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Medicine mylanta: Mylanta Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing

Mylanta Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing

This medication can cause nausea, constipation, diarrhea, or headache. If these symptoms persist or become severe, notify your doctor.

If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, remember that he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

The magnesium in this product can cause diarrhea. Using an antacid that contains only aluminum along with this product can help control diarrhea. The aluminum in this product can cause constipation. To minimize constipation, drink plenty of fluids and exercise. Diarrhea is more common with this product than constipation.

Aluminum-containing antacids bind to phosphate, an important body chemical, in the gut. This can cause low phosphate levels, especially if you use this medication in large doses and for a long time. Tell your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of low phosphate: loss of appetite, unusual tiredness, muscle weakness.

Tell your doctor right away if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: dizziness, fainting.

Seek immediate medical attention if any of these rare but very serious side effects or symptoms of a serious medical problem occur: black/tarry stools, slow/shallow breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, mental/mood changes (e.g., confusion), deep sleep, pain with urination, stomach/abdominal pain, vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US –

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www. fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Mylanta Maximum Strength Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing

This medication can cause nausea, constipation, diarrhea, or headache. If these symptoms persist or become severe, notify your doctor.

If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, remember that he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

The magnesium in this product can cause diarrhea. Using an antacid that contains only aluminum along with this product can help control diarrhea. The aluminum in this product can cause constipation. To minimize constipation, drink plenty of fluids and exercise. Diarrhea is more common with this product than constipation.

Aluminum-containing antacids bind to phosphate, an important body chemical, in the gut. This can cause low phosphate levels, especially if you use this medication in large doses and for a long time. Tell your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of low phosphate: loss of appetite, unusual tiredness, muscle weakness.

Tell your doctor right away if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: dizziness, fainting.

Seek immediate medical attention if any of these rare but very serious side effects or symptoms of a serious medical problem occur: black/tarry stools, slow/shallow breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, mental/mood changes (e.g., confusion), deep sleep, pain with urination, stomach/abdominal pain, vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US –

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Mylanta for the Treatment of Heartburn, Ulcer, and More

Mylanta is a brand of nonprescription antacid with several formulations. It may contain aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide or calcium carbonate. These antacids may be used to help with symptoms of heartburn, indigestion, and stomach upset. Mylanta gas preparations contain simethicone, which can be helpful in treating intestinal gas.

How It Works

Mylanta antacids may be used to treat the symptoms of conditions including gastritis, hiatal hernia, and peptic ulcer. They are also used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

The aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide in Mylanta, as well as calcium carbonate in some preparations, work by reducing acid in the stomach.

Product Details and Preparations

The Mylanta product line changes over the years and it is important that you read the product labeling and instructions carefully so you understand which product you are using. You may have older products in your home that differ from the currently available formulations.

  • Mylanta Maximum Strength Liquid Antacid/Anti-Gas has active ingredients of aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, and simethicone. It may be used for heartburn, acid indigestion, and gas. It comes in a couple of flavors.
  • Mylanta Tonight Liquid Antacid/Anti-Gas has active ingredients of calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide, and simethicone. It is made in a honey chamomile flavor that you may find soothing but it does not produce drowsiness. It is used for heartburn, acid indigestion, and gas. 
  • Mylanta Gas Minis are chewable tablets in fruit or mint flavors with the active ingredient of simethicone. They are used to relieve gas.

Previously marketed formulations had various combinations of aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and simethicone. They included liquids, tablets, gel caps, chewable tablets, and chewable softgels, including some labeled for children.

Using Mylanta Products

Mylanta liquids should be shaken well before each use to mix the medicine evenly. To reduce the chalky taste, you can mix the liquid with water or milk. Be sure to note how much you should take based on age and don’t exceed the maximum dose per day. The products come with a dosing cup that should be cleaned with warm water and mild dish soap after each use.

Chewable tablets should be chewed slowly and thoroughly. They are less effective if swallowed whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking the tablets.

Follow the directions on the package label or on your prescription label carefully, and ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide antacids exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your healthcare provider.

Do not take antacids for more than one to two weeks unless prescribed by your healthcare provider.

Mylanta is designed to be used for the short-term control of minor symptoms. If your symptoms persist or worsen make sure to see your healthcare provider medication should only be used for an extended period of time under the careful guidance of a healthcare provider.

Precautions

Before taking Mylanta:

  • Tell your healthcare provider and pharmacist if you are allergic to aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide antacids, and also any other allergies you have. There may be inactive ingredients in products that you are allergic to in addition to the active ingredients.
  • If you are on a magnesium-restricted diet, discuss the use of Mylanta antacid products with your healthcare provider as the antacid formulations usually contain magnesium.
  • When using antacid products, tell your healthcare provider and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially aspirin, Lanoxin (digoxin), Valium (diazepam), Diflucan (fluconazole), Didronel (etirdronate), Dilantin (phenytoin), tetracycline antibiotics, and vitamins. Your healthcare provider will be able to tell you whether you can take antacids with these medications, and if so, whether you can do so at the same time, or take the medications at a different time. For example, you may need to delay taking other medications for two hours after taking an antacid. Calcium may decrease the effectiveness of other medications.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have or have ever had stomach problems or kidney disease.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. If you become pregnant while taking aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide antacids, call your healthcare provider.
  • Check the ingredients on other medications you are taking. Other medications may contain the same ingredients, and using both products may result in an excess dose.

Possible Side Effects

Although side effects from aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide or calcium carbonate in Mylanta are not common, they can occur. Simethicone does not usually cause side effects. Tell your healthcare provider if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • Upset stomach
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach pain
  • Belching
  • Constipation or diarrhea
  • Dry mouth
  • Increased urination
  • Loss of appetite
  • Metallic taste
  • Unusual tiredness
  • Muscle weakness

A Word From Verywell

The occasional use of antacids can help give you symptom relief, but these products don’t treat the underlying causes of your discomfort. But if you find yourself needing to use them regularly for heartburn or indigestion you should see your healthcare provider. Conditions with these symptoms, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), can have serious complications when not treated effectively. Your healthcare provider can advise you on more effective treatment.

Uses, Side Effects, Interactions & Pill Images


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IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

This medication is used for a short time to treat occasional constipation. It is a laxative (osmotic-type) that is thought to work by drawing water into the intestines, an effect that helps to cause movement of the intestines.This medication is also used to treat symptoms caused by too much stomach acid such as heartburn, upset stomach, or indigestion. It is an antacid that works by lowering the amount of acid in the stomach.

Take this product by mouth as directed. For the chewable form, chew thoroughly before swallowing. For the liquid form, shake the bottle well before each dose. Carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose. If you are taking this medication for constipation, drink a full glass of water (8 ounces or 240 milliliters) with each dose. Follow all directions on the product package, or use as directed by your doctor. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment.Extended use or overuse of this medication for constipation may result in dependence on laxatives and ongoing constipation. Overuse may also cause persistent diarrhea, dehydration, and mineral imbalances (e.g., high magnesium).Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens. For constipation problems, it may take 30 minutes to 6 hours to produce a bowel movement. Tell your doctor if this product does not produce a bowel movement, if you need to use this medication or other laxative products regularly for more than 1 week, or if you have rectal bleeding. For stomach acid problems, do not take the maximum dose of this medication for more than 2 weeks unless directed by your doctor. If you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

Diarrhea may occur. If this effect persists or worsens, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, remember that your doctor has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell your doctor right away if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: symptoms of high magnesium levels (e.g., muscle weakness, slow/irregular heartbeat, slow/shallow breathing, mental/mood changes such as confusion), symptoms of dehydration (e.g., decreased urination, dizziness, extreme thirst, very dry mouth), stomach/abdominal pain, bloody stools, rectal bleeding.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Before taking magnesium hydroxide, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: kidney disease, appendicitis or symptoms of appendicitis (e.g., stomach/abdominal pain, nausea/vomiting), magnesium-restricted diet, sudden change in bowel habits that lasts for longer than 2 weeks.During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.It is not known whether this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.Some products that may interact with this drug include: raltegravir, sodium polystyrene sulfonate.Magnesium hydroxide can decrease the absorption of other drugs such as dasatinib, delavirdine, atazanavir, gabapentin, digoxin, mycophenolate, phosphate supplements (e.g., potassium phosphate), tetracycline antibiotics (e.g., doxycycline, minocycline), certain azole antifungals (ketoconazole, itraconazole), and quinolone antibiotics (e. g., ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin). Separate your doses of these medications as far as possible from your doses of magnesium hydroxide. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about how long you should wait between doses and for help finding a dosing schedule that will work with all your medications.

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include: severe/persistent diarrhea, muscle weakness, mental/mood changes (e.g., confusion), slow/irregular heartbeat, decreased urination, dizziness.

Keep all regular medical and laboratory appointments.Lifestyle changes such as regular exercise and diet changes (including drinking enough water, eating a proper diet with fiber-rich foods such as bran, fresh fruits/vegetables) may prevent or relieve constipation. Lifestyle changes such as stress reduction programs, stopping smoking, limiting alcohol, and diet changes (e.g., avoiding caffeine/certain spices) may help to reduce heartburn and other stomach acid problems.Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about lifestyle changes that might benefit you.

Not applicable.

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. If you have any questions about storage, ask your pharmacist. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Information last revised August 2021. Copyright(c) 2021 First Databank, Inc.

Amazon.com: Mylanta Antacid and Gas Relief, Maximum Strength Formula, Classic Flavor, 12 Fluid Ounce : Health & Household

Causes of Heartburn

Stomach acid is necessary for normal digestion, but when it moves from the stomach up the esophagus, that’s when you feel the burn we call heartburn. Lots of things can cause heartburn, such as overeating, stress, or acid reflux. You can even experience ‘breakthrough heartburn’ while taking a preventative heartburn medicine. The good news is, there are lots of good treatments, too.

Heartburn Prevention

So many of the things we encounter every day can trigger heartburn. Eating too much, eating too quickly, eating fatty foods, and being overweight are just a few of the causes of heartburn. You can prevent heartburn by watching what and how much you eat, exercising, and losing weight.

Heartburn Relief

When heartburn prevention tips don’t work, many seek heartburn relief from medications like Mylanta. Mylanta relieves heartburn fast and also works on ‘breakthrough heartburn’ which can occur even while taking a preventative heartburn treatment, like Prilosec OTC Nexium OTC. Occasionally, more severe symptoms may require a doctor’s care.

Gas Relief

When there’s too much gas in your stomach, you can definitely feel it. Excess gas can result in uncomfortable and sometimes painful bloating and pressure. Mylanta contains simethicone, the #1 selling OTC ingredient for gas relief*, and relieves gas fast!

*Q4 2020 Nielsen Sales Data

Mylanta – an overview | ScienceDirect Topics

Antacids

Antacids are drugs capable of buffering stomach acid. Antacids raise the pH of the stomach contents toward neutrality. An antacid that raises the pH from 1.5 to 3.5 produces a 100-fold reduction in the concentration of gastric acid. Furthermore, the reduction of acidity is accompanied by inhibition of pepsin activity, another important component of the digestive juice. According to their approved labeling, the only symptoms that can be safely diagnosed and self-treated with OTC antacids are those caused by excess stomach acid. These symptoms have been described as burning sensations in the upper abdomen, behind the chest, and high as the throat. The official FDA-approved claims for antacids are for the relief of “heartburn, sour stomach, acid indigestion, and upset stomach.” Based on the many years that OTC antacids have been used for heartburn, it is apparent that a consumer who has heartburn can determine when he or she has heartburn, and in most cases can predict what foods, situations, or life stresses can cause heartburn.

Great disparity exists in the acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of various antacids (Table I). The more potent antacids (e.g., Mylanta II) require a smaller dose, compared to a weaker product (e.g., Amphogel), and this is advantageous for treating ulcers. However, ulcer treatment is clearly outside the scope of OTC product labeling and should be treated only by physicians, not by self-treatment. The dose of antacid that will relieve pain in a patient with gastric ulcer must provide an ANC of 152 mEq. A weaker product, such as Amphogel, would require 25 teaspoonfuls to neutralize gastric acid, whereas a stronger product, such as Mylanta II, requires only 6 teaspoonfuls (Table I).

TABLE I. Acid-Neutralizing Capacity of Selected Antacidsa

Product Acid-neutralizing capacity in mEq acid/dose Standard dose to neutralize 152 mEq acid/dose
Alka-Seltzer (tablet) 10.6 tablets 15 tablets
Amphogel (liquid) 6. 5 tsp 25 tsp
Amphogel (tablet) 9 tablets 17 tablets
Maalox (liquid) 13.5 tsp 11 tsp
Maalox Therapeutic Concentrate (liquid) 28.5 tsp 5 tsp
Mylanta (liquid) 12.5 tsp 12 tsp
Mylanta II (liquid) 25.5 tsp 6 tsp
Mylanta II (tablet) 23 tablets 7 tablets
Titralac (liquid) 19 tsp 8 tsp
Tums (tablet) 10 tablets 16 tablets

Note: Data adapted from Zimmerman, 1983.

It should be noted that liquid antacid preparations generally provide faster buffering action than do tablet preparations. However, from a therapeutic perspective, there is a dissociation between the duration of buffering capacity of antacids, which is relatively short (30 minutes), and the duration of the pain relief required for heartburn or peptic ulcer (approximately 4 hours). Thus, on the basis of pain relief, antacids administered at a low frequency of about three times daily would not be therapeutically sufficient for healing gastric or duodenal ulcers. However, this low frequency of administration does provides pain relief in mild to moderate heartburn.

The neutralization of gastric contents by antacids promotes antral gastrin release, which promotes gastric emptying and hence contributes to the short duration of their buffering action. Due to the gastrin-induced gastric emptying, the more potent antacids have durations of buffering action essentially similar to those of weaker antacids. Therefore, the increased potency of an antacid should not be a criterion for a patient’s product selection for the self-treatment of heartburn.

Several principal ingredients are present in antacids: bicarbonate (sodium, potassium, and calcium), aluminum, magnesium, phosphate, and silicates. Bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol), which is marketed for the treatment of heartburn, has minimal antacid action and therefore is not pharmacologically classified as an antacid. All antacid products contain at least one ingredient; most contain at least two ingredients. Sodium bicarbonate and calcium carbonate are more potent antacids, compared to magnesium compounds. Magnesium compounds are more potent than aluminum compounds. Sodium and potassium bicarbonate are soluble antacids that are readily absorbed into the blood, and thus are particularly risky for patients with impaired kidney function. Calcium compounds (calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate) are potent and fast-acting antacids that are readily absorbed. However, these drugs may form calcium kidney stones. Paradoxically, calcium antacids promote antral gastrin release to a greater degree than do noncalcium antacids, which in turn stimulate gastric acid production. The aluminum compounds induce constipation and the magnesium compounds induce diarrhea, thus these two ingredients are combined together, although the net effect of the combined product is laxation. This is especially noted when the combined drugs are taken at increased dosages. The silicate antacids (e.g., magnesium trisilicate) interfere with the absorption of some drugs and this needs to be considered by patients and health care providers. For specific details about all available antacid products and their pharmacological characteristics, the readers are encouraged to consult the Physicians’ Desk Reference for Nonprescription Drugs.

Mylanta Max Strength Liquid Antacid, Classic Flavor – 12 fl oz

Mylanta Max Strength Liquid Antacid, Classic Flavor – 12 fl oz | Rite Aid

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From the Manufacturer

More Information

More Information
Product Name Mylanta Max Strength Liquid Antacid, Classic Flavor – 12 fl oz
Package Count 1
Container Type plastic bottle
Form Liquid
Flavor Classic Mint
Model 81990301028
Country of Manufacture United States
Ingredient Preference Made in the USA
Prop 65 No

Reviews

PRODUCT DETAILS

Item No. 0377301

For over 25 years doctors have been recommending Mylanta for fast heartburn relief. Unlike proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) or h3 blockers, Mylanta starts to work on contact. Mylanta Maximum Strength Liquid Antacid/Anti-Gas Classic lemon mint is smooth and refreshing and packed with extra coating power. Tough on heartburn, acid indigestion, and bothersome gas symptoms but gentle on your body. Try our Classic flavor today! Use as directed.

Features & Benefits:

  • Multi-symptom relief
  • Extra coating power
  • Paraben-free
  • Maximum strength formula
  • Great-tasting flavor

Over-the-counter acid controllers are now eligible for FSA and HSA reimbursement. For any questions you may have regarding FSAs or HSAs, please browse our FAQ.

HOW TO USE

Shake well before use. Measure with dosing cup provided. Adults and children 12 years and over: Take 10-20 mL as needed, between or after meals, at bedtime or as directed by a doctor. Do not take more than 60 mL in any 24-hour period, or use the maximum dosage for more than 2 weeks. Children under 12 years: Ask a doctor.

INGREDIENTS

Aluminum hydroxide (equivalent to dried gel, USP) 800 mg, Magnesium hydroxide 800 mg, Simethicone 80 mg. Benzyl alcohol, flavors, glycerin, microcrystalline cellulose, purified water, sodium carbonate, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, sorbitol, sucralose, xanthan gum

SAFETY

Ask a doctor before use if you have. kidney disease. A magnesium-restricted diet. Ask a doctor or pharmacist before use if you are presently taking a prescription drug. Antacids may interact with certain prescription drugs. Keep out of reach of children. In case of overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

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Treatment of gastritis

Treatment of gastritis depends on its cause, but almost always involves changes in lifestyle, diet, drug therapy and, in some rare cases, even surgery to eliminate the disease or disorder that caused gastritis.

Medicines for neutralizing stomach acid

Stomach acid irritates the inflamed gastric mucosa, which causes painful sensations and aggravates the inflammation.For this reason, in the treatment of most cases of gastritis, drugs are used to neutralize or reduce stomach acid, including:

Antacids (anti-acid) agents . Over-the-counter antacids (maalox, milanta, and others), in liquid or pill form, are the most common cure for mild gastritis. Antacids neutralize stomach acid and quickly relieve pain.

Acid blockers. If antacids cannot provide the desired relief, your doctor prescribes medications such as cimetidine (tagamet), ranitidine (zantac), nizatidine (axid), or famotidine (pepsid), which help reduce gastric acid secretion.

Proton pump inhibitors. Stopping the acidic “pumps” of stomach acid in the acid-secreting cells of the stomach is an even more effective way to stop pain. Proton pump inhibitors reduce acid production by blocking these microscopic pumps. This class of drugs includes omeprazole (prilosec), lansoprazole (prevacid), rabeprazole (acifex), and esomeprazole (nexium). Proton pump inhibitors also inhibit the growth and development of Helicobacter pilori bacteria.

Cytoprotectors. These medicines are intended to protect the tissues of the inner lining of the stomach and small intestine. These include sucralfate (carafat) and misoprostol (cytotec). If you regularly take NSAIDs, your doctor may prescribe one of the cytoprotectants to protect your stomach. Bismuth subsalicylate (pepto-bismol) is another popular cytoprotectant. Preparations based on bismuth not only protect the inner mucous membrane of the stomach, but also stop the activity of Helicobacter pilori bacteria.

Medicines for the destruction of bacteria Helicobacter pilori

Several regimens of therapy are prescribed for the treatment of Helicobacter pilori infection. In most cases, a combination of two antibiotics is used in combination with a proton pump inhibitor. Sometimes a bismuth preparation (pepto-bismol) is also added to this combination. An antibiotic helps kill bacteria, an acid blocker or proton pump inhibitor relieves pain and nausea, relieves mucosal irritation, and increases the effectiveness of antibiotics.

Treatment of Helicobacter pilori is not always effective – the degree of eradication depends on the chosen treatment regimen – however, a combination of three drugs gives a better result than a therapy using only two drugs. Increasing the duration of the treatment – two weeks instead of the traditional ten days – also increases its effectiveness.

To make sure that the Helicobacter pilori infection has been eradicated, examinations and tests are often prescribed after a course of treatment. Best of all, the residual presence of Helicobacter pilori helps to identify the analysis of exhaled air and feces.A blood test can show the presence of bacteria for several months after Helicobacter pilori is killed.

Prevention of gastritis

Although it is not always possible to prevent infection with Helicobacter pilori, these recommendations will help reduce the likelihood of developing gastritis:

Stick to a balanced diet. If you often suffer from indigestion, try to eat more often, in smaller portions, to reduce the secretion of stomach acid.Also, avoid any foods that are difficult to digest, such as spicy, sour, fried, or fatty foods.

Limit or eliminate alcohol consumption. Alcohol abuse can irritate and destroy the lining of the stomach, leading to inflammation and bleeding.

Stop smoking. Smoking damages the protective shell of the stomach, which makes it more vulnerable and sensitive to the development of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.In addition, smoking increases the secretion of stomach acid, slows down the healing process, and increases the risk of stomach cancer. However, quitting smoking is not easy, especially for heavy smokers. The doctor will help you choose the most effective way to quit this bad habit.

Take other pain relievers . If possible, avoid taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. These medicines can irritate the stomach lining or make it worse.Better to replace them with pain relievers containing acetaminophen.

Follow your doctor’s advice. To prevent recurrence of gastritis, the gastroenterologist may prescribe an antacid (anti-acid) agent or an acid blocker.

Self-help

Digestive disorders and diseases, from common indigestion to stomach cancer, arise for various reasons, some of which are quite amenable to your control. In general, doctors recommend the following to maintain a healthy digestive system:

Practice healthy eating .The manner in which you eat is as important as the food itself. Try to eat more often, but in small portions. Eat regularly and relax with your meals.

Maintain a healthy weight. Digestive problems occur in people regardless of weight. However, overweight people are more likely to suffer from heartburn, shortness of breath and diarrhea. Maintaining a healthy weight can often help prevent gastritis or reduce its symptoms.

Exercise fitness. Aerobic exercise, which speeds up the breathing and heart rate, also stimulates the activity of the muscles in the stomach and intestines, allowing digested food to pass through the intestines more quickly.A daily 30-minute aerobic workout helps reduce the likelihood of gastritis.

Manage stress. Stress increases the risk of heart attack and stroke, weakens the immune system and can provoke or exacerbate skin problems . In addition, stress increases the secretion of stomach acid and slows down the digestion of food. Unfortunately, stress cannot be avoided, so you need to learn how to manage it. Eating a healthy diet, restorative rest, regular fitness and relaxation facilitates this task.If you find it difficult to relax, try meditating or doing yoga and other meditation practices. It helps to focus, calm down and relieve physical stress. Therapeutic massage also relaxes tense muscles and soothes irritated nerves.

90,000 MILANTS

For example, marshmallow

Registered trademarks

Copyright holder Limited Liability Company “MILANTA”, 644020, g.Omsk, avenue Karl Marx, 72, apt. 63 (RU)
Correspondence address 644099, Omsk, PO Box 91, LLC “Patent Agency”
Sign type TM
Registrar code RU
Registration number 538893
Registration date 04/03/2015
Application number 2013717735
Application date 28.05.2013
Registration expiration date 28.05.2023
Unprotected elements
List of goods and services
Publications on this TK

Class registration information

30 high protein cereal bars; noodle-based dishes; vermicelli; malt biscuits; light snacks based on rice; light snacks based on cereals; pasta products; milk porridge for human consumption; food gluten; food starch; corn grits; semolina; oat groats; barley groats; food cereals; couscous [cereal]; flour dishes; noodles; rice cakes; pasta; bean flour; potato flour; corn flour; food flour; wheat flour; soy flour; barley flour; muesli; crushed oats; peeled oats; cereal products; milling products; oat-based products; rice; wheatgrass for human consumption; malt for human consumption; spaghetti; crackers; breadcrumbs; unleavened dough bread; flakes [cereal products]; cornflakes; oat flakes; food malt extract; peeled barley.
31 algarobilla [animal feed]; algae for food and feed; feed yeast; chewing gum for animals; peanut fodder cake; feed cake; corn cake for livestock; rapeseed cake for livestock; unprocessed cereal grains; grain [cereals]; feed grain; lime for feed; pet food; pet food; feed for feeding animals in the stall; bird feed; strengthening feed for animals; poultry groats; bedding materials for animals; bran mash; peanut feed flour; flaxseed meal for feed; feed flour; linseed flour [fodder]; fodder rice flour; fish meal; drinks for pets; oats; cereal bran; distilling waste fodder; wine distillation waste; cuttlefish foam for birds; livestock bran swill; preparations for feeding animals; preparations for increasing the egg production of poultry; fodder cereal processing products; wheat; fodder wheat sprouts; linseed fodder seeds; hay; straw [fodder]; litter straw; livestock salt; peat for cattle bedding; fodder.
35 promotion of goods for third parties, including services for retail, wholesale of goods; procurement services for third parties [purchase and provision of entrepreneurs with goods].

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90,000 OTC antacids for heartburn. Harvard Medical School Recommendations – Pai.UKR

Heartburn is a sensation of discomfort or burning behind the breastbone, spreading upward from the epigastric region, sometimes radiating to the neck. Gastroesophageal (gastroesophageal reflux) is the medical name for heartburn, but should not be confused with epigastric burning, which can be a symptom of gastritis.

Popular patient publications say that heartburn is the result of gastric acid on the lining of the esophagus from the stomach as a result of gastroesophageal reflux or regurgitation. Other sources note that in addition to hydrochloric acid, pepsin, bile acids, lysolecithin and pancreatic enzymes also play a damaging role.

Various antacids used to relieve symptoms of heartburn

In developed countries, heartburn occurs in 20-50% of the population.Frequent heartburn (at least once a week) in Western Europe and North and South America and Turkey is 10-20%.

In the United States, more than 60 million people experience heartburn at least once a month, and 15 million of them – every day. There is evidence that 50 million Europeans suffer from heartburn, including about 20% of residents in France, and 40% in Sweden.

Heartburn is not fatal, but it causes discomfort in a person. This is probably why Harvard Medical School sent recommendations to our email address to get rid of this scourge.

The following over-the-counter heartburn remedies neutralize digestive acids in the stomach and esophagus and are good for people with mild, occasional symptoms. While many people find tablets to be more convenient, liquids can provide faster relief.

Magnesium-based antacids . These products, such as Maalox and Mylanta, are popular because they are fast acting. One of the possible disadvantages of magnesium-containing antacids is that they can cause diarrhea.

Suspension Maalox is an antacid preparation that neutralizes free hydrochloric acid of gastric juice without causing its secondary hypersecretion. In addition, an increase in the pH of gastric juice while taking Maalox leads to a decrease in the activity of pepsin in the gastric juice. The drug also has an absorbent and enveloping effect, due to which the effect of damaging factors on the mucous membrane of the esophagus and stomach is reduced.

Milanta is a brand of over-the-counter digestive products manufactured by Infirst Healthcare USA under license from McNeil Consumer Healthcare, a division of Johnson & Johnson.

Milanta contains active ingredients: aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide and simethicone. This drug works by neutralizing stomach acid so that stomach pain due to stomach acid irritation is reduced. Relieves symptoms of heartburn, nausea and flatulence.

Antacids based on aluminum . Amphojel and other aluminum-based products can relieve heartburn in the same way as antacids containing magnesium, but can cause constipation.

Calcium-based antacids . Medicines containing calcium have been used for centuries in the form of chalk powder and ground oyster shells. Modern calcium antacids include Tums, Rolaids, and Caltrate.

The calcium and magnesium carbonates contained in these antacids react with the hydrochloric acid of the gastric juice and are converted into chlorides. The effect is not accompanied by secondary hypersecretion of hydrochloric acid and changes in the systemic acid-base balance.However, calcium-containing antacids can cause constipation, and taking too much can cause high blood calcium levels.

Rolaids Advanced Antacid Plus Anti-Ga – chewable antacid tablets that act immediately to relieve heartburn, acid upset stomach, pressure and bloating.

Combined products . A striking representative – Gaviscon (Gaviscon) contains aluminum and magnesium carbonate and is available in the form of tablets and liquid.It forms a protective layer in the stomach that helps block acid reflux.

Sodium bicarbonate . The active ingredient in Seltzer drinks (Alka-Seltzer, Bromo-Seltzer) is sodium bicarbonate, also known as baking soda . However, sodium bicarbonate antacids are less effective than other antacids and are high in sodium. Do not take them if you are on a restricted salt diet or have heart failure, high blood pressure, or kidney problems.

An important point! Today in Ukraine you can order American baking soda – Baking Soda . It is better not to drink domestic soda – this is soda, but not the same.

And here are a couple of important things to remember: the tablets must be chewed thoroughly to be effective, and the best time to take the antacid is after a meal or when symptoms appear.

What is Medical Apcoding? – Health

Apcoding is a fraudulent medical billing in which a bill sent for medical services costs more than it should have been based on the service provided.Account with updated code may

Contents

Upcoding is medical billing fraudulent in which a bill sent for medical services costs more than it should have been based on the service provided. An updated invoice can be sent to any payer – be it a private insurance company, Medicaid, Medicare, or a patient.

While this is by no means the norm, upcoding can occur when you receive diagnostic services, medical procedures, or visit your doctor.The consequence of upcoding is to increase the cost of health care for everyone, as the government and private payers distribute the cost of health care among everyone.

Billing Codes

Every diagnostic test, office visit, or medical procedure performed by a doctor or other health care provider has a current procedural terminology (CPT) code set by the American Medical Association (AMA).

When your hospital sends a bill to your payer, this CPT code corresponds to the procedure, and the different procedures and services have higher or lower costs.While the code does not translate directly into payment, hospital payment must be accurate as long as the invoice contains the correct code.

How Upcoding Works

When a hospital updates a code, it means billers are assigning a code for a service or procedure that is more expensive than the one that was performed.

For example, a simple x-ray can be regarded as a more complex x-ray with more images than was actually taken. Sedation can be exhibited as a more complex anesthesia, or a procedure performed by an assistant or nurse can be exhibited as if it had been done by a doctor.

Why Upcoding Happens

Upcoding is illegal, but there are hospitals and healthcare providers who have been caught doing it. Healthcare administrators can profit professionally when their bottom line is impressive, and upcoding is one way to do this by tricking the system.

Some medical institutions trick the code into receiving hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars. Sometimes, working doctors, nurses and healthcare professionals are unaware that their own services are being updated if malicious employers hide billing.

Upcoding costs consumers money

The most significant effect of upcoding is the increased costs for healthcare payers, which they pass on to consumers.

When government payers end up spending excessive amounts on health care, this is reflected in taxes and in government budgets. When health insurance companies overpay, they increase the cost of premiums for consumers to compensate for the loss of money.

What to do if you suspect upcoding

If you are concerned that the hospital you are receiving medical care is guilty of coding, there are some steps you can take to ensure that your payer is not fraudulently billed. You can start by checking your EOB to see what services your health care payer is billed for and if they match the services you received.

If you think there is a problem with your account, you can take the following actions:

  • First contact your provider and ask about it.They can either explain to you why it’s the right thing to do, they can suggest fixing it, or they can be just as concerned about the inconsistency as you are.
  • Please be aware that your doctor is not responsible for billing the services you were referred to – if a laboratory or diagnostic facility billed you for services that did not match the services you received, be sure to tell your doctor because he or she may stop mentioning the institution.
  • Consider calling the diagnostic center or laboratory where you got the tests to see if there is a reasonable explanation for your bill.
  • If your EOB appears to be very misleading and you believe the case is fraudulent, please report it to your health care provider.
  • If your payer is a private insurance company, call Customer Service and ask who to report coding fraud.
  • If you are getting Medicaid, you will need to check with your state’s Medicaid office how they want to report coding or other fraud.
  • If your payer is Medicare, you will find instructions for reporting fraud, including upcoding, on the Medicare website.

Word from Verywell

Sorry, hospitals, healthcare providers and diagnostic facilities have been caught coding. This can lead to the dismissal of administrators or even jail time. Often, however, those who are most skilled in these illegal activities can hide behind system glitches or bureaucracy to avoid being blamed for problems.

MDOU CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER-KINDERGARTEN 151, Tver

Legal name MUNICIPAL PRESCHOOL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER-KINDERGARTEN 151
Type of activity Provision of social services without housing

Catalog categories:

Information about the company

The company was registered on December 3, 2002, the registrar is the Interdistrict Inspectorate of the Ministry of the Russian Federation for Taxes and Duties No. 1 for the TVER region.Company MDOU CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER-KINDERGARTEN 151 is located at: 170043, TVER, st. LEVITANA, 44. The main activity is: “Provision of social services without providing accommodation.” The organization also carries out activities in the following non-core areas: “Preschool education (prior to primary general education)”. The head of the company is Olga Gennadievna Varask. Organizational and legal form – budgetary institutions. Property type – municipal property.

Address and telephones + location map

Legal. address 170043, TVER, st. LEVITANA, 44
Phones (9014) 88-31-81
E-mail [email protected]

Head of the MDOU CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER-KINDERGARTEN 151 – Varask Olga Gennadievna

Registration date December 3, 2002
Registration authority Interdistrict Inspectorate of the Ministry of the Russian Federation for Taxes and Levies No. 1 for the TVER Region
OPF Budgetary institutions
Type of ownership Municipal property
OGRN 1026

1820

INN 6

6200

OKPO 534
KPP 695001001

Flatulence (increased gas production) – a directory of diseases – HealthInfo

Gases are formed in the large intestine during bacterial fermentation of carbohydrates not digested in the small intestine.Unfortunately, a variety of healthy fiber-rich foods are often the culprit. Fiber has many beneficial properties for the body, in particular, it regulates the digestive tract, normalizes blood glucose and cholesterol levels, but can also lead to increased gas production.

Foods rich in fiber that are a common cause of flatulence:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Whole grains
  • Beans and peas (legumes)

Plantain seed shell supplements containing fiber, such as Metamucil to flatulence and associated pain, especially if they were added to the diet too quickly.Carbonated drinks such as soda or beer can also cause excess gas formation.

Other causes of gassing:

  • Air swallowed . Every time you eat or drink, you swallow air. It also happens when you are nervous, eat too fast, chew gum, suck on hard candy, or drink through a straw. Some air is released through the digestive tract.
  • Certain diseases .Increased gas production can be a symptom of serious health problems such as diverticulitis or inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. Gas and bloating can also be a manifestation of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine in diseases such as diabetes.
  • Food Intolerance . If excess gas and bloating occur primarily after eating dairy products, it may be because you have an intolerance to milk sugar, lactose.Other types of food intolerances, especially gluten, a protein found in wheat and some other grains, can also lead to excess gas, diarrhea, and even weight loss.
  • Artificial additives . You may also have an intolerance to artificial sugar substitutes such as sorbitol, mannitol, or xylitol, which are added to some foods, chewing gum, and candy. When eating foods, many people develop flatulence and diarrhea.
  • Constipation (constipation). If you are constipated, it can be difficult to pass gas, leading to bloating and discomfort.

90,000 Difference between an antacid and an acid-reduction agent

The key difference between an antacid and an acid reduction is that antacids work by neutralizing the acidity of the stomach, while acid reduction drugs can either neutralize stomach acid or they can reduce stomach acid production.

Antacids are also acid reducing agents. Therefore, they reduce the acidity in the stomach by neutralizing the acid in the stomach. While all antacids are acid reducing agents, all acid reducing agents are not antacids. There are some medicines that are used in the production of stomach acid, but we do not classify them as antacids.

Contents
  1. Overview and Key Differences
  2. What is antacid
  3. What is an acid reducing agent
  4. What is the Difference Between Antacid and Acid Reduction
  5. Conclusion
What is an antacid drug?

Antacids are medicines that are used to neutralize the acidity of the stomach, as well as to relieve heartburn and indigestion.These medicines are taken by mouth (by mouth) to quickly relieve heartburn and other symptoms of indigestion. In fact, these drugs cannot kill the Helicobacter pylori bacteria that can cause stomach ulcers.

Antacids

When there is too much acid in the stomach, the natural mucous barrier that protects the inner wall of the stomach can be damaged. Antacids contain alkaline ions that can neutralize this stomach acid. Thus, it reduces damage to the stomach and relieves pain.Some common antacids include Alka-Seltzer, Maalox, Milanta, Rolaids, and Tams.

This medicine is safe for humans in most cases. But there may be some side effects as well. For example, antacids containing magnesium can cause diarrhea. Calcium brands can cause constipation. Long-term use can cause kidney disease. Long-term use of aluminum grades can cause osteoporosis in humans.

What is an acid-reduction drug?

An acid-reduction drug is a substance that can reduce the acidity of our stomach.All antacids are acid reducing agents. Other medicines may include H 2 histamine receptor blockers or proton pump inhibitors. While antacids can neutralize stomach acid, other acid reducing agents can also reduce stomach acid production. For example, Ranitidine is a common acid-reduction drug that can reduce stomach acid production. This drug is taken by mouth or by injection into a muscle or vein.

What is the difference between an antacid and an acid-reduction agent?

Antacids are a medicine that is used to neutralize the acidity of the stomach, as well as to relieve heartburn, indigestion. The mechanism of action of these drugs is to neutralize stomach acid. Acid reducing agents are substances that can reduce the acidity of our stomach. These medicines can work by both neutralizing stomach acidity and by reducing stomach acid production.An antacid is taken orally (by mouth), while an acid reduction drug is taken either orally or by injection into a muscle or vein.