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Lipitor bad side effects: Side Effects of Lipitor (Atorvastatin Calcium), Warnings, Uses

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Side Effects of Lipitor (Atorvastatin Calcium), Warnings, Uses

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Lipitor (Atorvastatin) Side Effects | Risks & Warnings

Lipitor is a cholesterol-lowering drug that contains the active ingredient atorvastatin. It belongs to a group of drugs called statins. Doctors prescribe these drugs to patients who are at an increased risk for heart disease or who have cardiovascular risks associated with high cholesterol or triglyceride levels.

Doctors widely prescribe these drugs not only because of their proven effectiveness, but also because of their high tolerability and low likelihood of side effects.

Common Side Effects of Lipitor

Most common side effects of Lipitor are minor. But the medication can cause serious side effects, according to the drug label.

Side effects of Lipitor (atorvastatin) include:

  • Cold-like symptoms
  • Joint pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Stomach pain
  • Nausea
  • Muscle pain and spasms
  • Difficulty falling and staying asleep

Though the reactions occurred less often, people who took the drug during clinical trials also reported nose bleeds, blurred vision and ringing in the ears. Still others reported fever, liver problems, abnormal blood and urine test results, and malaise, which is a general feeling of discomfort or uneasiness.

After the medication became available to the public, people reported additional side effects such as tiredness, tendon problems, memory loss and confusion. Other reported issues included dizziness, depression, peripheral neuropathy, pancreatitis and interstitial lung disease. According to the drug label, the cognitive issues were generally not serious and went away after patients stopped taking the drug.

Diabetes Risk

In February 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved safety label changes to statin drugs to warn consumers of an increased risk for diabetes in patients who take the drugs. The agency based its decision in part on the Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection Therapy – Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 22 (PROVE-IT TIMI 22) substudy, which associated high-dose atorvastatin with worsening glycemic control.

The announcement came nearly two decades after the FDA approved Lipitor and about two years after evidence of a minimal diabetes risk from the cholesterol drugs first emerged.

Data collected in 2010 from 91,000 patients who had been treated with either a statin or a placebo revealed that about one in every 255 patients who had taken the medication went on to develop diabetes.

But researchers later found this figure to be inaccurate because the study included weaker statins. The drugs used had been introduced to the market earlier than atorvastatin.

The increased diabetes risk only emerged in studies once researchers looked specifically at more potent statins such as Lipitor, Zocor and Crestor. This heightened risk became especially apparent when doctors prescribed the drugs at higher doses.

Fact

Evidence shows statins can cause diabetes, especially in women, the elderly and people of Asian descent.

A Finnish study published in 2015 in the journal Diabetologia showed men prescribed statins had a nearly 50 percent greater chance of developing diabetes after six years on the cholesterol-lowering drug compared to those who weren’t taking the medication.

The study, which included only white male participants, found statins seemed to make people more resistant to insulin’s effects. Additionally, the medications appeared to cause the pancreas to secrete less insulin into the patients’ bloodstream. Patients who started with the “closest to normal” blood glucose levels were affected most by the medicines, according to the study.

Earlier findings published in 2013 in the journal Current Diabetes Reports found “a wealth of evidence” that showed statins increase the risk of diabetes, possibly by impairing the function of special cells in the pancreas that store and release insulin and by decreasing the body’s sensitivity to insulin.

“Groups at particular risk include the elderly, women, and Asians,” the study’s authors wrote.

People who took Lipitor and developed diabetes sued Pfizer over allegations that the company knew of the risk but failed to warn the public. In 2018, a district court dismissed all remaining Lipitor lawsuits after it had sided with Pfizer.

Muscle and Joint Problems

Some Lipitor patients report various types of muscle injuries after taking the drug. Although the likelihood of muscle disease is minimal with statins alone, researchers determined the risk is substantially elevated among patients who take statins at the same time as other medications such as certain antibiotics, antifungals and treatments for HIV and hepatitis C.

“Lipitor can cause serious muscle problems that can lead to kidney problems, including kidney failure,” according to the drug label. “You have a higher chance for muscle problems if you are taking certain other medicines with Lipitor.”

Did you know?

A 2013 study in JAMA Internal Medicine matched about 7,000 statin users with similar nonusers and found musculoskeletal conditions, joint disease, injuries and pain were more common among the statin group.

Myopathy and Rhabdomyolysis

Lipitor occasionally causes myopathy, a condition where muscle tissue fibers do not function as they should. Early symptoms of myopathy include muscle pain, weakness or tenderness, and dark urine. These signs typically appear within the first few months of statin therapy. Other symptoms might include muscle cramps, stiffness and spasm.

Researchers have linked a particularly severe form of myopathy called rhabdomyolysis to the use of statins. With this potentially life-threatening complication, muscle tissue dies and products of the damaged cells can enter the bloodstream. Some of these products are toxic to the kidneys and may lead to kidney failure. While rhabdomyolysis only occurs in about 0.1 percent of patients who take statins, the risk increases for patients who also take certain other drugs such as macrolides.

“All patients starting therapy with Lipitor should be advised of the risk of myopathy and told to report promptly any unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness,” according to the drug label.

Grapefruit Juice

The risk of myopathy increases when Lipitor users drink more than 1 liter of grapefruit juice.

Immune-Mediated Necrotizing Myopathy (IMNM)

Some post-marketing reports associate immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy with statin use. This particular myopathy is characterized by muscle weakness along with elevated levels of serum creatine kinase, which is an enzyme found in muscle and the brain. The elevated levels indicate damage to the muscle or brain. The autoimmune disorder can persist even after statin treatment is stopped. Immunosuppressive agents usually help patients improve.

Liver Problems

Doctors advise against statin therapy for patients with liver problems. Clinical studies revealed Lipitor can damage liver function, and the FDA has received rare post-marketing reports of both fatal and nonfatal liver failure. Other reported liver problems include jaundice, hepatitis, chronic liver damage and fatty changes to the liver.

The agency recommends doctors perform liver enzyme tests before they prescribe Lipitor to determine whether the patient can tolerate treatment. Talk to your doctor about stopping treatment immediately if you develop serious liver injury or jaundice.

Strokes

A study published in The New England Journal of Medicine found atorvastatin reduced the recurrence of ischemic and “mini-strokes” in patients who had recently experienced a stroke. But researchers saw a slight increase in the rate of hemorrhagic strokes, or bleeding on the brain, in patients who took 80 mg of Lipitor daily and had experienced a stroke or mini-stroke in the preceding six months.

The 2006 study was a randomized clinical trial that involved nearly 5,000 participants. The serious side effect was not fatal in the majority of patients affected. However, some cases resulted in death.


Please seek the advice of a medical professional before making health care decisions.

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Symptoms, warnings, and drug interactions

Lipitor is the brand name of the medication atorvastatin, which is a statin that reduces blood cholesterol. The risk of experiencing side effects when taking this drug is low.

According to the American College of Cardiology, about 85–90% of people report no side effects from taking statins. When side effects do occur, the most common are muscle pain and joint pain.

In this article, we discuss the side effects and other possible risks of taking Lipitor.

Lipitor is a statin, which is a class of drug that helps lower cholesterol levels by reducing the amount of this substance that the liver produces.

Lipitor lowers the levels of cholesterol and lipoprotein in the blood and reduces how much low density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad” cholesterol, the body produces.

As a result, this medication helps lower the risk of heart related health events in people with risk factors for these issues. Lipitor can help reduce a person’s risk of heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, and angina. A person at high risk is also less likely to need stents or bypass surgery when they take this drug.

People who are at risk for coronary heart disease may benefit from taking Lipitor. Lipitor can also help people with an abnormal lipid profile and those with type 2 diabetes who have cardiac risk factors.

People taking Lipitor may experience side effects, the most common of which include:

Muscle pains and cramps are more likely when a person first starts taking Lipitor or when they increase their dosage. People who are 65 years of age or older may be more at risk of this side effect than younger adults.

Sometimes, doctors will notice that people experiencing muscle pains with Lipitor also have high levels of a liver protein called creatine phosphokinase. If this is the case, they will monitor the levels of this protein while decreasing the dosage of Lipitor. They may choose to replace Lipitor with another cholesterol lowering drug.

Doctors will perform liver function tests before prescribing Lipitor, as it can affect the results of these tests. After taking the drug for at least 6 weeks, doctors will recheck the liver to make sure that the drug has not caused any significant changes to the liver function.

If the person has elevated test results, the doctor will check their blood at more frequent intervals until the measures normalize. Sometimes, the doctor may need to lower the dosage of Lipitor or stop this treatment altogether.

Share on PinterestPossible side effects of Lipitor include muscle pain, nausea, and indigestion.

Severe side effects are rare, but they can occur. Lipitor may affect kidney or liver function.

Research has linked Lipitor to a serious muscle condition called rhabdomyolysis, which can cause kidney failure. If this occurs, doctors will stop the drug and provide the individual with plenty of fluids to prevent kidney failure.

People who have kidney disease or take certain other medications alongside Lipitor may be more at risk of developing rhabdomyolysis.

The three symptoms of this condition are:

  • muscle weakness
  • muscle pain
  • tea colored urine

However, doctors report that fewer than 10% of people will have all three symptoms.

Doctors diagnose rhabdomyolysis by checking the blood levels of creatine phosphokinase. Most experts agree that a number five times the normal limit can confirm a diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis.

Statins and other cholesterol lowering medications can affect the function of the liver. At higher dosages, the risk of liver function test abnormalities increases. In rare cases, people have experienced fatal and nonfatal liver failure as a result of taking statins.

Anyone with an allergy to atorvastatin or any other statin should avoid taking Lipitor.

Women who are pregnant, wish to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding should not take Lipitor. There is not enough evidence to confirm that Lipitor is safe or effective during pregnancy or breastfeeding.

If a woman becomes pregnant while taking Lipitor, the doctor will stop the medication and replace it with another cholesterol lowering medication.

Doctors will not usually prescribe Lipitor to anyone with active liver disease, but in some situations, the benefits of taking Lipitor may outweigh the risks. People with chronic liver disease, such as hepatitis or nonalcoholic liver disease, may still take Lipitor.

People should also avoid drinking excessive amounts of alcohol while taking Lipitor.

Lipitor can interact with some other drugs to increase the risk of rhabdomyolysis. Birth control pills and grapefruit juice can also affect how Lipitor works.

The following table lists Lipitor’s potential drug interactions, which can cause rhabdomyolysis and other skeletal muscle effects.

Drugs What to do
Cyclosporine

Tipranavir + ritonavir

Glecaprevir + pibrentasvir

Do not take with Lipitor.
Clarithromycin

Itraconazole

Saquinavir + ritonavir

Darunavir + ritonavir

Fosamprenavir

Fosamprenavir + ritonavir

Elbasvir plus grazoprevir

Do not take with more than 20 mg of Lipitor daily.
Nelfinavir Do not take with more than 40 mg of Lipitor daily.
Lopinavir + ritonavir

Simeprevir

Fibric acid derivatives

Erythromycin

Azole antifungals

Lipid-modifying doses of niacin

Colchicine

Use with caution and at the lowest possible dosage.

People taking birth control pills with Lipitor may have higher levels of progesterone and estrogen in the bloodstream. Doctors need to choose an appropriate birth control pill that will not interact with Lipitor.

People who take Lipitor must avoid drinking grapefruit juice. The body uses an enzyme called CYP3A4 to digest Lipitor. Drinking more than 1.2 liters of grapefruit juice per day can block the action of this enzyme and raise the levels of Lipitor in the blood.

Share on PinterestA person should report any side effects that they are experiencing to their doctor.

Muscle pains and cramps are a common side effect of taking Lipitor, but a person should notify a doctor if they experience them. The doctor can then test the person’s liver function.

People should also report any side effects that affect their quality of life. Lipitor is an effective medication to prevent heart related events, but it only works if a person takes it daily according to the prescription.

People who have tea colored urine or notice that their skin or the whites of their eyes are turning yellow should seek emergency medical attention. These symptoms can indicate liver failure.

If a doctor is aware of the side effects that a person is experiencing, they can help them find an alternative cholesterol lowering medication that will be effective and safe.

Lipitor is an effective medication that doctors prescribe to prevent cardiovascular disease in people with cardiac risk. Some people may experience side effects, such as diarrhea, nausea, and indigestion, when taking Lipitor.

Other side effects, such as rhabdomyolysis and liver function abnormalities, can be more severe and may require immediate medical attention.

Doctors will monitor a person’s liver function regularly to detect any signs of liver function abnormalities before symptoms arise.

Some other drugs can interact with Lipitor, so doctors will need to take a full medical history before prescribing Lipitor.

Page Not Found | Lipitor.com

LIPITOR tablets are not for everyone, including anyone who has previously had an allergic reaction to LIPITOR. It is not for those with liver problems. And it is not for women who are nursing, pregnant, or may become pregnant. If you get pregnant, stop taking LIPITOR and call your doctor right away.

If you take LIPITOR tablets, tell your doctor if you feel any new muscle pain or weakness. This could be a sign of rare but serious muscle problems that can lead to kidney problems, including kidney failure.

Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and all medications you take. This may help avoid serious drug interactions. Your doctor should do blood tests to check your liver function before starting LIPITOR and during your treatment if you have symptoms of liver problems. Call your doctor right away if you have the following symptoms of liver problems – feel tired or weak or have a loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark amber colored urine, or yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.

Tell your doctor if you have diabetes. Elevated blood sugar levels have been reported with statins, including LIPITOR.

Common side effects are diarrhea, upset stomach, muscle and joint pain, and changes in some blood tests.

Talk to your healthcare provider if you have side effects that bother you or that will not go away.

INDICATIONS

LIPITOR is a prescription medicine that lowers cholesterol in the blood. It lowers the LDL-C (“bad” cholesterol) and triglycerides in your blood. It can raise your HDL-C (“good” cholesterol) as well. LIPITOR is for adults and children over 10 whose cholesterol does not come down enough with exercise and a low-fat diet alone.

LIPITOR can lower the risk for heart attack, stroke, certain types of heart surgery, and chest pain in patients who have heart disease or risk factors for heart disease such as age, smoking, high blood pressure, low HDL-C, or heart disease in the family. LIPITOR can lower the risk for heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes and risk factors such as eye problems, kidney problems, smoking, or high blood pressure.

Limitations of Use: LIPITOR has not been studied in people who have an increase of chylomicrons (Fredrickson Types I and V).

Please see Full Prescribing Information and Patient Information.

Lipitor Complications National Drug Injury Law Firm The Driscoll Firm, LLC

The Pfizer Inc. cholesterol-lowering drug Lipitor (atorvastatin) has been linked to a variety of adverse side effects. These adverse effects include the development of diabetes. Liver damage, muscle problems and memory loss and confusion also have been identified as Lipitor side effects.

Lipitor is one of several medications known as “statin” drugs. Statins are prescribed along with diet and exercise to reduce LDL cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the “bad” cholesterol). They work by blocking the production of LDL cholesterol in the liver. This makes the liver use the cholesterol already circulating in the blood. This, in turn, reduces the blood’s cholesterol levels.

In February 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) made “important safety changes” to the labels of statin drugs, including Lipitor. The changes addressed the increased risk of diabetes.

The Driscoll Firm, LLC, is now investigating cases of patients who have suffered harmful side effects from Lipitor. If you have developed diabetes, liver problems or other severe medical problems from the use of Lipitor, you could be eligible for compensation.

Find out more by calling us today at our toll-free number or completing our online form.

Diabetes Risk Linked to Lipitor

A main concern about statin drugs’ side effects is their potential for raising blood-sugar levels and causing Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lipitor, which is administered as a tablet, poses a particular concern because it is often prescribed in higher doses than other statins.

A study by the University of Massachusetts Medical School found a 48 percent increased risk of diabetes among women aged 50 to 79 who used statin drugs. A study published in The Lancet, a British medical journal, reported that statin drug therapy was associated with a 9 percent increased risk for developing diabetes. And the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) said in 2011 that three large randomized clinical trials indicated that 80-mg doses of Lipitor were associated with a small but definite increased risk of new-onset Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

What is Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition. It affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body’s main source of fuel, the Mayo Clinic explains. Diabetics either do not produce enough insulin – the hormone that regulates the movement of glucose into the body’s cells – or their bodies do not use insulin properly.

Diabetes can be controlled with diet and exercise, or with self-administered insulin shots. But if it goes untreated or improperly treated, Type 2 diabetes can be life-threatening. Some of the potential complications of diabetes include cardiovascular problems such as:

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Chest pain (angina)
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Narrowing of arteries (atherosclerosis)
  • High blood pressure.

The American Heart Association says the risk of stroke is two to four times higher for people with diabetes, and the death rate from heart disease is two to four times higher than for people who do not have diabetes.

Other complications of diabetes include:

  • Alzheimer’s disease – Poor blood flow from the cardiovascular damage caused by diabetes may lead to Alzheimer’s disease, or improper levels of insulin in the blood can damage the brain.
  • Kidney damage – Renal failure or irreversible end-stage kidney disease may result in the need for dialysis or a kidney transplant.
  • Eye damage – Problems with the eyes can include cataracts, glaucoma or blindness.
  • Nerve damage (neuropathy) – Tingling, numbness, burning or pain in the hands and feet (peripheral neuropathy) may spread up the limbs, which can lead to erectile dysfunction and digestion problems (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation).
  • Foot damage – This may result from poor blood flow and cause cuts and blisters to become serious infections, possibly requiring amputation of toes, feet or even a leg.
  • Skin problems – These problems include increased susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections.

Additional Lipitor Side Effect Risks

Lipitor and other statins are also known to cause:

  • Liver problems
  • Muscle injury (myopathy / rhabdomyolysis)
  • Memory loss and confusion
  • Joint pain
  • Tendon problems
  • Diarrhea
  • Upset stomach.

Get Legal Help If You Are Experiencing Lipitor Side Effects

If you or a loved one has been prescribed Lipitor (atorvastatin) and developed diabetes, liver damage or another serious adverse reaction, contact The Driscoll Firm, LLC, today. You could be eligible to obtain financial assistance for current and future medical expenses as well as compensation for your lost income, pain and suffering. We offer a free, no-obligation initial consultation about your case. Call our toll-free number or contact us online to learn more.

For more information:

10 truths about statins and high cholesterol | Heart

Do statins cause muscle pain and weakness?

Muscle aches occur in about 10 percent of people who take statins. It’s the most common side effect of statins, but another way to look at it is that nine out of 10 patients don’t experience it at all.

When patients do have muscle pain:
Actual muscle damage occurs in only 1 in 10,000 patients. In the rare event that muscle damage occurs, it is almost always reversible. To correct it while still protecting you from heart attack or stroke, we can adjust your medication or try a different statin. There also are many strategies to effectively manage muscle symptoms while continuing to take your medication.

If you experience muscle pain while taking a statin, don’t stop taking it without first talking with your doctor. For almost all patients, we’re able to find an effective medication that the body can tolerate. If you simply can’t tolerate statins, there are other cholesterol medications we can prescribe.

  • The symptom is often resolved by adjusting the medication dosage or switching to a different statin.
  • Occasionally, the statins have to be stopped altogether.
  • When the medication is switched or stopped, the symptoms go away and there is no damage to the muscle.

Can statins increase my risk for memory loss or dementia?

Memory and cognitive symptoms from statin use are very uncommon, and it is unclear if statins are really the culprit. When symptoms have been reported, they’re typically not severe and usually resolve when the statin dosage is adjusted or the medication is switched.

Affected patients have reported feeling unfocused or “fuzzy” in their thinking, but these experiences are rare. Concerns about long-term cognitive problems and memory loss due to use of statins have not been proven. On the contrary, most recent data actually point to potential prevention of dementia due to statin use.

These data are logical because one of the major causes of dementia is atherosclerosis, which is hardening of the arteries in the brain. There is strong evidence that statins protect against atherosclerosis. It’s one of the “invisible” benefits of taking a statin medication.

Also, keep in mind that increasingly high cholesterol (requiring treatment) and memory problems both are common symptoms of aging. Sometimes it’s difficult to disentangle these two, and that’s why statin use and memory problems may seem related at times.

If you’re concerned about statins and memory loss, don’t stop taking your medication without consulting your doctor. There may be other reasons for your memory symptoms, or alternate treatments for your high cholesterol can be considered.

Will statins increase my risk for diabetes or complicate my existing diabetes?

This risk is true to some extent, but it’s wildly exaggerated.
In fact, there are good data to show that people who have problems with their blood sugar or who have diabetes benefit most from statins. Even though their blood sugar may go up slightly, the added risk is significantly offset by the reduction in heart disease risk that a statin can provide.

If you’re already at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, or if you have prediabetes, you may monitor your blood glucose more closely after starting a statin. But exercise and weight loss have been shown to lower the risk of developing diabetes in those with borderline blood glucose levels, regardless of statin use.

  • If your blood sugar was under control before you began taking statins, your sugars may rise slightly. But if you’re slim, trim, and not predisposed to diabetes because of obesity, statins won’t cause you to develop diabetes.
  • If you already had prediabetes or have borderline blood sugar levels, the statin may make your blood sugar rise enough to put you in the diabetes category. This happens to about one of every 255 patients taking statins. When it does happen, the patient is already on the path to getting diabetes – it just happens a little faster. In these patients, statin use simply accelerates by a few weeks to a few months a condition that was already inevitable over their lifetime.
  • Statins slightly increase the incidence of Type 2 diabetes in people who have two or more symptoms of metabolic syndrome, but the benefits of statins for these patients generally far exceed the risk of elevated blood sugar.

Can statins damage my liver?

Liver damage from taking statins is extremely uncommon. We used to test patients for liver damage throughout the course of statin treatment, but because of the rarity of that potential side effect, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determined that regular monitoring of liver function tests is unnecessary for patients taking statins. Now, we check a patient’s liver enzymes before we begin statin therapy to ensure the liver is healthy before treatment begins, and we don’t put anyone through unnecessary testing during treatment, unless symptoms arise.

Interestingly, there is a statin study examining people who already had abnormal liver function tests and fatty liver. Roughly half of the participants took a statin medication, and the other half took a placebo. The people who took statins actually had improvements in their liver function compared to the placebo group and had a lower risk of cardiovascular events. People who have blood sugar issues, have insulin resistance, and are obese or have other risks for heart disease often have fatty liver and abnormal liver function tests. The study suggests that these people may need statins the most.

On the rare chance that symptoms of liver damage arise, we’ll definitely want to perform tests right away. Symptoms of liver damage include weakness and fatigue, loss of appetite, upper abdominal pain, dark-colored urine, or yellowing of the eyes or skin. Again, it’s very rare, but if you experience any of these symptoms while taking a statin medication, contact your doctor right away.

Do statins cause cancer?

There is no evidence to suggest that taking statins increases cancer risk. Several studies suggest possible benefits for patients who take statins and are currently fighting cancer; research is ongoing as to whether statins actually may help prevent cancer.

Why do doctors focus on my LDL cholesterol?

Some cholesterol is necessary for normal cell and body function. But too much cholesterol can lead to atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), which results in heart disease, heart attack, and stroke.

There are two types of cholesterol: high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or good cholesterol) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or bad cholesterol). The amount of each that circulates in your blood is added together to form your total cholesterol number. Thus, focus on total cholesterol can be confusing as it may be elevated due to high HDL cholesterol.

When your LDL cholesterol is above 130 it is considered borderline, while above 160 is considered high. Ideally, we would all have an LDL under 100 (or even closer to 70), but not everyone needs medications above this level.

We focus on the bad cholesterol because it is one of the main culprits responsible for blocking and hardening the arteries. A blocked artery can lead to a heart attack or stroke. Statin therapy helps control the bad cholesterol of patients who are at high risk for heart disease, stroke, and other serious cardiovascular events. In general, the lower your LDL levels, the better off you will be.

There’s a lot of science around how HDL cholesterol affects your risk for heart disease. But it’s the function – how well it works – that may be more important than how high its level is.

For example, people in a small village in Italy have very low HDL numbers (10 to 30mg/dL), and they have a longer life expectancy and very little heart disease. That’s because their HDL is like a factory – it shuttles cholesterol from the arteries to the liver rapidly, and then disappears. Good cholesterol doesn’t last in their blood very long, but it is very efficient.

Society’s focus on raising HDL is likely misguided when compared to the actual evidence. Two recent studies of raising HDL with niacin showed no improvement in risk of heart attacks and strokes, and potentially some harms. There is a lot of work to be done to determine what we can and should do in targeting HDL.

Can ‘natural’ remedies lower high cholesterol without statins?

Exercise on its own doesn’t lower your LDL (bad cholesterol) much – often only a few points. Exercise helps minimize many heart disease risk factors, including obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Make a point to exercise five days a week for at least 30 minutes each day.

Diet is incredibly important in managing your cholesterol.
Every patient who comes to our preventive cardiology clinic for cholesterol management sees a nutritionist as part of the visit because we feel so strongly about the importance of diet. There are many patients for whom we’ve delayed prescribing statins, or suggested that they get off their medication if it isn’t appropriate for their level of risk.

Some patients think, “I’m on a statin – I don’t have to exercise, and I can eat whatever I want!” But that’s not the case. Lifestyle choices absolutely matter. For high-risk patients, it’s not a question of either improving the diet or getting on a medication, it’s both – lifestyle changes and taking a statin together are necessary to protect high-risk patients against heart attack and stroke.

If your cholesterol is borderline but not yet high, changing your diet and incorporating healthier food choices can help lower your cholesterol a decent amount. Eating more fiber and lowering your intake of saturated fat definitely can help. For people with relatively low risk, this may be enough to lower heart attack and stroke risk. 

  • Certain foods, such as fried food and fast food, are high in saturated fat, which contributes to high cholesterol.
  • Not all fats are unhealthy – good fats, such as those found in fatty fish, nuts, and olive oil, have many health benefits.
  • Read food labels and limit your daily intake of saturated fat to 16 grams, and omit trans fats completely.
  • Eating more fiber can help reduce LDL significantly. For some patients, eating fiber along with maintaining an exercise program is enough to manage cholesterol. But for high-risk patients, it’s not enough to prevent the need for statins.

Are there alternatives to statins for lowering high cholesterol?

In patients whose cholesterol can’t be controlled by lifestyle changes or who simply can’t tolerate statins, we can offer alternative treatments.

What You Need to Know About Atorvastatin (Lipitor)

  • Lipitor lowers “bad” cholesterol (LDL) and triglycerides, while boosting “good” cholesterol (HDL).
  • Lipitor is the most widely sold prescription drug in the U.S.
  • Lipitor is not for pregnant women, those intending to become pregnant, or people with kidney or liver issues.
  • Tolerable reactions include heartburn, muscle weakness, queasiness, and diarrhea.
  • More serious side effects can include muscle breakdown, inflammation, and abdominal pain.

Lipitor (atorvastatin) is part of a class of drugs knows as statins (or HMG CoA reductase inhibitors). Atorvastatin is a drug that is taken to treat hyperlipidemia, an abnormally high concentration of fats or lipids in the blood. In simpler terms, atorvastatin lowers the concentrations of “bad” cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL) and triglycerides, while boosting levels of “good” cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein, or HDL).

Through lowering high levels of cholesterol, Lipitor also reduces the risk factors that are commonly associated with all types of vascular and heart disease, as well as complications that high cholesterol can give to people with type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular problems.
Children age 10 and older and adults can be prescribed this drug for the treatment of high cholesterol and triglycerides, but patients with liver disease, pregnant women, women planning to get pregnant, as well as women who are breast-feeding should abstain from taking atorvastatin.

In addition, atorvastatin can cause complications which create failure in skeletal muscle tissue, leading to a breakdown in kidney function. Check with your health care provider urgently if you experience unusual muscle weakness or pain, especially when these come in conjunction with high fever, unfamiliar fatigue, or dark-colored urine.

For Lipitor to be most effective in treating high levels of cholesterol, it is advisable to take this drug in conjunction with exercise, good hydration, weight control, and a cholesterol-lowering diet that is low in fat or cholesterol.

There are some studies that suggest a relationship between statins and dementia. Statins include drugs like Crestor (rosuvastatin), Lipitor (atorvastatin), Mevacor (lovastatin), Livalo (pitavastatin), and Zocor (simavastatin). However, no direct relationship has been proven and additional studies must be conducted by researchers before it can be recommended clinically.

The most recent study was published in 2014 in the Public Library of Science (PLOS). The study involved approximately 16,000 Taiwanese individuals with type 2 diabetes who were new to statins, compared to 2,400 Taiwanese patients with diabetes who had been on statins. It must be noted that individuals with type 2 diabetes are already at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia.

The research revealed that people on statins like Lipitor or Crestor had a 25% lesser chance of acquiring Alzheimer’s disease, but statins did not have similar effects on other types of dementia. Might statins be the long-awaited breakthrough? Not so fast, say most researchers on Alzheimer’s disease.

Another study involved more than 5,000 persons in their seventies and early eighties. They were split up into a group that was given a statin by the generic name of pravastatin (brand name Pravachol), while the other group received a placebo (a substance with no active therapeutic effect.) After years monitoring both groups, the researchers concluded that there was no significant effect on cognitive function in the group that received the statin.

In yet another larger study involving more than 20,000 people who were split up between a placebo group and another group that was on simvastatin (brand-name Zocor, among others.) After another long monitoring period, the same result was reached: both groups displayed the same propensity for developing dementia. Thus, as stated, additional research is needed to clarify whether there is a link between statins and dementia.

The Potential Negative Side of Statins

Some researchers have discovered that patients taking statins reported memory loss symptoms after starting statins, although it did not occur to everyone taking statins. In a 2010 study of 600 people taking Lipitor, memory loss was identified as a symptom. Despite that, a precise association between Lipitor and memory loss, i.e. a cause-and-effect relationship, has yet to be confirmed. That is the reason why physicians routinely inquire about other underlying conditions that may affect memory, for example age, heart disease, and even pre-diagnosis Alzheimer’s.

The Potential Positive Side of Statins

However, according to research studies conducted by Dr. Tin-Tse Lin of Taiwan and presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress, high doses of statins can actually help prevent dementia in older individuals. The large study was conducted on 58,000 people and found that high potency statins provided the strongest protection against dementia.

So what does all of this mean? In summary, research on the relationship between statins and dementia is ongoing. Until definite conclusions can be made, physicians will predominantly recommend other means of preventing memory loss and other symptoms of dementia in older populations.

  • Studies have revealed that treatment with atorvastatin drugs is linked to significant reductions in vascular issues of the heart. Lipitor treatment is also effective in diabetic patients, especially those with type 2 diabetes.
  • Lipitor must be taken once a day at anytime, and doses vary from a low dose of 10 mg to a high dose of 80 mg a day. The most common prescriptions are for dosages of either 10 or 20 mg a day, although it is often prescribed at a dose of 40 mg based on the patient’s overall health.
  • Dosage adjustments are typically made by a health care provider at intervals of 2 to 4 weeks. Never change dosage of this medication without prior consultation with your doctor.
  • Lipitor is not approved for use with children who are younger than 10 years-old. For those ages 10 to 17, the pediatric dose is 10 to 20 mgs a day, and a maximum dosage of 20 mgs a day, with adjustments at 4 weeks.
  • If you realize that you have missed taking a dose, take one, unless the next time you are due to take your medication again is less than 12 hours away.

Avoid taking atorvastatin if you have experienced liver complications or are pregnant, intend to become pregnant, or if you are breast-feeding. Furthermore, make sure that you inform your doctor if you might have:

  • A high and regular consumption of alcohol
  • A thyroid problem
  • History of kidney disease or current kidney problems that can show as shortness of breath or fatigue, muscle tenderness or pain, or difficult or painful urinating
  • Liver problems that can show as gastrointestinal problems, itching, tiredness, nausea, weight changes, urine that is dark, and jaundiced or yellowish skin and eyelids
  • Signs of a stroke, which can show as sudden severe headache, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance, one side of the body feeling suddenly weak or numb, or other unusual changes in your health

When on a Lipitor regimen, avoid eating grapefruit, for it can have adverse effects due to its’ reactions with atorvastatin. The same goes for excess alcohol consumption, for alcohol can cause injury to the liver and raise triglyceride levels.

In addition, when taking atorvastatin, older adults and individuals who have kidney disease or poorly controlled hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) may have complications that can produce a failure of skeletal muscle tissue, leading to a breakdown in kidney function.

Potential Less Severe Side Effects of Atorvastatin include:

  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Fatigue
  • Gas
  • Heartburn
  • Hoarseness
  • Headache
  • Muscle Weakness
  • Lower Back or Side Pain
  • Pain or Tenderness Around the Eyes and Cheekbones

Side effects that should be promptly reported to a physician include:

  • Hemorrhagic Stroke
  • Deterioration or Gradual Loss of Muscle
  • Muscle Breakdown (rhabdomyolysis)
  • Inflammation, Pain with Swelling of the Joints (Arthralgia)
  • Abdominal or Stomach Pain
  • Back Pain
  • Belching or Excessive Gas
  • Heartburn, Indigestion, or Stomach Discomfort
  • Shivering
  • Loss of Appetite, Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Increased Thirst or Hunger

Other unusual side effects and sudden health issues:

  • Confusion, or Memory Problems
  • Fever, Drowsiness, and Loss of Appetite
  • General Feeling of Discomfort or Illness
  • Dark Urine
  • Jaundice, i.e. yellowing of the skin and eyes
  • Runny or Stuffy Nose, Sneezing, Coughing, Sore or Scratchy Throat (nasopharyngitis)
  • Sleep Disturbance and Insomnia

Less known incidence:

  • Continuing ringing or buzzing or other unexplained noise in the ears
  • Menstrual bleeding occurring earlier or lasting longer than usual
  • Black, tarry stools
  • Bloody nose
  • Bloody or cloudy urine
  • Blurred vision
  • Difficult, burning, or painful urination
  • Difficulty seeing at night
  • Excessive muscle tone or tension
  • Groin or scrotum pain
  • Increased body movements
  • Increased sensitivity of the eyes to light
  • Increased sensitivity to touch or pain
  • Increased urination
  • Loss of sexual ability, drive, or desire
  • Depression, nervousness, nightmares, paranoia
  • Pinpoint red spots on the skin
  • Slurred speech
  • Swollen or tender lymph glands in the neck, armpit, or groin
  • Unable to move or feel face
  • Unusual bleeding or bruising
  • Large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat,
  • Hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
  • Red skin lesions, often with a purple center sore
  • Red, irritated eyes
  • Sore throat
  • Sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips
Lipitor and Alcohol:

Excessive alcohol consumption can boost triglyceride levels and may cause harm to the liver; conserve your health by drinking in moderation when taking Lipitor.

Atorvastatin and Grapefruit:

When taking atorvastatin, you need to abstain from eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice, as these may boost levels of the drug to hazardous intensities in your system.

Atorvastatin and Drug Interactions:

There are numerous medications that interact with atorvastatin, including:

  • Many antacids
  • Several antibiotics (for example, clarithromycin or erythromycin)
  • Diltiazem (Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, and others)
  • Telaprevir
  • Warfarin
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Antifungal medicines (such as fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, or voriconazole)
  • HIV medications (such as darunavir, fosamprenavir, ritonavir, and various others)
  • Medicines that contain niacin (for example Advicor, Niaspan, Niacor, and various others)
  • Drugs that weaken your immune system (such as steroids, cancer medicine and others)
  • Medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection (such as sirolimus, tacrolimus and others

Here is some information that may be of interest to anyone on a Lipitor regimen or discussing taking Lipitor with a health care provider:

Atorvastatin and weight gain:

Individuals often ask about Lipitor in connection with weight gain. There is nothing in the medical literature on this subject. However, while on this medication, you should exercise and maintain a healthy diet to prevent gaining weight. Be alert to the possibility that recent changes in your weight are not resulting from some other coexisting health-related condition.

Lipitor and muscle pain and tenderness:

One of the more serious, though infrequent, Lipitor byproducts includes weakness or tenderness in muscle groups. If you or a loved one experience such symptoms, you should not procrastinate. Instead, consult with a physician before this condition gets worse.

Atorvastatin and anxiety:

The prescribing information that is readily available for Lipitor mentions nothing about anxiety resulting from taking Lipitor. If you feel stressed out or having anxiety attacks while on a regimen of Lipitor, your doctor will once again be able to tell you if this is being caused by another coexisting condition, or he or she may lower your dosage of the drug.

Lipitor and grapefruit:

Lipitor (atorvastatin) has an adverse interaction with grapefruit juice, the effects of that combination lasting up to 24 hours or more after consuming grapefruit. While taking Lipitor, grapefruit and its juice may lead to potentially hazardous effects.

Lipitor and vitamins:

According to the information that the Lipitor manufacturer provides on the package, Lipitor does not react adversely with vitamins or herbal supplements. Any unusual physical or mental changes should however be promptly discussed with your doctor.

Lipitor and memory:

There is conflicting evidence about the relation of Lipitor to memory and Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia. It has not been proven whether the memory loss that is occasionally observed in older people is caused by the Lipitor that they are taking or by other age-related causes, cardiovascular issues that may be causing the beginnings of vascular dementia, or other reasons already present in as yet undiagnosed dementia. Let your physician guide you on this, as informed by the most up-to-date research.

Lipitor is a medication used for lowering high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. If you are concerned about its possible impact on memory and other cognitive function, the evidence to date is mixed and inconclusive. The best thing you can do is to allow your primary care physician to guide you based on your medical history and signs and symptoms that he or she discovers during an examination. Lipitor is an effective drug for lowering cholesterol, and while it may show promise in other realms (e.g. dementia prevention), research is not conclusive enough to recommend it for these purposes.

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90,000 LIPITOR: SIDE EFFECTS, GENERICS, DOSAGE, USAGE AND MUCH MORE – MEDICAL

Lipitor is a prescription drug approved by the FDA for: Treat high cholesterol. For this, it is prescribed in combination with a healthy diet for adults and some children. These kids in

Contents:

  • What is Lipitor?
  • Drug details
  • Efficacy
  • Lipitor generic
  • Lipitor side effects
  • Mild side effects
  • Serious side effects
  • Side effects in children
  • Side effect details
  • Lipitor dosage
  • Forms and forms and , 20 mg, 40 mg, 80 mg.
  • Dosage for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases
  • Dosage for high cholesterol
  • Dosage for heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia
  • Pediatric dosage
  • What if I miss a dose?
  • Do I need to use this drug for a long time?
  • Lipitor against Crestor
  • Ingredients
  • Uses
  • Forms of drugs and method of administration
  • Side effects and risks
  • Efficacy
  • Costs
  • Lipitor against Zokor
  • Ingredients
  • Uses drugs
  • Side effects and risks
  • Effectiveness
  • Costs
  • Alternatives to Lipitor
  • Alternatives to high cholesterol
  • Alternatives to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and associated death in adults
  • Lipitor uses
  • Lipitor to prevent cardiovascular disease
  • Lipitor for the treatment of high cholesterol
  • Lipitor for the treatment of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia
  • Lipitor and children
  • Lipitor and alcohol
  • Lipitor interactions
  • Lipitor and other drugs rstvo
  • Lipitor, herbs and additives
  • Lipitor and products
  • General questions about lipitor
  • Which Lipitor drug? (Blood thinner, beta blocker or ACE inhibitor?)
  • Will Lipitor cure my high cholesterol?
  • Can I eat grapefruit while taking Lipitor?
  • Do I need to follow a specific diet when taking Lipitor?
  • Does lipitor cause muscle damage?
  • Why do some people think drugs like Lipitor are bad for you?
  • How Lipitor works
  • What is cholesterol
  • What does Lipitor do
  • How long does it take to work?
  • How long will Lipitor stay in my system?
  • How to take Lipitor
  • When to take
  • Take Lipitor with meals
  • Can Lipitor be chopped, split or chewed?
  • Lipitor cost
  • Financial and insurance assistance
  • General version
  • Lipitor and pregnancy
  • Lipitor and contraception
  • For women using lipitor
  • For men using lipitor
  • Lipitor and breastfeeding
  • other drugs
  • Lipitor precautions
  • Lipitor overdose
  • What to do if you take too much Lipitor
  • Lipitor shelf life, storage and disposal
  • Storage location
  • Disposal
  • Professional information about Lipitor
  • Indications
  • Administration
  • Mechanism of action
  • Pharmacokinetics and metabolism
  • Contraindications
  • Storage location

What is Lipitor?

Lipitor is a prescription drug approved by the FDA for:

  • Treat high cholesterol. For this, it is prescribed in combination with a healthy diet for adults and some children. These children are between the ages of 10 and 17 with high cholesterol levels caused by heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (a genetic disorder).
  • Reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and related deaths and reduce the need for certain types of cardiac surgery. Lipitor for this purpose is prescribed for adults.

Lipitor is approved for the treatment of these conditions in certain situations.For more information on how the drug is used, see the Using Lipitor section below.

Details of the drug

Lipitor contains the active drug atorvastatin, which is classified as a statin. (A drug class is a group of drugs that work together in the same way.)

Lipitor comes as a tablet that you take by mouth. It is available in four doses: 10 milligrams (mg), 20 mg, 40 mg, and 80 mg. It is usually taken once a day.

Effectiveness

For information on the effectiveness of Lipitor, see the Using Lipitor section below.

Generic Lipitor

Lipitor is a brand name drug that contains the active drug atorvastatin, which is also available as a generic drug.

Generic is an exact replica of an active drug in a brand name drug. It is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. Generic drugs usually cost less than brand name drugs.

Lipitor side effects

Lipitor may cause mild to serious side effects. The following lists list some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Lipitor. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Lipitor, consult your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you advice on how to deal with any side effects that may be troubling.

Note: The FDA monitors the side effects of its approved drugs. If you would like to notify the FDA of a side effect you have with Lipitor, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild Lipitor side effects may include: *

  • diarrhea
  • nausea
  • joint pain
  • muscle pain
  • urethral infection
  • legs

  • pain in hands or arms
  • upper respiratory tract infections, such as the common cold

Most of these side effects can go away within a few days or a couple of weeks.But if they get more severe or persist, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

In clinical studies, reported side effects were similar for men and women taking this drug.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Lipitor. For other mild side effects, talk to your doctor or pharmacist, or read the prescribing information for Lipitor.
† For more information on these side effects, see Drug Administration.See “Details of Side Effects” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Lipitor are uncommon but may occur. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect. Call 911 or your local emergency number if symptoms appear to be life-threatening or if you think you need urgent medical attention.

Serious side effects and their symptoms may include:

  • Liver damage.Symptoms may include:
    • fatigue (lack of energy)
    • nausea or vomiting
    • swelling in the abdomen, ankles, or legs
    • urine darker than usual
    • yellow skin eye)
    • Elevated liver enzymes (shown in laboratory studies)
  • Rhabdomyolysis * (muscle disease that can be life-threatening).
  • Allergic reaction. *

* For more information on these side effects, see the “Information on side effects” section below.

Side effects in children

In clinical studies, children who took Lipitor had the same side effects as children who were given a placebo. (A placebo is treatment without an active drug.) These side effects are similar to those seen in adults, as mentioned above.

Side Effect Details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug and whether certain side effects are associated with it. Here are some details about some of the side effects this drug may or may not cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most medicines, some people may experience an allergic reaction after taking Lipitor. It is not known exactly how often this happens.Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction may include:

  • skin rash
  • itching
  • redness (warmth and redness of the skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction may include:

  • swelling under the skin, usually on the eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of the tongue, mouth, or throat
  • difficulty breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a serious allergic reaction to lipitor.Call 911 or your local emergency number if symptoms appear to be life-threatening or if you think you need urgent medical attention.

Muscle pain

You may experience muscle pain while taking Lipitor.

If you experience any unexplained muscle pain while taking Lipitor, you should see your doctor immediately. You should also report any unexplained tenderness or weakness. While muscle pain is not severe in most cases, it can be a symptom of a more serious problem.

It is especially important to talk to your doctor if you have other symptoms associated with muscle pain. For example, you should tell your doctor right away if you have lack of energy or a general feeling of anxiety (malaise) with muscle pain. These could be signs of a severe and possibly life-threatening muscle condition known as rhabdomyolysis.

Symptoms of rhabdomyolysis may include:

  • severe muscle pain and weakness
  • nausea
  • brown, red, or tea urine
  • loss of consciousness

If you have muscle pain or discomfort, your doctor may try lowering your lipid dose.Or, they may prescribe another medicine to treat your condition. In most cases, muscle pain disappears after you stop taking Lipitor.

Diabetes mellitus

You may have problems with blood sugar levels, including diabetes, while taking Lipitor. This has been reported by people taking statins (a class of drugs) such as Lipitor. But this was not specifically reported by people taking Lipitor in clinical trials.

Before taking Lipitor, be sure to tell your doctor if you have diabetes.Also let them know if you have had any blood sugar problems in the past. While you are taking Lipitor, your doctor may order blood tests to make sure your blood sugar remains normal.

If you have any further questions about diabetes and lipitor, talk to your doctor.

Joint pain

Joint pain is one of the most common side effects of Lipitor. In clinical studies, 6.9% of people taking Lipitor reported joint pain.In these studies, 6.5% of people taking a placebo (treatment without active medication) reported joint pain.

If you experience joint pain while taking Lipitor, consult your doctor. He may suggest pain relief or reduce the dose of Lipitor. Or they may think you will try another medicine for your condition.

Memory loss

Cognitive problems have been reported with the use of statins (a class of drugs that includes lipitor).Cognition includes mental processes such as thinking and knowledge, including memory loss.

No memory loss was reported in clinical trials with Lipitor or other statins. But there have been rare reports of cognitive problems in people taking statins. These problems are related to brain function. Examples of cognitive problems include forgetfulness, confusion, and memory loss.

If you think you are having cognitive problems while taking Lipitor, consult your doctor.Memory loss problems usually resolve after stopping the drug. The time it takes to do this can vary from person to person. On average, these problems go away about 3 weeks after stopping the drug.

Weight gain or loss (no side effects)

Weight gain is not a side effect of Lipitor. However, Lipitor belongs to a class of medications known as statins that are associated with weight gain.

Some researchers have found that people who use statins tend to consume more calories than those who do not.This includes getting more calories from fat. Researchers believe this is because some people believe Lipitor compensates for the negative effects of unhealthy diets. Overall, there is insufficient evidence that statins, such as Lipitor, cause weight gain.

It is important to remember that Lipitor and other statins should not be used as a substitute for a healthy diet and exercise. In addition to taking Lipitor as directed, remember to follow your doctor’s diet and exercise guidelines.

If you have questions about weight gain while taking Lipitor, consult your doctor.

Lipitor dosage

The lipitor dosage prescribed by your doctor will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you are using Lipitor
  • your age
  • other medical conditions you may have
  • other medications you may be taking

Your doctor will usually prescribe low dosage.They will then adjust it over time to achieve the amount you want. Ultimately, your doctor will prescribe the lowest dosage that will produce the desired effect.

The following information describes commonly used or recommended dosages. However, be sure to take the dose that your doctor has prescribed for you. Your doctor will determine the optimal dosage for your needs.

Form and strength of the preparation: 10 mg, 20 mg, 40 mg, 80 mg.

Lipitor is available as a tablet that you take by mouth.It is available in four different dosage options:

  • 10 milligrams (mg)
  • 20 mg
  • 40 mg
  • 80 mg

Dosage for the prevention of cardiovascular disease

Lipitor approved for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in adults … “Cardiovascular system” refers to the heart and blood vessels.

The recommended dosage for this use is 10 mg to 80 mg once a day.

Dosage for high cholesterol

Lipitor is approved for the treatment of high cholesterol in adults. For this use, the recommended dosage is 10 mg to 80 mg once a day.

Dosage for Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

Lipitor is approved for the treatment of Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) in children aged 10 to 17 years. HeFH is a genetic disorder that causes high cholesterol levels.

The recommended dosage for the treatment of HeFH is 10 to 20 mg once daily.

Pediatric Dosage

Lipitor is approved only for the treatment of HeFH in children aged 10 to 17 years (see above).

The recommended dosage for this use is 10 to 20 mg once daily.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Lipitor, try taking it as soon as you remember. If 12 hours or more have passed since you missed a dose, simply skip that dose and take your next dose at the usual time.Do not take two doses of Lipitor. This can increase the risk of side effects from the medication.

Try using a medication reminder to avoid missed appointments. This could include setting an alarm on your phone or downloading an app for reminders. The kitchen timer can work too.

Do I need to use this drug for a long time?

Lipitor is indicated for long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Lipitor is safe and effective for you, you are more likely to take it for a long time.

Lipitor vs. Crestor

You may wonder how Lipitor differs from other drugs prescribed for similar use. Here we take a look at how Lipitor and Crestor are similar and different from each other.

Ingredients

Lipitor contains the active drug atorvastatin, and Crestor contains the active drug rosuvastatin. Both atorvastatin and rosuvastatin belong to a class of drugs called statins. (A drug class is a group of drugs that act in a similar way.)

Uses

Here is a list of conditions for which the FDA has approved Lipitor and Crestor.

  • Both Lipitor and Crestor are FDA approved for:
    • help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and associated death in adults
    • Treat high cholesterol levels from various factors in adults (when combined with a healthy diet)
  • Lipitor is also FDA approved for:
    • to treat high cholesterol levels caused by heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH), a genetic disorder in children between the ages of 10 and 17 (when combined with a healthy diet)
  • Crestor is also approved FDA for:
    • Treat high cholesterol levels caused by HeFH in children aged 7 to 17 years (in combination with a healthy diet)
    • Slow the progression of atherosclerosis

Drug form and route of administration

I Lipitor , and Crestor comes in pill form that you take by mouth.

Side effects and risks

Lipitor and Crestor can cause very similar but different side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with Lipitor or Crestor, as well as mild side effects common to both drugs.

  • May occur with lipitor:
    • urethral infection
    • upper respiratory tract infections
  • May occur with Crestor: pain
    • unusual weakness or lack of energy 9008

      3 9000

    • May occur with both Lipitor and Crestor:
      • joint pain

    Serious side effects

    This list contains examples of serious side effects of both Lipitor and Crestor.

    • May occur with both Lipitor and Crestor:
      • liver damage
      • rhabdomyolysis (a muscle condition that can be life-threatening)
      • allergic reaction

    Efficacy

    The use of Lipitor and Crestor for the treatment of high cholesterol in adults has been directly compared in a clinical study.

    In this study, adults with high cholesterol were randomly selected to receive one of four different statin drugs.These drugs were atorvastatin (active drug in Lipitor), Crestor, simvastatin (active drug in Zocor), and pravastatin (active drug in Pravachol). Study participants took the drugs for 6 weeks. The researchers wanted to find out if any drug was actually better at lowering LDL cholesterol in humans.

    Researchers found that, depending on the dosage used, LDL cholesterol levels were:

    • 46% to 55% lower in people taking Crestor
    • 37% to 51% lower in people taking atorvastatin
    • 28% lower – 46% lower in people taking simvastatin
    • 24–30% lower in people taking pravastatin

    The American College of Cardiology (ACC) publishes guidelines for managing high cholesterol.The ACC recommends a variety of statins, including Lipitor and Crestor, for different people.

    The statin your doctor prescribes will depend on various factors. These include factors such as your age, cholesterol levels, and your risk of heart disease (a condition that affects the heart or blood vessels). If you have questions about which statin is right for you, talk to your doctor.

    Costs

    According to GoodRx.com estimates, Lipitor usually costs more than Crestor.The actual price you pay for both drugs depends on your plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

    Lipitor is available as a generic drug called atorvastatin. Crestor is available in the form of the generic rosuvastatin. A generic is an exact replica of an active drug in a brand name drug. Generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. Generic drugs usually cost less than brand name drugs.

    Lipitor vs. Zocor

    You may wonder how Lipitor differs from other drugs prescribed for similar use.Here we will see how Lipitor and Zocor are similar and how they differ.

    Ingredients

    Lipitor contains the active drug atorvastatin. Zokor contains the active drug simvastatin. Both atorvastatin and simvastatin belong to a class of drugs known as statins.

    Uses

    Lipitor and Zokor FDA approved for:

    • Reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (disease affecting the heart or blood vessels) and associated death in adults
    • Reduced high the level of cholesterol caused by various factors in adults (in combination with a healthy diet)
    • Treatment of high cholesterol levels caused by heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic disease, in children aged 10 to 17 years (in combination with a healthy diet)

    Drug Forms and Directions for Use

    Both Lipitor and Zocor come in pill form that you take by mouth.

    Side effects and risks

    Lipitor and Zocor can cause very similar but different side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

    Mild side effects

    These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug, as well as the mild side effects that both drugs can have.

    • May occur with lipitor:
      • urethra infection
    • May occur with Zocor:
      • Headache
      • high blood sugar 9008

        3 9000

    • May occur with both lipitor and Zocor:
      • joint pain
      • upper respiratory tract infections

    Serious side effects

    This list contains examples of side effects. both Lipitor and Zocor.

    • May occur with both lipitor and Zocor:
      • liver damage
      • rhabdomyolysis (a muscle condition that can be life-threatening)
      • allergic reaction
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    The use of Lipitor and Zocor for the treatment of high cholesterol in adults has been directly compared in a clinical study.

    In this study, adults with high cholesterol were randomly selected to receive one of four different statin drugs.These drugs were atorvastatin (active drug in Lipitor), Crestor, simvastatin (active drug in Zocor), and pravastatin (active drug in Pravachol). Study participants took the drugs for 6 weeks. The researchers wanted to find out if any drug was actually better at lowering LDL cholesterol in humans.

    Researchers found that, depending on the dosage used, LDL cholesterol levels were:

    • 46% to 55% lower in people taking Crestor
    • C 37% to 51% lower in people taking atorvastatin
    • C 28% up to 46% lower in people taking simvastatin
    • 24-30% lower in people taking pravastatin

    The American College of Cardiology (ACC) publishes guidelines for managing high cholesterol.The ACC recommends a variety of statins, including Lipitor and Zocor, for different people.

    The statin your doctor prescribes will depend on various factors. This includes things like your age, cholesterol levels, and your risk of heart disease. If you have questions about statins that are right for you, talk to your doctor.

    Costs

    According to GoodRx.com estimates, a branded Lipitor usually costs more than a branded Zocor. The actual price you pay for both drugs depends on your plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

    Lipitor is available as a generic drug called atorvastatin. Zocor is available as a generic drug called simvastatin. A generic is an exact replica of an active drug in a brand name drug. Generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. Generic drugs usually cost less than brand name drugs.

    Alternatives to Lipitor

    There are other drugs available that can treat high cholesterol levels. Some may suit you better than others.If you are looking for an alternative to Lipitor, talk to your doctor. They can tell you about other medicines that may help you.

    Alternatives to high cholesterol

    Examples of other drugs that can be used to treat high cholesterol include:

    • other statins, * such as:
      • fluvastatin (Lescol XL)
      • lovastatin (Altoprev)
          9017

        • pitavastatin (Livalo)
        • pravastatin (Pravachol)
        • rosuvastatin (Crestor)
        • simvastatin (Zokor)
      • bile acid binding resins (
      • )
        • Colestipol (Welchol)
        • Colestid
      • Ezetimibe (Zetia)
      • Fibrates, such as:
        • Fenofibrate (Antara, Lipofen, 903 Hemophene, Tricor

            9017

          • cholesterol injections, such as:
            • alirocumab (Praluent)
            • 90 173

              • evolocumab (Repata)

            * Some of these drugs are also approved to reduce the risk of death from heart disease or stroke.For more information on treatment options, talk with your doctor.

            Alternatives to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and related death in adults

            Examples of other drugs that may be used to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and related death in adults include:

            • Other statin drugs , such as:
              • fluvastatin (Lescol XL)
              • lovastatin (Altoprev)
              • pitavastatin (Livalo)
              • pravastatin (Pravachol)
              • rosuvastor
              • 0009 )
            • Gemfibrozil (Lopid)

            Lipitor uses

            The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Lipitor for the treatment of certain medical conditions.

            Lipitor for the prevention of cardiovascular disease

            Lipitor is approved by the FDA for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in people at high risk of developing the condition. “Cardiovascular system” refers to the heart and blood vessels. Examples of cardiovascular disease include stroke and heart attack.

            Certain risk factors can increase your chances of developing cardiovascular disease. These risk factors include:

            • age (your risk increases with age)
            • smoking or tobacco use
            • hypertension (high blood pressure)
            • low high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (“good” blood fat)
            • family history of cardiovascular disease
            • type 2 diabetes
            • being male

            Lipitor is also approved to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with heart disease.This includes people who have:

            • ischemic heart disease
            • a history of stroke or other problems with the blood supply to the brain.
            • peripheral vascular disease

            High blood cholesterol levels increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. By lowering cholesterol levels, Lipitor helps reduce the risk of heart problems.

            Efficacy in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and associated death

            Lipitor belongs to a class of drugs called statins.(A class of drugs is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.) Like other statins, Lipitor helps reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and associated death.

            Study in People with High Blood Pressure

            In one study, researchers examined more than 10,000 people with high blood pressure but no history of heart attack. To participate in the study, people must have had at least three risk factors for cardiovascular disease.The people in the study took either Lipitor 10 milligrams (mg) or a placebo (tablets with no active drug). Half of the people in this study were followed up for just over 3 years.

            At the end of the study, the researchers compared people taking a placebo with those taking Lipitor. They found that those who took Lipitor reduced their risk of cardiovascular problems, such as heart attack, by 36%.

            Study in people with type 2 diabetes

            A similar study included about 3000 people with type 2 diabetes but no heart disease.To participate in the study, people must have at least one other risk factor for cardiovascular problems. The researchers randomly selected people who took Lipitor 10 mg or a placebo once a day. Half of the people in this study were followed for almost 4 years.

            At the end of the study, the researchers found that compared to people taking placebo, those who took Lipitor:

            • reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease by 37%
            • reduced the risk of stroke by 48%
            • reduced the risk of heart attack by 42%

            Lipitor for the treatment of high cholesterol

            The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Lipitor for the treatment of high cholesterol.For this use Lipitor should be combined with a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol.

            About cholesterol

            Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance. Although people sometimes mistake it for harm, cholesterol is in every cell in your body and you can’t live without it. Your body makes enough cholesterol on its own to meet your needs. Cholesterol only becomes a problem if the amount in the blood gets too high.

            The term “cholesterol” generally refers to total cholesterol. This is the total amount of cholesterol in the blood. Total cholesterol is composed of:

            • low density lipoproteins (LDL), sometimes called “bad cholesterol”
            • high density lipoproteins (HDL), sometimes called “good cholesterol”
            • triglycerides, a type of fat that is the “building block” of cholesterol …

            The term “high cholesterol” specifically refers to high levels of LDL in the blood.But in addition to lowering LDL cholesterol, Lipitor can also:

            • Reduce total cholesterol
            • Reduce triglycerides
            • Increase HDL cholesterol

            High cholesterol does not cause symptoms in most people. Often times, people don’t know they have it until something serious happens, like a heart attack or stroke. For this reason, talk to your doctor about routine cholesterol screening if you are 20 or older.

            What Lipitor Treats

            Lipitor is approved for the treatment of people with the following types of high cholesterol:

            • Primary hyperlipidemia or mixed dyslipidemia. People with primary hyperlipidemia generally have high levels of LDL cholesterol in their blood. People with mixed dyslipidemia may have problems with more than one type of cholesterol. Lipitor has been shown to reduce LDL, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels under these conditions. It has also been shown to reduce levels of a protein known as apolipoprotein B (Apo B).It has also been shown to increase HDL levels.
            • Hypertriglyceridemia. People with hypertriglyceridemia have high blood triglyceride levels. Triglycerides are a type of fat. Under this condition, Lipitor should be used in conjunction with a healthy diet.
            • Hyperlipoproteinemia type 3. Lipitor is used to treat people with type 3 hyperlipoproteinemia who do not respond to diet treatment. This is an inherited version of high cholesterol.People with this condition have a higher than normal level of medium-density lipoprotein in their blood.
            • Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a genetic disorder that causes high blood cholesterol levels. People with this condition have high cholesterol levels not due to lifestyle or diet. For the treatment of HoFH, Lipitor should be used in conjunction with other lipid-lowering drugs, if available.

            Note: Lipitor has not been studied for the treatment of cholesterol problems called Fredrickson hyperlipidemias type 1 and 5.As a result, Lipitor should not be used to treat people with these lipid disorders.

            Hyperlipidemia can generally be divided into five categories based on specific patterns of lipoprotein levels. These categories are called Frederickson’s hyperlipidemia types. In people with hyperlipidemia 1 and 5 of Fredrickson’s type, the number of chylomicrons is higher than normal. It is a type of protein that carries cholesterol.

            Efficacy on high cholesterol

            Clinical studies have shown that Lipitor is useful in the treatment of high cholesterol.

            One study compared adults taking Lipitor versus those taking a placebo for hyperlipidemia (high blood lipids). A placebo is a pill with no active medication. The researchers followed people for 6 weeks. They compared their cholesterol levels before and after the study.

            At the end of the study, the researchers found that:

            • Total cholesterol in people taking Lipitor decreased by 29–45%, depending on the dose used.The total cholesterol of people taking placebo increased by 4%.
            • LDL cholesterol levels in people taking Lipitor decreased by 39-60%, depending on the dose used. LDL cholesterol in people taking placebo increased by 4%.
            • Triglyceride levels in people taking Lipitor decreased by 19–37%, depending on the dose used. Triglyceride levels in people taking placebo increased by 10%.

            Lipitor for the treatment of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

            Lipitor is approved for the treatment of high cholesterol in children aged 10 to 17 years with a condition known as heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH).This is an inherited form of high cholesterol (caused by your genes).

            Elevated cholesterol levels usually do not cause any symptoms. This means that HeFH is usually not diagnosed until your child has a blood test that shows high cholesterol levels. If you have a family history of heart disease or if you or your child’s other parent has high cholesterol levels, talk to your child’s doctor. They will help determine if your child should be tested for HeFH.

            Efficacy in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

            Researchers studied 187 children aged 10 to 17 years with HeFH. The children were randomly given either Lipitor or placebo (tablets with no active drug) for 26 weeks. The aim of the study was to find out if Lipitor is better at lowering cholesterol levels in children with HeFH.

            To be included in the study, children must have:

            • LDL cholesterol level ≥ 190 milligrams per deciliter (mg / dL) or
            • LDL cholesterol level ≥ 160 mg / dL and a family history of familial hypercholesterolemia or heart disease

            After 26 weeks, the researchers found that:

            • Total cholesterol in children taking Lipitor decreased by 31.4%.In children taking placebo, total cholesterol dropped by 1.5%.
            • In children taking Lipitor, LDL cholesterol decreased by 39.6%. The LDL cholesterol level in children taking placebo decreased by 0.4%.
            • The triglyceride level in children taking Lipitor decreased by 12%. Triglyceride levels in children taking placebo increased by 1%.

            Lipitor and Children

            Lipitor is approved for the treatment of high cholesterol levels in children aged 10 to 17 years with a condition known as heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (see section 4.4).Above).

            Lipitor and alcohol

            There is no known interaction between lipitor and alcohol consumption.

            However, drinking too much alcohol can damage your liver. And liver damage is a potential side effect of Lipitor. The combination of these two factors can increase the risk of liver-related side effects.

            Before you start taking Lipitor, be sure to tell your doctor if you drink alcohol, especially in large quantities.And be sure to ask your doctor if you have any other questions about drinking alcohol while taking Lipitor.

            Lipitor interactions

            Lipitor may interact with several other medications. It can also interact with some products.

            Different interactions can cause different effects. For example, some interactions can affect how well a medicine works. Other interactions can intensify side effects or make them more serious.

            Lipitor and other medicines

            Below are some medicines that can interact with Lipitor. This section does not cover all drugs that can interact with Lipitor.

            Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking Lipitor. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other medicines you are taking. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

            If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

            Potent CYP3A4 inhibitors

            CYP3A4 is an enzyme that helps the body break down drugs. Taking Lipitor with potent CYP3A4 inhibitors, which are medications that inhibit (slow down) CYP3A4 activity, can increase lipitor levels in your body. This increases the risk of side effects from Lipitor.

            Examples of potent CYP3A4 inhibitors include:

            • some antibiotics, such as clarithromycin and erythromycin
            • some antifungal agents, such as ketoconazole and itraconazole (Sporanox)
            • Some protease inhibitors, such as 9017 sakavinavir
            • and 9017 any of these medicines, you should consult your doctor before taking Lipitor.They can reduce the dose of Lipitor. Or they may prescribe another medicine for you instead of a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor.

              Cyclosporine or letermovir

              Cyclosporine (Gengraf, Sandimmun) or letermovir (Previmis) should not be taken while taking Lipitor. This can increase the risk of myopathy (muscle pain or weakness). These drugs can affect how your body processes and breaks down lipitor by slowing down the production of a protein that helps transport drugs in your body.

              If you are taking cyclosporine or letermovir, you should consult your doctor before taking Lipitor. They will select the best medicines to safely treat your condition.

              Gemfibrozil and other fibrates

              You should not use gemfibrozil while taking Lipitor. Gemfibrozil is a fibrate drug that helps lower triglyceride levels (a type of fat found in the blood).

              Like cyclosporine and letermovir (seeAbove), gemfibrozil slows down the production of a protein that helps transport drugs like Lipitor in your body. Thus, the combination of gemfibrozil and lipitor significantly increases the risk of developing myopathy (muscle pain or weakness).

              Before taking Lipitor, you should also tell your doctor if you are taking another fibrate drug, such as fenofibrate. Lipitor can still interact with these drugs, although not as much as with gemfibrozil.This is because fibrate-based drugs can also cause myopathy as a side effect. Taking these drugs in combination with Lipitor may increase your risk of muscle pain.

              If your doctor thinks you should take Lipitor with Fibrate, they may decide to lower your Lipitor or Fibrate dosage. Or they may decide to replace one or the other with another.

              Other medicines that increase the risk of muscle pain

              In addition to the medicines described above, other medicines may increase the risk of myopathy (muscle pain or weakness) when taken with Lipitor.

              These medications include:

              • some combination drugs used for hepatitis C:
                • glecaprevir / pibrentasvir (Mavyret)
                • elbasvir / gazoprevir (Zepatie)
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            • nia If you are taking any of these medicines, check with your doctor before taking Lipitor. Your doctor may decide to prescribe a lower dosage of Lipitor or your other medicine.Or they may prescribe a different drug for you other than Lipitor or the drugs listed above.

              Lipitor, Herbs and Supplements

              Herbs or supplements have not been reported to interact with Lipitor. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Lipitor.

              Lipitor and Products

              You should avoid consuming excessive amounts of grapefruit juice while taking Lipitor.To learn more about how grapefruit juice can interact with medications, check out this guide.

              General questions about Lipitor

              Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Lipitor.

              Which drug is Lipitor? (A blood thinner, beta blocker or ACE inhibitor?)

              Lipitor belongs to a class of drugs known as statins. (A class of drugs is a group of drugs that work together in a similar way.) Statins are used to lower cholesterol levels.Lipitor is not a blood thinner, nor is it a beta blocker or ACE inhibitor.

              People with high cholesterol, diabetes, or heart disease may also need to take these other medications. For example, they may need an ACE inhibitor or beta blocker to control high blood pressure. Or they required a blood thinner to prevent blood clots (which can lead to heart attack or stroke).

              When taking multiple medicines, it is important to check with your doctor and pharmacist that they are all safe to take together.Your doctor or pharmacist may review your Medication List to make sure you are not duplicating medications. They can also make sure that you are taking the best medicines for your conditions.

              Will Lipitor Cure My High Cholesterol?

              No, Lipitor will not cure high cholesterol. There is currently no known cure for high cholesterol.

              However, studies have shown that with a healthy diet, Lipitor can lower blood cholesterol.It can lower your risk of heart disease and other problems like stroke.

              If you have any other questions about the treatment of high cholesterol, talk to your doctor.

              Can I eat grapefruit while taking Lipitor?

              You should avoid consuming large amounts of grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while taking Lipitor.

              Certain substances in grapefruit can slow down the activity of the CYP3A4 enzyme in your body.CYP3A4 helps the body break down drugs, including lipitor. Thus, blocking CYP3A4 from working can increase lipitor levels in your body. This can increase the risk of side effects from the drug.

              Drinking more than 1.2 liters of grapefruit juice per day may increase the risk of side effects.

              If you have any questions about eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while taking Lipitor, talk to your doctor.

              Do I need to follow a specific diet when taking Lipitor?

              No, there is no specific diet that you need to follow when taking Lipitor.However, it is important to remember that Lipitor should not be a substitute for a healthy diet. Lipitor does not reverse poor nutrition. When taking Lipitor, you need to follow a heart-healthy diet. Otherwise, the medicine may not work.

              The American Heart Association offers dietary guidelines for controlling cholesterol and reducing the risk of heart disease, including: fiber and whole grains

            If you have any questions about which diet is best for you, talk to your doctor or dietitian.

            Does lipitor cause muscle damage?

            Although infrequent, Lipitor can cause myopathy (muscle pain or weakness) and muscle damage.

            See Lipitor side effects section above for more information.

            Why do some people think drugs like Lipitor are bad for you?

            Lipitor belongs to a class of drugs called statins. (A drug class is a group of drugs that work the same way.)Some people think statins like Lipitor have too many risks.

            This may be because in a small number of studies, statin use has been associated with an increased risk of certain side effects. These include high blood sugar, type 2 diabetes, and memory problems. However, the risk of these side effects has been proven to be very low.

            In addition, other risk factors play a role when people develop these side effects.This is why some people, such as pregnant women or those with liver disease, should not take statins.

            Whether Lipitor is right for you depends on your health condition and risk factors. If you have further questions about taking Lipitor, talk to your doctor.

            How Lipitor Works

            Lipitor works by lowering the amount of cholesterol your body produces.

            What is cholesterol

            Cholesterol is a lipid. Lipids are fat-like substances produced by your liver.While you may have heard bad reviews about cholesterol, it’s actually what your body needs to function properly. For example, your body cannot make vitamin D without cholesterol.

            Cholesterol cannot pass through your blood on its own. So, your liver also makes lipoproteins, which carry cholesterol through the bloodstream. There are two main lipoproteins: low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL).

            LDL cholesterol (LDL cholesterol) is often referred to as “bad” cholesterol.Too high LDL cholesterol in the blood is known as high cholesterol. When LDL levels are too high, LDL cholesterol can start to build up in the walls of your arteries. This accumulation is called a cholesterol plaque.

            Plaque cholesterol increases the risk of blood clots. This is because plaque constricts blood vessels and restricts blood flow. This increases the likelihood of blood adhering to the blood vessel wall, completely blocking blood flow. Eventually, the plaque can grow large enough to block blood flow on its own.

            In addition, cholesterol plaques can break off and travel through the blood. If the plaque reaches an artery in the heart, it can block blood flow and cause a heart attack. If it reaches an artery in your head, it can block blood flow and cause a stroke.

            In contrast, HDL cholesterol is often referred to as “good” cholesterol. This is because it helps return LDL cholesterol to the liver. Your liver converts cholesterol into bile salts, which are then sent to the intestines for removal from the body.Thus, HDL helps prevent plaque buildup in the arteries.

            What Lipitor Does

            Lipitor contains the active drug atorvastatin. Atorvastatin affects the production of cholesterol in the body.

            In particular, atorvastatin blocks the action of an enzyme called HMG-CoA reductase. An enzyme is a protein your body makes to speed up reactions like cholesterol production.

            HMG-CoA is one of the most important cholesterol-producing enzymes.By blocking this enzyme, atorvastatin reduces the production of cholesterol in the body. It lowers the amount of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and other fats in the blood.

            Lipitor also increases blood levels of HDL.

            How long does it take to work?

            Lipitor takes effect as soon as you take a dose. It reaches its maximum blood level about 1 to 2 hours after taking a dose. Most people will notice an improvement in their cholesterol levels within 2-4 weeks.

            However, because of the way the drug works, you probably won’t feel any different from taking Lipitor (unless you have side effects). The only way to know what your cholesterol level looks like is with a blood test. Your doctor will check your blood from time to time to see how well Lipitor is working.

            How long will Lipitor stay in my system?

            It takes about 3 days for Lipitor to leave your system.

            How to take Lipitor

            You must take Lipitor as directed by your doctor or healthcare provider.

            When to take

            You can take Lipitor at any time of the day. This is because Lipitor’s active drug, atorvastatin, remains in the body for a long time. So even if you take it in the morning, it will still work at night.

            Regardless of when you take your dose, try to take Lipitor at the same time every day.

            To avoid missed appointments, try setting a medication reminder on your phone or download a reminder app.The kitchen timer can work too.

            The best time to take Lipitor is when it will be easiest for you to remember.

            Take Lipitor with food

            Lipitor can be taken with or without food.

            Can Lipitor be chopped, split or chewed?

            No, do not crush, split or chew Lipitor tablets.

            Lipitor cost

            As with all medicines, Lipitor cost may vary. For current Lipitor prices in your area, visit GoodRx.com.

            The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you can pay without insurance. The actual price you pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

            Your insurance company may require prior authorization from you before it can approve Lipitor coverage. This means that your doctor and insurance company must tell you about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug.The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

            If you are not sure if you need prior authorization to use Lipitor, contact your insurance company.

            Financial and Insurance Assistance

            If you need financial support to pay for Lipitor or need help understanding your coverage, help is available.

            Pfizer, the manufacturer of Lipitor, offers the Lipitor Loyalty Card.This card can help reduce the cost of the drug for you. For more information and to see if you are eligible for support, call 855-496-8792 or visit the program website.

            General version

            Lipitor is available in a generic form called atorvastatin. A generic is an exact replica of an active drug in a brand name drug. Generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. And generics tend to be cheaper than brand name drugs.To find out how the cost of atorvastatin compares to the cost of lipitor, visit GoodRx.com.

            If your doctor has prescribed Lipitor and you want to use atorvastatin instead, talk to your doctor. They can give preference to one version or another. You will also need to check your insurance plan as it may only cover one or the other.

            Lipitor and pregnancy

            You should not take Lipitor during pregnancy. Research has shown that statins, including Lipitor, can cause birth defects when used during pregnancy.

            If you become pregnant while taking Lipitor, stop taking the medicine and see your doctor.

            Lipitor and contraceptives

            It is not safe to take Lipitor during pregnancy. * Therefore, if you are sexually active, you need to consider your contraceptive needs when taking Lipitor if you or your partner may become pregnant.

            For women using Lipitor

            If you are taking Lipitor and may become pregnant, you should use an effective birth control method while taking the drug.

            If you become pregnant while taking Lipitor, stop taking the medicine and see your doctor.

            For men using Lipitor

            The manufacturer Lipitor has not made a birth control recommendation for men using this medication. If you are a man taking Lipitor and have sex with a woman who can become pregnant, consult your doctor. They can advise you on what contraception you need while using this drug.

            * For more information on taking Lipitor during pregnancy, seeSee Lipitor and Pregnancy above.

            Lipitor and breastfeeding

            Lipitor should not be taken while breastfeeding. It is not known whether the drug passes into human breast milk. If found in human breast milk, Lipitor can cause serious side effects in a breastfed baby.

            The drug is indeed present in rat milk, but animal studies do not always predict what will happen to humans.

            If you have any questions about the use of Lipitor and breastfeeding, please consult your doctor.

            Using Lipitor with Other Drugs

            Your doctor may prescribe Lipitor for use alone or with other drugs, depending on the condition it is being used to treat.

            Examples of other drugs that can be taken with Lipitor to treat high cholesterol include:

            • ezetimibe (Zetia)
            • bile acid binding resins such as:
              • cholestyramine (Preval)
              • colesevelam ( Welchol)
              • colestipol (Colestid)
            • injectables such as:
              • alirocumab (Praluent)
              • evolocumab (Repata)

            Lipitor is also used to reduce the risk of vascular disease associated death, and to reduce the need for certain types of heart surgery.You do not need to use Lipitor with any medications for this. Your doctor will most likely ask you to continue taking medications that you are taking for other conditions, including heart disease.

            Lipitor precautions

            Before taking Lipitor, talk to your doctor about your health history. Lipitor may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health. These include:

            • History of liver disease. Lipitor should not be used if you have liver disease. And people with a history of liver disease may be at a higher risk of side effects from lipitor. Be sure to tell your doctor about any active or past liver disease before taking Lipitor.
            • History of alcohol abuse. Excessive alcohol consumption can cause liver damage, which may increase the risk of side effects from lipitor. Before taking Lipitor, tell your doctor if you consume more than two alcoholic beverages per day.
            • Kidney disease. If you have kidney disease, taking Lipitor may increase your risk of developing myopathy (muscle pain and weakness). Be sure to tell your doctor about any history of kidney disease before taking Lipitor.
            • Untreated hypothyroidism. Myopathy (muscle pain and weakness) is a possible side effect of Lipitor. People with untreated hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid gland) may have a higher risk of developing this side effect.Before taking Lipitor, be sure to tell your doctor about any history of thyroid disease.
            • Recent stroke or transient ischemic attack. If you have had a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (also called a mini-stroke) in the past 6 months, Lipitor may increase your risk of a hemorrhagic (bleeding) stroke. Be sure to tell your doctor about a history of stroke before taking Lipitor.
            • Allergic reaction. If you have ever had an allergic reaction to Lipitor or any of its ingredients, you should not take Lipitor. Ask your doctor what other medications might be right for you.
            • Pregnancy. You should not take Lipitor during pregnancy. See Lipitor and Pregnancy section above for more information.
            • Breastfeeding. Do not take Lipitor while breastfeeding. For more information seeLipitor and breastfeeding section above.

            Note: For more information on the potential negative effects of Lipitor, see the Lipitor Side Effects section above.

            Lipitor overdose

            Do not use Lipitor more than your doctor recommends. For some medicines, this can lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

            What to do if you have taken too much Lipitor

            If you think you have taken too much of this drug, see your doctor.You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if you have severe symptoms, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

            Lipitor Shelf Life, Storage and Disposal

            When you buy Lipitor from a pharmacy, the pharmacist will indicate the expiration date on the bottle label. This date is usually 1 year from the date the medication was dispensed.

            The expiration date guarantees that the medicine will act during this time. The current position of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid the use of expired drugs. If you have an unused medicine that has expired, talk to your pharmacist about whether you can use it.

            Storage location

            The shelf life of a medicine can depend on many factors, including how and where you store it.

            Lipitor tablets should be stored at room temperature (20 to 25 ° C / 68 to 77 ° F). Store in a tightly closed container. Avoid storing this medication in places where it can get wet, such as bathrooms.

            Disposal

            If you no longer need to take Lipitor and still have medication, it is important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent other people, including children and pets, from accidentally taking the drug. It also helps prevent the harmful effects of the drug on the environment.

            This article contains some helpful tips for disposing of medicines. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of the medicine.

            Professional information on lipitor

            The following information is intended for physicians and other healthcare professionals.

            Indications

            Adults Lipitor is indicated for:

            • reduction in the risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in persons with multiple risk factors for coronary heart disease (including the risk of future events in persons with existing coronary heart disease)
            • reduction in total cholesterol, LDL, Apo B and TG, and an increase in HDL in persons with primary hyperlipidemia or mixed dyslipidemia as an adjunct to the diet
            • Decreased triglyceridemia in patients with hypertriglyceridemia as an adjunct to a diet
            • Decreased triglyceride levels in people with hyperlipoprotein 3 who do not respond to diet
            • as an adjunct to other treatments, lowering total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in people with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH)

            Lipitor is also indicated for children aged 10 to 17 with HeFH.It is used as a dietary supplement to lower total cholesterol, LDL, and Apo B. It is prescribed if LDL levels remain at 190 mg / dL or higher despite dietary therapy. It is also prescribed if their LDL remains above or equal to 160 mg / dL, if the child has a family history of premature heart disease, or if the child has two or more risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

            Administration

            Lipitor is available in the form of tablets that are taken by mouth.The typical dosage range is 10 mg to 80 mg once a day, depending on the condition being treated and several patient factors.

            Mechanism of action

            Lipitor contains the active ingredient atorvastatin, which is an inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase. HMG-CoA serves as a catalyst in the rate limiting step of cholesterol synthesis. By inhibiting HMG-CoA, atorvastatin causes a decrease in cholesterol production.

            Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

            Atorvastatin undergoes intensive metabolism during the first pass, which gives a low bioavailability – 15%.No clinical impact is expected, whether the drug is taken with or without food. The drug is ≥ 98% bound to plasma proteins. Metabolism occurs primarily in the liver via CYP3A4.

            Lipitor half-life is about 14 hours. However, the inhibitory effect of the drug on the activity of HMG-CoA reductase has a half-life of 20 to 30 hours, since the drug is converted into active metabolites.

            Contraindications

            The use of Lipitor is contraindicated in the following patients:

            • persons with active liver disease
            • Persons with a history of hypersensitivity to atorvastatin or any component of the drug.
            • pregnant or nursing mothers

            Storage location

            Store Lipitor tablets at room temperature (20 ° C to 25 ° C 68 ° F to 77 ° F) in a tightly closed container.

            Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to ensure that all information is accurate, complete and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and experience of a licensed healthcare professional.Always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all potential uses, indications, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or side effects. The absence of warnings or other information about a particular drug does not mean that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

            90,000 What are the side effects of Lipitor?

            Lipitor® side effects are divided into three groups. The first is a safe set of side effects that are not dangerous, such as upset stomach and joint pain. The second set of side effects is more serious and can cause long-term health problems such as liver damage. Finally, a final set of side effects includes the harm Lipitor® can do to an unborn or nursing baby.Anyone considering taking Lipitor® should discuss the risks with their healthcare professional.

            Lipitor®, also known as atorvastatin, is a drug developed by Pfizer that lowers blood cholesterol. The drug works by suppressing the production of cholesterol in the liver. Most patients who take Lipitor® experience the expected effect, especially if they combine medications with healthier eating and exercise habits. However, all medicines, including Lipitor®, carry risks.Lipitor® side effects can make the patient so unhealthy that the medication is counterproductive.

            Of all the side effects of Lipitor®, headaches are the most common. More than 10% of patients report headaches during the first week of treatment. Slightly less than 10% of patients suffer from abdominal pain and diarrhea. Other common side effects include temporary weakness and dizziness. Patients should not be bothered by these symptoms unless they persist for more than a week.

            If symptoms persist or worsen, the patient may be at risk for one of the most serious side effects of Lipitor®. Because Lipitor® works by suppressing certain liver functions, liver damage is possible through a rare long-term side effect. If a patient reports the long-term side effects described above, the doctor will do a blood test to determine liver health. Blood test results, along with the physical symptoms of jaundice or medication-related hepatitis, are clear signs that Lipitor® is doing more harm than good.Patients who experience liver damage may need further treatment.

            The last group of Lipitor® side effects includes those that affect unborn and breastfeeding women taking medications. Lipitor® can completely suppress the ability of an unborn baby to produce cholesterol. This side effect is fatal to a child. Lipitor® can also harm breastfeeding as it is excreted in mother’s milk. For these reasons, doctors do not prescribe Lipitor® to pregnant and lactating women.

            Although there is little risk of serious side effects with Lipitor®, people considering using a cholesterol-lowering drug should discuss these risks with their doctor. Medical history and lifestyle influences the likelihood of certain side effects. To minimize the risk, the doctor may prescribe lifestyle changes before the patient starts taking Lipitor®.

            OTHER LANGUAGES

            90,000 Good cholesterol has gone bad | Forbes.ru

            And finally, the results of the first large trials of these drugs appeared. They look terrifying. Last December, Pfizer stopped testing an experimental drug, torcetrapib, after trials on a group of 15,000 people showed an increase in mortality. Even despite the 60% increase in “good cholesterol” noted in previous studies. At a congress of cardiologists a month ago, the mediocre results of clinical trials of two more similar drugs were presented.Three other studies have shown that Pfizer’s experimental drug does not clear arteries at all. The fourth drug being tested, presented by AstraZeneca and AtheroGenics, also failed to address the heart problem.

            The results were so disastrous that the very ability of pharmaceuticals to create a new generation of drugs that lower cholesterol was questioned. And the doctors, in turn, wondered whether it is always good to have a high level of “good cholesterol” in the blood test.“We came across a dry spring. This is disheartening, ”says Stephen Nissen of the Cleveland Clinic, who recently revealed dismal results from two experimental drugs. “It will take years to figure this all out,” adds Eric Topol of the Scripps Research Institute.

            Cholesterol, the fat that clogs the arteries and causes most heart attacks and strokes, is carried through the body by two different proteins. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the so-called bad cholesterol, carries fats into the arteries, where they are deposited on the walls in the form of plaques.These particles irritate the arteries, leading to inflammation and ultimately plaque breakdown. And this is the cause of most heart attacks and strokes. High-density lipoprotein is thought to carry cholesterol from the walls of arteries to the liver for elimination from the body. In some cases, it can also help reduce inflammation of the arterial walls.

            The interest of pharmacologists and doctors in HDL levels did not arise during clinical trials, but during studies of various factors affecting health.In 1976, studies showed that healthy farmers in Jamaica had higher HDL levels than people who had had a heart attack. A year later, the results of the large Framingham Heart Study, conducted on 2,800 patients, appeared. According to the findings, low HDL levels were the primary factor in heart disease, even more important than high levels of “bad cholesterol”. A 1% increase in HDL cholesterol led to a 2% reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease, the study noted.

            However, the relationship between HDL levels and cardiovascular disease has proven to be extremely complex. The disease, the researchers found, does not threaten all people with low HDL levels. Normally, this figure is 50 mg per deciliter. But 27 years ago, Italian scientists examined a family whose rate was 15 mg due to gene mutations. Such arteries should just be tightly blocked, but these people did not have cardiovascular diseases at all. It turned out that their HDL is very effective at moving cholesterol from the walls of the arteries to the liver.Conversely, cases of patients with a different gene mutation have been described in Japan. Their HDL levels were high, but no benefit was observed. To complicate matters further, HDL contains an ever-changing array of 50 or more linked proteins. “It’s an unstable particle, HDL is like a chameleon,” says University of California cardiologist Alan Fogelman.

            In the early 1980s, pharmacologists focused on the study of “bad cholesterol” because the situation seemed simpler with it.Scientists observing families with genetic defects, due to which cholesterol levels rise sharply, have discovered a key gene region responsible for cholesterol synthesis. This discovery was awarded the Nobel Prize and served as the basis for the development and manufacture of drugs that are marketed today that lower cholesterol levels. The first drug, Merck’s mevacor, was introduced in 1987. Zokor, Lipitor and Crestor from AstraZeneca have a significantly more powerful effect. Sales of this group of drugs in 2006 amounted to $ 35 billion.Cardiologists, encouraged by the drugs’ successes in saving lives, have also taken the problem of “bad cholesterol” seriously.

            Increased research interest in HDL emerged in the late 1990s when a method was discovered to increase the level of “good cholesterol” by blocking the cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP). Some studies have shown that people with genetic defects that caused low CETP levels were less likely to have heart disease.However, other studies have denied this.

            In hopes of extending the life of Lipitor, the world’s # 1 selling prescription drug, Pfizer has invested nearly $ 1 billion in the development of torcetrapib, a CETP-blocking drug. By 2004, Merck and Roche joined the game with their counterparts of this tool. Novartis and Eli Lilly are looking for other ways to raise HDL levels. At the same time, many have overlooked that much less is known about this lipoprotein than about “bad cholesterol”.

            The reasons for Pfizer’s unsuccessful development can hardly be sorted out in a few months. Perhaps this will never be figured out at all. Researchers are trying to figure out what went wrong in the 15,000-patient study and hope to have some results by the fall. Testing of CETP blocking drugs at Roche and Merck is likely to be delayed.

            One of the lessons of this story is that the type of HDL is more important than the level of its content. According to the researchers, HDL is so difficult that you can level it up but still get poor results.“When it comes to HDL, it has so many components that we are still wandering in the dark,” says University of California researcher Aldons Lusis. “HDL is much more complex than LDL,” said Sanjay Kaul of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

            Pfizer’s torcetrapib could have produced large amounts of non-functioning HDL, which would have exacerbated the problem. In laboratory experiments, the Californian cardiologist Fogelman found that HDL in healthy patients has anti-inflammatory properties.But when HDL from patients with cardiovascular disease was placed in the same experimental conditions, inflammation accelerated. According to Fogelman, a large number of positive results are due to the very nature of research: they are carried out in healthy people.

            In fact, according to Allen J. Taylor, chief cardiologist at the Walter Reed Military Medical Center, extremely high HDL levels can still be a worrying symptom. The 60 mg level is not a concern, but as the patient grows further, Taylor does diagnostic tests to check for plaque in the patient’s arteries.If there are, he thinks the HDL has gone bad and prescribes more drugs to lower the LDL.

            At the same time, it is believed that shifting the focus to HDL was generally a scientific mistake. Low HDL is almost always accompanied by high triglycerides, fatty particles in the blood associated with much more dangerous forms of LDL. “I’m not at all convinced that HDL levels are that important. Likewise, you can say that triglycerides are a risk factor and HDL is just attached, ”says Annie Tibjerg-Hansen, a biochemist at the University of Copenhagen Clinic.

            Drug manufacturers still believe in HDL. He is “extremely important,” says Marc Fishman, head of the Novartis Research Lab, a cardiologist by training. But he admits that there are good HDL particles and there are bad ones. The latter can contribute to the inflammatory process in the arteries. Novartis is testing a liquid formulation of HDL (invented by Fogelman) that does not target HDL levels. The task of this drug is to convert bad HDL particles into good ones.

            In the meantime, scientists have not found a solution, doctors prescribe patients with low levels of “good cholesterol” to take care of their health without the help of drugs. Studies have shown that vigorous exercise and a healthy diet increase HDL levels and lower triglyceride levels. If that doesn’t work (and for many it will), you can try an ancient HDL-boosting drug called niacin (vitamin PP, nicotinic acid), unless you’re intimidated by the frequent fever side effects.In general, don’t expect pharmaceutical companies to solve your problems quickly and painlessly.

            90,000 A new drug for “bad” cholesterol and pharmacoeconomics

            New drug for heart attack prevention is more effective – and more expensive – statins

            Anna Stavina, XX2 century

            A drug to lower the level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) – or “bad” cholesterol – reduces the risk of heart attack and some other serious heart problems by 15-20%.This is the conclusion reached by scientists who have studied the effectiveness of Repatha, a new drug designed to prevent cardiovascular disease.

            Classic drugs for fighting “bad” cholesterol, statins – for example, Lipitor or Crestor – are cheap. However, not all patients tolerate these drugs well, and not all patients have statin prescriptions that produce the desired results. The use of the drug Repata (INN – evolocumab) produced by the American pharmaceutical company Amgen allows achieving unprecedented low levels of LDL.In addition, an injection of Repata (the drug is injected) is enough to do 1 or 2 times a month.

            However, the annual course of Repaty today costs more than 14 thousand US dollars. Therefore, American insurance companies decided not to include the drug on the list of drugs covered by insurance until evolocumab proves to be able to reduce the risks of developing cardiovascular diseases, not just LDL levels. The authors of the new study were able to demonstrate that Repata is effective – but the benefits from its use are not as great as many doctors believed.

            Out of every 200 people who receive Repatu for two years, three – thanks to this drug – will be able to avoid a heart attack, stroke or death from heart and vascular diseases.

            “This is a great advantage,” says
            new study leader Dr. Marc Sabatine of Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “For the millions of people with or at high risk of cardiovascular disease, the new drug is well worth the investment.”But Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, a leading preventive medicine specialist at Northwestern University and a spokesman for the American Heart Association, called the results “modest,” adding that they became “not quite what we hoped or hoped for.”

            The study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine (Sabatine et al., Evolocumab and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease).They were also discussed at the conference
            American College of Cardiology.

            Repata and another drug with a similar mechanism of action, Praluent, belong to the group of PCSK9 inhibitors (proprotein convertase subtilisin / kexin type 9). In 2015, they were approved for use in patients with a high hereditary risk of hypercholesterolemia or cardiovascular diseases who have already caused a heart attack or other serious problems.A new study examined the effectiveness of Repata in more than 27,500 patients in whom LDL levels exceeded the recommended level of 70 mg / dL, despite taking statins at the maximum dosage.

            After two years of taking Repata in combination with statins, the average LDL concentration of the volunteers decreased from 92 mg / dL to 30 mg / dL. At the same time, Repata demonstrated its safety – the side effects of taking the drug were comparable to those that occurred during the use of a placebo.The new drug reduced the combined risk of heart attack, stroke and death from heart disease by about 20%. At least one of these events during the observation period occurred in less than 6% of the participants in the experimental group and in more than 7% of those receiving placebo. With an increase in the duration of taking Repata, the benefits grew – in the second year of using the drug, the risk decreased by 25%. Also, with the use of evolocumab, the incidence of other events, for example, hospitalizations for chest pain or due to the need for a procedure to expand the lumen of the arteries, decreased approximately by 15%.

            The latter indicator, studied in the course of the study, has become a subject of particular interest from insurance companies. To what extent can the use of Repata reduce the cost of expensive treatment? If this drug is 50 times more expensive than statins, does that mean it is 50 times better?

            Amgen says Repata’s performance justifies its cost. The developers of the drug even offered insurance companies to reimburse the costs of treating patients who have a heart attack or stroke after six or more months of taking Repata.

            Dr. Lloyd-Jones noted: “Perhaps we should only use [evolocumab] in high-risk patients who are not getting enough benefit from statins. At least until the price of Repatha changes. ”

            Portal “Eternal Youth” http://vechnayamolodost.ru
            03/20/2017

            LIPITOR (ATORVASTATIN) SIDE EFFECTS: INTERACTIONS AND WARNINGS

            Lipitor (atorvastatin) is an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (“statin”) that lowers blood cholesterol and is used to treat high total cholesterol, LDL

            Contents:

            Lipitor (atorvastatin) is an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (“statin”) that lowers blood cholesterol and is used to treat high total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides, and to raise HDL cholesterol.

            The effectiveness of Lipitor in lowering cholesterol is dose dependent, which means that higher doses lower cholesterol levels to a greater extent.

            All statins, including lipitor, prevent the production of cholesterol in the liver by blocking HMG-CoA reductase, an enzyme that produces cholesterol. Statins lower total cholesterol as well as LDL cholesterol in the blood.

            LDL cholesterol is believed to be the “bad” cholesterol, which is primarily responsible for the development of coronary heart disease.Lowering LDL cholesterol levels slows the progression and may even reverse coronary heart disease. Lipitor also increases HDL (“good”) cholesterol, which protects against coronary heart disease and lowers blood triglyceride levels. (High concentrations of triglycerides in the blood are also associated with coronary artery disease.)

            Common Lipitor side effects include:

            • constipation,
            • diarrhea,
            • fatigue,
            • gas
            • heartburn,
            • Headache,
            • colds,
            • joint pain,
            • limb pain and
            • urinary tract infections (UTIs).

            Serious side effects of Lipitor include:

            • liver damage,
            • severe destruction of muscle cells (rhabdomyolysis), which can lead to kidney failure and even death, increased HbA1c and fasting serum glucose as shown in
              • diabetes,
              • memory loss,
              • forgetfulness,
              • amnesia,
              • confusion and
              • memory impairment.

            Lipitor drug interactions include erythromycin, ketoconazole, itraconazole, clarithromycin, telithromycin, cyclosporin, nefazodone, and HIV protease inhibitors such as indinavir and ritonavir because these drugs decrease lipitor excretion in the body, which can increase and muscle tissue risk.toxicity from lipitor.

            Large amounts of grapefruit juice (more than 1.2 liters per day) also increase blood lipitor levels and should not be taken.

            The following drugs may also increase the risk of muscle toxicity when combined with Lipitor:

            • amiodarone,
            • verapamil,
            • cyclosporine,
            • niacin,
            • gemfibrozil, and
            • fenofibrate.

            Lipitor enhances the effect of warfarin and the concentration of digoxin in the blood.

            Cholestyramine reduces lipitor absorption. Lipitor should be given at least two hours before and at least four hours after cholestyramine.

            Rifampicin increases lipitor breakdown. To reduce the likelihood of this interaction, both drugs should be administered at the same time. Lipitor should not be given after rifampicin.

            Lipitor should not be taken during pregnancy because the developing fetus requires cholesterol for development and Lipitor reduces cholesterol production.Lipitor should be given to women of childbearing age only if they have no chance of becoming pregnant.

            It is not known whether Lipitor is secreted in breast milk. Due to the potential risk of side effects, breastfeeding mothers should not use Lipitor.

            Other common side effects include:

            • Colds (rhinopharyngitis)
            • Joint pain (arthralgia)
            • Pain in the extremities
            • Urinary tract infection

            Lipitor can damage the liver and muscles.Serious liver damage caused by statins is rare. Liver tests should be performed at the beginning of treatment and then as needed.

            Muscle inflammation caused by statins can lead to severe destruction of muscle cells called rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis causes the release of muscle protein (myoglobin) into the bloodstream, while myoglobin can cause kidney failure and even death.

            When used alone, statins cause rhabdomyolysis in less than one percent of patients.To prevent severe rhabdomyolysis, patients taking atorvastatin should contact their healthcare professional immediately if they develop unexplained muscle pain, muscle weakness, or soreness.

            Statins are associated with increased levels of HbA1c and fasting serum glucose levels observed in diabetes.

            Post-marketing reports of atorvastatin side effects include:

            • Memory loss
            • Forgetfulness
            • Amnesia
            • Confusion
            • Memory impairment

            Symptoms may disappear within three days or years on average after starting treatment and after stopping statins.

            Clinical Trials Experience

            Because clinical trials are conducted in a wide variety of settings, the incidence of adverse reactions observed in clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared with those of clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect those observed in clinical practice.

            Lipitor Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials Database of 16066 patients (8755 Lipitor vs. 7311 placebo; age range 10-93, 39% women, 91% Caucasians, 3% blacks, 2% Asian, 4% others) with with a median treatment duration of 53 weeks, 9.7% of Lipitor-treated patients and 9.5% of placebo-treated patients discontinued treatment due to adverse reactions regardless of causation.

            The five most common adverse reactions in patients treated with Lipitor, which led to discontinuation of treatment and occurred more frequently than placebo:

            • myalgia (0.7%),
            • diarrhea (0.5%),
            • nausea (0.4%),
            • increase in alanine aminotransferase (0.4%) and
            • increase in liver enzymes (0.4%).

            The most frequent adverse reactions (frequency ≥ 2% or more than placebo), regardless of causal relationship, in patients who received Lipitor in placebo-controlled studies (n = 8755) were:

            • nasopharyngitis (8 , 3%),
            • arthralgia (6.9%),
            • diarrhea (6.8%),
            • limb pain (6.0%) and
            • urinary tract infections (5.7%).

            Table 3 shows data on the incidence of adverse clinical reactions, regardless of causation, in ≥ 2% and higher than placebo in patients treated with Lipitor (n = 8755) in seventeen placebo-controlled studies …

            Table 3: Clinical adverse reactions occurring in ≥ 2% of patients receiving any dose of Lipitor and with a frequency higher than placebo, regardless of causation (% of patients).

            916.8

            Adverse reactions * Any dose
            N = 8755
            10 mg
            N = 3908
            20 mg
            N = 188
            40 mg
            N = 604
            80 mg

            Placebo
            N = 7311
            Nasopharyngitis 8.3 12.9 5.3 7.0 4.2 8.2
            Arthralgia 6.9 8.9 11.7 10.6 4.3 4.3 6.4 14.1 5.2 6.3
            Limb pain 6.0 8.5 3.7 9.3 3.1 5.9
            Urinary tract infection 5.7 6.9 6.4 8.0 4.1 5.6
            Dyspepsia 4.7 3.2.9

            5.

            Nausea 4.0 3.7 3.7 7.1 3.8 3.5
            Musculoskeletal pain 3.8 5.2 3.2 5.1 2.3 3.6
            Muscle spasms 3.6 4.6 4.8 5.1 2.4 3.0i

            3.6 5.9 8.4 2.7 3.1
            Insomnia 3.0 2.8 1.1 5.3 2.8 2.9
            Pharyngolaryngeal pain 2.3 3.9 1.6 2.8 0.7 2.1
            * Adverse reaction ≥ 2% in any dose exceeding placebo

            Other adverse reactions reported in placebo-controlled studies include:

            • Body as a whole: malaise, hyperthermia;
            • Digestive system: abdominal discomfort, belching, flatulence, hepatitis, cholestasis;
            • Musculoskeletal system: Musculoskeletal pain, muscle fatigue, neck pain, joint swelling;
            • Metabolic and nutritional system: increase in the level of transaminases, impaired liver function, increase in alkaline phosphatase in the blood, increase in creatine phosphokinase, hyperglycemia;
            • Nervous system: nightmares;
            • Respiratory system: epistaxis;
            • Skin and appendages: urticaria;
            • Special Senses: blurred vision, tinnitus;
            • Genitourinary system: positive urine test for leukocytes.

            Anglo-Scandinavian Heart Outcome Study (ASCOT)

            ASCOT enrolled 10,305 participants (age 40-80, 19% women; 94.6% Caucasians, 2.6% Africans, 1.5% South Asia, 1.3% mixed / other) treated with Lipitor 10 mg per day (n = 5,168) or placebo (n = 5137), the safety and tolerability profile of the Lipitor group was comparable to that of the placebo group , during an average of 3.3 years of observation.

            Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS)

            In CARDS, 2838 patients (age range 39-77, 32% women; 94.3% West Asians, 2.4% South Asians, 2.3 % Afro-Caribbean countries, 1.0% others) with type 2 diabetes treated with Lipitor 10 mg daily (n = 1428). ) or placebo (n = 1410), there was no difference in the overall incidence of adverse reactions or serious adverse reactions between treatment groups during a median follow-up of 3.9 years.No cases of rhabdomyolysis have been reported.

            New Target Study (TNT)

            • TNT study with 10,001 patients (age range 29-78, 19% women; 94.1% Caucasians, 2.9% Blacks, 1.0% Asian, 2. 0% of others) with clinically evident coronary artery disease who received Lipitor 10 mg per day (n = 5006) or Lipitor 80 mg per day (n = 4995), in the high-dose atorvastatin group there were more serious adverse reactions and cases of discontinuation due to adverse effects (92, 1.8%; 497, 9.9%, respectively) compared with the low-dose group (69, 1.4%; 404, 8.1%, respectively) during a mean follow-up period of 4.9 years.
            • A persistent increase in transaminase levels (≥ 3x ULN twice within 4-10 days) was observed in 62 (1.3%) patients who received atorvastatin 80 mg and innin (0.2%) who took 10 mg orvastatin. The increase in CC (≥ 10x ULN) was low in general, but was higher in the high-dose atorvastatin group (13, 0.3%) compared with the low-dose atorvastatin group (6, 0.1%).

            Gradual endpoint reduction with the Aggressive Lipid Lowering Study (IDEAL)

            • The IDEAL study enrolled 8888 patients (age 26-80, 19% female; 99.3% Caucasian, 0.4% Asian, 0.3% blacks, 0.04% others) who received Lipitor 80 mg / day (n = 4439) or simvastatin 20-40 mg.daily (n = 4449), there were no differences in the overall incidence of adverse reactions or serious adverse reactions between treatment groups during a mean follow-up of 4.8 years.

            Prevention of stroke by aggressively lowering cholesterol (SPARCL)

            • In SPARCL involving 4731 patients (age range 21-92, 40% of women; 93.3% of Caucasians, 3.0% of blacks, 0.6% of Asians, 3.1% others) without clinically evident coronary artery disease, but with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) within the previous 6 months of treatment with Lipitor 80 mg (n = 2365) or placebo (n = 2366) during the mean follow-up 4 , 9 years old, patients had a higher incidence of persistent elevations in hepatic transaminases (= 3xULN twice within 4-10 days).the atorvastatin group (0.9%) compared with the placebo group (0.1%).
            • The increase in CK (> 10 x ULN) was rare, but was higher in the atorvastatin group (0.1%) compared with placebo (0.0%).
            • Diabetes was reported as an adverse reaction in 144 patients (6.1%) in the atorvastatin group and 89 patients (3.8%) in the placebo group.
            • In a retrospective analysis, Lipitor 80 mg reduced the incidence of ischemic stroke (218/2365, 9.2% versus 274/2366, 11.6%) and increased the incidence of hemorrhagic stroke (55/2365, 2.3% versus 33 /.2366, 1.4%) compared with placebo.
            • The incidence of fatal hemorrhagic stroke was similar between groups (17 lipitor versus 18 placebo).
            • The incidence of nonfatal hemorrhagic strokes was significantly higher in the atorvastatin group (38 nonfatal hemorrhagic strokes) compared with the placebo group (16 nonfatal hemorrhagic strokes).
            • Subjects included in the study with hemorrhagic stroke were at increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke [7 (16%) Lipitor vs. 2 (4%) placebo]).
            • There were no significant differences between treatment groups for all-cause mortality: 216 (9.1%) in the Lipitor 80 mg / day group versus 211 (8.9%) in the placebo group.
            • The proportion of subjects who died from cardiovascular disease was numerically lower in the Lipitor 80 mg group (3.3%) than in the placebo group (4.1%). The proportion of subjects who did not have cardiovascular death was numerically greater in the Lipitor 80 mg group (5.0%) than in the placebo group (4.0%).

            Adverse reactions in clinical trials of Lipitor in children

            • In a 26-week controlled study of boys and girls in the postmenarchal period with HeFH (aged 10 to 17 years) (n = 140, 31% of women; 92% of Caucasians, 1.6% Black, 1.6% Asian, 4.8% Others) Safety and tolerance placebo.

            Post-Marketing Experience

            • The following adverse reactions have been identified with post-approval Lipitor use.
            • Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.
            • Adverse reactions associated with Lipitor therapy that have been reported since market launch that are not listed above, regardless of causality assessment, include the following:
              • anaphylaxis,
              • angioedema,
              • bullous eruptions (including erythema multiforme , Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis),
              • rhabdomyolysis,
              • myositis,
              • fatigue,
              • tendon rupture,
              • fatal and non-fatal liver failure,
              • dizziness,
              • depression
              • 0009 pancreatitis and
              • interstitial lung disease.
            • There have been rare reports of stat-related immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy.
            • There have been rare post-marketing reports of cognitive impairment (eg, memory loss, forgetfulness, amnesia, memory impairment, confusion) associated with statin use.
            • These cognitive problems have been reported for all statins.
            • Reports are usually frivolous and reversible after discontinuation of statins, with varying time to symptom onset (1 day to several years) and resolution of symptoms (average 3 weeks).

            Strong inhibitors of CYP 3A4

            • Lipitor is metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4. Simultaneous administration of Lipitor with strong inhibitors of CYP 3A4 can lead to an increase in plasma concentrations of atorvastatin.
            • The degree of interaction and potentiation of effects depends on the variability of exposure to CYP 3A4.

            Clarithromycin

            • The AUC of atorvastatin was significantly increased with concomitant administration of Lipitor 80 mg with clarithromycin (500 mg twice daily) compared with Lipitor alone.
            • Therefore, caution should be exercised in patients taking clarithromycin if the dose of Lipitor exceeds 20 mg.

            The combination of protease inhibitors

            • The AUC of atorvastatin was significantly increased with the simultaneous use of lipitor with several combinations of HIV protease inhibitors, as well as with telaprevir, an inhibitor of hepatitis C protease, compared with lipitor alone.
            • Therefore, concomitant use of Lipitor should be avoided in patients taking the HIV protease inhibitor tipranavir plus ritonavir or the hepatitis C protease inhibitor telaprevir.
            • Patients taking the HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir plus ritonavir should be careful when prescribing Lipitor and use the minimum dose required.
            • In patients taking the HIV protease inhibitors saquinavir plus ritonavir, darunavir plus ritonavir, fosamprenavir, or fosamprenavir plus ritonavir, the lipitor dose should not exceed 20 mg and should be used with caution.
            • In patients taking the HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir or the hepatitis C protease inhibitor boceprevir, the lipitor dose should not exceed 40 mg, and close clinical monitoring is recommended.

            Itraconazole

            • AUC of atorvastatin significantly increased with the simultaneous use of Lipitor 40 mg and Itraconazole 200 mg.
            • Therefore, patients taking itraconazole should be careful when the dose of Lipitor exceeds 20 mg.

            Grapefruit juice

            • Contains one or more components that inhibit CYP 3A4 and may increase plasma atorvastatin concentration, especially with excessive consumption of grapefruit juice (> 1.2 liters per day).

            Cyclosporin

            • Atorvastatin and its metabolites are substrates of the OATP1B1 transporter.
            • OATP1B1 inhibitors (eg, cyclosporine) may increase the bioavailability of atorvastatin.
            • The AUC of atorvastatin was significantly increased with concomitant administration of Lipitor 10 mg and cyclosporin 5.2 mg / kg / day compared with Lipitor alone.
            • Simultaneous administration of Lipitor with cyclosporine should be avoided.

            Gemfibrozil

            • Due to the increased risk of myopathy / rhabdomyolysis, concomitant use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors with gemfibrozil should be avoided while taking Lipitor with gemfibrozil.

            Other fibrates

            • Since it is known that the risk of myopathy during treatment with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors increases with the simultaneous administration of other fibrates, Lipitor should be prescribed with caution when used concomitantly with other fibrates.

            Niacin

            • Risk of skeletal muscle exposure may be increased when Lipitor is used in combination with niacin; In this situation, the possibility of reducing the dosage of Lipitor should be considered.

            Rifampicin or other inducers of cytochrome P450 3A4

            • Simultaneous use of lipitor with inducers of cytochrome P450 3A4 (for example, efavirenz, rifampicin) can lead to a variable decrease in plasma concentrations of atorvastatin.
            • Due to the dual mechanism of rifampicin interaction, the simultaneous use of Lipitor with rifampicin is recommended, since delayed administration of Lipitor after rifampicin administration was associated with a significant decrease in plasma concentrations of atorvastatin.

            Digoxin

            • With the simultaneous use of several doses of lipitor and digoxin, stable concentrations of digoxin in plasma increased.
            • Patients taking digoxin should be monitored appropriately.

            Oral contraceptives

            • The combined use of Lipitor and oral contraceptive increased the AUC values ​​for norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol.
            • This increase should be considered when choosing an oral contraceptive for a woman taking Lipitor.

            Warfarin

            • Lipitor did not have a clinically significant effect on prothrombin time when administered to patients receiving chronic warfarin treatment.

            Colchicine

            • Cases of myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis, have been reported with the simultaneous administration of atorvastatin with colchicine, therefore, caution should be exercised when prescribing atorvastatin with colchicine.

            Summary

            Lipitor (atorvastatin) is an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (“statin”) that lowers blood cholesterol and is used to treat high total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides, and to raise HDL cholesterol.Common side effects of Lipitor include constipation, diarrhea, fatigue, gas, heartburn, headache, colds, joint pain, limb pain, and urinary tract infection (UTI). Lipitor should not be taken during pregnancy because the developing fetus requires cholesterol for development and Lipitor reduces cholesterol production. It is not known whether Lipitor is secreted in breast milk.

            Cholesterol-lowering drugs to choose

            Different pharmaceutical companies can create a cholesterol drug based on a single statin.Such drugs include Lipitor, Zokor, Lescol, Mevacor, Crestor and some others. It is important to remember that almost these cholesterol-lowering drugs can lead to side effects: constipation, diarrhea, dizziness.

            Sometimes whole complexes of statins can be found in one drug. In terms of their hypocholesterol efficacy, such drugs may be superior to drugs based on any one statin, however, the side effects of the use of such drugs for cholesterol are more varied and profound in their manifestations.Some of these drugs can cause nausea, abdominal pain, general fatigue, and even a decrease in potency. This group includes vitorin, kaduet and some others.

            In addition to statins, there are other substances with a different principle of action on lipoproteins.

            2. Gemfibrozil.

            The principle of action of this drug for cholesterol is to accelerate its excretion from the liver and remove it with bile from the body. The side effects of gemfibrozil are similar to those of statins, but can also lead to allergic reactions and dry skin.In pharmacies, gemfibrozil is sold under the brand names Lopid and Tricor.

            3. Niacin, or nicotinic acid.

            Also called vitamin B3. Participates in many metabolic reactions in the body, such as: metabolism of fats, proteins, purines, amino acids. Also, it is necessary for the processes of tissue respiration. But for you and me, the fact is important that in sufficiently large doses, nicotinic acid is very effective in reducing the amount of low density lipoproteins and total cholesterol in the blood in a short time.For example, according to outpatient studies, within a few days after the start of niacin intake, patients showed a hypocholesterol effect. It can be added that the amount of fat in the blood begins to decrease within a few hours after the ingestion of niacin. Niacor, nicolar, niaspan and some other drugs for lowering cholesterol are produced on the basis of nicotinic acid.

            With the illiterate use of large amounts of niacin, dizziness, diarrhea, dry skin, nausea and some other disorders may appear.With prolonged use, even fatty degeneration of the liver and an increased content of uric acid in the blood can develop.

            90,000 All about lipids and HIV

            What are lipids?

            Many HIV-positive people have elevated blood lipids (fats). There are two main types of lipids:

            Cholesterol. Our body needs cholesterol for the formation of cell membranes, the production of sex hormones, the maintenance of digestion and the production of vitamin D, which helps to strengthen bones.Most of the cholesterol is produced by the liver, but some of it comes from the food we eat, mainly animal products such as meat, dairy products, and eggs.

            Cholesterol is “good” (HDL) and “bad” (LDL). If there is too much LDL cholesterol in the blood, it can accumulate on the walls of the arteries and lead to the formation of plaques. This reduces blood flow, which can lead to heart attack or stroke.

            Triglycerides. They provide the cells with the fuel they need to function properly. Like cholesterol, triglycerides are naturally produced in the liver, but they also come from food, especially sugar and saturated fat. High triglyceride levels can lead to malfunctioning of the pancreas (pancreatitis) and can also increase the risk of heart disease.

            Why does lipid levels rise?

            Elevated levels of cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood are quite common in people taking HIV medications.It is not yet fully understood why HIV drugs cause changes in the level of “bad” lipids, but most protease inhibitors (with the exception of Reyatase) and some nucleoside analogs (in particular, Zerit), according to some studies, definitely contribute to this problem.

            However, HIV drugs are not the only cause. With the increase in life expectancy for people with HIV, they also have to deal with “common” causes of high lipid levels: aging, consumption of foods high in saturated fat, and a sedentary lifestyle.

            Is there an increased risk of heart attack or stroke?

            Studies have shown that people who take anti-HIV drugs that increase lipid levels increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes. However, most of the patients examined had a variety of other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including heredity, smoking, and drug use. It is difficult to say to what extent HIV drugs increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.Experts believe that the benefits of HIV treatment still outweigh the harm it can do.

            How to lower blood lipids?

            In addition to important lifestyle changes that can help you control lipid levels and reduce your risk of heart disease (see Tips), there are a number of treatments:

            Switch to another HIV drug. If you are taking a protease inhibitor and have elevated lipid levels, you can try switching to a more harmless protease inhibitor, such as Reyatase (Atazanavir), or a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, such as Sustivu (Efavirenz) or Viramune (Nevirapine).In addition, you can try to switch from Zerit (Stavudin) to its nucleoside analogue.

            Start taking lipid-lowering drugs (that is, drugs that lower lipid levels). Studies show that Statins (Pravachol, Lipitor), cholesterol absorbing inhibitors (Zetia), fibrates (Tricor, Lopid) and several other drugs help lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood of HIV-positive people. In this case, side effects and interactions with other drugs are possible, therefore, consult your doctor before using.

            Tips

            The risk of developing cardiovascular disease can be reduced by lifestyle changes.

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            Stay on a diet

            Try to eat foods low in saturated fat and cholesterol, so that no more than 7% of the total calories are consumed with saturated fat, and the amount consumed cholesterol did not exceed 200 mg per day.

            Stop smoking

            Smoking increases lipid levels and dramatically increases the risk of heart disease. It’s never too late to quit smoking!

            Limit sugar and alcohol consumption

            Foods high in sugar and alcohol increase triglyceride levels; experts advise to reduce their consumption.

            Control your weight

            Weight loss is especially important if, in addition to high triglycerides and / or cholesterol levels, a person has too much waist (for men – more than 102 cm, for women – more than 88 cm).

            Monitor the pressure

            Regularly measure the pressure, and if it is high, take measures to reduce it. Losing weight, quitting smoking, reducing alcohol and fat consumption will help you with this.

            Go in for sports

            Regular exercise is good for all people. Exercise helps to normalize lipid levels and blood pressure, is the prevention of diabetes and obesity – that is, it helps to fight all four risk factors for cardiovascular disease.