and organs easier to see in the x-ray images. If your CT scan requires this, be prepared to have an intravenous (IV) line gently inserted into your arm before the scan begins.

While the scan is in progress, you will hear clicking and whirring while the machine rotates around you, but there is no pain, and nothing comes in contact with your skin. Note that patients must weigh 500 pounds or less to receive a CT scan due to the scan table load limit.

Make the Most of Your MRI or CT Scan

Salem Radiology Consultants offers the most advanced MRI technology known as 3T. A “T,” or Tesla, is a measurement of the magnetic field strength. Before the introduction of the 3T machine, the standard was 1.5T.

Greater magnetic strength means our MRIs provide improved image quality with high-definition clarity. Scans also take less time with stronger magnets. In addition, our 3T MRI machine features a larger opening, making the scanning experience more pleasant, especially for patients with claustrophobia. There is no extra cost for receiving a higher-quality 3T scan, so it makes sense to take advantage of the best technology available.

Our CT scanner is equipped with advanced ASIR technology whichperforms scans with the lowest possible dose of radiation for drastically reduced radiation exposure and greater safety to our patients. Rest assured that the results are superior, so there’s no reason not to choose the low-dose option.

If you have any questions about which type of diagnostic imaging is right for you, or you’re ready to schedule your MRI or CT scan, please contact Salem Radiology Consultants at (503) 399-1262.

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90,000 Which is better – fluorography or CT of the lungs?

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Which is better – fluorography or CT of the lungs?

Fluorography or CT of the lungs? Which examination method is better and more expedient? These questions arise in many people who are planning a diagnosis of the respiratory organ for prophylactic purposes, when suspicious symptoms appear, or after chest injuries.

Both computed tomography and fluorography are X-ray methods based on the property of tissues and organs, depending on their density and morphology, to transmit X-rays in different ways.

However, computed tomography allows you to obtain clearer images in three projections, and then, on their basis, to recreate a 3D-reconstruction (volumetric model) of the investigated area of ​​the body. When is it needed, what else is the difference between fluorography and CT of the lungs? Let’s take a closer look.

What is the difference between CT and X-ray of the lungs?

The method of fluorography was patented in the 1940s. The first images were printed on film containing silver. The study was expensive and was not as widespread and widespread as it is today.Nevertheless, in the middle of the 20th century, fluorography of the chest organs proved to be excellent in the diagnosis of tuberculosis, oncological tumors, and bone fractures. When, instead of film, the image began to be displayed on the screen and digital fluorography appeared, the method became more accessible, the images became more convenient to store, it became possible to enlarge them, to adjust the quality.

Computed tomography was invented and patented only in the 1970s, but this event revolutionized modern medical diagnostics, and scientists Godfrey Hounsfield and Allan Cormack were awarded the Nobel Prize for their discovery.The novelty consisted in a fundamentally important and new opportunity to study internal organs, bones and the vascular bed “in volume”, that is, on cross-sectional images in three projections. Computer processing made it possible to combine many images obtained as a result of scanning the body with dynamically rotating sensitive sensors into a detailed and detailed 3D model.

Computed tomography (CT) differs from X-ray in a number of ways:

1.Lung examination result. A fluorogram is a two-dimensional planar image in frontal projection. Digitizing the image allows you to enlarge the image, however, the information content of lung fluorography is lower due to an incomplete two-dimensional view and possible artifacts (distortions). Inaccuracies are not excluded due to the imposition of organ shadows on some areas of the tissue. The result of CT of the lungs is recorded on a DVD, which contains many cross-sectional scans (up to 1 mm thick) of the chest in three projections: horizontal, frontal, sagittal, as well as a 3D model of the airways, skeleton and vascular bed (if the study was carried out with contrast).

2. Technique. Both fluorography and CT of the lungs are performed quickly (1-3 minutes) and do not require preliminary preparation. An exception is CT of the lungs with contrast – such an examination takes 10-15 minutes, there are recommendations that should be followed before the examination. Modern multispiral tomographs (in particular, our Siemens somatom go.now device) scan the chest in dynamics – the patient moves on the tomograph table to the gantry (ring-shaped frame), and the sensitive sensors located in several rows move in a spiral and take pictures.To get a fluorographic image, the patient needs to press his chest against the screen and hold his breath.

3. Image clarity. Better CT chest images. To make the image more contrast, it is better to examine the vessels and soft tissues, possibly by intravenous administration of an iodine-containing drug (CT with contrast). Due to the special technique of the X-Ray procedure, the rays obtained during the tomography have a higher penetrating power.

4. Radiation dose. Irradiation during fluorography is minimal – 0.05–0.5 mSv. CT scan of the lungs is 2–2.9 mSv. This is a harmless radiation exposure. It is believed that it is safe to do up to 5 CT scans throughout the year.

5. Availability. The cost of computed tomography is higher, and not all medical institutions have special equipment. Meanwhile, fluorography is suitable for annual prophylactic screening (if there are no special indications for CT) and various medical commissions.

When is fluorography enough?

Fluorography is performed annually – with the help of this preventive examination, tuberculosis, tumors (larger than with CT), fractures, pathological changes in soft tissues are revealed.

During fluorography, radiologists reveal:

  • Inflammatory processes in the lungs caused by fungi and bacteria (foci of viral pneumonia are much better visible on tomograms).
  • Neoplasms (tumors from 1 cm) in the lungs, mediastinum, heart, large blood vessels.
  • Foreign objects in the respiratory tract.

To clarify the results of fluorography, the doctor may prescribe a computed tomography to the patient. A single or even double scan on a tomograph after fluorography is absolutely safe for a patient who has not had other CT examinations for a year.

Fluorography is mandatory for visiting the pool and sports clubs, for future students and military personnel, employees of medical institutions, catering establishments.

When is the best time to have a CT scan of the lungs?

Today, CT is considered the most informative examination of the chest. Most often, such a study is prescribed by the attending physician, but it can also be done for preventive purposes at will. It is best for this to do a low-dose CT scan of the lungs on a multispiral tomograph – even the smallest tumors, infiltrates, calcifications that are not visible on X-rays and fluorography will be visible on the scans.

CT of the chest (even better than MRI) shows:

  • Pneumonia;
  • Tuberculosis;
  • Thymomas and tumors of the lungs, mediastinum, blood vessels, bones;
  • Injuries to the chest and thoracic spine, rib fractures.

CT scan of the chest is a comprehensive examination, after which there is no need to do fluorography. Sometimes, based on the results of CT, it is possible to differentiate pneumonia (viral, bacterial or caused by fungi) even before laboratory diagnosis. In this regard, CT of the lungs has become the main method for diagnosing pneumonia caused, for example, by a new coronavirus infection – when there is no time to wait for PCR results and doctors need to urgently decide on further treatment.

Computed tomography (CT) in Oryol

OPTIMUM TIME

The whole process of passing a computed tomography study with the preparation and the study itself takes up to 15 minutes per study area.In the process of preparation, the doctor gives individual recommendations, the implementation of which will make the examination as effective and informative as possible.

INTEGRATED APPROACH

Currently, it is difficult to imagine any area of ​​medicine without diagnostics by this method – tomography is indispensable in the clinical practice of oncology, surgery, traumatology, orthopedics, neurology, cardiology, radiology and others.

HIGH QUALIFICATION OF DOCTORS

An important factor affecting the correctness of the diagnosis is the qualification and specialization of the doctor conducting the examination, a careful approach to the process of decoding the tomogram.Our clinic employs highly qualified doctors who have extensive practice in the field of radiation diagnostics and are constantly undergoing advanced training.

MEDICAL STANDARDS COMPLIANCE

All medical services of the clinic are provided in accordance with the procedures and standards of medical care. After examination, the software package for processing the obtained digital image provides additional information

QUALITY AND SAFETY

Together with Roszdravnadzor, the clinic carries out constant monitoring of medical devices not registered in the unified register.We guarantee the use of equipment, tools, sutures and dressings that meet all quality standards adopted in the Russian Federation.

UNIQUE RESEARCH

Computed tomography is indispensable for examining patients with contraindications to MRI (pacemakers, metal implants, ferromagnetic devices). The value of tomography lies in the fact that it is non-invasive (it allows you to detect pathologies without instrumental intervention in the body), a painless method for examining the state of internal structures, and also allows you to diagnose with a high degree of accuracy the smallest changes and disorders in a short time.Also, the advantage of this study is the absence of overlapping organs and tissues – there are no closed areas. This allows you to assess the ratio of organs in the study area.

Visual diagnostics

Our employees

is an experienced and well-coordinated team that constantly improves its level of knowledge, both at Russian and foreign training events.

A modern veterinary clinic cannot do without modern equipment, which is necessary for a detailed examination of the patient, which provides more accurate information for the diagnosis.
The veterinary center “Solnyshko” has all the necessary modern equipment: digital X-ray, rigid and flexible endoscopy, ultrasound machine with Doppler and much more.

Dear animal owners! We are pleased to announce that now you can perform computed tomography at the Solnyshko veterinary center!

Our new computed tomography scanner allows us to understand in a new way, much more precisely, what is happening in the patient’s body.Any part of the body, bones, as well as soft tissue can be scanned and evaluated in a few seconds!

The CT scanner is capable of producing 3-D images that can be rotated in any direction to evaluate the organ at all angles for optimal visualization.

For example, after scanning a patient, we can focus on the kidney. Rotate the 3-D image around and look at the organ from all sides. Virtually “cut” the kidney in any plane without touching the patient.

In this way, we can find abnormalities that cannot be detected using conventional diagnostic measures such as ultrasound and radiography.

We will answer frequently asked questions:

Question 1: What is computed tomography? (CT)

Answer: Computed tomography is non-invasive and painless. Your pet will sit on a movable table that is advanced into the scanner, where the scanning element is rotated 360 degrees around the pet.The computer takes images from the scanner and creates a three-dimensional picture of the scanned area.

Question 2: For whom is computed tomography recommended?

Answer: Pets requiring a CT scan in the following cases:

  • lung diseases,
  • screening of the lungs to detect metastases,
  • diseases of the nose,
  • ear disease,
  • multiple abdominal pathologies,
  • diseases of the spine and brain, as well as various orthopedic diseases.

The 360-degree rotation technology avoids the overlap of organs and tissues that occurs with conventional X-rays and therefore provides a more detailed and clear 3-D image.

The information obtained from the CT scan helps your veterinarian make a final diagnosis and suggest the best options for treating your pet.

Question 3: Are there any known complications from computed tomography?

Answer: CT is absolutely safe.This unit uses ionizing radiation (like X-rays).

Unlike people who can lie motionless on the table, the animals under study, for computed tomography, must be under anesthesia. Therefore, all patients are given an intravenous catheter. Before, during and after the scanning procedure, patients are closely monitored by an anesthesiologist.

Question 4: How do I prepare my pet for a CT scan?

Answer: Before the examination and as part of preparing the pet for anesthesia, a 12 hour fasting diet with free access to water is required.