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Stomach ache empty stomach: Peptic ulcer – Symptoms and causes

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How To Prevent Abdominal & Stomach Pain

Stomach pain can range from a dull ache to a sharp twinge. It can make you feel nauseated, bloated, or full. You might have gas or diarrhea, or you might be constipated. It can bother you for a short while or for hours.

With so many kinds of belly pain, it’s no surprise that different things can cause it. Some are out of your control, like if you have appendicitis. But you can change a few habits to make other kinds less likely to happen.

Slow Down

If you tend to take big bites and eat without chewing well, you can swallow air, which adds gas to your stomach and can lead to stomach pain. Take time to chew slowly and swallow without rushing. This also gives your brain time to realize you’re full before you eat too much.

Change How Often You Eat

Some people get belly pain between meals, when there’s no buffer for the acid in your stomach. If this happens, eat smaller meals or snacks spaced out through the day so your stomach isn’t empty for long periods.

The opposite also can cause stomach pain. If you eat so much that you feel stuffed, your stomach is likely to hurt.

Watch What You Eat

Fatty, fried, or spicy foods could be behind your stomach woes. They can wreak havoc on your gut as your body digests them. They also can slow down the process and make you more likely to get constipated.

If you eat more nutritious foods, with a focus on veggies and fiber, you’ll digest things at a healthy speed, and your stomach will thank you.

Follow Your Hunches

If you notice your stomach always cramps up after you drink a glass of milk or eat a certain thing, see your doctor. You might have a problem with dairy products (called lactose intolerance) or another kind of food. If your doctor finds an issue in your diet, they can help you find ways to stay away from it or eat less of it.

It’s a good idea to work with your doctor on this instead of trying to figure it out on your own. You could get on the wrong track and miss out on nutrients from some foods without really needing to.

Drink More Water, Less Soda

Water helps keep things moving in your gut so you stay regular. Pay attention to your body when you’re thirsty, and have a glass of water, not soda. Carbonation can cause stomach pain because the fizz can lead to gas.

Alcoholic and caffeinated beverages can cause trouble for some people, too, so steer clear of them if they bother your stomach.

Wash Your Hands

A common cause of stomach pain is gastroenteritis, sometimes called a stomach bug or a stomach virus. It can cause diarrhea, nausea, fever, or a headache, too.

The best way to prevent the spread of germs is to wash your hands often, especially before you eat, after you go to the bathroom, and when you’ve been in public places.

Manage Stress

Some people feel their hearts race or their palms sweat when they’re stressed or anxious. And plenty of people have stomach pain. They may feel their stomachs churn or seem to tie up in knots.

The obvious answer is to stay out of stressful situations when you can. Since that’s not always possible, you can ease stress with things like exercise, meditation, hobbies, or hanging out with friends. If those don’t work, it might help to talk with your doctor or a therapist about ways to manage it.

Consider Over-the-Counter Meds

Over-the-counter medications, sometimes called OTCs, can help you manage belly symptoms.

Two main types of OTC medications help with nausea and vomiting:

  • Bismuth subsalicylate helps protect your stomach lining and is used to treat ulcers, an upset stomach, and diarrhea. It’s the active drug in brand-name medications like Kaopectate and Pepto-Bismol.
  • Brand-name medications such as Dramamine and Bonine use active ingredients like diphenhydramine, meclizine, cyclizine, and dimenhydrinate to block messages to your brain related to nausea and vomiting.

For diarrhea, besides bismuth subsalicylate, loperamide (Imodium, Diamode) also helps, by slowing down fluid moving in your gut.

Several types of laxatives can help you go to the bathroom if you haven’t gone for 3 days or so. Talk to your doctor about which one is best for you:

  • Bulk-forming laxatives use active ingredients like polycarbophil, psyllium, or methylcellulose to draw water into your poop so that it’s easier to pass. Drink plenty of water with these.
  • Osmotic laxatives draw fluid into the bowel from the nearby tissue with active ingredients like polyethylene glycol or magnesium.
  • Lubricant laxatives use mineral oil or glycerin to lubricate your stool and make it easier to pass. Some of these go directly into your rear end (suppositories).
  • Stimulant laxatives cause your bowels to contract to help squeeze stool out of your body. But they are hard on your body, so it’s best not to use them for more than a couple of days.

Check with your doctor if you plan to use a laxative for more than a week or if you already have fever, nausea, or vomiting.

For heartburn — a burning feeling in your throat or stomach — you can try:

  • Antacids, which neutralize stomach acid with ingredients like magnesium, baking soda, or calcium carbonate
  • Alginic acids, which help your body form a protective barrier over inflamed areas of your gut
  • h3 blockers, which help slow your body’s production of stomach acid with drugs like cimetidine (Tagamet) and famotidine (Pepcid). One type, called proton pump inhibitors, uses drugs like lansoprazole (Prevacid) and omeprazole (Prilosec). It can work for up to 24 hours.

When to Call the Doctor

Seek medical help as soon as possible if your belly pain is serious, you’re pregnant, or you also have:

  • Several days of nausea or not being able to keep food down
  • Breathing problems
  • Blood in your poop or vomit
  • Tenderness in the belly
  • A recent belly injury
  • Several days of pain

These symptoms may suggest an infection, bleeding, or inflammation that requires medical help right away.

Some other things that can cause stomach pain include:

 

What Stomach Cramps Can Say About Your Health, According To Science

Your run of the mill stomach ache probably isn’t too much cause for concern. You ate something that didn’t agree with you, and that’s that. But if you have stomach cramps out of the blue and can’t figure out what the deal is, your stomach cramps can actually say a lot about your health. From periods, to food allergies, to potential irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), your stomach gurgles and grumbles can be so much more than just the result of a tuna sandwich that’s gone off.

You may need to pay attention to your symptoms closely on your own; a meta-analysis of 14 studies in 2014 found that in one-third of cases, people who went to their GPs with abdominal pain weren’t given a diagnosis because the doctor wasn’t sure of the cause. When do you get your cramps? Do you eat beforehand, and what’s in those meals? Are they worse at a particular time of day, or at one point in the month? How severe is the pain? Serious stomach cramps and pain may indicate a medical emergency, so if you’re in a lot of agony and your stomach won’t stop contracting, get to the GP or the emergency room ASAP. Otherwise, here’s what your stomach cramps may be trying to tell you about your health.

1

You’re Hungry

Nusara/Shutterstock

Sometimes stomach cramps are just signals that you need some food. “Hunger pangs, or hunger pains, are caused by strong contractions of the stomach when it’s empty,” explains Healthline. However, just because your stomach is contracting when it’s empty doesn’t mean you actually need to eat; it may just be your stomach reacting to a change in your eating schedule. We know from research in 2013 that the stomach has its own circadian clock which keeps track of eating patterns across the 24 hours of the day, and if you don’t eat at the usual time — or have a disrupted eating pattern because of jet lag — your stomach is going to let you know about it.

2

Your Period Is Coming

Andrew Zaeh for Bustle

Stomach cramps can be related to menstrual cramping. Obstetrician Nancy Cossler told Women’s Health, “Hormones cause contractions of the uterine muscle, which causes cramping. It’s completely normal if your stomach cramps, causing an upset stomach or diarrhea.” Uterine contractions during your menstrual period are caused by prostaglandins, and they can be intense — but they don’t mean there’s anything problematic to worry about.

3

You Have A Food Allergy

ESB Professional/Shutterstock

Cramping after eating particular meals can mean you have an allergy or intolerance to something you ate. Cramps are one of the most common symptoms of a food allergy, along with vomiting and nausea; if they show up after you eat dairy, gluten, shellfish, wheat, or nuts, according to Healthline, you can talk to an allergist about the best course of action.

4

You’re Taking Too Many Vitamins

Mangostar/Shutterstock

This is an unusual one, but it’s a possibility. If you take too many supplements based around vitamin C or zinc without proper supervision by doctors, you may be causing yourself some stomach upsets. “Too much vitamin C or zinc could cause nausea, diarrhea, and stomach cramps,” according to WebMD.

5

You Have Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Rawpixel/Shutterstock

6

You Have Trapped Gas Or Constipation

Ashley Batz/Bustle

If your cramps don’t seem to have anything to do with your pattern of eating, there’s another possibility. “Stomach cramps with bloating are often caused by trapped wind. This is a very common problem that can be embarrassing but is easily dealt with,” says the National Health Service. Massage your stomach to see if that might help, or see a doctor if you can’t seem to pass the obstruction without help.

7

You Have Gallbladder Issues

Stockbakery/Shutterstock

Pain after eating a meal with a high fat content can indicate that your gallbladder is having problems digesting this kind of food, according to gastroenterologist Hardeep Singh. “Women are especially prone to gallbladder disease,” he noted in an article for St. Joseph’s Health in 2016. If you experience what feels like serious stomach cramping after a meal, your gallbladder may have gallstones — hardened pieces of digestive liquid — blocking its ducts. The “attack” comes when the gallbladder tries to secrete bile through its ducts after you eat, and can’t get any through.

A gallbladder attack is extremely painful, and it’s recommended that you get help as soon as you can if you experience pain in your upper right abdomen.

8

You Have Stomach Flu

Lolostock/Shutterstock

Cramps that come on suddenly and are accompanied by diarrhea, nausea or vomiting indicate that you may have gastroenteritis, or the stomach flu. This, the National Health Service explains, is “a viral or bacterial infection of the stomach and bowel, which should get better without treatment after a few days.” The main risk of gastroenteritis is dehydration and loss of nutrition, as you’ll likely not be able to keep food or liquids in your system while it runs its course. The symptoms of gastroenteritis are similar to those of food poisoning, and both will pass off without much treatment over several days.

9

Cramps can be just a minor inconvenience, but they could be a sign of something bigger. If you’re cramping on the regular, pay attention and talk to your doctor; your stomach could need a bit of help.

Abdominal Pain and Cancer – Managing Side Effects


Some types of abdominal problems accompany cancer and can include:
abdominal pain,
abdominal cramping, flatulence
(gas)


What is abdominal pain and abdominal cramping? What is their relationship
to cancer and chemotherapy treatments?


The abdomen is the part of the body located between the chest and the pelvis.
Most people refer to it loosely at the stomach (although the stomach is an organ
within the abdomen). Pain is a personal experience of discomfort. Abdominal
pain can be associated with a variety of conditions both within and outside or the
abdomen. Abdominal or lower abdominal pain can be
a dull ache, cramping, or sharp pain. Dull aches and cramping are not uncommonly
associated with some chemotherapy drugs. Sharp pain that does not resolve
in a few minutes may be an indicator of a more serious problem.

Cancer treatment-induced abdominal pain, cramping and flatulence (gas):

  • Chemotherapy can cause both increased (rapid) and decreased (slow) motility of the
    intestines. In other words, the normal wave-like action that moves stool through
    the bowel may be faster or slower than usual.
  • Rapid motility may cause stool to travel faster and be less formed. Rapid
    motility can be associated with cramping and/or diarrhea.
  • Slow motility may cause stool to travel slower, becoming harder and dryer and more
    difficult to pass. It may contribute to constipation. Pain may be achy
    or cramp-like and may be associated with increased flatulence (gas).
  • Chemotherapy may also alter the normal bacterial flora that is present in the intestines.
    This can affect digestion and cause abdominal pain, cramping or flatulence
    (gas).
  • Steroids and other immunosuppressive medications may increase the probability of
    ulcers or other potentially serious abdominal complications such as perforation.
  • A history of or the development of lactose intolerance may contribute to worsening
    abdominal pain, cramping or flatulence (gas).
  • Cramping is a caused by a spasm (or contraction) of the bowel. It may be associated
    with the urge to move your bowels. It is not usually constant but comes more
    in “waves”. It may be accompanied by either diarrhea, constipation or flatulence
    (gas).

Things you can do to manage abdominal pain or cramping:

  • In order for your health care provider to assist you in managing your pain, it is
    helpful for you to be able to adequately describe your pain. One way to do
    this is by answering the following questions.
  • You may choose to keep a diary so that you can track your pain over time:
    • Onset – when did the pain start? What was I doing when I had pain?
    • Quality – what does the pain feel like? Is it knifelike and stabbing,
      or dull and constant?
    • Location – Where is the pain? Can I point to it with my finger,
      or is it spread all over?
    • Intensity – How bad is your abdominal
      pain all the time? How bad is it with certain activities that cause you to feel
      pain, on a 1-10 scale, with the number “10” being the worst pain imaginable?
    • Duration – How long did the pain last for? Is it while I was walking
      to the door, or did it continue for a while?
    • Character or aggravating factors – Does the pain come and go whenever
      I perform a certain activity, or is it unpredictable?
    • Relieving factors – What can I do to make the abdominal
      pain go away? Does anything help? What have I used in the past that have worked,
      and does this work now?
    • How is your mood? Are you depressed or anxious? Does this make
      the pain worse?
  • Sometimes lying down for a while will help relieve abdominal discomfort.
  • Drink plenty of fluids (2-3 quarts every 24 hours), unless you have been told to
    restrict your fluids.
  • Take your medication with food unless you are specifically to take it on an empty
    stomach.
  • Avoid aspirin or products containing aspirin and NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory
    drugs, unless your doctor specifically prescribes them.
  • Avoid narcotic pain medications if they are not needed. Do not use for abdominal
    pain, unless recommended by your physician (the cause of the pain should be determined
    first).
  • Avoid drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes; both can be irritating to your stomach.
  • If you experience cramping, you may try to relax and breathe
    deeply to assist in relief.
  • Eat bland foods in small amounts: similar to managing nausea and/or diarrhea.

Nausea/Vomiting

Foods to avoid during cancer treatments, to avoid abdominal pain:

  • Hot, spicy foods (i.e. hot pepper, curry, Cajun spice mix).
  • Fatty, greasy or fried foods.
  • Very sweet, sugary foods.
  • Large meals.
  • Foods with strong smells (foods that are warm tend to smell stronger).
  • Eating or drinking quickly.
  • Drinking beverages with meals.
  • Lying down after a meal.


Tips to try:

  • Small meals throughout the day.
  • Refrigerated or room temperature entrees.
  • Rinse mouth with lemon water after eating.
  • Suck on ice cubes, mints, or hard candies.
  • Distractions such as TV, music, or reading may be helpful while eating.

Diarrhea

Foods to avoid:

  • Hot, spicy foods (i.e. hot pepper, curry, Cajun spice mix).
  • High fiber foods (i.e. raw fruit and vegetables, coarse whole grains).
  • Fatty, greasy, or fried foods.
  • Rich desserts.
  • Nuts, seeds, or dried fruit.


Beverages to avoid:

  • Beverages that are very hot or cold.
  • Beverages containing caffeine (coffee, strong tea, soda, and possibly chocolate).
  • Use caution with milk products.


Tips to try to minimize or avoid cancer treatment-based abdominal
pain:

  • Low total fiber or good soluble fiber source (i. e. rice, bananas, white bread, oatmeal,
    mashed potatoes, applesauce, skinless/boneless chicken or turkey).
  • Increase the amount of sodium (salt) and potassium in your diet.
  • Drink plenty of fluids.


In some cases, managing your abdominal pain may require some “trial and error” in
terms of identifying things that may make it better or worse.


Drugs or recommendations that your health care provider may prescribe:

  • Although there are many over-the-counter remedies for abdominal pain, they are usually
    associated with other stomach problems as well. You should discuss taking
    any medications with your health care provider. Some medications include: Maalox®, Mylanta®, Pepto-Bismol®, and TUMS®.
  • If you are lactose intolerant, Lactaid® may help.
  • See also; Managing Heartburn, Managing Nausea, Managing Diarrhea or Managing Constipation,
    if applicable.

When to call your health care provider:


Seek emergency help and call your doctor immediately
if you develop sudden severe abdominal pain that does not resolve in a few minutes,
especially if accompanied by any of the following:

  • Sudden abdominal swelling.
  • Feeling faint, weak and dizzy.
  • Sweating
  • Fever of 100.5 or higher.
  • Sudden vomiting or vomiting blood.
  • Loss of consciousness.
  • A stiff board-like abdomen


Contact your health care provider within 24 hours if you experience:

  • Constant abdominal pain that does not go away with prescribed methods.
  • Cramping that does not go away after trying options listed above.
  • Nausea (interferes with ability to eat and unrelieved with prescribed medication).
  • Vomiting (vomiting more than 4-5 times in a 24 hour period).
  • Diarrhea (4-6 episodes in a 24-hour period).
  • Black or tarry stools, or blood in your stools.
  • If you have not had a bowel movement in three days despite following the recommendations
    of your doctor or health care professional.
  • If your stomach looks swollen and/or feels hard to the touch.


What is flatulence and how is it affected by cancer treatment?


Flatulence, or gas, is actually a normal bodily function and, in fact, it is quite
healthy. Socially, flatulence is fairly unacceptable but the fact remains…we
all have “gas.” Flatulence is the by-product of digestion, although when
cancer treatment causes severe flatulence and/or lower abdominal pain, measures
can be taken to minimize the treatment’s effects. All food that
enters the body is digested (broken down) into small parts (nutrients) to be absorbed
into the bloodstream through the bowel wall and transported to other parts of the
body.


Protein must be broken into amino acids, fats must be broken into fatty acids and
carbohydrates must be broken down into glucose-like molecules. Nutrients that
are not used are stored as fats or glycogen.


Sometimes, food is not completely broken down in the stomach or small intestine.
There are a variety of reasons why food does not break down in the stomach or small
intestine including lactose intolerance (the body lacks the enzyme lactase to break
down lactose), for example. Once the food arrives in the large intestine, there
are hundreds of bacteria (normal flora) that are available to help break down break
down the undigested food. When this happens, a variety of gasses are released
(much like the carbon dioxide released by yeast when making bread rise). These
bacteria release gases like methane, hydrogen, and hydrogen sulfide. Hydrogen
sulfide is the gas that causes odor.


Certain foods are more difficult to digest than other foods. Carbohydrates
are the most flatulence-producing foods. Some of these include beans, bran,
potatoes, fruits, vegetables (such as cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower, onions,
garlic) and even milk.


On a lighter note, flatulence, in addition to being known as gas, has also been
referred to as toots, farts, honks, breaking wind and a variety of other home-concocted
names.

Chemotherapy-induced abdominal pain, cramping and flatulence:

  • Chemotherapy can cause both increased (rapid) and decreased (slow) motility of the
    intestines. In other words, the normal wave-like action that moves stool through
    the bowel may be faster or slower than usual.
  • Rapid motility may cause stool to travel faster and be less formed. Rapid
    motility can be associated with cramping and/or diarrhea.
  • Slow motility may cause stool to travel slower, becoming harder and dryer and more
    difficult to pass. It may contribute to constipation and lower abdomen pain.
    Pain may be achy or cramp-like and may be associated with increased flatulence (gas).
  • Chemotherapy may also alter the normal bacterial flora that is present in the intestines.
    This can affect digestion and cause aching, cramping or flatulence (gas).
  • Steroids and other immunosuppressive medications may increase the probability of
    ulcers or other potentially serious abdominal complications such as perforation.
  • A history of or the development of lactose intolerance may contribute to worsening
    abdominal pain, cramping or flatulence (gas).
  • Cramping is a caused by a spasm (or contraction) of the bowel. It may be associated
    with the urge to move your bowels. It is not usually constant but comes more
    in “waves.” It may be accompanied by either diarrhea, constipation or flatulence
    (gas).

Things you can do and cancer treatment-induced abdominal pain:

  • Drink plenty of fluids (2-3 quarts every 24 hours), unless you have been told to
    restrict your fluids.
  • Take your medication with food unless you are specifically to take it on an empty
    stomach.
  • Avoid aspirin or products containing aspirin and NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory
    drugs, unless your doctor specifically prescribes them.
  • Avoid narcotic pain medications if they are not needed. Do not use for abdominal
    pain.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes; both can be irritating to your stomach.
  • If you are experience cramping, you may try to relax and breathe deeply to assist
    in relief.
  • Eat bland foods in small amounts: Similar to managing nausea and/or diarrhea.

Nausea/Vomiting

Foods to avoid:

  • Hot, spicy foods (i.e. hot pepper, curry, Cajun spice mix).
  • Fatty, greasy or fried foods.
  • Very sweet, sugary foods.
  • Large meals.
  • Foods with strong smells (foods that are warm tend to smell stronger).
  • Eating or drinking quickly.
  • Drinking beverages with meals.
  • Lying down after a meal.


Tips for avoiding lower abdominal pain and flatulence while undergoing
cancer treatments:

  • Small meals throughout the day.
  • Refrigerated or room temperature entrees.
  • Rinse mouth with lemon water after eating.
  • Suck on ice cubes, mints, or hard candies.
  • Distractions such as TV, music, or reading may be helpful while eating.

Diarrhea


Foods to avoid:

  • Hot, spicy foods (i.e. hot pepper, curry, Cajun spice mix).
  • High fiber foods (i.e. raw fruit and vegetables, coarse whole grains).
  • Fatty, greasy, or fried foods.
  • Rich desserts.
  • Nuts, seeds, or dried fruit.


Beverages to avoid:

  • Beverages that are very hot or cold.
  • Beverages containing caffeine (coffee, strong tea, soda, and possibly chocolate).
  • Use caution with milk products.


Tips to try:

  • Low total fiber or good soluble fiber source (i.e. rice, bananas, white bread, oatmeal,
    mashed potatoes, applesauce, skinless/boneless chicken or turkey).
  • Increase the amount of sodium (salt) and potassium in your diet.
  • Drink plenty of fluids.


Drugs or recommendations that your health care provider may prescribe
to combat flatulence and abdominal pain during and after cancer treatment:

  • There are over-the-counter remedies for flatulence. Most contain the ingredient
    simethicone. Some products include Gas-X®
    and Beano®. Also, some anti-acids contain
    simethicone. If you are lactose intolerant, Lactaid®
    may help. You should discuss taking any medications with your health care
    provider.


See also: Managing Heartburn, Managing Nausea, Managing Diarrhea
or Managing Constipation, if applicable.

When to call your health care provider:


Contact your health care provider within 24 hours if you experience:

  • Constant abdominal pain that does not go away with prescribed methods.
  • Cramping that does not go away after trying options listed above.
  • Nausea (interferes with ability to eat and unrelieved with prescribed medication).
  • Vomiting (vomiting more than 4-5 times in a 24 hour period).
  • Diarrhea (4-6 episodes in a 24-hour period).
  • Black or tarry stools, or blood in your stools.
  • If you have not had a bowel movement in three days despite following the recommendations
    of your doctor or health care professional.
  • If your stomach looks swollen and/or feels hard to the touch.


Note: We strongly encourage you to talk with your health care professional
about your specific medical condition and treatments. The information contained
in this website is meant to be helpful and educational, but is not a substitute
for medical advice.

UHS Nausea and Vomiting

UHS Nausea and Vomiting

UT University Health Services














Common causes of nausea and vomiting are viral infections (the “stomach flu”), drinking too much alcohol, bacterial infections (including food poisoning), motion sickness, and intolerance to certain foods or medications. Other health conditions – some minor and some serious – can also cause nausea/vomiting. These include inner ear problems, pregnancy, stress, sinus drainage, migraine headaches, and increased pressure on the brain due to head trauma or meningitis.

Signs and Symptoms

  • Feeling like you are going to vomit
  • Vomiting the contents of your stomach
  • Dry heaving (Vomiting with an empty stomach)

Self-Care

  • For motion sickness… take an over-the-counter anti-motion sickness medication.

If you are nauseated but not vomiting:

  • Eat small amounts of dry foods like toast or plain crackers.
  • Sip clear liquids.

If you are vomiting:

  • Stop eating solid food.
  • Every hour for 12 to 24 hours, drink four to eight total ounces of clear, non-caffeinated liquids such as water, sports drinks, broth/bouillion, diluted fruit juice, or flat ginger ale or sodas. Sip only one to two ounces at a time. Avoid acidic drinks like lemonade or orange, grapefruit, and tomato juice.
  • Suck on ice chips to prevent dehydration if nothing else will stay down.
  • For fever, take an over-the-counter pain reliever with acetaminophen only. Other types of pain relievers may irritate your already-upset stomach.
  • If necessary, take an over-the-counter anti-nausea medication.
  • Four to eight hours after the last time you vomited and when you can keep clear liquids down, start eating small amounts of bland foods like crackers, toast, Jell-O, plain rice, noodles, or other easily-digestible, non-irritating foods.
  • If you vomit within one hour of taking a birth control pill, use a back up method of contraception such as condoms until your next period starts, but keep taking your pills on schedule.

Over the Counter Medications for Nausea

  • Brand names listed as examples do not imply better quality over other brands. Generic equivalents may also exist.
  • Use only as directed on the package, unless your healthcare provider instructs you to do otherwise.
  • OTCs may interact with other medications or be potentially harmful if you have certain medical conditions. Talk to your pharmacist about options that are right for you.

Nausea:

examples: Pepto-Bismol®, Emetrol®

Forty Acres Pharmacy

The Forty Acres Pharmacy, located in the SSB 1.110 and operated by the UT College of Pharmacy, sells a wide variety of OTC medications and treatments. Ask our pharmacists to help you choose appropriate medications or products for your symptoms.

Red Flags

CALL THE UHS NURSE ADVICE LINE (512) 475-6877 (NURS) IF YOU EXPERIENCE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING:

  • Nausea or vomiting following a recent discontinuation of long-term steroid use
  • Vomiting within one hour of taking any prescription medication
  • Severe dizziness or a spinning sensation
  • Pain in one or both sides of your back with fever and/or shaking chills
  • Yellow discoloration of your skin or the whites of your eyes
  • Signs of significant dehydration including: dizziness, especially when you stand up; dry mouth; decreased urination and/or dark yellow urine; mild confusion; or weakness
  • Nausea/vomiting lasting more than one week
  • Inability to hold down any fluids for more than 24 hours
  • Fever of 100.5 degrees F (38 degrees C) or more or fever that lasts longer than 72 hours

CALL 911 OR GO DIRECTLY TO AN EMERGENCY ROOM IF YOU EXPERIENCE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING:

  • Signs of a heart attack including: pain, pressure, or tightness in your chest; pain that spreads to your arm, jaw, or neck; or pain that is associated with shortness of breath; irregular heart beat; profuse sweating; and/or significant weakness – especially if you have a personal or family history of heart disease
  • Nausea or vomiting following a recent injury to your head
  • Severe headache and stiff neck with fever and/or shaking chills
  • Vomiting large or repeated amounts of bloody or coffee-ground appearing material
  • Severe difficulty breathing or severe dizziness, weakness or confusion
  • Severe abdominal pain (being doubled over or unable to stand up) or pain associated with a hard abdomen

Diarrhea

Food Allergies and Intolerances

Hydration

UT University Health Services

UT University Health Services










University Health Services is committed to providing high-quality care to patients of all ages, races, ethnicities, physical abilities or attributes, religions, sexual orientations, or gender identities/expression.












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Stomach Ache Remedies: Ginger, Peppermint, and More

  • Stomach ache remedies include ginger, peppermint, and diluted apple cider vinegar.
  • You can also try using a heating pad or a hot water bottle to relax the muscles in your abdomen.
  • Dehydration could also cause a stomach ache, so drinking lots of water may help ease abdominal pain.
  • Visit Insider’s Health Reference library for more advice.

Dull pain, sharp pain, throbbing pain, cramping — stomach problems can evoke it all. Many times, these stomach aches are impossible to ignore and can really throw a wrench in your day if you don’t do something to treat them. 

However, certain remedies are more effective than others. For example, the popular BRAT diet of bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast is no longer recommended for stomach bugs.

In this article we discuss common causes for your stomach ache and offer five natural home remedies proven to ease your pain and get back to feeling better.

Common stomach ache causes 

There are many reasons you may have a stomach ache, ranging from something as simple as taking medication on an empty stomach to something more serious, like an ulcer, says Rudolph Bedford, MD, a gastroenterologist at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. 

Acute, short-term stomach aches usually last for between two to three days and don’t necessarily require a doctor’s visit. Here are some common causes of acute, short-term stomach aches:

  • Gas and indigestion
  • Allergic reaction to food
  • Food poisoning 
  • Stomach flu
  • Eating spicy foods
  • Taking certain medications on an empty stomach
  • Constipation
  • Dehydration
  • Stress and anxiety
  • Appendicitis (This condition is acute but very serious. Seek medical attention immediately if you believe you have appendicitis) 

Chronic stomach pain can be a sign of a more serious underlying condition and you should consider scheduling an appointment with a doctor. More serious stomach aches may be caused by the following: 

  • IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome), an intestinal disorder.
  • Stomach ulcers
    • Gallstones (Gallbladder stones and inflammation)
    • Pancreatitis, a condition that causes the pancreas to become inflamed.
    • Crohn’s disease, a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBS) which is caused by an inflamed digestive tract.
    • Ulcerative colitis, a type of IBD that causes chronic inflammation and ulcers in the digestive tract.
  • Certain cancers including stomach, liver, pancreas, gallbladder, and kidney

The best stomach ache remedies 

Bedford says that many patients respond well to home remedies, whether natural or over the counter. Here are five remedies to help ease your pain.

1. Ginger

Ginger is a natural remedy that’s been used since ancient times. Ancient people native to India and China are thought to have used ginger 5000 years ago to treat their ailments. 

Today, ginger is still widely used as an effective remedy — and Bedford recommends it too for his patients suffering from stomach discomfort and nausea.  

Ginger can help with stomach pain because it acts as an anti-inflammatory. Additionally, if you’re struggling with nausea, Bedford says ginger can relieve and prevent nausea and vomiting, and you don’t have to chew on raw ginger to get relief. Bedford says any form of ginger can be beneficial.

You can consume ginger in multiple ways:

  • Chewing on the fresh ginger root itself
  • Drinking ginger ale (Ginger ale can be high in sugar, so if you’re trying to cut back on sweets, this may not be the best option.)
  • Drinking ginger tea 
  • Eating ginger chews 
  • Ginger supplements 

2. Peppermint

Bedford says peppermint has provided his patients with relief from stomach aches, gas, and bloating. This is because the two main ingredients in peppermint — menthol and methyl salicylate — have antispasmodic properties, meaning they relieve spasms, such as those that IBS sufferers may experience.

“For many people who have stomach aches, it’s usually caused by spasming of the lining or the walls of the small bowel, colon, or stomach, and peppermint oil just seems to relax those muscles,” says Bedford.

Overall, the stomach and surrounding muscles will relax thanks to these properties, reducing spasms, which can lead to relief from stomach ache, gas, bloating, and nausea. 

Studies surrounding peppermint and stomach aches have mostly been centered around IBS, and results are promising. For example, a meta-analysis published in 2019 in the BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine reviewed 12 studies for a total of 835 participants. The meta-analysis found that peppermint oil capsules are more effective at providing symptom relief than a placebo, with a low risk of adverse effects. 

Quick tip: The two main ways to consume peppermint are through peppermint oil capsules or peppermint tea. 

3. Apply heat

Using a heating pad or hot water bottle can help relieve patients’ stomach pain, Bedford says. Just make sure that there is a barrier between your skin and the heating pad or water bottle to avoid burns. Lie down in a position that’s comfortable and then place it on your upper or lower abdomen, wherever you are experiencing the pain.

The heat acts as a muscle relaxer for the muscles in your belly which can help relieve pain associated with muscle cramping and gas. Heating pads are great if your stomach ache may be stemming from stress and anxiety. Additionally, if your belly pain is due to menstrual cramps, a heating pad is a great remedy for that, too. 

Additionally, researchers at the University College London discovered that applying heat of at least 104º Fahrenheit externally can block internal pain receptors, which in turn will make the original pain less detectable by the body. The researchers found that this mechanism works at a molecular level, similar to pain medications. The heat works by blocking pain receptors, called P2X3 receptors, which transmit pain signals to the brain.

Note: Aside from using a heating pad, you can also take a hot bath for a similar effect. But people who are pregnant should not use a heating pad on their stomach at any point during pregnancy because excess heat can increase the risk of birth defects.

4. Stay hydrated

Dehydration can cause a mineral imbalance in your body, which disrupts normal bodily function and can trigger a series of symptoms including stomach pain. 

So, if your pain is from dehydration, make sure you’re getting enough fluids in your diet. Especially if you’re sick and sweating a lot, have diarrhea, or are vomiting as these conditions can worsen dehydration.

The notion that you need to drink eight glasses of water a day is a myth. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recommend that women get 91 fl. oz. of fluids per day and men get 125 fl. oz. This can come from water, other beverages, and foods.

5. Drink diluted apple cider vinegar

If you’re dealing with a stomach ache caused by gas or indigestion, apple cider vinegar might do the trick to help aid digestion. Bedford says the “recipe” that homeopathic doctors usually recommend is:

  • One cup of warm water
  • One tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
  • One tablespoon of honey

Taking the apple cider vinegar alone undiluted is not recommended since the acidity can irritate your throat and deteriorate tooth enamel. Plus, mixing it with water and honey can make the vinegar more palatable. 

Most of the evidence for apple cider vinegar and stomach aches is anecdotal, and more research is needed to determine if this is a sure-fire remedy for most.

Insider’s takeaway

Different remedies work for different stomach aches. And what works for your friend may not work for you. So it may take some trial and error to figure out what remedy you respond to best.

If your symptoms are persistent, not responding to home remedies, and interfering with your daily life, Bedford says you should see a gastroenterologist to figure out what’s going on and get you on the right treatment plan. 

Additionally, he says if you’re seeing any blood whether in your bowel movements or if you’re coughing or vomiting blood along with your stomach ache, this could be a sign of more serious conditions such as diverticulitis, ulcers, colon cancer, or rectal cancer, and you should seek medical attention as soon as possible. 

Common Causes of Stomach Ache

A stomach ache is a term used to describe cramps or a dull ache in the abdomen. Usually, a stomach ache is short-lived and not a cause for concern. Stomach pain that is severe is more likely to be cause for concern, especially if it occurs unexpectedly and suddenly, in which case it should be treated as a medical emergency.

Image Credit: CHAjAMP / Shutterstock.com

Whether the stomach pain is mild, sharp, or feels like cramps, the pain can have various different causes. Some of the most common causes of stomach ache are described below.

Indigestion

Also called dyspepsia, indigestion refers to a full and uncomfortable feeling in the stomach after eating. Indigestion may be accompanied by a burning sensation in the upper part of the stomach.

Indigestion may be a sign of an underlying issue such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gall bladder disease, or ulcers; therefore, the treatment for this condition will depend on its cause.

Indigestion is a common problem; however, several factors can cause certain individuals to be more susceptible to this condition. Some of the risk factors for indigestion include:

  • Gastroparesis, which is a condition in which the stomach fails to empty fully. Gastroparesis is a common problem among people who have diabetes.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Stomach infection
  • Pancreatitis
  • Thyroid disease
  • Stomach cancer, although this is rare

Some medications that may lead to indigestion include:

  • Aspirin and other analgesics
  • Thyroid medications
  • Birth control pills
  • Steroids
  • Certain antibiotics

Some lifestyle factors that may lead to indigestion include:

  • Eating too much, too quickly, or while stressed
  • Excess alcohol intake
  • Stress
  • Tiredness
  • Smoking

Constipation

Constipation refers to difficult bowel movements or bowel movements that occur less frequently than usual. Constipation is not usually serious.

Bowel movements vary between individuals, with some people finding it is normal for them to have bowel movements three times a day, whereas others may only have them twice a week. Generally, no bowel movements for more than three days is too long. This can lead to the hardening of feces, which makes it difficult to pass.

Some causes of constipation can include:

  • Dietary changes
  • The use of antacids that contain calcium or aluminum
  • IBS
  • Inactivity
  • Lack of water or fiber
  • Pregnancy
  • Overuse of laxatives
  • Some medications, such as antidepressants and iron supplements
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Stress

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis is a condition where the stomach and intestines become irritated and inflamed, usually as a result of a bacterial or viral infection. Pain in the stomach is usually accompanied by diarrhea and vomiting, with some individuals also reporting a fever and headache.

Gastroenteritis can be spread in many ways, some of which include:

  • Contact with someone who has the condition
  • Intake of contaminated food or water
  • Failing to wash the hands after using the toilet

Gastroenteritis is most commonly caused by a virus, usually norovirus or rotavirus. Norovirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in the United States, whereas rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in young children and infants. Gastroenteritis can also be triggered by Campylobacter bacteria and salmonella, which are usually spread as a result of the consumption of undercooked poultry or eggs.

IBS

IBS is a collection of symptoms that occur together including stomach pain, cramping, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. The condition can cause intestinal damage and can have a significant effect on a person’s life.

Image Credit: Irina Strelnikova / Shutterstock.com

The cause of IBS is unknown; however, some suggested triggers for this condition include an overly sensitive immune system or colon. Bacterial infection in the gastrointestinal tract can also cause post-infectious IBS.

Food poisoning

Food poisoning occurs as a result of eating toxic, contaminated, or spoiled food, which leads to vomiting and diarrhea. Food poisoning is a common problem, with one in six individuals in the United States experiencing it every year.

Usually, food poisoning is triggered by one of the following three factors:

  • Bacteria – Salmonella is the most common cause of serious food poisoning in the U.S.; however, other culprits include E. coli, listeria, Campylobacter, and C. botulinum.
  • Parasites – The most commonly occurring parasite to cause food poisoning is toxoplasma, which is usually found in cat litter boxes. Parasites can go undetected in the intestine for years, but people with weakened immune systems and women who are pregnant are at the greatest risk of serious side effects if parasites make their way into the intestine.
  • Viruses – Some of the viruses that cause food poisoning include norovirus, sapovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, all of which cause similar symptoms.

References

Further Reading

Chow Line: Stomach pain after eating apples?

Sometimes when I eat an apple, I get a stomachache afterward. Could it be from pesticide residues?

It’s highly unlikely that your stomach pains are coming from pesticide residues. In fact, there’s no evidence to support that notion.

It’s true that apples tend to land high on the list of the highly publicized Environmental Working Group’s annual Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce. In fact, in its 2014 report, the organization said nearly all apples it tested were positive for at least one pesticide residue.

Although that sounds alarming, the report doesn’t say much about the levels of pesticides detected. The organization uses data gathered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to come up with its listings. In the data the group used for its 2014 guide, 743 of the 744 apples tested had residues lower than the government limits, most of them much, much lower. Remember, just because something is detected in minuscule amounts doesn’t mean it’s harmful. As with any substance, it’s the dose that makes the poison.

A 2011 study in the Journal of Toxicology — written in direct response to the advocacy group’s annual listings — analyzed the data and found that exposures to commonly detected pesticide residues pose a negligible risk — so low, in fact, that substituting organic produce for conventionally grown “would not result in any appreciable reduction of consumer risks.”

Avoiding apples and other produce is a bigger risk: Their health benefits are well-documented.

Still, the stomach pains you describe are not uncommon after eating apples. So, what’s going on?

A food intolerance is possible. A set of carbohydrate intolerances are suspected to play a role in some types of abdominal pain. If the problem is severe, you’ll want to check with your doctor to get a diagnosis.

The organization Food Intolerances Diagnostics suggests people with this type of intolerance avoid foods with a fructose content of more than 3 grams per serving, or a fructose-to-glucose ratio greater than 1. A fresh apple has 6 grams of fructose per 100-gram serving (or 3.5 ounces), and a fructose-to-glucose ratio of about 2.

If this is what’s going on, only you can decide if you enjoy eating a fresh, crisp apple enough to endure any resulting discomfort.

Finally, as with all fresh produce, don’t forget to rinse it thoroughly under running water first, preferably just before eating. That will dislodge any surface dirt and bacteria and wash it away.

Chow Line is a service of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH, 43210-1043, or [email protected]

Editor: This column was reviewed by Sanja Ilic, food safety specialist for Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.

For a PDF of this column, please click here.

Nutritionists named foods that are dangerous for consumption on an empty stomach: Food: From life: Lenta.ru

Nutritionists named foods that are dangerous for consumption on an empty stomach. This is reported by the 74.ru edition with reference to a study by Russian scientists.

The habit of drinking water in the morning is considered beneficial, however, according to experts, it can even lead to cancer. This was explained by the temperature. Cold water on an empty stomach is not recommended for people with diseases of the stomach or cardiovascular system.Water with a temperature above 65 degrees, if drunk regularly, damages the mucous membranes, and frequent burns provoke the appearance of abnormal cells that can become malignant over time.

Coffee, according to scientists, stimulates the increased production of acid in the stomach, and also irritates the stomach lining, which causes nausea and heartburn. In people with irritable bowel syndrome, coffee can worsen its symptoms – abdominal cramps, bloating, and digestive upset and gas.

It is noted that the body spends a lot of energy on the digestion of meat, as well as on any animal proteins. Bakery and flour products are also not advised to eat on an empty stomach. Nutritionists call these foods “the direct road to obesity.” It can also cause blood sugar spikes and insulin spikes.

It is not recommended to drink juices on an empty stomach, as they are pomace, devoid of fiber – this can hit the pancreas hard. In addition, the starving body perceives this drink as food and begins to produce a significant amount of insulin.

Sour fruits and berries contain numerous acids that can be harmful to eat on an empty stomach. If swallowed in an empty stomach, they can cause heartburn and lead to allergies, ulcers, or gastritis. Nutritionists did not consider certain types of vegetables, since, in their opinion, harm can be found in almost everyone if they are eaten on an empty stomach.

Fermented milk products on an empty stomach are called not very harmful, but useless. In the morning after sleep, the human stomach has a high concentration of hydrochloric acid, and the acidic environment kills all the beneficial lactobifidobacteria found in fermented milk products.

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What you can’t eat on an empty stomach

Dishes with a lot of spices

When an empty stomach is already rumble, you want to pounce on aromatic dishes with hot spices. But the spices can make your stomach more unpleasant, says Lisa Ganjhu, M.D., a gastroenterologist at the Langone Medical Center at the University of New York.

The stomach is empty and nothing softens the effect of the spices when they come into contact with the lining of the stomach.

Lisa Ganji

Food with hot peppers or sauce is best left for the second course, until at least something appears in the stomach.

What to Eat

Dairy products are excellent at extinguishing spicy food fires and gently cover the stomach walls. Therefore, Indian food is often served with yogurt-based sauces. Therefore, if you are hungry and there is a spicy food in front of you, first take a few sips of milk or eat a couple of tablespoons of unsweetened yogurt. Spices are allowed, but quieter: cumin or coriander does not irritate the digestive system.

Fruit, if it’s the only meal

Didriks / Flickr.com

An apple or pear won’t kill hunger by itself, says Tamara Melton, a nutritionist and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in Atlanta. The sugar found in fruits enters the bloodstream more slowly than sugar from candy, thanks to the fiber, but this will not save you from the desire to eat.

Foods with a high protein content should be added to the fruit. They are digested more slowly and, studies show , inhibit the production of ghrelin, the hormone responsible for feeling hunger.It is ghrelin that signals hunger to the brain.

What to eat

Seize the fruit with nuts or raw pigtails. Fruit and cottage cheese go well with Greek yogurt dressing.

Snacks, chips and biscuits

Five crackers can store up to 100 calories, which will not help to cope with hunger in any way. This is the main problem with fast food snacks: because of the large amount of readily available carbohydrates, they dramatically increase blood sugar levels, which then quickly drop.And you are hungry again.

What to Eat

For a snack on the run, it’s best to stock up on a chicken or turkey sandwich. 200-300 kcal will cope with hunger much better.

Oranges, mint, coffee, ketchup

These are all foods that stimulate the production of acid in the stomach. If eaten on an empty stomach, the consequences will manifest itself in the form of heartburn and pain, says Dr. Lisa Ganji. There is already a lot of acid in an empty stomach, and there is not enough food to neutralize its effect on the lining.Coffee and caffeine are irritating to those with gastritis.

What to Eat

Most vegetables do not cause a violent release of acid, moreover, they have a lot of fiber, which helps with gastritis. Vegetables, mashed peas, or mashed potatoes are great options for satisfying hunger.

Sushi

Michael Kappel / Flickr.com

The combination of white rice and soy sauce is harmful when eaten on an empty stomach, says Maria Bella, nutritionist and founder of Top Balance Nutrition Clinic in New York.Rice is low in fiber, and the salty sauce is thirsty. But our brain confuses thirst and hunger. Trying to fill an empty stomach and seize thirst at the same time, you will eat more. You will pay with a feeling of heaviness.

What to eat

The same rolls, wrapped not only in rice, but also in a cucumber (or just a cucumber). Better to start with a regular salad.

Alcohol

Alcohol, of course, is not eaten, but drunk. But on an empty stomach, it is better not to do this – you will get drunk faster, and then you will want to eat even more.A hungry and drunk person runs the risk of eating everything: chips, and spicy pizza, and everything else, from which it is better to refrain. This is due to the effect of alcohol on the levels of leptin, a hormone that signals the brain to satiety. Three servings of alcohol – and you are already 30% less sensitive to the hormone .

What to eat

It’s simple: first the snack, then everything else. Start off with grilled vegetables or chicken dishes that are light and nutritious enough.

Read also 🧐

Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease – symptoms and stages

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You have been treated by an otorhinolaryngologist , but the prescribed treatment did not help? You cannot understand why you are referred to a gastroenterologist if you have a sore throat, a hoarse voice and even its loss or a persistent cough that does not respond to standard therapy?

Often the cause of these complaints can be diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, namely gastroesophageal reflux disease , or in abbreviated form GERD .

What is gastroesophageal reflux disease?

In this disease, gastric or gastrointestinal contents are thrown (reflux) into the esophagus and even into the larynx, due to the fact that the epithelium of the pharynx and larynx is more sensitive to the damaging action of gastric secretions, and the above complaints appear.

The presence of such extraesophageal manifestations can cause difficulties in both diagnosis and errors in therapy. What to do? First of all, it is necessary to analyze the time and causes of the onset of symptoms of the disease.If these symptoms are associated with GERD, they arise and worsen with bending, in a horizontal position, physical stress, after taking alcohol and some errors in food (fatty foods, alcohol, carbonated drinks), while taking certain drugs that reduce tone smooth muscles, often accompanied by heartburn, sour belching and even chest pain.

Of the instrumental diagnostic methods that make it possible to diagnose GERD, there are daily pH-metry with the simultaneous use of two probes (pharyngeal and esophageal) and esophageal impedancemetry , which allow us to estimate the number of gastric contents, their duration, to assess the composition of the thrown contents.

How is gastroesophageal reflux disease treated?

Treatment of GERD should begin with lifestyle changes: first of all, it is necessary to reduce body weight, if it is overweight, and stop smoking. It is necessary to avoid the use of acidic fruit juices, alcohol, carbonated drinks, very spicy, fatty foods, foods that increase gas production, avoid overeating, stop eating a few hours before bedtime. If symptoms worsen, lying down is recommended to sleep with the head of the bed raised.

Drug therapy for GERD includes the use of drugs that reduce gastric secretion and normalize motility. The dosage and duration of therapy will be determined individually and depend on age, severity of manifestations, concomitant diseases and existing complications.

If you continue to be bothered persistent cough , sore throat , hoarseness , recurrent laryngitis , and the treatment is ineffective, be sure to consult an experienced gastroenterologist.A timely diagnosis is the key to successful treatment!

90,000 The doctor told for what types of pain an ambulance should be called

Andrey Baranovsky, chief gastroenterologist of the Northwestern Federal District and head of the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology of St. to Channel Five.

According to the doctor, people often have stomach aches after heavy meals, but food is not always the reason for this.

Abdominal pain can indicate problems with the biliary system, and also signal pancreatitis or cholecystitis. Baranovsky noted that characteristic symptoms are not only growing pain in the upper abdomen, but also bitterness in the mouth, nausea or vomiting with bile.

“This, of course, requires calling an ambulance and providing emergency care,” the gastroenterologist explained, noting that such conditions often require surgical intervention.

In addition, people with chronic diseases often do not pay attention to the already habitual abdominal pain, however, it can also be dangerous. Perhaps the pain speaks of new processes that worsen the state of health or even signal a relapse of the disease.

The most dangerous pains are at night and those that occur on an empty stomach. So, for example, at night a person wakes up from pain and hunger, and they can be dulled only with food, water or medicine.According to Baranovsky, this indicates an exacerbation of peptic ulcer disease or gastritis with erosions.

“Such situations also require help, especially if they are aggravated by symptoms such as vomiting, especially with elements of black blotches. This can signal gastric bleeding,” – said the gastroenterologist.

Delays in peptic ulcer or duodenal diseases that require immediate surgery can be life-threatening.

The physician advises not to endure the pain and not to drown it with medications, but it is better to immediately call an ambulance.

90,000 Health starts with attention

How to prevent or treat gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer?

Ill, we all dream of getting to an experienced doctor who will thoroughly figure out what happened to us, take into account the peculiarities of our body, lifestyle and prescribe a treatment that will certainly help and will not give side effects, neither now nor in the future.Today, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer have become more common. Peptic ulcer disease is one of the most common diseases of the digestive apparatus. Available statistics indicate a high percentage of patients with this disease. In various countries, up to ten percent of all residents suffer from this disease.

Risk zone

Peptic ulcer is a disease in which defects (ulcers) form in the stomach and / or duodenum of a person.Most often, men from 20 to 50 years old suffer from peptic ulcer disease. The disease is characterized by a chronic course and cyclicity: the disease undermines the health of its owner for years, periods of exacerbation are replaced by deceptive calmness. Most often, the ulcer makes itself felt in the spring and autumn. Duodenal ulcer is much more common than gastric ulcer. Typically, an ulcer occurs against the background of gastritis (inflammation of the gastric mucosa) or duodenitis (inflammation of the duodenal mucosa) associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.
Damage to the mucous membrane with the formation of ulcers, erosions and inflammation is associated with the predominance of aggressive factors (hydrochloric acid, pepsin, bile acids) over the protective factors of the mucous membrane. Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role. These microorganisms can cause inflammation of the mucous membrane, while destroying local defense factors and increasing acidity.
At the same time, this microorganism can be found in more than 80% of the inhabitants of Russia, but far from all of them suffer from peptic ulcer disease.The fact is, an ulcer does not develop without a number of additional factors:
• prolonged neuro-emotional stress;
• genetic predisposition;
• the presence of chronic gastritis or duodenitis;
• violation of the diet;
• Consumption of strong alcoholic drinks and smoking;
• the use of certain drugs (acetylsalicylic acid, indomethacin, etc.).
The most common manifestation of peptic ulcer disease is pain in the upper abdomen, which often occurs on an empty stomach.e. between meals. Pain can also occur at night, causing the patient to wake up and eat. The pain usually subsides in the first 30 minutes after eating. Less specific, but common symptoms in peptic ulcer disease are nausea, heaviness after eating, a feeling of fullness in the stomach, vomiting, loss of appetite, body weight, heartburn.

Mechanisms of occurrence

The microbe Helicobacter pylori is transmitted from person to person through close long-term contact, for example, through kissing, through shared dishes and towels, as well as by non-observance of hygiene rules in toilets.
Once in the stomach of Helicobacter, it begins to actively multiply and conduct subversive activities. It produces special enzymes (urease, proteases) that damage the protective layer of the mucous membrane (inner) of the stomach and duodenum, disrupts cell functions, mucus production and metabolic processes and causes ulcers.
First of all, the occurrence and development of peptic ulcer disease is signaled to a person by pain in the upper abdomen. Disturbed by night and “hungry” pains, in which a person needs to eat something in order to “extinguish” the pain.
Pain in peptic ulcer disease has a clear rhythm (time of occurrence and connection with food intake), periodicity (alternation of pain sensations with periods of their absence) and seasonality of exacerbations (in spring and autumn).
One of the common symptoms of peptic ulcer disease is heartburn, which usually occurs 2-3 hours after eating. Nausea, vomiting, “sour” belching, constipation – these nonspecific symptoms can also indicate an ulcer. Appetite in peptic ulcer disease is usually preserved or even increased, the so-called “painful feeling of hunger.”Keep in mind, in some cases, the ulcer may be asymptomatic!
If ​​the disease is left untreated, the ulcerative defect extends deeper into the stomach wall. This process can end with life-threatening complications: perforation (perforation), in which a through hole forms in the wall of the stomach or intestine, or bleeding.

See a doctor

Treatment of uncomplicated peptic ulcer disease should be conservative. Surgical treatment of peptic ulcer disease is resorted to only on strict indications.During the period of exacerbation, the most correct is a six- or eight-week course of treatment in a hospital. The main types of treatment used in the hospital are: bed rest, which should be monitored by nursing staff; medical food, medications.
Strict bed rest, which must be observed by the patient in the first three weeks of treatment, is gradually expanded in the future. Smoking is strictly prohibited. If it is impossible to place the patient in a hospital, a course of antiulcer treatment at home should be provided for 4-5 weeks, followed by the transition to the so-called half antiulcer treatment – after a normal working day, the patient spends the rest of the day in bed at home or in a night sanatorium.
Patients with peptic ulcer in remission or subsiding exacerbation in the absence of pyloric stenosis, penetration, a tendency to bleeding and suspicion of malignant degeneration are subject to spa treatment.

Nutrition for peptic ulcer disease

The diet should have a high nutritional value and include a sufficient amount of fats, proteins, carbohydrates, mineral salts and vitamins. Food should not mechanically irritate the gastric mucosa.Therefore, all products should be consumed in chopped or pureed form. As your condition improves, switch from mashed foods to cooked ones. Thermal sparing means the use of food, the temperature of which does not irritate the damaged gastric mucosa. It is not recommended to eat foods that are either too cold or too hot. Better if their temperature is close to body temperature.
Consult your healthcare professional for specific dietary advice.The duration of the diet depends on the severity of the disease and the rate of healing of the ulcer.
Remember that the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is possible only under the supervision of a doctor! If you do not treat peptic ulcer disease, continue to eat, drink and smoke improperly, then such a lifestyle can lead to bleeding, perforation of the walls of the stomach and intestines, which is fraught with death! An important fact: regular medical examination will help to identify the disease at an early stage, and therefore prevent a serious illness.

Prepared by the surgeon of the Tambov City Clinical Hospital No. 3 Tambov Sergei EREMIN
The material was published in the Tambov Courier newspaper

Why does the stomach hurt: causes, symptoms, what to do?

Gastritis is an inflammation of the stomach lining. The cause of the disease in almost 90% of cases is not “dry food” food, as many believe, but the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. Gastritis is acute, with severe excruciating pain, and chronic, when attacks occur chaotically, but are less painful.Moreover, the disease can be asymptomatic for years, in which case the pain is severe or there may be no symptoms at all.

If you think that gastritis is the most common disease of the digestive system, you are mistaken. Most often, it is not about inflammation of the mucous membrane, but about disruption of the stomach. This condition is called functional dyspepsia – with this condition, the stomach does not work properly, which causes pain. Its reason is not what we eat. It is a somatoform disorder – when there is no obvious cause for the pain.This is due to the banal hypersensitivity of receptors due to constant stress, anxiety, depression.

Moreover, gastritis and functional dyspepsia can run in parallel. According to the gastroenterologist Aleksey Paramonov, if Helicobacter is removed from a dyspeptic, only 10% of patients will have symptoms.

What symptoms should I see a doctor for?

  • For stomach pain, which is worse during hunger.
  • The feeling of fullness comes very quickly during meals.
  • With heaviness in the stomach.
  • For frequent diarrhea.
  • For bloating and nausea.
  • With constant pain under the “spoon”.
  • With frequent vomiting.
  • For difficulties and discomfort when swallowing.

For the diagnosis of diseases of the gastrointestinal tract do FGDS – fibrogastroduodenoscopy, or more simply – gastroscopy. In this test, a doctor examines the stomach and duodenum using a thin tube with a video camera.If necessary, you can take material for research: gastric juice – to determine acidity, a section of the mucous membrane, etc. After the results, you may be additionally sent for an ultrasound of the abdominal organs, as well as for X-ray.

After all the research, you can understand which function of the stomach is impaired.

What to do if your stomach hurts?

– If you think you are poisoned, take a modern enterosorbent – for example, enterosgel .Call a doctor for severe pain or repeated vomiting. In no case do not drink antibiotics on your own: you will not get better, but the consequences will not be long in coming.

– If you are concerned about even rare pains, see your doctor. You may be prescribed enzymes, or anti-acid drugs, or antibiotics . And with functional dyspepsia, they can also be sent to a psychotherapist.

– Get enough sleep, observe the daily routine and diet, try to be less nervous.It is often these “drugs” that work best for dyspepsia.

90,000 causes and treatment in adults

Sources of information

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2 Loginov, A. Diseases of the intestine: a guide for doctors / A.S. Loginov, A.I. Parfenov // M .: Medicine – 2000 – P. 318.
3 Khavkin, A.Disturbances of intestinal microecology and enterosorption / A.I. Khavkin // Questions of modern pediatrics – 2009 – VOLUME 8 – №2 – P. 94-98.
4 Mayev, I. Practical gastroenterology. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. / I.V. Maev, S.V. Cheryomushkin // Manual for doctors, Moscow – 2012 – pp. 20-23.
5 Instructions for the medical use of the drug Duspatalin® (Mebeverin 135 mg), film-coated tablets, dated July 13, 2021.
6 Shabanova, A.Comparative characteristics of the features of the motor-evacuation function of the digestive system in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with various clinical forms. Shabanova // Experimental and Clinical Gastroenterology – 2014 – No. 2 (102) – P. 55-56.
7 V.T. Ivashkin, I.V. Maev, E.K. Baranskaya et al. Recommendations of the Russian Gastroenterological Association for the diagnosis and treatment of cholelithiasis RZHGK 2016; 3: 64-80 2.
8 UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.Irritable bowel syndrome in adults: diagnosis and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in primary health care. Clinical practice guidelines, March 2017.
9 E.P. Yakovenko et al. Abdominal pain: mechanisms of formation, a rational approach to the choice of therapy. Breast cancer supplement “Diseases of the Digestive System” No. 2 dated 01.09.2009. P.48.

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