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Nose job made me beautiful: What It’s Really Like to Get a Nose Job: Before/After, Price, Benefits

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What It’s Really Like to Get a Nose Job: Before/After, Price, Benefits

Like many others, one thing about my body that always brought about feelings of insecurity was my nose. I could wax poetic about the kid in elementary school who nicknamed me “pelican” (kids can be mean—but hey, if you’re reading this, all is forgiven!). Or the way my grandma so lovingly yet annoyingly referred to the shape of my nose as “Roman” (it’s true, I am Italian, but that didn’t help quell any self-doubt). However, the bottom line is—everyone else’s snarky or well-intentioned comments aside—that I’ve always simply wanted my nose to look different. What’s more, for as long as I can remember, I’ve also had a weird psychological and physical disconnect; I inherently thought that my nose looked different than it really did, only to see a profile photo of myself and be legitimately surprised (not in a good way).   

All of this is to say that rhinoplasty—specifically, to get rid of the hump on the bridge of my natural nose—has been in the back of my mind since my early teen years. Though while my nose always irked me, another part of me (and my bank account) could never fully justify an actual surgical procedure. I explored other less-invasive options, including using fillers to even things out (a.k.a the non-surgical nose job), but nothing seemed to make sense for the outcome I wanted. Eventually though, after becoming engaged to my long-time partner, the timing finally felt right to pursue a more permanent solution. I also finally had a reason to justify it (if only to myself): Wedding photos that would, as I so dramatically quoted to my partner on numerous occasions, last for generations

Trust me, the decision to go under the knife was not one that I took lightly. On the contrary, after ruminating about it for years and years (and years), I did my homework. I talked to friends who had the procedure, a handful of plastic surgery and rhinoplasty experts and many fellow beauty writers and editors. Eventually, after thoroughly plotting out and exploring all options, I settled on an open rhinoplasty with a surgeon who I trusted completely.  

And the eventual outcome was even better than I ever anticipated—so incredibly satisfying that I wanted to write about it (and even share photos of my old nose!) to share my experience with others; something that I never in my life thought I would be doing. But alas, here are all the details about my own pre-wedding surgery (before and after pictures included), and the many reasons why I am so genuinely happy that I had it done.

Two quick asides before we jump in... First off, no—I’m not going to argue that in order to feel your very best on your wedding day, you should get plastic surgery. Or even Botox. Or even wear makeup. Everyone is different, and this just happens to be my story. 

Second, when my editor and I envisioned this article more than a year ago, we obviously had no idea that the year 2020 would completely upend every facet of life on an unprecedented level—my wedding plans, and plastic surgery in general, included. Needless to say, the unfortunate ways in which 2020 continues to unfold make my elective rhinoplasty and the postponement of my wedding ceremony feel incredibly frivolous compared to what’s going on around the world. 

That said, with plastic surgeons in most states currently getting the green light to move forward with elective procedures—and my own recent last-minute decision to elope—writing this now finally feels more appropriate. So, here goes…

 Rebecca Dancer

What Is a Rhinoplasty?

Rhinoplasty is the medical term for a nose job, which involves surgically (re: invasively) changing the shape, size and/or appearance of the nose. Nose jobs can be performed for purely cosmetic reasons, as in my case, or to correct a deviated septum (or other structural issues) and improve breathing.

The cost of the surgery, as with all plastic surgery, will depend on a few different factors, including where you live, your preferred surgeon, and the extent of surgery you need. In general, rhinoplasties can range anywhere from approximately $5,000 to over $15,000. This is obviously a huge price range, which is why it’s important to really do your research beforehand (and you already are by reading this).

The Benefits of a Rhinoplasty

Again here, the benefits can be cosmetic or medical (or both!). On the cosmetic side, a nose job can correct certain elements of a natural nose that the patient is unhappy with, some of the most common being a bump along the bridge and the size of the tip of the nose.

On the medical side, nose jobs can be performed to correct airways that are naturally or have otherwise become obstructed (this is called a deviated septum) and improve the patient’s breathing ability.

Either way, the overall goal of a quality rhinoplasty should be to correct each patient’s specific issues in a way that is balanced and proportional to the rest of the face. “This is important for any rhinoplasty,” explains Adam Kolker, a plastic surgeon based in New York City. “The nose needs to be internally balanced, meaning that the upper third needs to match the middle third, which needs to match the lower third, which needs to be balanced with the entire face.”

Rhinoplasty vs. Non-Surgical Nose Job

I first considered the non-surgical nose job, which involves using injectables to correct cosmetic issues such as evening out a dorsal hump, making the nose look more proportional to the face, and even lifting the tip. The non-surgical version is temporary, as all fillers are, and typically lasts somewhere in between six and twelve months, depending largely on the patient’s own metabolism.

Because I was ultimately looking to decrease volume rather than add it and wanted a permanent solution, I opted for the surgical route.

Finding the Right Surgeon

As a beauty writer, I’ll admit that I had a leg up here. After talking with everyone I knew who knew anything about nose jobs, plus diving down many an internet rabbit hole, I ended up consulting with a few rhinoplasty experts in New York City (where I live) until I found the right fit in Dr. Kolker.

Not only is he literally the kindest, most genuine, and professional doctor I have ever met with (and I am not just saying that; the man is a genius), but he also said things like: “It’s always best when refinements are subtle and natural-looking,” and “It’s important to bear in mind that natural and proportional are always better than over-done.” And perhaps most importantly in my own mind, especially since I knew that my dad (who I have to thank for my natural nose in the first place) would never be fully on board with this until seeing the final results: “People will say you look amazing, but it will be so subtle that they won’t even know what changed.”

Meet the Expert

Adam Kolker, MD, is a board-certified plastic surgeon in New York City specializing in cosmetic surgery of the face, body and breasts.

Dr. Kolker was speaking the exact words I had thought repeatedly in my mind: Subtle and natural-looking. He also took the time to answer all of my many questions, explain in detail how he would personally perform the procedure (this is important, since every plastic surgeon operates slightly differently and has their own preferences), and also show me a mock-up image of what the intended outcome would look like. Basically, he hit everything on the nose—pun intended—and I knew in my gut that he was the right doctor for me. 

In the recovery room immediately after surgery.

The Surgery

After a few pre-op meetings to finalize exactly what I was hoping for and some routine bloodwork, my surgery was scheduled for mid-September. In the land of rhinoplasty, there are two types of procedures (though again, each surgeon has their own nuanced approach): Closed and open. Per Dr. Kolker’s advice, I opted for the latter.

“An open rhinoplasty approach offers a tremendous amount of exposure to the architecture of the nose, including all of the cartilage and bone elements,” Kolker explains. As opposed to a closed rhinoplasty, an open surgery would give him “almost limitless control over the fine-tuning and sculptural modification of those elements.”

This seemed crucial to me because I couldn’t (and still can’t) wrap my mind around how someone could shave down the bridge of my nose without having full access to seeing it. But again, every surgeon is different, which is why it’s so important to discuss the intended logistics of any plastic surgery procedure beforehand. 

“It’s not as if there is one absolutely uniform, ideal way to do a rhinoplasty for every individual,” Kolker emphasizes. “There are some surgeons who only perform closed rhinoplasties, and there are some who only do open ones.”

The downside of an open rhinoplasty, I was told, is a small incision underneath the nose along the tiny bridge of tissue that runs in between either nostril (technically called the columella). But the many upsides of an open procedure, plus my complete faith in Dr. Kolker’s expertise, made it definitely worth it to me. Besides, the tiny scar from said incision would fade over time (and, as I found out, was also easily covered by concealer). 

 Rebecca Dancer

The stitches post-surgery

The Recovery

This part was probably more difficult for my fiancée than it was for me—in part because I repeatedly sent him to the store to get more ice cream. Also, partly because I think it was uncomfortable to see my face so swollen and bruised.

In the recovery room right after surgery, dark bruising had already begun to form underneath my eyes. But overall, I was feeling pretty good. Very out of it, definitely, but not in any pain. The car ride back to Brooklyn was slightly uncomfortable, but as soon as I got home and propped up in bed, in terms of pain level, I was feeling fine. Said fiancée helped set me up with a bowl of mashed potatoes and some Bravo reality shows to binge, and I was comfortable until I passed out a few hours later. One slightly difficult lifestyle adjustment: I had to sleep on my back with my head propped up on a few pillows—for at least two weeks, per the paperwork I initialed—which I at first found to be uncomfortable but quickly got used to. Turning to sleep on either side, as I normally do, would put pressure on my splint and also increase swelling. 

The other post-op rules were pretty standard: No alcohol, aspirin (which thins the blood), or spicy foods and plenty of liquids. No showering for the first 48 hours after surgery, and no strenuous activity for at least two weeks (obviously, I happily obliged to this one). Dr. Kolker sent me home with an antibiotic in order stave off potential infection (which I took twice daily until the bottle ran out), and some prescription Percocet, though I personally only needed to take the heavy-duty stuff once or twice. After that, I switched to over the counter Tylenol a few times a day and genuinely was not in any pain. 

More apparent than any pain was the swelling, which hit peak-bulge about three or four days post-surgery. Over the first two weeks after surgery, my bruising changed color and shape so frequently that I actually found it fascinating to watch how quickly and efficiently my body could heal itself. What at first was black then became dark blue, then purple-ish red, then so swollen that my eyes could barely poke through my puffed-up cheeks, then a sallow yellow shade, and eventually subsided altogether.  

“Everybody bruises differently, and everybody swells differently,” Kolker explains, noting that I was fortunate to experience very mild bruising. I think this mildness was likely due, at least in part, to the pre-op supplement routine Dr. Kolker had me follow the week beforehand, which included hefty daily doses of vitamins C and B, zinc, and arnica montana. After the surgery, my supplement routine stayed the same for two weeks, plus the addition of bromelain. 

Over those first few weeks post-surgery, I was able to work from home—I was actually answering emails, albeit my tone a little loopier than normal, the morning after surgery (though I wouldn’t advise doing this!). I showered gently, taking care to keep my face out of the water, and used a washcloth or a makeup wipe to keep the rest of my complexion clean. My splint stayed on for almost a full week, after which I was told I could take it off myself, though it had become so loose at that point that it pretty much fell off on its own. I went into Dr. Kolker’s office eight days post-op to have the stitches in between my nostrils removed, which was slightly uncomfortable but not unbearable. The other stitches, all of them inside of my nose, would dissolve or fall out naturally (cute!). 

The Outcome

I was told that the ultimate shape of my nose would not reveal itself fully until, realistically, one-year post surgery. That seemed like a long time, but it’s definitely true: Features of my nose continue to change even now, about ten months out (though these slight changes haven’t really been noticeable by anyone other than myself). 

Rebecca Dancer

“The nose continues to mature over time, but most of the changes from a rhinoplasty are evident and settled by about twelve months afterward,” Kolker explains. “When you imagine that the nerves are re-connecting in that area, that also means that the veins and the lymphatics in the area, which drain the skin and the soft tissue, are also readjusting as well.

The swelling on the tip of my nose took the longest to subside—and still today hasn’t fully regained all feeling. “There are certain areas of the nose that heal more quickly,” Kolker explains. “The tip area is the one that takes the longest, and the bridge area usually settles down a bit more rapidly.”

All in all, even while I wait for the final shape of my nose to fall into place, I couldn’t be happier with the results. The irony, of course, is that the very event that prompted me to finally pursue rhinoplasty—our wedding celebration—had to be postponed for another year. Still, the timing of the surgery felt right, just like it did for our last-minute, socially-distanced nuptials, which we recently held outdoors with only immediate family in attendance (we’ve been together for nearly a decade, so we simply couldn’t wait another year to make it legal!). 

Before the procedure, I never would’ve felt comfortable posing for—let alone publishing—a profile shot of my face. But now, the image I always had in my mind matches the one I see in the mirror. 

My innate sense of self-confidence will forever be boosted—and I mean that genuinely, one hundred percent, as superficial as that may come across in writing. One recent comment from a childhood friend was just the cherry on top: You look amazing, and so happy! But I can’t tell what’s changed

Here’s What Having a Nose Job at 15 Taught Me About Self-Image

“Go ahead, pick your nose.”

An actual doctor wearing an actual lab coat actually said that to me. He pointed to a stack of Vogue magazines, all spread out in a finessed semicircle in the center of a mirrored coffee table.

The magazines looked untouched. Their covers had no fingerprints or creases — they were perfect, unlike me with that big mistake stuck in the center of my face, the one the boys had made fun of since the fifth grade.

I hadn’t even noticed my nose until they told me it was wrong. Until then, I actually had the nerve to think I was pretty.

“Big nose, big nose, big nose, big nose! Tracy’s got a big nose!”

They’d sing it, they’d yell it, they’d chant it, and they’d scream it. They did it before school, during school, and after school. They did it in the fifth grade, they did it in the sixth grade, they did it in the seventh grade, they did it in the eighth.

“Big nose, big nose, big nose, big nose! Tracy’s got a big nose!”

I hadn’t even noticed my nose until they told me it was wrong. Until then, I actually had the nerve to think I was pretty.

“Go ahead, choose a nose from one of the magazines,” the plastic surgeon said. Dr. Smith was his name, and he said it through a weird smile that bordered on both fatherly and flirtatious, which creeped me out. Maybe that was just his bedside manner.

“Choose any one you want. Pick your dream nose.”

He was tall and skinny and bald and maybe 45 or 50. I sat next to my mom on a stiff, white, armless leather couch, a space-age looking thing in what seemed to be an intentionally intimidating waiting room.

You’d think a plastic surgeon would have a welcoming, comforting, homey waiting room, maybe with an indoor zen fountain trickling near the couch. But this was Beverly Hills in 1993 — appearances mattered more than feelings, and quasi-spiritual accents like crystal lamps, Buddha statues, and zen fountains weren’t yet a thing.

I picked Christy Turlington’s nose. She was all the rage at the moment — super feminine, super skinny, super pretty, everything that I was convinced my 14-year-old self was not. I was sure the boys at school never made fun of her.

Super model Christy Turlington strolls off stage wearing huge earrings and jeweled collar in 1991.

David TurnleyGetty Images

“This one,” I told the doctor pointing to her.

He smiled and nodded and took a long look at my face, then asked, “How old are you?”

“14.”

“Ah,” he said. “You’re too young. Your nose will continue growing. You need to come back in a year. We can do it then.”

I was both infuriated and relieved.

Not having the surgery at 14 meant going an entire year with more torment, from both the boys and myself. But at least I was able to postpone the physical agony of rhinoplasty.

The nose job wasn’t even my idea.

After four straight years of getting bullied, I finally cried about it in front of my mom. Up until then, I somehow managed to convince myself that the bullying either didn’t happen or didn’t matter. I shoved down the humiliation, self-hate, and anger and told no one at home.

But on one Thursday night, every tease, every taunt, every sing-songy insult from each of those boys resounded in my mind with unignorable ferocity, like the operatic bit in Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody, yanking the pain out of my subconscious mind and shoving it into my conscious one.

I couldn’t escape it.

The tears came so hard I could barely breathe. I tried to stop them, but they just poured down my face as I sat in front of the TV, trying to watch Seinfeld.

“Why are you crying?” my mom asked.

“The boys at school are making fun of me.”

“Why are they making fun of you?”

“They’re saying my nose is too big.”

I had always wondered why all the women in my family had noses completely unlike mine.

I angrily awaited the BS that would inevitably pour out of her mouth. She’d blather on about how I’m beautiful just the way I am and how those boys are insecure little jerks and that I shouldn’t take anything they say seriously because they were probably raised by jerky parents.

But that’s not what she said.

“Well, we can go take you to a doctor for that.”

I didn’t really hear it at first.

“You mean a plastic surgeon?”

She nodded.

“For a nose job?”

I still couldn’t understand it.

“I don’t understand.”

“I had my nose done,” she said. “So did all of your aunts. And your grandma.”

In the three or four seconds it took her to complete that sentence, my reality twisted into something foreign and terrifying, as though I’d stepped inside a Picasso painting, and inside that painting, all the women in my family had turned into triangles and squares, their faces lopsided and warped, no longer comforting or familiar.

I had always wondered why all the women in my family had noses completely unlike mine, noses with super-smooth bridges, perfect, like the covers of the Vogue magazines on Dr. Smith’s table. Up until then, I had decided that I was just broken, a freak of nature in my Armenian-American family.

Armenians are known to have big noses. The following joke did the rounds at my Armenian summer camp.

Why don’t Armenian men have mustaches?

Because things don’t grow in the shade.

Later I would learn that getting your nose done is basically a right of passage for many Armenian-Angeleno women. I hate to say it, but it’s true. So many friends and friends of friends had theirs done, often at a young age, like me. It’s just what we do.

My family had been in LA for three generations, since the turn of the 20th century. By the time the 1990s hit, we were programmed with the beauty-obsessed Angeleno ethos.

AndreaObzerovaGetty Images


I endured another year of the torment, slowly falling into deeper hate with my big nose, fantasizing about how beautiful I’d be when it was gone from my face for good, fantasizing about being pretty.

When the year was up, I decided that I didn’t want to return to creepy Dr. Smith and his spacey ’80s waiting room though, so my mom took me to a female doctor in Glendale. It’s a city just a few miles north of Downtown Los Angeles, and it’s home to the largest Armenian community outside of Yerevan and Moscow.

Dr. Babakyan was young, maybe 30 or so. She had thick, straight, shiny black hair that fell to her chin, big, brown Armenian eyes and a heavy Armenian accent. She practiced out of a shabby, one-story grey building no larger than a mid-century two-bedroom tract home, and her waiting room was filled with old brown leather couches and old grey carpet that frayed at the baseboards — nothing like Dr. Smith’s office.

I was crossing my fingers that she’d say I was old enough for surgery. I’d waited long enough.

“You have too large of a hook and a deviated septum,” she said not long after I’d entered the exam room. “We can shave off the bump, straighten out the septum, and lift the tip a bit to balance out your face.

“I’m not too young for the surgery, am I?”

“No, 15 is good.”

I had the surgery at the beginning of my Christmas break during my sophomore year of high school, so I’d have plenty of time to heal up before returning from vacation.

After it was over, my eyelids had swollen shut. I couldn’t see and I couldn’t breathe, not with all that cotton packing stuffed up into my nostrils. The sharp, incessant throbbing inside of them only dulled slightly after the generous doses of Vicodin that Dr. Babkyan prescribed kicked in.

My grandmother nursed me back to health when my mom was at work. She placed ice packets on my eyes to help ease the swelling, and when I finally was able to take a look at myself in the mirror, all I saw was a massive white bandage; it was impossible to see how the nose job turned out, which depressed me a bit.

By the time I returned to school, the bandage had been removed, but not all of the swelling had gone down. Still, it was very obvious, at least to me, that I’d had a nose job.

The signature hook was gone, its bridge entirely straight, and the tip had been reshaped. It now tilted upwards like the nose of a Disney princess, which I didn’t mind at the time, but now I pretty much hate it. I honestly think my nose is a tad too short for my face, which has given me a new complex: The space between my upper lip and the tip of my nose is too large. At least in my opinion.

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I was definitely nervous before walking into school that first day, mostly nervous that the boys who bullied me for having a large nose might start bullying me for getting it fixed. Surprisingly, they left me alone. Maybe they didn’t even notice, or maybe they had just matured — we were all nearly 16.

I’m not sure if the nose job made me prettier. I do think it helped bring out my eyes, but I also think I would have grown into my old nose the way I’ve grown into every part of my body, mind, and spirit as I’ve aged.

And even if it did make me prettier, the sad reality is I have a Google doc full of at least 30 flaws that I see in my appearance, everything from that extra-long space between my nose and mouth to the petite size of my cranium (two men pointed out that my head is too small for my body when I was in my 20s) to the size of my hips (they are too small) to the size of my shoulders (they are too broad).

I type out all the imperfections because as the list grows and grows it becomes more and more laughable to me. Seeing all of my insecurities in print helps me take them less seriously.

For many women, and certainly some men, each airbrushed magazine cover or filtered video by some influencer on Instagram or YouTube forces us to scrutinize ourselves, to dissect our appearance in order to test whether we measure up.

This is sadly leading to an obsession with physical perfection, which, in turn, is leading to more and more plastic surgery and injections for younger and younger women and men.

It scares me.

We are not meant to be perfect, to have faces without pores, lines, and blemishes. To have a face without pores or lines or blemishes is to erase our uniqueness, our personalities, our stories, our history, and our power. We become flat, boring, and bland.

I wish I had my old, forceful, Armenian nose, instead of the picture-perfect Disney thing I have now, this Anglicized version of my true self. My old nose had character. My old nose was interesting. My old nose was fierce.

I can’t take the nose job back. But I can think twice, thrice, and maybe four times over before I shoot myself with injections or undergo any other physical alterations just to legitimize my beauty and worthiness as a woman.

I plan to do just that.


Tracy Chabala’s personal essays and journalism have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the LA Weekly, VICE, Motherboard, Salon, and other publications. She holds an MFA in Professional Writing from the University of Southern California. Twitter: @TracyAChabala

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Giving in to Rhinoplasty

Courtesy of Lisa Lewis

“You would be so pretty if you got your nose fixed,” my mother said.

Fixed. Like I was damaged.

She introduced me to friends with a disclaimer: “My daughter wasn’t supposed to look like this.” She’d chosen my father for breeding because of his handsome face and long fingers, and she wanted her daughter to be a button-nosed pianist. My nose was huge, and I didn’t play the piano, and my parents are now divorced. Just saying.

My beak was big, without a doubt— lumpy, crooked, and, I dare say, stereotypically Jewish amid the sea of wealthy Protestants in our Illinois town (voted, in 1997, one of the best in the nation in which to raise children).

“Pain for beauty,” was my mother’s motto, as she warped my long hair into scalp-pinching braids. A former actress and model, she appeared in a few episodes of All My Children before I was born. When I was growing up, she couldn’t leave the house without asking, “Do I look beautiful? You’re not looking—look. Beautiful?”

My mom had convinced her frugal mother to pay for her own nose job when she was a teen; later, she had it tweaked twice to get it right. So when a salesclerk or waitress recognized us as mother and daughter, she was insulted. Her surgeries were supposed to have saved her from looking like me.

At her best, my mother has always been generous, fun, witty, and deeply concerned about me, and, in her way, she was trying to help. To her, a smaller nose would be one less obstacle to a happy future. But when she asked again and again if she looked beautiful, I’d burst into tears, desperate for her to tell me I was beautiful too.

And yet, oddly, when I wasn’t crying, I was also totally into my nose. I was convinced that it made me funny, approachable, quirky, Jewish; that my personality, my identity, and my relationship with my mother were all in there. Depending on the day, my haircut, the bathroom lighting, or whether a boy had asked me to a dance (and they did), I ping-ponged between feeling exotic and like a total freak. Still, I rejected a “happy puberty” nose job at 13 and a “sweet 16” rhinoplasty, too.

Yet by 2006, when I was 24, single, and working in film production in New York City, it became clear that my mother wasn’t the only one who reacted negatively to my nose. People stopped me on the street to tell me I looked like Barbra Streisand. Japanese tourists wanted to take pictures with me. Hairstylists told me I needed to play down my nose—”no offense.” I started writing down the unprovoked remarks in a journal; in one year, I recorded 59.

September 23, 2006

Gay man at a party in Williamsburg: “Damn, girl, why you never got that thing taken off?”

A woman overhearing: “I like it, don’t get it fixed.

Her friend: “You’re Jewish, right?”

The nose hadn’t stopped me from dating, getting jobs, or making friends. But it was beginning to feel like some silly outfit I’d put on to annoy my mother. After years of defiantly building an identity around it, was I finally going to admit that I hated it too?

I went to see a plastic surgeon, who created a digital projection of the nose he could give me: scooped, small, with a slight upturn. The picture looked like another girl. And she was so pretty.

But I was worried. Would changing my nose change my identity? Would I lose the thing that gave me character? The doctor seemed amused. “Do you really think you are your nose?” he asked.

Well, yes. And this, I realized, was the real problem: My nose overshadowed what I loved about myself. After years of struggling not to be my mother’s mirror, it was time to be happy with my own reflection.

My surgery was in November 2007. My mother flew to New York and booked a hotel for us near the doctor’s office, where she drew me baths and read to me for the first few days of my recovery—the kind of mothering I had longed for. “Relax,” she told me as she replaced the bandages. “Soon you’ll be prettier than me.”

My new nose isn’t tiny, but it’s smaller, more sculpted. As one colleague said, “Now I can see your eyes, cheeks, and smile, too.” I hate to say it, but my mother is right: It’s the nose I was meant to have. I don’t have to make excuses for it or cover it with my hair. I can just be.

Asked why she used to be so cruel about my nose, my mother has explained that her own mother made her feel worthless. While that sad cycle helps me to understand her, it doesn’t excuse our past. Now each time she tells me I’m lovely, I feel the full force of its opposite—the stinging comments of my youth. But at least I believe her. I hate to admit how much that matters to me.

CHANGING FACES: THE NEWS IN NOSES

In the post-ski-jump era, the best nose job is one that looks like no nose job at all. According to NYC plastic surgeon Steven Pearlman, MD, who specializes in revision rhinoplasty (i.e., do-overs), spreader grafts—pieces of the patient’s own cartilage he inserts into the middle third of the nose—”create a smoother curve from the brow to the tip, with no ‘drop-off’ in the middle.” For patients with very thin skin, who were previously prone to the bony-looking “shrink-wrap” effect, Pearlman also adds ultrathin grafts of cartilage or tissue taken from the temple to the tip of the nose, a trick he refers to as “carpet padding.”

Photo:
Three decades of gold standards, according to Toby G. Mayer, MD, and Richard W. Fleming, MD, the L.A. doc duo behind an annual most-requested-features list.

Scalpel-phobic? Injections of Botox and fillers temporarily smooth bumps, lift drooping tips, and add definition, says L. A.–based cosmetic surgeon Alexander Rivkin, MD. He perfected the profile below in minutes with two vials of the filler Radiesse, which lasts 10 to 12 months. For a long-term fix, Rivkin recently began offering the same treatment using ArteFill, a filler made of Lucite spheres suspended in collagen, which is shown to last up to 15 years.

Photos: Lewis: courtesy of subject; Kidman: Dan MacMedan/WireImage; Hill: Evan Agostini/Getty Images; Porizkova: Getty Images; remaining images: courtesy of Alexander Rivkin

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Considering a Nose Job? Here’s What You Need To Know.

Is your nose too large for your face? Is it crooked? Does it have a bump in the middle, or a hook at the end? Or have you just never liked it?

If any of these ring true for you, there is a proven, highly effective way to get the beautiful, shapely nose you’ve always wanted: rhinoplasty (plastic surgery performed on the nose).

Nose reshaping surgery (commonly called a nose job) is usually performed to alter the size and shape of the bridge and tip of the nose. Some of my patients also want to narrow the base of their nose or reduce the size of their nostrils. Whatever type of nose you might be seeking, my goal is to give you a natural-looking, flattering nose that fits your face and your personality, helping you feel beautiful and self-confident.

What happens during a nose job (rhinoplasty)?

Nose reshaping is generally performed through surgical incisions inside the nose—the traditional “closed” approach.

A modified technique, called the “open” approach, is often used to benefit patients who need more complex correction or who are undergoing a secondary rhinoplasty procedure. In these cases, a small incision is made outside the nose across the columella (the tissue that divides the two nostrils). This enables me to turn the outer tissue of the nose back so I can see the structures inside. Additional incisions, similar to those used in the “closed” approach, are then made inside the nose. The small scar resulting from the columella incision eventually becomes almost invisible.

Are you a good candidate for nose surgery?

If you are in good general health, do not smoke or abuse alcohol, and have talked with me about realistic expectations, you are most likely a good candidate for this procedure.

The following are the most common reasons why people have rhinoplasty:

  • Their nose is too large or too small
  • Their nose does not seem to match the rest of their face
  • Their nose is crooked, badly shaped or out of alignment
  • They have a broken nose
  • They have nasal blockage inside their nose and have trouble breathing

What will a nose job do for me?

Your nose plays such a big part in the way you feel about yourself and how the world sees you. Many of my patients who were unhappy with their noses and who chose to have a nose job have made a point of telling me what a wonderful difference their “new nose” has made. They feel beautiful, sometimes for the first time in their lives, and also have discovered new-found confidence, affecting their work, relationships and self-esteem. Nose reshaping could achieve this things for you too!

Typically, for most people rhinoplasty brings about these results:

  • The shape, angle and size of your nose will be improved
  • Structural problems that restrict your breathing and cause congestion can be corrected
  • It can have a significant impact on your self-image and self-confidence

You might want to consider having chin augmentation at the same time

Patients with a receding chin may benefit from chin augmentation in addition to rhinoplasty in order to achieve a better balance of their facial features. Chin augmentation can strengthen the appearance of the chin by increasing its projection, without affecting your bite or dental work. The most common chin augmentation procedure entails the insertion of an implant through a small incision underneath your chin.

If you’re interested in having chin augmentation at the same time as nose reshaping or as a separate procedure, please contact me for a free consultation to determine if this would be beneficial surgery for you.

How much does a nose job cost?

Because every person’s nose is unique and the results they are seeking from nose reshaping surgery are specific to them, I determine the exact cost of the surgery only after meeting with the patient and together, we have decided what type of procedure will achieve the best possible results.

Getting a nose job is a big decision, and an irreversible one

That’s why it’s very important to ask a lot of questions and to be fully informed before making your final decision. Whatever procedure you choose, I want you to be completely happy and satisfied with your “new” nose. To learn more, please refer to the Nose Reshaping page on my website.

If you are interested in rhinoplasty

If you are thinking about getting nose reshaping surgery and would like to schedule a free consultation, please contact me.  I will send you additional information prior to your appointment. To make sure you are fully informed about your surgery options and understand exactly what results to expect, I will take all the time you need to make sure all your questions are answered.

You might find these pages helpful on my website:

Board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS), a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (ASAPS), and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons (FACS), Samuel J. Beran, MD is a highly accomplished plastic surgeon with offices in Manhattan, Harrison and Mount Kisco, NY. With more than 20 years’ experience and a thorough command of the most advanced techniques and technologies, Dr. Beran consistently provides his patients with the highest level of plastic, cosmetic and reconstructive surgery of the breast, face, skin and body. Recently, Dr. Beran was named a “Top Doctor” by RealSelf for his dedication to responding to consumer questions and patient feedback. The “Top Doctor” designation is awarded to less than 10% of the RealSelf physician community.

Best Nose Job San Diego

  • If you smoke, stop at least three weeks before rhinoplasty. 
  • Do NOT take aspirin, Bayer, Excedrin, Ibuprofen, or any other anti-inflammatory medication for at least ten days before rhinoplasty.  These increase bleeding and bruising, prolonging your recovery. 
  • Clear your calendar for the week following rhinoplasty. 
  • Arrange a ride home the day of surgery, and someone to stay with you overnight. 

Your rhinoplasty will be performed at a fully accredited ambulatory surgery center.  Upon arrival at the center, front desk staff asks you to complete documentation.

General Instructions to Follow Before & After Your Rhinoplasty Procedure >>

You change clothing and meet nursing staff in the pre-operative room.   Your Anesthesiologist will meet and interview you briefly, and examine you,  and Dr. Laverson will ask if you have last minute questions, concerns, requests, or reminders.  You are then walked to the operating room with the nurse who stays in the operating room during your entire procedure.  Dr. Laverson and the anesthesiologist will be there.  

The anesthesiologist starts an intravenous line, wishes you pleasant dreams, and before you know it (there is no sense of time under anesthesia) you awake from surgery in the recovery room!  After 60-90 minutes in recovery, you are usually awake enough to go home.   The week following rhinoplasty is the most unpleasant time.  There is a splint on top of your nose, so you won’t get to see the result right away.  Splints inside your nose force you to breathe through your mouth, even while eating.  For several days afterward, you may have post-nasal drip of blood and/or secretions.  A “moustache” dressing beneath your nostrils may also help absorb drainage.   

There will be swelling and bruising around the nose, visible beneath your eyes and on your cheeks.  Bruising usually resolves in several days.  Sleep with your head elevated on several pillows to minimize swelling of the nose and face.  Take prescribed pain medicine as needed.  At your one week follow up appointment with Dr. Laverson, splints and sutures are removed.  This is not painful or uncomfortable.  You will then get the first indication of your result, although still quite swollen.  By two weeks after your procedure, swelling and bruising are further diminished, and most normal activities can be resumed.

Top 10 Myths About Rhinoplasty Nose Job Surgery

1. It’s really simple to just take off that bump right?

Rhinoplasty is the most complex and challenging operation in all of plastic surgery. Not only must the nose match the face, but also each section of the nose must be harmonious with all the others. For example, removing a bump without changing the tip in many cases can make the tip appear like it’s sticking out too far from the face. Conversely, changing the tip alone without addressing the bridge can make a bridge appear too high or too wide. A rhinoplasty surgeon must have great attention to detail and have an appreciation for all the nuances of nasal and facial harmony.

2. I heard rhinoplasty is covered by my insurance.

Cosmetic rhinoplasty is not covered by insurance; however, if there is a functional component such as a problem breathing from a deviated septum or other cause, that portion of the surgery may be covered by your insurance plan.

3. The one’s I’ve seen all look obvious. I can spot them a mile away.

Certainly, poorly performed work can appear un-natural or look “done.” A common example of this is the overly pinched and up- turned tip. In years past, the cartilage of the nose was commonly over-reduced or removed which can result not only in this look, but also in poor breathing. A good rhinoplasty, on the other hand, typically appears natural, is no longer a distracting feature, and directs people’s attention to the person’s eyes, smile, hair, and skin.

4. My nose can look like any Hollywood celebrity’s nose of my choosing.

A prospective rhinoplasty patient should have realistic expectations. Each person’s face and visage is different. Brad Pitt’s nose would not look good on every man nor is it achievable. Blake Lively’s nose would not be appropriate for every woman. For example, a shorter woman can “get away” with a bit more “up-turning” or rotation of the tip than a taller woman. The same degree of rotation on a taller woman might look un-natural and “Ms. Piggy-ish.” In summary, your nose must fit your face, persona, ethnicity, etc.

5. Any plastic surgeon can perform a rhinoplasty.

Would you want a general contractor doing complicated plumbing or electrical work? Do you really want someone who does pre-dominantly breast augmentations and tummy tucks performing your rhinoplasty? Rhinoplasty is an exceedingly complex and demanding operation. A millimeter or two can make a huge difference in the result. It should be performed by someone who specializes and has specific training in it. Typically, the surgeon should be board certified in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery (and have specific interest in performing rhinoplasty). This surgeon will not only understand the aesthetics of the nose and face, but also will also have a great appreciation and understanding of the many functional components of this complex organ. (e.g. breathing, sense of smell, or sinus issues).

6. Won’t my surgery have to be re-done in the future?

While revision surgery is a reality when undergoing rhinoplasty (as high as 10-15% percent in some studies), rhinoplasty surgery ideally should be a one-time operation. A nose should be “built for life.” That aside, due to the complexities of the operation and the variability in each person’s anatomy, skin, and healing, on occasion revision surgery needs to be performed. When it occasionally occurs, usually it’s for something relatively minor such as a small residual bump.

7. Rhinoplasty is only for wealthy people.

The reality is that the median income for most patients having aesthetic surgery is $50,000 or less. Most surgeons offer payment plans of one form or another as well.

8. Cosmetic rhinoplasty and plastic surgery are only for vain people.

The truth is that a very small percentage of people seeking out cosmetic surgery are truly vain, meaning their entire existence and interactions with others are defined by their appearance. Most people pursuing rhinoplasty seek to create a harmonious relationship with their nose and the rest of their facial features. Often, they have been teased in school about their nose, their nose is too masculine (Daddy’s nose), or they had a traumatic injury.

9. I can outgrow my dislike for my nose.

If you are dissatisfied with your nose, your perception will not likely change during your lifetime. It may wax and wane to a degree, but you will always be unhappy with it; however, the decision to pursue rhinoplasty is a very personal one.

10. Anesthesia is dangerous.

Most rhinoplasty surgery is done under general anesthesia meaning you are completely asleep. It’s exceedingly safe even in sick and elderly patients. Most patients having rhinoplasty surgery are generally healthy, and risks of long term complications are exceptionally rare.


NOTICE: This is only a guide and is not a guarantee of results.  This article is for your entertainment only and is not being given as medical advice.  Always consult your personal physician on any medical matters.

Rhinoplasty Before & After Photos at Beverly Hills Profiles




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    Case 2: Correction of his broken nose and improved breathing were major goals for this young man. At the same time, he wanted to reduce his nasal hump and deproject his tip. He is extremely happy that his new nose looks good, fits his face, and still maintains a strong, masculine look.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 3: A curvature and droopy tip brings undue focus to this young man’s nose. Although there is still some swelling in these early post-operative photos, we can already see a nose that is now straight, has a smooth profile and no longer droops. A sense of length is preserved to match his oval face. More than that, because of these positive changes, he also looks younger.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 4: Some might think that this patient had had previous rhinoplasty with tip collapse, but she did not. Occasionally, the shape of the tip cartilages is very vertically-oriented, causing a deep groove in the nostril. She felt this, along with her marked tip crookedness, drew unwanted attention to her nose. Now, her nose is smaller, smoother, more defined, and just blends with the rest of her face.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 5: This handsome young African American professional had previously undergone septoplasty with resultant tip collapse. African American rhinoplasty must take into consideration weak cartilage, thick skin and a wide alar base. These one year results show a nose that is well-projected, refined, and narrowed while looking completely natural.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 6: This young African American lady presented with the goal of achieving a smaller, more refined front view as well as lengthening of the profile. Her base and front view show significant but ethnically appropriate reduction of her nostrils, and the profile shows correction of the overly rotate, shortened nose.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 7: This beautiful young lady is a great example of true finesse rhinoplasty. You will notice a subtle, but very real refinement of the tip along with reduction of her nostrils, that otherwise preserves her already great profile.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 8: This young, African American lady had a beautiful result. On front view, her tip is much more refined and her nostrils have been reduced but are still ethnically appropriate. On side view, she now has a softer, more feminine profile.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 9: This young woman’s main concerns with her nose were her bump and nasal projection along with a boxy tip. She wanted her nose to project a softer look and take a less prominent role. All of these issues were addressed with rhinoplasty while spreader grafts helped to make sure her airway and breathing was well supported.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 10: In this patient, a little height throughout the bridge gave the sense of a downturned tip. Hump reduction was combined with tip narrowing to bring an overall balance to the nose. At the same time, a conservative otoplasty was performed to set back somewhat prominent ears.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 12: One of the things that we love about rhinoplasty is that we can combine dramatic changes such as straightening this patient’s nasal twist, and at the same time create some subtle enhancements such as refining and slightly deprojecting the tip while reducing the sense of columellar show. At 6 months, her nose now balances with her face and really brings out her beautiful eyes.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 13: This patient felt like her nose dominated her face and was out of place with her other features. The challenge is to achieve substantial reduction in size on a background of thick skin while creating a naturally refined appearance. Now, her eyes really stand out in the photos and her nose is removed as the dominant feature of her face.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 14: A prominent nasal hump and droopy tip can contribute to an unintended and unwanted look of severity. In this case, correction of these concerns along with deprojection and straightening has led to a really beautiful new look.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 15: Creating beauty is about harmonizing facial features and that is our ultimate goal in rhinoplasty. This already beautiful woman was made more so by reducing her hump and softening her boxy tip. And, at 6 months, her improved sense of definition is going to get better yet.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 16: A crooked and overprojected nose draws the eye away from other beautiful features. In this pretty young woman, you can see how rhinoplasty transforms her face. Even at this early 3-month point, we see that her nose is more feminine and no longer dominates her otherwise delicate features. And, at the same time, it is balanced and ethnically-appropriate.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 19: This handsome, young gentleman is a great example of true tip deprojection. Preoperatively, he had an overly projected, droopy tip and bump. Postoperatively, you note his tip has been deprojected and the bump is gone, and he maintains a strong profile.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 20: Keeping a strong and masculine profile is critical in male rhinoplasty. This young man wanted his nose straightened with correction of his droopy, projected tip. At Profiles, we pride ourselves in achieving these goals while preserving his strong sense of identity.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 21: For our patients who are in image-centered occupations such as modeling or acting, nasal refinements often focus on small changes that will enhance the overall look and remove subtle cues about the nose that preoccupy or distract the eye. This successful model had a look that really worked for her but had always felt that her tip and nostrils were too wide, flared, and slightly droopy. Creation of a slightly narrower and more structured tip draws unwanted attention away from her nose and, instead, enhances her overall look.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 22: This young woman was happy with her profile but wanted to reduce nasal width, tip boxiness, and nostril flare on front and three-quarter views. The combination of narrowing her bridge, tip refinement, and nostril reduction helped bring her nose into balance. At the same time, fat transfer to the under eye hollows did a fantastic job of brightening her eyes and giving her a more youthful look.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 23: Very pretty features can be thrown off by a nose that is even slightly crooked or disproportionate. This woman provides a beautiful example of how subtle enhancements such as straightening and correction of tip fullness and droop can produce a stunning, transformative result.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 24: This patient had a broken nose with an S-shaped curvature and rounded, slightly droopy tip. She is still a little swollen in these photos, but you can already see significant straightening along with resolution of her nasal hump. Improvement in tip refinement and position helps to round out the overall result.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 25: This patient had what is called a tension nose wherein a convexity on the bridge pushes the tip forward and down. Notice how this also puts tension on the upper lip and appears to tether it from inside. a combination of straightening, improving breathing, removing the hump, and setting the tip appropriately also helps to relax the upper lip and complete the look.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 26: Narrowing a wide tip can really soften the face. The challenge in Ethnic rhinoplasty is in making a nose smaller while still maintaining good structure and support so that definition is enhanced. In these 15-month photos, you can now see how tip narrowing along with reduction of the bridge convexity has created a very pretty, feminine nose that enhances her beauty.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 27: This is a great example of a reduction rhinoplasty to correct an over-projected nose. Her nose looks balanced and refined but still completely ethnically appropriate and natural.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 28: This beautiful, young lady is a great example of a truly transformative result. Postoperatively, her nose is more refined; the bump and droopy, slightly over projected tip have been transformed to a balanced fantastic result and very confident young lady.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 29: Major concerns for this patient were widening of the tip with a marked lack of projection which made his nose feel flat and washed out. Nostril thickness and rounding was also something he wanted addressed. In this case, irradiated donor rib cartilage was used to project and support the tip along with alar base reduction removing a significant amount of nostril flare to create a natural tip and nostril contour that is ethnically appropriate. Fat transfer to the cheeks helps to balance out his flat mid-face to strengthen the cheek contour which can be seen nicely on the profile view.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 30: The goal here was to enhance overall facial proportions by improving the relationship between the nose and chin. Narrowing of the nose and squaring of the chin on front view combined with hump reduction and projection of the chin on profile view all helps to create a more balanced facial aesthetic while strengthening masculine features.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 31: This patient had some typical concerns of feeling washed out from the front with flattening and spreading of her tip. She was very happy with the narrowing and definition achieved for her bridge and tip along with nostril reduction. In addition, chin augmentation increased chin projection to improve the balance of her lower face and jawline.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 32: A boxy, bulbous tip, nasal hump, and excessive length can allow the nose to overtake this patient’s otherwise feminine features. Correction of these concerns creates a truly dramatic change while still looking completely natural for her.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 33: For this young woman, the nose felt boxy and unrefined in comparison to her more defined facial features. Goals of rhinoplasty included lifting and definition of the tip along with subtle hump reduction to create a more sleek and streamlined nasal contour. Achievement of these goals creates a nose that harmonizes rather than dominating other features.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 34: Hispanic Rhinoplasty in this patient meant removal of a high dorsal bump on profile and correction of a droopy-appearing tip. On front view, there is correction of a left nasal bone fracture and refinement of the nasal tip. All of this was done while still maintaining her unique individuality and while bearing in mind the various challenges Rhinoplasty in Latino patients present- thicker skin and softer cartilage.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 35: This young lady presented having fractured her nose as a young child. Her surgery resulted not only in significantly improved breathing, but a correction in the twist of her nose as well as refinement of the tip and profile line.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 36: This patient wanted maximal tip definition and refinement along with lifting of her droopy tip, reduction of a nasal hump, and correction of significant tip asymmetry. She is ecstatic with her result.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 37: Achieving a beautiful, natural change in an already beautiful woman is one of the great challenges we love in rhinoplasty. In front view you see a beautifully defined, natural change that simply looks great. Then on profile and 3/4 views, you see an elegant change where the tip is deprojected (made smaller) but retains a beautiful, natural aesthetic- this is finesse rhinoplasty.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 38: This beautiful young lady is an early 6 month example of a finesse rhinoplasty. On front view you can see the bridge is narrower and the sense of hang is improved. On profile, the tip looks undone, natural and less projected with correction of the slight hanging columella. The result is a beautiful, natural look that corrects the issues but leaves her looking totally natural and undone.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 39: The facial plastic surgeons at PROFILES Beverly Hills tailor every Rhinoplasty to achieve just what you are looking for. Sometimes, the most subtle of changes take just as much effort as the most dramatic ones. This pretty model didn’t want to drastically change her look. Her Los Angeles Finesse Rhinoplasty gave her the refinement she wanted, especially on her front and three-quarter views. Along with fat transfer to the lower eye area, her overall look was softened to make her that much more camera ready.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 40: Excessive nasal width can cause the nose to dominate other fine, delicate facial features. In Ethnic Rhinoplasty, the key to obtaining a more refined nose is to create a nasal framework upon which the thick skin will wrap around. This pretty young Persian woman wanted to reduce her nasal width, the fullness in her tip, and the sense that her tip was downturned. These six month photos show significant improvements in achieving these goals and her nose will only get better yet.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 41: For this young man, projection and over-rotation of his nose had always made him feel that his nose was too short and upturned. Rhinoplasty focused on deprojecting and lengthening his nose to reduce nostril show and give him a more natural nasal harmony.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 42: Crooked noses can be one of the hardest things to correct in Rhinoplasty, especially if there has been significant trauma involved. The entire nose must be reconstructed in order to make the desired improvements. It took a lot of work to straighten and improve breathing in this patient’s nose. At the same time, his Beverly Hills Rhinoplasty was designed to make his nose a little smaller, more refined, and less down-turned while still looking natural. Even the scar on his tip was improved as part of his surgery.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 43: Rhinoplasty in this pretty professional woman was all about removing the bump she had hated for years and correcting the tip droop and asymmetry that had worsened with age. Relatively small changes here have created a real sense of refinement while maintaining her long, elegant profile. A lower face and neck lift along with facial fat transfer helped to round out the enhancements in her already beautiful appearance.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 44: One of the hardest things to accomplish in a nose job is giving a person a smaller version of the same nose. In Los Angeles, where small differences can mean everything, doing Finesse Rhinoplasty is common. Even at 6 months, you can see that, on profile, this patient’s tip is less projected but he still has a strong masculine profile. On base view, you will also notice the deprojection and the fact that alar base reduction can be done with no visible scars and maintenance of the natural nostril curve.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 45: Rhinoplasty in this young woman was about removing the nose as a focal point and, instead, calling attention to her beautiful eyes and smile. By reducing overall nasal width and setting back her falling tip, she looks both younger and softer in these 3-month photos while retaining an elegant profile that is not too small for her face.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 46: A hump and hanging tip cause the nose to dominate otherwise beautiful features in this young woman. In this case, a tip lift, hump reduction, and tip refinement preserves some of her rounded appearance, very naturally enhancing her pretty eyes. On the bottom view, we see a good example of how open rhinoplasty incisions should heal virtually undetectably when done with care.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 47: This patient’s primary surgery left her with valve collapse, nostril notching, persistent tip rounding and hanging columella. Secondary surgery involved correction of these issues with repositioning and reconstruction of the tip cartilages to improve tip contour. Although she is still a little swollen in the after photos, she is already happy with her new nose.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 48: This is a good example of finesse rhinoplasty where subtle changes can make for a very nice and meaningful difference. This young woman liked the overall shape of her nose but wanted it slightly smaller in all dimensions to match her pretty, petite features. We were able to achieve these goals by always relying on techniques that produce stable and precise results. Subtle fat transfer to the under eye area further helped to reduce under eye circles and soften her overall look.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 49: This young woman felt that her nose dominated her face. Overall narrowing of the nose including nostril reduction helped to enhance facial harmony. Reprojection and sharpening of the tip also helped to create a more defined nasal appearance.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 50: A hump and a rounded tip can cause a nose to feel long and out of proportion with other features, especially in the setting of a softer chin. It is important in cases of thicker skin such as this to create a more structured nasal contour so that the desired refinement can be achieved as in this case.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 51: This man was generally happy with his look but felt his crooked nose and tip droop were causing him to look older. Again, one can see here how subtle changes such as straightening the bridge along with restoration of a more symmetric and well-supported tip can not only harmonize appearance but even appear to turn back the clock.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 52: Crookedness and breathing issues were the main concerns for this man. At the same time, tip deprojection and hump reduction succeeded in addressing his aesthetic goals by softening the slightly protrusive appearance of his nose.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 53: This is a case of a typical broken nose with the associated curvature and nasal hump. Corrective surgery focused on hump reduction, straightening, and some tip refinement to restore her nose to its pre-injury appearance. A chin implant also helped to balance her facial proportions.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 54: This example shows how deprojection, straightening, correction of a hanging columella, and narrowing of the nose can de-emphasize its prominence and create a beautiful harmony with other pretty features for this patient. We love how the new look really brightens her eyes.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 55: This young woman’s nose felt just a little too big for her face, especially on profile view where her nose was a little high all the way through. Deprojection and bridge reduction brought her profile into balance while at the same time increasing refinement on front view to highlight her beautiful eyes.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 56: This handsome gentleman presented with a droopy tip and bump which along with his thick skin dominated his face. Postoperatively, he has a strong profile along with much improved tip definition and refinement.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 57: This beautiful lady is a great example of rhinoplasty achieving a more youthful overall look. You’ll notice on front view her tip is more refined and her nostrils have been reduced, and on profile her nose is subtly rotated resulting in a very youthful change.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 58: This is a good example of a finesse rhinoplasty which involved a small hump reduction and slight lifting, straightening, and correction of tip asymmetries. You can see that even subtle changes can take away the feeling of length and a droopy tip to enhance her overall appearance.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 59: This 22 year old young woman disliked the width and thickness of her nose. She was otherwise happy with her profile but wanted to reduce the sense of rounding and improve the hanging columella. At one year, she has a beautifully natural nose that compliments and softens her look.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 60: Facial aging can be hard on someone who is naturally thin by creating a more severe and skeletonized appearance as facial fat is lost. A combined approach was used to create a beautiful transformation, including a trichophytic brow lift, lower lid tightening, and facelift along with a conservative rhinoplasty to straighten and balance her nose. Notice how the eyes are opened up and facial hollows are smoothened without the surprised look that can accompany over-aggressive lifts. You’ll also see that incisions are hidden within the hairline and natural skin creases making them almost invisible.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 61: The concerns in this case were crookedness and a significant breathing issue due to a severely deviated septum. She also felt her nose was over-projected and a little too big for her face. Here we can see resolution of her crooked septum on base view. The tip has been defined and de-projected and the bump brought down to create a naturally pretty and more balanced contour.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 62: A boxy and droopy tip can create a sense of facial imbalance for a woman like this who has naturally thinner, more slight facial features. Support and narrowing of the tip along with hump reduction helped to create a smooth contour that is in much better proportion with her other facial features.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 63: This young woman was unhappy with her bump and was also having breathing concerns from a deviated septum. Septorhinoplasty was able to correct her breathing issues and create the softer, more feminine profile that she preferred.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 64: This woman had thought about having rhinoplasty for a long time. She was unhappy with her crooked nose and bulky tip that drew attention away from her other features. Septorhinoplasty achieved narrowing and definition while also straightening her crooked bridge and tip as seen well on the base view.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 65: Septorhinoplasty here was focused on straightening and correcting a deviated septum, increasing length and tip definition along with removal of a dorsal convexity. At the same time, neck liposuction helped to further restore a more streamlined and youthful appearance.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 66: This patient has slight facial features and always felt that her nose felt too big for her face. Rhinoplasty focused on deprojection, reducing length, hump reduction, tucking the columella, and narrowing the tip to create a more harmonious nasal contour. She’s very happy that her nose now matches her face perfectly.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 67: The main concerns for this patient were the dorsal bump, asymmetry, and downturned appearance to the tip. In this case, fixing tip asymmetry, softening the bump, and changing the tip contour helped to remove the nose as a point of distraction.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 68: This was essentially a functional rhinoplasty to straighten his crooked nose and fix breathing issues as can be seen on the base view. At the same time, he wanted to soften his look by removing the convexity of his bridge line and somewhat defining the tip.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 69: This patient was bothered by his prominent ears and a sense of width to his nose that made it feel bulky and unrefined in his view. While still preserving his ethnic identity, he was able to achieve a meaningful improvement in nasal balance. Bringing his ears back into the vertical plane helped to make them less noticeable and remove them as a source of focus for him.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 70: With a small chin, this young woman felt that her nose was taking over her face, bringing undue attention to her mid-face and making her look more cheek-y. A combination of rhinoplasty and a chin implant with neck liposuction helped to restore a beautiful balance to her features. She couldn’t be happier with the result.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 71: Tip and nostril width and overall nasal projection made the nose feel dominant for this young woman. Rhinoplasty involved making her whole nose smaller by deprojecting, refining the tip, and removing some nostril flare. At the same time, a nasal fracture and breathing concerns were addressed. Neck Liposuction also helped to define and re-balance her jawline to create the improved facial proportions that she desired.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 72: This patient had sustained a nasal fracture that caused a significant deviation of her nose. The fracture was corrected along with a septoplasty to improve breathing. Loss of tip support after the injury made her hump look more prominent and her tip felt more droopy. The bump was smoothened and her tip angulation restored to create the softer, more feminine profile she wanted. At the same time, fat transfer to the cheek and under eye area and subtle neck liposuction substantially improved the flat cheek and mid-face contour that previously made her feel hollowed and tired looking without makeup.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 73: Removal of the bump with improvement in nasal tip refinement and drooping were the main goals for this patient. Importantly, she wanted to preserve her overall look with an emphasis on softness and a more feminine contour.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 74: This patient wanted to achieve a much smaller nose with significant refinement and correction of her bulbous and droopy tip. She’s very happy that her new nose is now much more harmonious with her features.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 75: Getting a severely crooked nose as close to perfectly straight as possible is one of the hardest things to accomplish in rhinoplasty. Our extensive experience at Profiles with traumatic noses has us well positioned to treat these difficult cases and achieve a nasal contour that is no longer a focal point but now blends with the rest of her features.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 76: This patient wanted to achieve maximal tip refinement and hump reduction. She preferred a slightly sloped bridge line with a slight supra-tip break. We are careful in such cases to create a softer profile without looking excessively scooped or washed out.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 77: This patient was very bothered by her nasal hump and crooked nose which were softened dramatically. But, perhaps an even more spectacular improvement was achieved with liposuction alone that has completely transformed her jawline contour.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 78: A combination approach was used here to create a really meaningful but completely natural transformation. Otoplasty made prominent ears all but disappear from the field of view and no longer distract or draw attention. At the same time, rhinoplasty, chin augmentation, and neck liposuction accomplished were able to remove a nasal hump and overprojection while improving chin and neck laxity to achieve a nice overall balance.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 79: Rhinoplasty in this patient was undertaken to narrow her nose, including correction of a rounded bifid tip and nostril flare. This was able to achieve improved facial harmony while preserving her ethnic identity.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 80: This patient wanted to maintain her projection but soften the nasal contour by achieving straightening, some tip refinement, and reducing some of her dorsal height and curvature.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 81: A badly crooked nose and septum were the main motivations for undergoing septorhinoplasty for this patient. At the same time, she had always been uncomfortable with her nasal shape and was hoping for improvements in that area as well. Open septorhinoplasty was able to accomplish all of her aesthetic and functional goals.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 82: This patient really disliked the width and bulkiness of his nose and wanted a much more streamlined contour. He is really happy with the level of definition and refinement that he was able to achieve.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 83: This patient wanted to achieve significant definition and refinement of her bulbous tip. At the same time, a slight dorsal convexity was reduced and her mid-vault narrowing was supported with improvement of her nasal breathing.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 84: A severely broken nose not only impacted her breathing but made this patient self-conscious about her nasal appearance. The focus here was on straightening, removing the traumatic bump, and re-supporting a droopy tip. Now, her nose goes unnoticed and she couldn’t be happier.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 85: This young woman really disliked her nasal hump and droopy tip. She preferred a much softer aesthetic with a slight dorsal break that we were able to accomplish with rhinoplasty. That combined with a medium chin implant really helped to soften her look.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 86: Aside from crookedness and difficulty breathing, this patient felt her nose was too large and too projected for her face, making her look more harsh than she wanted. Septorhinoplasty involved straightening, hump removal and deprojection to significantly soften her look. She’s thrilled with the result.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 87: This young woman had broken her nose and was noticeably crooked with poor nasal breathing. In addition, she disliked her nasal hump and length. She preferred an aesthetic with a slight supra tip break to soften her profile. Beyond straightening and improving her breathing, you can see how we were able to remove the nasal hump and lift her tip to transform her look while still looking completely natural.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 88: The goals of this septorhinoplasty were to straighten her crooked nose and improve breathing. She also hated how her nasal hump and length brought attention to her irregular profile. In our opinion, the mark of a good rhinoplasty is that the nose should become a background feature, and she’s very happy to have achieved that goal with her Profiles rhinoplasty.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 89: This patient had broken her nose with consequent severe loss of tip support, tip rounding, crookedness, and a traumatic bump. In this case, a lateral crural overlay technique was used to reduce and lift the tip along with a septal extension to help with support and straightening which has improved tremendously as seen on the base view. Even though she’s still swollen in these early photos, she already has a great result and it’s only going to get better.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 90: This young woman has slight features and felt her nose was too dominant for her face. Our surgery comprised straightening and correction of breathing as well as reduction of the dorsal hump and minor tip setback. Her nose now blends seamlessly with her features and really highlights her eyes.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 91: In addition to a crooked nose and breathing problems, this patient felt her nose was overprotected and disliked her hanging columella. She liked the look of a softer nasal contour with a slight supra tip break, and she’s very happy with how her rhinoplasty turned out as it now just makes sense for her face.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 92: This procedure was all about correction of a droopy twisted tip. This patient was especially bothered by the tip’s tendency to drop and spread when she smiled, with a twist that made one nostril look higher than the other. After surgery, her nose is about as straight and symmetric as can be and the straighter bridge line makes her look younger.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 93: Sometimes rhinoplasty can make a transformational change. In this case, reducing a hump along with straightening, defining, and lifting the tip have given this patient a completely different look and removed her nose as a point of distraction. Look how much brighter her eyes look! She is thrilled with the result.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 94: This patient was seeing the early signs of facial aging including loss of skin tone and elasticity, early jowling, and heaviness under the chin. A lower facelift along with fat transfer to the under eye and cheek area substantially improved the contour and even apparent texture of her skin, making her look noticeably younger. In addition, the overall effect was completed with a rhinoplasty focused on reducing the width, rounding, and thickness of her tip and nostrils which is a challenge in the setting of thick skin.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 95: Fat transfer was used here to improve under eye depth and symmetry, and to give more structure to the cheek mound to create a better highlight over the cheek bones. In addition, finesse rhinoplasty involving primarily the tip helped to reduce tip boxiness and asymmetry to give a more streamlined appearance.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 96: To see how well our results last, see these photos of our patient 8 years after rhinoplasty and facial fat transfer! Her rhinoplasty involved softening her look and removing the convexity on the bridge that made her tip look downturned. Fat transfer under the eyes has stood the test of time and really helped to reduce her under eye hollows to noticeably brighten her appearance.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 97: Having a rhinoplasty along with a facelift can be absolutely transformative. By addressing aging changes in the lower face and nose, such as tip droop and tip/nostril widening, a truly beautiful natural rejuvenation can be accomplished.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 98: In this Ethnic Rhinoplasty, the goals were to straighten his broken nose and improve breathing. Removing his dorsal hump and correcting his droopy, asymmetric tip creates a nose that looks fantastic and fits perfectly with his features.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 99: This patient felt her hump and strong nasal bridge dominated her face. She wanted a softer, more feminine profile and that is exactly what she got! She couldn’t be happier.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 100: These 6-month results show what a beautiful change can be made by softening a nose that feels too wide, high, and boxy. Our patient is thrilled and so are we.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 101: Sometimes, even someone who’s never had rhinoplasty can have tip deformities and collapse with severe breathing problems. Fixing these issues and deprojecting the tip to make the whole nose smaller requires some of the more advanced techniques in rhinoplasty, and is best done by experienced surgeons. Adding in a chin implant made a tremendous difference in this case and helped to create a beautifully balanced contour.

    *Results May Vary




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    Case 102: This is a beautiful 6 month result for our patient who was looking to soften her nose. Removing the nasal hump and lifting and supporting the tip created a beautiful, feminine nose that looks completely natural.

    *Results May Vary

  • Plastic nose: patient reviews