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Teething two months: Symptoms, Signs, Fever & Remedies

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Are Teething Gels Safe?

It’s a stage every parent goes through: Baby is teething something fierce and you want to help ease the pain, but don’t quite know where to start. Many parents’ natural inclination is to reach for a topical teething gel to rub on those sore, red gums. But before you do, it’s important to know the risks associated with them and the pros and cons of the various teething pain remedies. As always, check with your pediatrician first to find out the best way to bring your child relief.

There are four main types of teething pain treatments available:

Topical teething gels and liquids with benzocaine

Though these were deemed acceptable ways to relieve teething pain in the past, recent research has led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to advise against using benzocaine, an anesthetic found in many over-the-counter teething gels, on children under 2. It can cause a rare but serious (and occasionally even deadly) condition called methemoglobinemia, in which the oxygen carried through the bloodstream is reduced to dangerous levels. Symptoms can show up minutes or hours after using the product and include pale or gray- or blue-colored skin, lips and nail beds; shortness of breath; rapid heart rate; lightheadedness; and confusion. Once your toddler passes his second birthday (at which point he may be cutting his first and second molars), benzocaine-based numbing gels are considered safer to use. But make sure to talk to your child’s doctor first before treating teething pain with those products.

Prescription teething gels and liquids containing viscous lidocaine

Prescription local anesthetics containing viscous lidocaine are not recommended by the FDA for children at all. They can make swallowing difficult, increase the risk of choking or breathing in food, affect the heart and nervous system and lead to drug toxicity. Avoid those kinds of teething remedies completely.

Homeopathic-labeled teething gels, liquids and tablets

In the past, some of the treatments sold as “homeopathic” were deemed perfectly safe as long as you checked the ingredients on the label and asked your doctor about the kind and brand in question before giving them to your child. But as of September 2016, the FDA advises against using any homeopathic teething gels, liquids or tablets whatsoever, saying they can pose a risk to infants and other children. The concern has generally been over those remedies made with an unregulated form of belladonna, a toxic plant that can be potentially dangerous and cause heart problems and drowsiness, and the fact that the amount contained in the products may exceed what’s listed on the label. The FDA now says all homeopathic-branded teething treatments are off-limits, and parents should call their pediatrician immediately if their children experience seizures, trouble breathing, excessive sleepiness and other unusual symptoms after being given those gels or tablets.

The strict definition of “homeopathic” refers to an alternative treatment or remedy containing a small, dilute amount of a natural substance believed to have medicinal benefits. But many products sold as homeopathic either are made with too small an amount of that ingredient to actually confirm it’s there at all, or contain a substantial amount of the active ingredient that could possibly cause sometimes serious side effects and dangerous drug interactions. The FDA regulates homeopathic-labeled products but cannot confirm their safety or effectiveness.

How to soothe baby’s teething pain

6 Teething Relief Tricks

Teething gel alternatives
When your cutie is cranky (and she will be — teething makes for very sore gums), try one of these safe teething remedies to help her feel better as she starts to pop those pearly whites:

  • Give baby a cold teething toy or washcloth to chew. Store it in the refrigerator, not the freezer.
  • Provide soothing counterpressure by using a finger brush or wash cloth to rub baby’s gums.
  • For babies over 6 months old, offer icy cold water.
  • When chewing, rubbing, cold and counterpressure don’t help, try an infant pain reliever like acetaminophen as recommended by your pediatrician.
  • Soak a washcloth in chamomile tea and apply to baby’s gums. Older children with molars erupting can scratch a teething brush steeped in chamomile tea around the area.

Unsafe numbing tactics and teethers to avoid
Though the FDA specifically warns against benzocaine-based and lidocaine-based teething gels as well as homeopathic teething gels, tablets and numbing agents, you should also never rub alcohol or rubbing alcohol into your baby’s gums — ingesting even a small amount can make baby sick. Many pediatric health experts also advise against amber, wood, marble or silicone teething necklaces, which can pose a strangulation risk for babies.

Here’s hoping you can take the bite out of your tot’s teething troubles.

When do babies start teething? Timeline, signs, and more

Newborns typically have 20 baby teeth concealed below the gumline. Teething is the process of these teeth erupting through the gums.

Teething usually begins about halfway through the first year of life. Different teeth erupt at different rates, with the front teeth tending to emerge first.

During teething, a baby may feel pain and discomfort, and they can show this in various ways.

In this article, we give a general timeline for the eruption of baby teeth. We also describe signs of teething and provide tips on easing any pain and discomfort.

Share on PinterestGnawing or biting on objects can be a sign that a baby is starting teething.

According to the American Dental Association (ADA), baby teeth tend to appear within the first 6–8 months of life.

The first teeth to erupt are usually the front teeth at the top or bottom of the mouth. Dentists refer to these teeth as the incisors. The rate and order in which the other teeth appear can differ from one baby to another.

The ADA provide the following timeline of the usual ages at which baby teeth emerge:

  • lower central incisors (the bottom front two teeth): 6–10 months
  • upper central incisors (the top front two teeth): 8–12 months
  • upper lateral incisors (at either side of the central incisors): 9–13 months
  • lower lateral incisors (at either side of the central incisors): 10–16 months
  • upper first molars (behind the upper canines): 13–19 months
  • lower first molars (behind the lower canines): 14–18 months
  • upper canines: 16–22 months
  • lower canines: 17–23 months
  • lower second molars: 23–31 months
  • upper second molars: 25–33 months

If there is no sign of any teeth appearing at about 6 or 7 months of age, this is usually no cause for concern, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

By the baby’s first birthday, they should see a dentist, whether or not they have teeth yet.

The enamel coating on baby teeth is thinner than that on adult teeth, and so it is more prone to cavities. For this reason, routine dental checkups are important for babies.

There are several indications that a baby is teething, including:

  • increased irritability
  • increased crying
  • drooling
  • a rash around the mouth, neck, or chest, caused by drooling
  • gnawing or biting on objects
  • cheek rubbing
  • ear pulling
  • a slight elevation in temperature, but not a fever

At about 6 months of age, when teething usually begins, a baby’s immune system is starting to develop, and the antibodies received from the placenta are wearing off. During this time, babies start developing colds and other viral illnesses.

It can be easy to mistake symptoms of a minor cold — such as a fever, a runny nose, fussiness, or poor appetite — for symptoms of teething.

Also, many babies put things in their mouths, drool more, and bite or chew on objects when they are this age, whether or not they are teething.

A parent or caregiver can take some steps to ease discomfort during teething and prevent issues such as a rash developing on the face or neck.

A person might try:

  • providing a rubber teething ring to satisfy the urge to bite or chew
  • rubbing the gums for a few minutes at a time to help prevent cheek-rubbing and ear-pulling
  • applying a barrier cream or moisturizing ointment to the cheeks to help prevent a rash
  • keeping the area around the mouth, cheeks, and neck as clean and dry as possible to prevent skin irritation
  • spending more time comforting the baby, for example by holding them for longer periods during the day
  • providing a safe dosage of a pain medication suitable for infants

Some approaches to teething can be dangerous for babies. Parents and caregivers should avoid:

Freezable teething rings

These tend to become very hard in the freezer and can hurt a baby’s gums, causing more harm than good in the long term.

Topical pain relievers

People should avoid using topical pain relief medications, such as creams or gels, on infants’ gums.

These can be harmful if a parent or caregiver accidentally applies too much or the baby swallows an excessive amount.

It is especially important to avoid gels containing benzocaine, such as Orajel products, because the medication can cause side effects.

Products containing belladonna

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have warned people against using teething tablets that contain extracts of the Atropa belladonna plant, commonly called belladonna.

Their investigations indicate that some of these products contain potentially toxic levels of belladonna.

The FDA have received reports of babies experiencing serious health issues after taking teething products that contain belladonna.

In most cases, a baby will not need to see a doctor because of teething. Home care can often provide relief from pain and discomfort.

However, a parent or caregiver should contact a doctor anytime an infant has a fever higher than 101°F (38.3°C), with or without additional symptoms. It could indicate that the baby has an infection.

During teething, a baby may pass looser stools. However, if a parent or caregiver believes that a baby has diarrhea, they should contact a doctor. Diarrhea can lead to dehydration, especially if it is severe, long-lasting, or accompanied by vomiting.

A baby should visit a dentist by their first birthday, whether or not their teeth have started to come through. Also, routine dental care is important to prevent cavities in baby teeth.

Teething typically begins around 6 months of age. Some signs include irritability, drooling, and gnawing on objects, though not all babies experience the pain or discomfort that causes these behaviors.

A parent or caregiver can typically treat any associated discomfort at home. However, contact a doctor if an infant develops a fever, diarrhea, or other common cold or flu symptoms.

Even if their teeth have yet to appear, a baby should receive a dental checkup by their first birthday.

12 common teething questions answered

Teething can be an uncomfortable time for your baby, but the more you know about it, the more you can help your little one get relief and practice their new smile.

The teething experience can be different for every child. Here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about teething symptoms and remedies.

What age does teething start?

Your baby’s first tooth may appear as early as three months or as late as a year or more. The average age is around six months.

If your baby was born premature, their teeth will likely take longer to start coming through.

How long does it last?

An individual tooth will usually only cause discomfort for a few days at most, but it can take longer for some babies. The whole teething process is usually complete by the age of two to three.

Is teething always painful?

Teething is associated with pain, but that’s not always the case. Younger babies may appear to suffer more from teething,because they’re less used to dealing with discomfort.

What are the symptoms of teething?

The first sign of teething that many parents notice is their child being sulky and irritable. But there are more common teething symptoms to look out for, including:

  • excessive drooling
  • red, swollen or bulging gums
  • redness on the cheeks or chin
  • an increase in biting, chewing and sucking behaviour
  • rejecting food
  • disturbed sleep
  • face rubbing or ear pulling.

If your child has a few of these symptoms together, it’s likely due to teething, but that may not be the only cause.

Are symptoms worse at night?

Your baby may seem more bothered by teething discomfort at night when there are fewer distractions. Teething can cause some children to wake up several times through the night.

What remedies work for sore gums and teething?

If your child is feeling teething pain, there are many home remedies and products you can try to relieve these symptoms and soothe their aching gums. These include:

Gum massage: Making sure your fingers are clean, gently rub the sore areas of your baby’s gums. This counter-pressure can give them some temporary relief.

Teething toys: Soft plush, plastic and rubber toys are safe for your baby to chew on and could soothe their gums.

Cold washcloth: Chill a damp, clean washcloth in the fridge or freezer and allow your child to gnaw on it. This can relieve some of the pressure and swelling.

Medicine: If home remedies aren’t working, ask your paediatrician, dentist or chemist about safe pain relief options.

Are teething necklaces safe?

Amber teething necklaces and bracelets have become a popular remedy for easing teething pain, but the scientific claims of these products have not been substantiated.

They can also be a choking and strangulation hazard, so teething necklaces should never be used without supervision.

Can I still breastfeed?

Some babies prefer to nurse more often during teething for the comfort it provides, while for others the sucking action can make the pain worse.

If you’re worried about your baby biting, gently massage their gums every so often using a clean finger or knuckle to help relieve the discomfort. If they do bite, pulling them away suddenly and yelling “ouch!” will usually give them the message.

What order do a baby’s teeth grow in?

Teeth usually erupt in pairs and follow a routine according to the age of the child, but that’s not always the case.

The two lower middle teeth (central incisors) are normally the first to appear at around six months, followed a couple of months later by the upper middle teeth. These are followed by the surrounding teeth (lower and upper lateral incisors) two months later.

The first back teeth (molars) typically appear at 12 to 14 months. These are the largest teeth in the mouth and can cause the most discomfort when they erupt. These are followed by the four canine teeth around 18 months and the second molars around two years of age.

Keep in mind that these are just rough guidelines. Every child is different and you might find that a younger child already has a tooth that your child doesn’t. Don’t worry – that’s totally normal.

Do teething babies eat less?

Some babies may find eating uncomfortable when their gums are swollen, while others may want to eat more often to feel the counter-pressure on their gums.

If a hunger strike or nursing strike persists for a few days, you should talk to your paediatrician.

Do teething babies poop more?

Teething shouldn’t cause any change in the number of soiled nappies. One reason for this common misconception is that many parents begin feeding their children solid food at six months, around the same time teething starts. This is often what’s actually affecting any changes in your child’s bowel movements.

If your child has diarrhoea for longer than 24 hours, you should make sure they drink plenty of fluids and make an appointment to see your paediatrician.

When should I start to brush my child’s teeth?

As soon as your baby’s first tooth appears, you need to start taking care of it. Tooth decay can affect children of all ages, so it’s important to keep it at bay through regular cleaning.

Gently brush or rub their milk teeth using water. You don’t need to use toothpaste because babies tend to simply swallow it! This should be enough, especially in areas where there’s fluoride in the drinking water, but consult with your dentist to be sure. By age three, your child can graduate to a small bit of fluoride toothpaste (smaller than pea-sized) twice a day.

Checking in with a dentist

Your child should have their first dental check-up by the time they reach their second birthday. Your dentist will make sure they feel as comfortable as possible while they check that their teeth and jaw are developing properly and look for any signs of problems.

Your dentist can also advise you on the best brushing technique and tips on nutrition.

Looking for a dentist? Find your nearest Bupa Dental clinic. 

Everything you need to know about teething

From signs of teething to safe ways to soothe your baby’s pain, here’s what you need to know about teething.

While every baby photo is cute, it’s especially true of a snapshot of your little one showing off her first tooth. But getting to that major milestone isn’t easy. Teething is synonymous with lots of fussiness, crying and sleepless nights. Read on to find out everything you need to know about teething.

When do babies start teething?

Typically, the first teeth come in around six months of age, but babies can start teething anywhere from six to 13 months. “I have seen them come in as early as four months, but that’s pretty rare,” says Jeffrey Bourne, a paediatrician at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California.

In what order do baby teeth come in?

The front incisors usually come in first. Typically, the bottom front teeth will make an appearance first, but sometimes it’s the top two. Next, the canines will arrive. Your baby’s eight molars usually come in between her first and third birthdays, so she will be teething for a long time!

How do I know if my baby is teething?

At two or three months, you’ll notice your baby start to drool and gnaw on things, including her fingers, your fingers and anything she can get her tiny little hands on. But that’s not a sign of teething, explains Bourne. “Teething is really when the teeth start to erupt,” he says. “You might not see them initially, but you can actually feel little bumps on the gums within a day or two when they start coming through. That’s when it hurts: when they’re poking up through the gums.”

Now you’ve probably heard that fever and diarrhea can be signs of teething, but they’re not. “Teething can cause drooling and irritability, but that’s it,” explains Bourne. “The reason people think teething causes fever, diarrhea and other symptoms is because sometimes babies develop a lot of viral illnesses at that time, so it’s just a coincidence. But teething doesn’t cause a true fever.”

Bourne explains that there are only two signs of teething:

1. Fussiness

You can’t blame your baby for being cranky during the teething process: It hurts! Irritability is a major symptom of teething. Expect your little one to be short-tempered and quick to cry during this period. Just like any other time when she is fussy, rocking, shushing and going for car rides can help soothe your baby.

2. Drooling

You’ve been warned: Lots of drooling is in store when your baby is teething. That’s because teething stimulates saliva, so be prepared with lots of bibs.

What are the best teething remedies?

Here are some paediatrician-approved teething remedies:

1. Chewing on something cold

Bourne recommends putting a clean, wet washcloth in a plastic bag and letting it cool in the fridge—your baby will love gnawing on that.

2. Teething rings

This teething remedy is a classic for a reason: It really works! A teething ring gives your baby something to chew on, and that pressure can help soothe aching gums. “Parents can put a teething ring in the refrigerator to cool it down,” says Bourne. “That’s always very useful.”

3. Teething toys

You should invest in a few teething toys, but not all teething toys are created equal. Bourne recommends the line of Sophie toys. “Those little giraffe toys are so popular,” he says. They aren’t just cute; they work! Pay attention to what teething toys are made of and how easy they are to wash: Your baby will be putting this toy in her mouth, so you want to be sure that it’s made of safe materials and easy to clean so you can prevent mould from growing inside.

4. Pain medications

Some painkillers are perfectly safe to use as a teething remedy for babies six months and older. Bourne recommends acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advin, Motrin) and suggests that you only give it at bedtime if your baby is fussy. “It works really well, but I wouldn’t give it around the clock,” says Bourne. “Once at night for a couple of nights, when the teeth are coming through, is very reasonable.” Always check the label for the safe dosage for your baby’s weight.

What teething remedies are unsafe for babies?

1. Teething gels with benzocaine

This unsafe topical numbing cream is found in products like Orajel. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advises parents not to use benzocaine teething gels on children younger than two, except under doctor supervision. Benzocaine can cause methemoglobinemia, a serious condition that can cause death.

2. Amber necklaces

“There’s a substance called succinic acid found in amber from the Baltic region, and it’s supposed to go through the skin to create an analgesic effect,” explains Bourne on how amber necklaces can help teething babies. But so far, there is no research that these necklaces actually work. “There’s no data at all that any is leached out into the skin,” he explains. Doctors also warn parents that the necklaces are a choking and strangling hazard. “They break really easily, so the beads can choke babies as well,” he says. “If parents insist on using them, we think babies definitely shouldn’t be put down in a bed or someplace where they’re not being supervised.” But at the end of the day, Bourne sees no benefit to the beaded jewellery. “No paediatrician I know recommends them because there is really no benefit to them at all,” he says.

3. Homeopathic teething tablets

This controversial remedy caused a stir when Hyland’s Teething Tablets were pulled off the market because they contained varying amounts of belladonna, an herb used as a painkiller that can be toxic. “But even after they were regulated, there are still problems with belladonna,” cautions Bourne. In late 2016, the FDA advised parents to stop using homeopathic teething tablets and gels after multiple incidents of babies and toddlers having seizures after taking them.

Toddler Teething: What to Expect

Categories: Tips / How-Tos, Toddlers

Phases of Teeth Growth

If your little one has passed the one year mark and has endured the challenges of teething, you may think the discomforts of teething are behind you. Around 18 months, it often appears that they have a full complement of baby teeth. However, the two-year molars have yet to erupt.

Toddler Teething & Two-Year Molars

Two-year molars are your toddler’s second set of molars that emerge posterior to (that is, emerge further back in the mouth than) the molars that came in around their first birthday. Second molars typically erupt anywhere between 19 months and 3 years of age. Since these molars are large and square compared to your toddler’s anterior teeth (the teeth they use to bite rather than chew), it might seem like they would cause more discomfort—but in fact, you may not even realize when these teeth erupt. Many toddlers present with minimal symptoms with the eruption of these teeth.

Toddlers typically stop teething by three years old, although they may stop teething even before, depending on when their two-year molars fully emerge. By this time, your toddler will have developed all 20 baby teeth, which are also known as primary teeth. To compare, adults have 32 teeth, including 12 molars (4 of which are wisdom teeth) and 8 premolars.

Signs and Symptoms of Toddler Teething

Each child reacts to pain differently. If necessary, soothe your toddler with the same remedies you relied on when their previous baby teeth erupted. At this age, some kids are able to express feelings with signs or basic words, which may be helpful for parents to understand their cause of discomfort, so encourage your child to communicate verbally.

Toddler teething can be mistaken for ear infections, since posterior molar eruption may cause generalized pain that radiates to the ear. Baby or toddler teething, however, does not cause ear infections. If your toddler has a persistent fever, appears lethargic or has ear drainage, consult your pediatrician, as these are more typical signs of an ear infection. Tugging on ears, fingers in the mouth, and increased drool in the absence of the previously mentioned signs are more consistent with teething pain.

Similarly, teething should not cause a high fever. While your toddler may experience a minor uptick in temperature while teething, their fever should not exceed 101°F. If their temperature does rise above 101°F or if their temperature lasts more than a few days, it’s probably attributed to something other than teething. Consult your pediatrician to rule out illness.

Many parents observe that their toddler’s teething pains are worse at night, causing them to sleep fitfully, if at all. There’s no medical reason for why your baby or toddler’s teething pain would be worse at night. Some doctors think that this trend isn’t actually due to an increase in pain, but rather can be attributed to general tiredness after a long day. When your toddler is tired, they may be crankier, which exacerbates their teething aches and pains.

Your toddler may experience ear pain or a minor temperature while their two-year molars erupt; they also may struggle to sleep through the night. The key to determining what can be attributed to their two-year molar versus another illness is longevity. If the symptoms are consistent over three to five days, it’s likely not caused by their molar eruption.

Feeding During the Two-Year Molars

While your teething toddler’s molars are growing, chewing might cause pain. Your child might drool more and become fussy more quickly during mealtime. Plan meals around their symptoms—choose foods that are easy to swallow and don’t take a lot of work to eat. Here are a few food ideas for your teething toddler:

Smoothies. Turn mealtime into a treat that’s soft and cold for your teething toddler’s gums. Smoothies are quick to make if you have frozen food on hand and can be a nutritious breakfast option for your toddler. You can even include dark green veggies like kale and spinach.

Mashed bananas. Even easier to prepare than smoothies, mashed bananas can be mashed with a fork or potato masher. Use fresh or frozen bananas and add a nut butter for a protein boost.

Soups or stews. Healthy, vegetable-filled soups and stews are easy to eat options for your toddler. Opt for smoother soups rather than chunky ones that require more chewing.

Pureed fruits and veggies. Pureed fruits and vegetables don’t need to be chewed, so this may be an ideal choice during periods of discomfort.

Frozen fruit. When flash frozen, produce contains the same nutritional value as its fresh counterpart. Frozen sliced grapes and frozen cherries are great options for finger-friendly snacks, and the cold temperature will be soothing for your teething toddler.

Chilled applesauce. Put this snack standby in the refrigerator before serving to your toddler for a cool, sweet dessert.

When Should I See a Pediatrician or Dentist?

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a call to the doctor or an emergency room visit if your child has a fever above 104°F, if your child’s fever has lasted longer than five days or if fever reducing medicines do not reduce the fever. Take behavior and activity level into account, too. Observe how your child behaves and whether they’re acting like themselves.

Knowing the symptoms and the timeline for your toddler’s teething will help you be prepared when the two-year molars erupt. Teething symptoms like gum and ear pain can be remedied by soft, cool foods. Once your toddler has all 20 of their baby teeth, it’s now time to keep the teeth healthy and strong. Before you know it, they’ll be losing their baby teeth and developing their first adult teeth: the six-year molars.

For more information about Dr. Reena’s work at Growing Smiles, please visit the Growing Smiles website.

Dr. Reena Shah, DDS, Growing Smiles

Baby milestones: Teething | BabyCenter

Getting teeth isn’t one of those milestones a baby reaches all at once. Transforming that gummy grin into a mouthful of gleaming teeth is a rite of passage that takes a few years. By the time your little one is 3, he’ll have a mouthful of chompers that he can practice brushing himself, a basic step on the road to self-care. (He won’t yet have the skills to do a good job, though, so be sure to lend a hand until he’s at least 6 years old.)

When do babies start teething?

Most babies sprout their first tooth sometime between 6 and 10 months old.

Teeth begin developing when your child is still in the womb. While you were pregnant, your baby developed tooth buds, the foundation for baby teeth (also called milk teeth). Very rarely, a baby is born with a tooth or two, or grows a tooth in the first few weeks of life.

If your baby develops teeth early, you may see the first one (usually a bottom middle tooth) as soon as 3 months. In other cases, you may have to wait until he’s at least a year old.

Most babies get new teeth in this order: the bottom two middle ones first, then the top two middle ones, then the ones along the sides.

The last teeth to appear are the second molars, found in the very back of the mouth on the top and bottom. They’ll probably start coming in when your child is between 23 and 31 months old. Shortly after that, your child should have a full set of 20 baby teeth.

For more details, check out the video below or our baby teething timeline slideshow.

What are the signs of teething?

Some babies breeze through teething, but many feel some discomfort. You may notice signs and symptoms of teething such as:

  • Drooling (which can lead to a facial rash)
  • Swollen, sensitive gums
  • Irritability or fussiness
  • Gnawing or biting
  • Refusing to eat
  • Sleep problems
  • Rubbing face and ears

Though many parents swear that teething causes a fever, vomiting, or diarrhea, there’s no good scientific evidence that it does. If your baby has more than a very slight increase in temperature (higher than 100.4 degrees F) or any other worrisome symptoms, give his doctor a call.

Teething remedies to help your baby

Here are some things you can give your baby to make him more comfortable during the teething process:

Something to chew on. Offer a teething ring or a wet washcloth cooled in the refrigerator. Don’t store teethers in the freezer because frozen teethers can get hard enough to damage a baby’s gums.

Also, don’t use teething necklaces because they’re choking and strangulation hazards.

Cold food. If your baby is eating solids, yogurt or chilled applesauce may provide relief. If your baby is old enough to eat finger foods, a frozen banana or bagel may be soothing. As always, be aware of food choking hazards.

Gum massage. Wash your hands, then gently but firmly rub your baby’s gums with your finger. This can be a welcome counter pressure to what your baby feels from his emerging teeth.

Pain reliever. If nothing else helps and your baby is at least 6 months old, his doctor may suggest acetaminophen or ibuprofen to ease the pain and inflammation. See our dosage charts for acetaminophen and ibuprofen, but be sure to double check the correct dose with your baby’s doctor before giving any pain reliever to a child younger than 2.

Never give your baby aspirin (or rub it on his gums). Aspirin can lead to a rare but potentially life-threatening condition called Reye’s syndrome.

Also, don’t use over-the-counter teething medications, like gels and creams, on children younger than 2. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other experts warn that topical numbing medications containing benzocaine can cause methemoglobinemia, a rare but serious condition in which the amount of oxygen in the blood drops dangerously low.

The FDA also recommends against using homeopathic teething tablets and gels because of reported side effects, such as seizures and breathing problems, in infants and children.

How to brush your baby’s teeth

Once your baby’s teeth start to come in, it’s up to you to keep them clean. As soon as his teeth appear, brush them twice a day (like once in the morning then again right before bed).

Use a baby-size toothbrush with a smear of toothpaste. Ask his doctor or dentist if you should use fluoridated toothpaste. If your child doesn’t like the taste of one kind of toothpaste, try another flavor.

You don’t have to brush in a certain direction. Just try to get out any food particles.

Once your baby has multiple teeth, it can be hard to reach all the tooth surfaces with a toothbrush. That means it’s time to begin flossing! Those colorful flossing sticks designed especially for kids can make it easier for everyone.

At about 18 months, your child may be ready to start learning to brush his own teeth. You’ll still have to help because he won’t have the dexterity to maneuver a toothbrush successfully.

When your baby turns 2 years old, start to use a little bit more toothpaste – an amount about the size of a pea.

Other ways to care for your baby’s teeth

Take steps to avoid bottle-related tooth decay
Don’t let your baby fall asleep with a bottle (unless it’s filled with water). The sugars in formula and breast milk can lead to baby-bottle tooth decay if they’re in contact with his teeth all night.

Another way to prevent this condition and lower the risk of cavities is to switch your baby from a bottle to a cup as soon as he’s coordinated enough to manage it, usually sometime around his first birthday.

You may want to avoid letting your child get into the habit of carrying around a sippy cup of juice or milk because prolonged exposure to sugar can damage teeth, just like when using a bottle. If you do give your baby a sippy cup, fill it with only water.

Ask about a fluoride supplement
The 6-month checkup is a good time to ask your child’s doctor whether your baby needs a fluoride supplement. (These cavity-preventing drops are necessary only if the water supply in your area isn’t fluoridated.) Also ask the doctor to examine your child’s teeth.

See the dentist
Dentists recommend scheduling your baby’s first dental appointment around his first birthday or within six months after his first tooth erupts, whichever comes first.

Set limits on treats
Limit the amount of sweets your child eats. When he does have a sugary treat (at a birthday party, for example), be sure to brush his teeth soon after he eats.

What to do if your baby doesn’t have teeth yet

If you still don’t see any sign of a tooth by his 18-month checkup, tell your child’s doctor or dentist. (Premature babies may take a few months longer to get their teeth.)

Also, if your child has all the signs of teething – heavy drooling, swollen gums – but also shows signs of severe pain (crying inconsolably, for example), call his doctor. Teething shouldn’t be an excruciating ordeal for a baby.

When do children begin losing teeth?

Baby teeth don’t begin to fall out until your child’s permanent teeth are ready to come in, beginning around age 6.

Where to go next

Watch a video showing how to care for your baby’s teeth and gums.

See your child’s teething and tooth loss timeline.

Find out how other parents soothe teething symptoms.

Teething: Signs, Soothing Sore Gums & More About Baby’s First Teeth!

We get a lot of questions about teething from concerned parents, so we thought we’d cover some of the basics about this natural process here on our blog. While this can be a tough time for both baby and parents, knowing what to expect and how to ease discomfort can help.

At what age does teething start?

Teething in babies can start anywhere from 3 months to as late as 14 months, with the average age being around 6 months old. Usually, the first to appear are the lower central incisors, followed by the upper central incisors after a month or two. While it’s not uncommon for teeth not to follow the same exact order, they’ll generally appear in the order below, with a month or so in between each different tooth type.

Signs + Symptoms of Teething

Some babies don’t show any signs of teething, while others will start to exhibit some behaviors that suggest their teeth are getting close to peeking through. Some of the most common signs are:

  • Drooling
  • Puffy gums
  • A desire to chew, gnaw, or bite
  • Fussiness or irritability
  • Ear pulling

What to expect with a teething baby.

This is an uncomfortable time for your baby, as the pressure and pain associated with their teeth erupting are new for them. They will be fussy and cry, and you’ll likely have some restless nights as teething seems to be more active at night. It’s important to remember that this is normal. Still, discomfort shouldn’t be excessive, gradually worsen, or last longer than a week. If it does, make sure call your dentist or doctor.

It can take up to two years for all of baby’s teeth to come in, but they shouldn’t be teething the entire time. Once the first few teeth erupt, the process becomes much less painful for them.

How can I make my baby feel better during teething?

 

Washcloths that have been in the freezer for a while are great for babies. They’re still soft, but cold enough to numb some of the pain. Baby can also get a good grip on them!

You might find that your baby prefers something harder than a washcloth to chew on. There are several toys on the market made of rubber or silicon that are great options for this. We personally like the Baby Banana Infant Training & Teether for how it massages sore gums, but also because it promotes good oral hygiene early!

If the tooth hasn’t erupted yet, massaging your baby’s gums with a clean finger has worked to reduce discomfort. Applying light pressure helps combat the pressure they’re feeling, as well as swelling.

For babies that are already eating solid food, a chilled food like a soft frozen banana is a welcome distraction to teething discomfort.

For babies that breastfeed, continuing to do so while they’re teething can be a source of great comfort. We’ve also heard that parents have had success with breast milk ice cubes, or for very young babies, crushing them up in a washcloth for them to chew on.

  • Distraction + Extra Cuddles

Don’t underestimate the power of some extra cuddles and snuggles during the teething process. A new toy or some extra one-on-one time can be a welcome distraction from the dull ache of their gums.

Different things work for different babies, so experiment to find out which works best for yours. It will be tough to see them through their discomfort, but remember this is a natural process we all go through. Plus, waiting on the other end of the teething process is a happy, healthy, toothy smile!

What have you found to work best during teething?

90,000 Infant Teething Syndrome: A New Look at an Old Problem | Zaplatnikov A.L., Kasyanova A.N., Maykova I.D.

The article presents an analysis of the literature on the problem of teething in infants. The use of topical drugs to reduce teething discomfort in infants is discussed. Presented the characteristics of the gel for topical application

In recent years, most researchers and pediatric practitioners have been of the opinion that teething syndrome in infants is a diagnosis of exclusion [1–5].However, despite this, there are still cases when children of the first year of life under the guise of “teething” miss the debut of such formidable diseases as pyelonephritis, pneumonia, meningitis. It should be especially noted that late diagnosis of these pathological conditions leads to a severe course, the risk of complications and, in extreme cases, can cause an unfavorable outcome.
In this regard, when discussing this problem, one should always draw the attention of pediatricians to the need for a careful analysis of anamnestic data, detailing clinical manifestations, as well as active monitoring of the child’s condition over time.At the same time, indeed, during the period of teething in children, along with local symptoms (hyperemia and swelling of the gums), there may be general symptoms (anxiety, irritability, decreased appetite, sleep disturbance, fever, etc.), but they are nonspecific. and are found in various infections and inflammatory diseases. Taking this into account, when a child develops fever during the dentation period, it is first of all necessary to exclude infectious and inflammatory processes, and only if they are absent, it is possible to stop at the diagnosis of teething syndrome [2–5].It should be noted that this syndrome in the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision (ICD-10) is indicated in the section “Diseases of the oral cavity, salivary glands and jaws” under the code K00.7 [6].
Teething is one of the stages in the development of teeth. Milk teeth begin to calcify already in the fetus by the 4th month. pregnancy and further develop up to about 6 months. pregnancy [1, 5, 7]. In the vast majority of cases, in children between the age of 6 months.and in the 2nd year of life, 20 milk teeth erupt. The central incisors appear first; the latter are the upper second molars. The scheme of milk teeth on the upper and lower jaws includes 2 central incisors, 2 lateral incisors, 2 canines and 4 molars (Fig. 1) [8].

The lower central incisors usually appear first, between the 4th and 6th months. the child’s life, the upper incisors appear a little later – between the 5th and 7th months. life. The eruption of the central and lateral incisors on the upper and lower jaws is most often completed during the 1st year of the child’s life.
On average, the eruption of milk teeth occurs in the following periods:
central and lateral incisors – from the 3rd to the 12th month;
first molars – from the 12th to the 19th month;
canines – from the 18th to the 24th month;
second molars – from 24th to 32nd months.
Permanent teeth in the amount of 32 begin to erupt at the age of about 6 years with the appearance of the lower molar. The process of eruption of permanent teeth is long, it can last 18–20 years, ending with the eruption of the third molar, better known as the “wisdom tooth” [1].
The greatest difficulties for children and their parents, as well as for a pediatrician, are caused by the eruption of milk teeth. The idea that milk teeth are only a temporary organ, which will be replaced by permanent teeth, as well as that their diseases and loss do not entail any consequences, is deliberately incorrect


The appearance of milk teeth allows the child to switch from liquid food to semi-liquid, and then solid. Moreover, the position of milk teeth ensures the correct development of dental arches, they act as guides for permanent teeth, leaving them sufficient space for proper growth and adequate positioning in the oral cavity [1, 8, 9].It has been established that milk teeth not only provide mechanical processing of food and play an important role in digestion processes, but are also an important marker of the child’s health [10]. For example, according to the condition of the teeth, you can suspect a child with malabsorption syndrome or a violation of mineral metabolism. Sometimes teeth can serve as the primary source of infection, which can then spread to other tissues by hematogenous route.
The appearance of the first teeth is a physiological process.In most cases, teething does not cause problems, despite developing local and even systemic disorders (Table 1). Among the most common localized symptoms of teething, gum swelling can be noted, which makes it more sensitive, causing a feeling of discomfort. As a result, the child’s desire to suck, chew and bite increases, and the production of saliva (sialorrhea) increases, which, being released in large quantities from the oral cavity, can cause skin irritation with the development of perioral dermatitis.Systemic symptoms include fever or general discomfort with increased anxiety, decreased appetite and sleep disturbance [11, 12]. At the same time, I.N. Zakharova et al. (2016) noted that the clinical features of the teething process may depend on the type of constitution of the child [4]. So, in children with a lymphatic type of constitution, the eruption of milk teeth, as a rule, occurs with a delay and in the wrong order. At the same time, there are often expressed anxiety, crying, violation of the nature of the stool, swelling and soreness of the gums, profuse salivation.In cases of neuro-arthritic constitution, the first teeth in children usually appear on time. However, their eruption is often accompanied by severe pain, excitability, episodes of crying and sleep disturbance. In addition, there is a refusal to eat, regurgitation, vomiting and an increase in body temperature may occur [4].

In a study by M. Memarpour et al. (2015) analyzed the frequency of the most common symptoms in children with teething of deciduous teeth. The study included 270 children aged 8 to 36 months.The most common teething symptoms were salivation (92%), sleep disturbance (82.3%) and irritability (75.6%). Moreover, these symptoms were more pronounced in children with low birth weight. In addition, low birth weight children were more than 2.5 times more likely to develop diarrhea [OR = 2.90, CI 95% (1.56–5.40), p = 0.001]. The authors also found that eruption of canines was accompanied by loss of appetite more often than eruption of incisors (p = 0.033) or molars (p = 0.014) [13].
Meta-analysis by S.Massignan et al. (2016), including 16 studies on teething syndrome in children under the age of 36 months. from 8 countries (Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Finland,
India, Israel, Senegal, USA), showed that only 30% of children had no symptoms of teething, while 70% of children had different clinical manifestations [14]. Among them, swelling of the gums, irritability and pronounced salivation were most often noted – in 86.8%, 68.1% and 55.7% of cases, respectively.In addition, the process of eruption of deciduous teeth in a number of children was accompanied by loss of appetite, restless sleep, nasal congestion and a slight increase in body temperature. At the same time, it was found that usually these symptoms were noted for a short time [14].
Similar results were obtained by M. Macknin et al. (2000), who showed that in the vast majority of children, symptoms of discomfort may appear 4 days before the eruption and, as a rule, stop within 3 days after the appearance of the tooth [18].
In the last decade, it has been established that proinflammatory cytokines play a key role in the development of various symptoms of teething. According to the literature, in the gingival fluid during primary teething, the concentration of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukins (IL-1, IL-2, IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) increases, which may explain the clinical manifestations associated with with teething [19–21].
Thus, L. Shapira et al. (2003) studied the relationship between teething, the content of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-8, TNF-α) in the gingival fluid and clinical symptoms.The study included 16 healthy children aged 5 to 14 months. (average age – 9.8 months), which were examined 2 times a week for 5 months. Analyzing the results obtained, the authors came to the conclusion that the period of teething was accompanied by a significant increase in the levels of IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α in the gingival fluid. It was noted that there was a direct positive correlation between an increase in the concentration of certain pro-inflammatory cytokines and specific symptoms of eruption.Thus, it was found that with an increase in the level of IL-1β in the gingival fluid, fever, gastrointestinal disorders, sleep and appetite disturbances were observed much more often. At the same time, it was noted that an increase in the concentration of IL-8 was more often accompanied by gastrointestinal disorders, while an increase in the level of TNF-α was more characteristic of the appearance of fever and sleep disturbance [19].
Various medications are used to reduce the severity of local teething symptoms in infants.However, some drugs designed to relieve the symptoms of teething discomfort contain lidocaine. However, due to the lack of a clear dosage and possible swallowing of the drug, the likelihood of an overdose of lidocaine and the development of systemic effects increases. Given the high risk of severe side effects, it is currently recommended to limit the use of drugs containing lidocaine for teething and stomatitis in children [22]. FDA experts also warn about the inappropriateness of the use of homeopathic medicines, i.because their safety and effectiveness have not been evaluated. In this case, homeopathic preparations containing belladonna can be especially dangerous [23]. In this regard, among the means intended for the relief of local symptoms of teething, Kamistad ® Baby is of particular interest [24].
Kamistad ® Baby does not contain lidocaine; its active ingredients are chamomile flower extract and polidocanol [24]. The positive therapeutic effect of chamomile flower extract in various inflammatory diseases of the oral cavity is well known [25–28].Thanks to the extract of chamomile flowers, which is part of Kamistad ® Baby gel, when using it, the severity of local symptoms of teething decreases, as well as antiseptic and regenerating effects are achieved. In turn, the presence of polidocanol in the composition provides an analgesic, cooling and distracting effect [29]. Taking into account the combined mechanism of action and good tolerance, Kamistad ® Baby can be recommended for use in infants for effective and
dangerous relief of local symptoms of teething.Kamistad ® Baby is available in the form of a gel, which is recommended to be used 2-3 times a day (preferably after meals and before bedtime), applying it, lightly rubbing, on the gum surface [24].
Thus, given the low specificity of the clinical symptoms detected during dentition, teething syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion. At the same time, to reduce the manifestations of discomfort in infants, it is necessary to use only safe and effective means, one of which is Kamistad ® Baby.

.

Teething in children after one year

When teething in children

When children are teething. In most babies, the first teeth erupt from 5-7 months. Although three months and 9-10 months are considered the norm. There is nothing wrong, even if a child has several teeth at birth (“Teething of the first teeth – signs and delusions”). It also happens very late teething – about a year, and even later. Especially often in premature babies.If you are worried about this situation – sign up for a consultation with our specialists – he will study everything and dispel your fears or prescribe treatment, if necessary.

How to see if a child’s teeth are teething. Very simple. Ideally, from the first days of the baby’s life, the mother should regularly cleanse and massage the gums using a special nozzle or just a moistened gauze swab on her finger. In this case, the mother will immediately pay attention to the changes in the gums – they swell, turn slightly red.Although often from the moment of swelling to the birth of a long-awaited tooth, even one and a half to two months pass! Immediately before the appearance of a tooth, a so-called “eruption cyst” may appear (not necessarily!) – such a tubercle over a growing tooth, with a transparent liquid, of a bluish color.

This is quite normal, the cyst resolves on its own after the eruption of the gums and does not require any treatment. Directly during the period of teething, the baby’s gums itch, saliva is strongly secreted.There may be an increase in temperature and other body reactions, which we have described in detail in special articles. You should be careful and differentiate the swelling of the gums with the growth of teeth and the manifestation of stomatitis (“Stomatitis in infants – types, causes, symptoms”). To make sure that the clove has already been born, it is enough to lightly tap the gum with a coffee spoon – you will hear a characteristic knock.

To what age do children have teeth. Milk teeth in the amount of 20 pieces, as a rule, by the age of 3, everything is in stock.The norm is +/- 4 months. For more details read “Baby teeth in children – photo”.

Temperature during the eruption of molars in children – happens much more often than during the eruption of the first teeth up to a year. In general, the eruption of molar teeth is longer, painful and unpleasant for the baby due to the large area of ​​the tooth. About what complications and reactions can be during this period, and how to alleviate it for the baby – in the article “How to help a child when teeth are being cut.”

Teething temperature: causes, duration

During teething, the child’s body experiences severe stress and reacts to this with an increased temperature. In order not to confuse the common cold and teething temperature, you need to know what exactly happens when the teeth are cut.

The reason for the temperature rise during teething
The temperature does not arise for a reason. The child’s body reacts in this way to the emerging inflammation of the gums, through which the tooth will soon come out.At this time, immunity at the site of the future tooth decreases, and various microorganisms begin to activate, which also cause temperature.
Until a year, teething is more or less calm and does not cause severe inconvenience, but after a year, when the canines begin to erupt, which need more time to appear, the baby may experience pain, accompanied by a temperature, up to several weeks.
Often the temperature rises not due to inflammation of the gums, but due to viruses or infections that have entered the body due to lowered immunity.The body with its help fights them, because they are not able to exist at high temperatures, therefore they die.

How much can the temperature rise?
How much the temperature rises is individual for each organism. Normally, it can vary from 37.5 to 38.5 degrees. It is necessary to measure the temperature every half hour or hour, because in young children it can rise very quickly, because their body is not yet able to perform heat exchange correctly.
If the temperature begins to reach 39 degrees, then you must immediately call an ambulance, because this can mean the appearance of various complications.

Duration
Regardless of the examples given, all organisms react differently, so different children can develop according to their own scenario. Usually the temperature lasts 2-3 days and disappears when a tooth erupts. There are also cases when the temperature lasts for 5 or even 7 days, and the temperature can rise and disappear completely after a few hours.
Be that as it may, the doctor still needs to be called to examine the baby. To exclude complications and a number of other diseases, so that if something happens, start treating them as early as possible.

What other symptoms are there in addition to fever?
Temperature is not the only sign of teething. In parallel, a runny nose may join due to the spread of edema from the gums to the nasal mucosa. This happens when the upper teeth are erupting.
Also one of the symptoms is profuse salivation and weakening of the baby’s stool.

What symptoms should alert you?
Due to lowered immunity, the child’s body is not able to fight many viruses and infections. The following signs may indicate their presence:
• the nose is heavily stuffed up, and snot is flowing from it in large quantities. This means that rhinitis has joined the edema, it must be treated;
• diarrhea. Very rarely, it appears along with the temperature, but it still happens.This can mean any intestinal infection brought in by the baby with the help of toys;
• cough. Because of the strong salivation, children do not always have time to swallow saliva, so sometimes they can choke on it, as a result of which they cough. If the cough repeats systematically and at the same time there are signs of outgoing sputum, then inflammation of the respiratory tract has joined the temperature;
• reddened throat. In addition to the nasal mucosa, edema can also spread to the mucous throat. This may mean the appearance of pharyngitis or acute respiratory infections;
• nausea and vomiting.They occur at a very high temperature, possibly a symptom of an intestinal infection or damage to the nervous system.
If the baby has these signs, you need to immediately consult a doctor who will prescribe the necessary treatment, regardless of the presence of a temperature.

What measures to take in case of high temperature?
Many parents start giving antipyretic and antiviral drugs when the temperature is mild. This cannot be done, because you need to allow the body to fight the virus itself.Abuse of such drugs can lead to addiction, and the body in the future will not be able to cope with infections and viruses on its own. Pediatricians advise not to bring down the temperature until it reaches 38 degrees, because you need to give the body a fight.
With low effectiveness of antipyretic agents, you can rub the baby with a little cool water or rub it with an alcohol solution with the addition of vinegar.
Sometimes parents resort to such a method as homeopathy, but with the help of these means it will not be possible to effectively lower the temperature, although they can generally improve the condition of the crumbs.
If the temperature does not drop for more than 3 days, you should consult a doctor.

Is it possible to walk at a temperature?
If the baby’s health is normal, and the temperature is not too high, then a walk in the fresh air will only be beneficial. Only the child needs to be dressed for the weather. You need to walk calmly so that he does not overwork.
Even if there is confidence that the temperature is a consequence of teething, you still need to call a doctor who will make an accurate diagnosis and prescribe the correct treatment.Self-medication in this case is unacceptable, because in the event of an error, you can harm the baby’s health.

Sign up for treatment and consultation with a pediatric dentist!

Useful information for parents | Pediatric stomatological clinic 25

Recommendations on oral hygiene for children from 0 to 3 years old

Dentist visit

  • at 9 months
  • at 12 months
  • twice a year

Observation of teething teeth, examination of children for the early diagnosis of anomalies in the pathology of the dentition, recommendations on the rules for brushing teeth, selection of oral hygiene products, removal of dental plaque and plaque (if necessary).

Teeth cleaning

In the morning after breakfast and in the evening before bedtime. The time for brushing your teeth is 3 minutes.

Basic oral hygiene products:

  • Manual Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste

The first children’s toothbrush should be like this: with a small, atraumatic, rounded head; with very soft bristles; the tips of each bristle should be rounded and polished.

FIRST TEETH – parents clean!

Carefully clean the gums and wipe the teeth with damp gauze or special soft napkins (tissue fingertips) directing movements from the gums to the cutting edge of the tooth.
Use children’s toothbrushes, but not yet paste

2 YEARS – the child brushes his teeth under the supervision of his parents!

Use children’s toothbrushes with toothpaste

3 YEARS – the child brushes his teeth on his own, but under the supervision of his parents!

Use children’s toothbrushes with toothpaste

Power:

  • Breastfeeding up to one year
  • Avoid the use of sugar-containing drinks at night (juices, compotes, sweet kefir, etc.)n.)
  • Avoid the use of sugar-containing foods (sweets, cookies, chips, etc.) between main meals
  • Eat foods that are healthy for the teeth, containing a small amount of sugar, a sufficient amount of vitamins and minerals
  • It is good to eat solid foods, raw vegetables and fruits.

Useful products for teeth

  • Raw vegetables and fruits
  • Nuts, dried fruits
  • Milk, cheese, meat
  • Fish, tea

Harmful products for teeth

  • Caramel, lollipops, chocolate
  • Sweet carbonated drinks
  • Sugar-based chewing gum

Teething:

First, the gum swells and looks slightly inflamed, then the area where the tooth appears turns white.This phenomenon occurs due to the advancement of the tooth upward. It shines through the thinned gum, so its color changes. The final stage is the appearance of the tooth.

How to help with teething?

Use a non-allergenic polymer or silicone teether. Teethers can be liquid-filled or solid (the teether should be sterilized and cooled before each use).

Use teething gels with analgesic effect.

Gels may contain anesthetics, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory components. Pain relieving gels work superficially, but when teething occurs, they should not be used more than six times a day. Be sure to consult your dentist or pediatrician.

Early childhood caries

Caries of early childhood is typical for children from one to three years old. Most often, the cause of the development of this disease is the infection of the child from the parents with cariogenic microflora, the use of sugar-containing drinks at night (juices, compotes, sweet kefir, etc.).and lack of oral hygiene.

Carious process first affects all 4 anterior teeth (upper incisors). Caries affects almost the entire surface of the erupted front teeth, the enamel of which is still immature and fragile at this age. Then the rest of the child’s temporary teeth begin to be affected by caries. The carious process progresses rapidly, leading to tooth decay and early extraction.

How to prevent decay of deciduous teeth?

Be sure to sterilize bottles, teats, baby toys and teethers!
Do not take samples from the food on the baby’s spoon!
Limit breastfeeding (after a year) and carbohydrate intake (sweet drink) at night!
A baby should not suck on a pacifier by one year!

Average terms of the eruption of deciduous teeth.

Central incisors 6-8 months

Lateral incisors 8-10 months.

Canine teeth 16-20 months

First molars 12-16 months

Second molars 20-30 months

Timely and consistent teething indicates the normal development of the child’s body. Violation of the timing and sequence of eruption can be noted with endocrine and metabolic disorders or general diseases of the child.

Remember that you need to go to the dentist, when the child is healthy and does not have a toothache!

Recommendations on oral hygiene for children from 3 to 6 years old

Dentist visit:

  • Twice a year

Examination of children for the early diagnosis of dental caries and its complications, examination of children for the early diagnosis of anomalies in the pathology of the dentoalveolar system, recommendations on the rules for cleaning teeth, selection of oral hygiene products, removal of dental plaque and plaque (if necessary), sealing teeth fissures

Teeth cleaning:

In the morning after breakfast and in the evening before bedtime. Time to brush your teeth – 3 minutes.

Basic oral hygiene products:

  • Manual Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste

A toothbrush for children 3-6 years old should be as follows: with soft bristles, with rounded and polished tips; with a large handle; with indication of the degree of wear of the bristles.

Power:

Products useful for teeth should contain a small amount of sugar, a sufficient amount of vitamins and minerals.It is good to eat solid foods.

Avoid the use of sugar-containing foods (sweets, cookies, etc.) between main meals.

Useful products for teeth

  • Raw vegetables and fruits
  • Nuts, dried fruits
  • Milk, cheese, meat
  • Fish, tea

Harmful products for teeth

  • Caramel, lollipops, chocolate
  • Sweet carbonated drinks
  • Sugar-based chewing gum

Dental caries

Tooth decay is a disease of the hard tissues of the tooth that occurs with irregular oral hygiene and excessive consumption of sweets.

The defeat of the teeth with caries is always accompanied by a violation of their function, with the destruction of the teeth, difficulties arise when eating, pain, a violation of appearance, especially when the front group of teeth is affected by caries. Caries in temporary teeth proceeds with the same discomfort as in adults.

Complications of deciduous teeth caries can lead to severe inflammatory processes in the maxillofacial region.

Early extraction of deciduous teeth is one of the reasons for the formation of dentoalveolar anomalies, that is, malocclusion, the shape and size of the dentition.

At the age of 5-6, temporary teeth begin to fall out and permanent teeth begin to erupt.

The first permanent molars appear in the oral cavity as the very first permanent teeth. At the same time, temporary teeth do not fall out, since the first permanent molars erupt behind the temporary molars from behind, so parents do not pay due attention to these teeth, taking them for temporary ones.

On the chewing surfaces of the first permanent molars, deep pits (fissures) are determined, which are primarily affected by caries.To protect against caries, immediately after the eruption of these teeth, it is necessary to carry out a sealing technique, which includes filling the fissures with a special material.

Therefore, it is important to visit the dentist on time to identify caries, its treatment and prevention, both in temporary and permanent teeth.

IMPORTANT!

If dark gray spots appear on the teeth, if the teeth react to cold, hot, sweet, sour, and even more so if carious cavities are visible on the teeth, then, obviously, the child has caries.You must immediately contact your dentist.

Remember that you need to go to the dentist, when the child is healthy and does not have a toothache!

Recommendations on oral hygiene for children from 6 to 15 years old

Dentist visit:

  • Twice a year

Examination of children for early diagnosis of dental caries and its complications, detection of dentoalveolar anomalies and early orthodontic treatment, control of the condition of the gums and periodontal tissues, recommendations on the rules for cleaning teeth, selection of oral hygiene products, removal of dental plaque and plaque (if necessary), sealing teeth fissures

Teeth cleaning:

In the morning after breakfast and in the evening before bedtime.The time for brushing your teeth is 3 minutes.

Basic oral hygiene products:

  • Manual Toothbrush / Electric Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste (on the recommendation of a dentist)

A manual toothbrush should have: medium bristles; rounded and polished bristle tips; a rounded head with a size corresponding to the size of the teeth; small head, which provides maneuverability in the oral cavity; voluminous handle for better grip of the brush.

For children over six years of age, we recommend the electric children’s toothbrush: with soft two-level bristles; with indication of bristle wear; with a round head.

Additional oral hygiene products, are used on the recommendation of a dentist and under the supervision of parents from 7-9 years old:

  • Floss
  • Rinse aid
  • Sugar Free Chewing Gum with Xylitol
  • Foam
  • Tongue scraper
  • Dental Brushes

Flossing (FLOSS)

From the age of 7, it is necessary to introduce the use of dental floss into personal hygiene.This is especially indicated for children with a high risk of caries, with crowded position of the teeth, as well as those undergoing orthodontic treatment using non-removable orthodontic equipment.

It is recommended to use dental floss before brushing your teeth with toothpaste, and if you use a mouthwash, then after the toothpaste, before rinsing. Dental floss, or floss, has been developed specifically for cleaning hard-to-brush contact surfaces of teeth.

Mouthwash is recommended as an additional hygiene product, i.e.because it cleans the interdental spaces well and has a deodorizing effect. The rinse aid must contain fluoride and not contain alcohol. Rinse mouth for 1 minute, do not swallow.

The use of dental rinses allows you to destroy a significant part of the bacteria remaining after brushing with a toothbrush. By improving gum health, the risk of periodontitis and other dental diseases is reduced. Tooth rinses help maintain whiteness, strengthen enamel, fight tartar and prevent tooth decay.

Foam is used for cleaning teeth when it is not possible to use a regular toothbrush. The action of foams is expressed in cleaning and leveling the acid-base balance in the oral cavity, which prevents the growth of dental plaque and the development of pathogenic microorganisms in it.

Xylitol (xylitol) has pronounced anti-carious properties: it has a specific antimicrobial effect against the most cariogenic microorganisms, accelerates salivation, improves self-cleaning of the oral cavity and increases the ability of saliva to strengthen tooth enamel.The use of chewing gum containing xylitol is recommended after a meal for 10-15 minutes.

ATTENTION! However, it must be remembered that excessive intake of xylitol in the body can lead to undesirable side effects, as it contributes to diarrhea. The daily dose of xylitol for an adult is from 30 to 50 grams.

Professional oral hygiene (teeth cleaning) – a system of therapeutic and prophylactic measures carried out in a dental clinic, aimed at preventing the onset and progression of oral diseases.At the same time, the doctor or hygienist removes plaque and tartar, polishes the surfaces of the teeth.

Professional oral hygiene should be carried out at least once a year.

Power:

Products useful for teeth should contain a small amount of sugar, a sufficient amount of vitamins and minerals. It is good to eat solid foods.

Avoid the use of sugar-containing foods (sweets, cookies, etc.) between main meals.

To exclude the use of sweet carbonated drinks.

Useful products for teeth

  • Raw vegetables and fruits
  • Nuts, dried fruits
  • Milk, cheese, meat
  • Fish, tea

Harmful products for teeth

  • Caramel, lollipops, chocolate
  • Sweet carbonated drinks
  • Sugar-based chewing gum

At the age of 6-15 years, the teeth of the temporary bite are replaced with permanent teeth.

Timely and consistent teething indicates the normal development of the child’s body. Violation of the timing and sequence of eruption can be noted with endocrine and metabolic disorders or general diseases of the child.

Dental caries

Tooth decay is a disease of the hard tissues of the tooth that occurs with irregular oral hygiene and excessive consumption of sweets.

The defeat of the teeth with caries is always accompanied by a violation of their function, with the destruction of the teeth, difficulties arise when eating, pain, a violation of appearance, especially when the front group of teeth is affected by caries.Caries of temporary and permanent teeth in children proceeds with the same unpleasant sensations as in adults.

From the age of 6, temporary teeth begin to fall out and permanent teeth erupt.

The first permanent molars appear in the oral cavity as the very first of the permanent teeth behind the posterior temporary molars, so parents do not pay enough attention to these teeth without noticing them.

Ripening of enamel (strengthening) continues after teething in the oral cavity, therefore it is extremely important to create full-fledged conditions for this process: for this it is necessary to carry out professional oral hygiene with application of special mineral gels, thoroughly brush your teeth at home.

Attention! On the occlusal surfaces of the first permanent molars, deep pits (fissures) are often identified, which are primarily affected by caries. To protect against caries, immediately after the eruption of these teeth, it is necessary to carry out a sealing technique, which includes filling the fissures with a special material.

Therefore, it is important to visit the dentist on time, to identify caries, its treatment and prevention, both in temporary, and even more so in permanent teeth.

IMPORTANT!

If dark gray spots appear on the teeth, if the teeth react to cold, hot, sweet, sour, and even more so, if carious cavities are visible on the teeth, then obviously the child has caries.We must immediately contact the dentist! If there is crowding of teeth, a permanent tooth erupted not evenly or at the wrong time, if bleeding appears when brushing your teeth, you should immediately contact your dentist!

Remember that you need to go to the dentist, when the child is healthy and does not have a toothache!

Recommendations on oral hygiene for adolescents from 15 to 18 years old

Dentist visit:

  • twice a year

Examination of children for early diagnosis of dental caries and its complications, detection of dentoalveolar anomalies and early orthodontic treatment, control of gum condition, recommendations on the rules for cleaning teeth, selection of oral hygiene products, removal of dental plaque and plaque (if necessary)

Teeth cleaning:

The procedure for caring for the oral cavity should be regular and carried out in the morning after breakfast and in the evening before bedtime.

Time for brushing teeth – 3 minutes.

Basic oral hygiene products:

  • Manual Toothbrush / Electric Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste (on the recommendation of a dentist)

A prophylactic manual toothbrush should have: medium bristles; rounded and polished bristle tips; a rounded head with a size corresponding to the size of the teeth; small head, which provides maneuverability in the oral cavity; voluminous handle for better grip of the brush.

For adolescents, an electric toothbrush should be as follows: with a prophylactic brush attachment, with a two-level arrangement of bristles, have two degrees of hardness – medium and soft, with an indication of the degree of wear of the bristles, with a round head, with moderate vibration

Complementary oral hygiene products :

  • Floss
  • Rinse aid
  • Foam
  • Dental Brushes
  • Chewing gum (sugar free)
  • Tongue scraper
  • Irrigator

Dental brushes are used to remove plaque from the interdental spaces.It is especially important to use dental brushes for patients with periodontal diseases, fixed orthopedic and orthodontic structures in the oral cavity.

It is recommended to use dental floss before brushing your teeth with toothpaste, and if you use a mouthwash, then after the toothpaste, before rinsing.

Dental floss or floss were developed specifically for cleaning hard-to-brush contact surfaces of teeth.

Floss are made of special synthetic fiber.They can be waxed or non-waxed, round and flat. Dental floss with special prophylactic impregnations, which strengthen the tooth enamel in hard-to-reach places, are also effective.

Mouthwash is recommended as an additional hygiene product, because it cleans the interdental spaces well and has a deodorizing effect. The rinse aid must contain fluoride and not contain alcohol. Rinse mouth for 1 minute, do not swallow.

The use of dental rinses allows you to destroy a significant part of the bacteria remaining after brushing with a toothbrush.By improving gum health, the risk of periodontitis and other dental diseases is reduced. Tooth rinses help maintain whiteness, strengthen enamel, fight tartar and prevent tooth decay.

Irrigation of the oral cavity is carried out using an irrigator by supplying a constant or pulsating stream of water under pressure. It has a cleansing, massaging and healing effect. The procedure time for the gum of one jaw is 2-3 minutes.

ATTENTION! The use of oral hygiene irrigators cannot completely replace a toothbrush.

Foam is used for cleaning teeth when it is not possible to use a regular toothbrush. The action of foams is expressed in cleaning and leveling the acid-base balance in the oral cavity, which prevents the growth of dental plaque and the development of pathogenic microorganisms in it.

A tongue scraper should be used daily to remove plaque from the surface of the tongue.

Xylitol (xylitol) has pronounced anti-carious properties: it has a specific antimicrobial effect against the most cariogenic microorganisms, accelerates salivation, improves self-cleaning of the oral cavity and increases the ability of saliva to strengthen tooth enamel. The use of chewing gum containing xylitol is recommended after a meal for 10-15 minutes.

ATTENTION! However, it must be remembered that excessive intake of xylitol in the body can lead to undesirable side effects, as it contributes to diarrhea.The daily dose of xylitol for an adult is from 30 to 50 grams.

Professional oral hygiene (teeth cleaning) – a system of therapeutic and prophylactic measures carried out in a dental clinic, aimed at preventing the onset and progression of oral diseases. At the same time, the doctor or hygienist removes plaque and tartar, polishes the surfaces of the teeth.

Professional oral hygiene should be carried out at least once a year.

Power:

Products useful for teeth should contain a small amount of sugar, a sufficient amount of vitamins and minerals. It is good to eat solid foods, raw vegetables and fruits.

Avoid the use of sugar-containing foods (sweets, cookies, etc.) between main meals.

To exclude the use of sweet carbonated drinks.

Useful products for teeth

  • Raw vegetables and fruits
  • Nuts, dried fruits
  • Milk, cheese, meat
  • Fish, tea

Harmful products for teeth

  • Caramel, lollipops, chocolate
  • Sweet carbonated drinks
  • Sugar-based chewing gum

Caries

The reason for the development of this disease is irregular oral hygiene or its absence, the use of high carbohydrate foods.

For the prevention of dental caries, it is necessary to periodically visit the dentist for the purpose of professional teeth cleaning, covering the teeth with fluoride-containing varnish.

Gingivitis

This is an inflammation of the gums, which is accompanied by bleeding when brushing your teeth. If left untreated, gingivitis can cause periodontitis and tooth loss.

ATTENTION! At this age, hormonal changes in the body continue, which affects the condition of the gums and periodontal tissues (“youthful” gingivitis appears), in the dental office, while you will be timely prescribed preventive measures and, if necessary, performed dental treatment.

Remember that you need to go to the dentist, when the child is healthy and does not have a toothache!

90,000 Teething of temporary and permanent occlusion in children

It is believed that at the age of 6-7 years the first milk teeth (lower central incisors) should fall out, at the same time the first permanent molars grow. But what if the pattern breaks down? Can the upper incisors fall out first, or, for example, the lateral incisors and then the central incisors? What does this mean, and should parents pay special attention to this?

What if the teeth fell out too early? Or did the molars begin to grow before the incisors fell out? Is it normal for molars to start growing at 4-5 years of age? With what it can be connected? When should the situation alert parents?

Milk teeth appeared too early or too late

The rudiments of deciduous teeth are formed from the dental plate at the 7th week of embryonic development.The first are the rudiments of the lower incisors, a little later the rudiments of the upper jaw incisors are formed. By the end of the third month of fetal development, the tooth rudiments are completely separated and, as a result of cellular transformations, take the form of crowns of future teeth of a temporary bite. Further, the formation of tooth tissues (enamel, dentin, cement) begins, which continues until the birth of the child.

Although the enamel of an erupted tooth is similar in structure to the enamel of a tooth before eruption, it also has some significant differences, in that mature enamel contains more mineral components that cause resistance to caries.The enamel continues to mature after the eruption of the tooth, mainly due to saliva.

It is with this that the relationship between the early teething of deciduous teeth in a child and the risk of developing caries in the first year of life is connected. The first tooth (usually the incisors of the lower jaw) appears in a child at about 6 months of age. However, an earlier eruption at 3-4 months is increasingly common. As a rule, this is due to a genetic predisposition, and is not a marker of certain, in particular, endocrine disorders.Sometimes babies are already born with teeth – these are natal teeth. Neonatal teeth include teeth that have erupted in a baby in the first month of life (neonatal period). The reasons can be both genetic factors and an excess of calcium in the mother’s body during pregnancy or endocrine disorders. In this case, the baby should be shown to the pediatric dentist to determine the completeness of early erupted teeth, and, accordingly, the choice of treatment tactics.

Teething of deciduous teeth is considered late if the first tooth did not appear when the child reaches 1.5 years of age.In such a situation, it is necessary to consult a pediatric dentist and pediatrician. Genetic factors and endocrine pathology can often be the cause.

Often, pediatric dentists encounter milk teeth that have not erupted to the end. As a rule, these are individual teeth (a group of teeth, for example, the first temporary molars). Incomplete eruption of teeth is mainly associated with anatomical features, namely the fusion of the tooth root with the walls of the alveoli. Departure of teething from the usual pattern is not a pathology.Also, the timing and sequence of teething can be affected by birth trauma and the presence of congenital clefts. In the absence of a replacement tooth rudiment (primary adentia), the timing of the loss of a temporary tooth also increases.

General somatic pathology also affects the eruption of milk teeth. So in children with cerebral palsy, there is a lag in the formation of a temporary bite. It is the activation of teething that serves as one of the reliable criteria for assessing successful rehabilitation based on the main diagnosis of such patients.

Rickets and rickets-like conditions can also lead to delayed teething. Due to a lack (not assimilation of vitamin D) and a violation of mineral metabolism.

Permanent teeth appeared too soon or too late

It should be noted that in connection with the manifestation of acceleration processes, the timing of the eruption of permanent teeth has changed somewhat. Permanent teeth began to erupt earlier, at least 6-8 months. Often, already at the age of five, a child has a changeable bite, in which the first permanent molars and central incisors are already erupted.

The timing of teething is influenced by both local and general factors.

Local:

  • injury,
  • premature extraction of a temporary tooth,
  • adentia,
  • tooth retention,
  • congenital clefts.

In the absence of the rudiment of a permanent replacement tooth or in its incorrect position, there is no pressure on the bony septum separating it from the roots of the temporary tooth.This leads to a lack of activity of osteoclasts, the cells responsible for root resorption.

General:

  • heredity,
  • genetic factors,
  • endocrine pathology
  • In particular, in diseases of the thyroid gland as a result of imbalance in the mineral balance in the body, there is a delay in the eruption of teeth, both temporary and permanent bite.So with hypothyroidism, there is a delay in the eruption of milk teeth for 1-2 years, permanent ones – for 2-3 years.

  • general health.

In general, more and more pediatric dentists and pediatricians note significant differences in the timing and sequence of teething of temporary and permanent dentition in children. Teething is a multifactorial process. The timing of teething is influenced by both race and the general health of the body.None of the theories existing today fully give an answer to the mechanisms of teething.

Indisputable, in the opinion of many domestic and foreign pediatric dentists, is the fact that the eruption of both temporary and permanent teeth in today’s generation of children occurs earlier than average by at least 6-8 months.

Regular check-ups can help you avoid serious dental problems. The pediatric dentist and orthodontist closely monitor the formation of the child’s dentition, providing timely assistance if necessary.

March 19, 2020
90,000 Recommendations on oral hygiene for children from 0 to 3 years old

Dentist visit

  • at 9 months
  • at 12 months
  • twice a year

Teething monitoring.
Examination of children for early diagnosis of anomalies in the pathology of the dentition.
Recommendations for the rules of brushing your teeth.
Selection of oral hygiene products.
Removal of dental plaque and plaque (if necessary).

Teeth cleaning

In the morning after breakfast and in the evening before bedtime. The time for brushing your teeth is 3 minutes.

Basic oral hygiene products:

  • Manual Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste

The first children’s toothbrush should be like this:
with a small, atraumatic, rounded head;
with very soft bristles;
the tips of each bristle should be rounded and polished.

FIRST TEETH – parents clean!

Carefully clean the gums and wipe the teeth with damp gauze or special soft napkins (tissue fingertips) directing movements from the gums to the cutting edge of the tooth.
Use children’s toothbrushes, but so far without paste.
2 YEARS – the child brushes his teeth under the supervision of his parents!
Use children’s toothbrushes with toothpaste
3 YEARS – the child brushes his teeth on his own, but under the supervision of his parents!
Use children’s toothbrushes with toothpaste

Power:

Breastfeeding up to one year.
Avoid the use of sugar-containing drinks at night (juices, compotes, sweet kefir, etc.).
Avoid the use of sugar-containing foods (sweets, cookies, chips, etc.) between meals.
Eat foods that are healthy for teeth, containing a small amount of sugar, a sufficient amount of vitamins and minerals.
It is useful to eat solid food, raw vegetables and fruits.

Useful products for teeth
Raw vegetables and fruits
Nuts, dried fruits
Milk, cheese, meat
Fish, tea

Harmful products for teeth
Caramel, candy, chocolate
Sweet carbonated drinks
Sugar-containing chewing gum

Teething:

First, the gum swells and looks slightly inflamed, then the area where the tooth appears whitens.This phenomenon occurs due to the advancement of the tooth upward. It shines through the thinned gum, so its color changes. The final stage is the appearance of the tooth.

How to help with teething?

Use a teether made of non-allergenic polymers or silicone. Teethers can be liquid-filled or solid (the teether should be sterilized and cooled before each use).

Use teething gels with analgesic effect.

Gels may contain anesthetics, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory components. Pain relieving gels work superficially, but when teething occurs, they should not be used more than six times a day. Be sure to consult your dentist or pediatrician.

Early childhood caries

Early childhood caries is typical for children from one to three years old. Most often, the cause of the development of this disease is the infection of the child from the parents with cariogenic microflora, the use of sugar-containing drinks at night (juices, compotes, sweet kefir, etc.).and lack of oral hygiene.

Carious process first affects all 4 anterior teeth (upper incisors). Caries affects almost the entire surface of the erupted front teeth, the enamel of which is still immature and fragile at this age. Then the rest of the child’s temporary teeth begin to be affected by caries. The carious process progresses rapidly, leading to tooth decay and early extraction.

How to prevent decay of deciduous teeth?

Be sure to sterilize bottles, pacifiers, baby toys and teethers!
Do not take samples from the food on the baby’s spoon!
Limit breastfeeding (after a year) and carbohydrate intake (sweet drink) at night!
A baby should not suck on a pacifier by one year!

Average terms of the eruption of deciduous teeth.

Central incisors

6-8 months

Lateral incisors

8-10 months

Fangs

16-20 months

First molars

12-16 months

Second molars

20-30 months

Timely and consistent teething indicates the normal development of the child’s body. Violation of the timing and sequence of eruption can be noted with endocrine and metabolic disorders or general diseases of the child.

Remember that you need to go to the dentist, when the child is healthy and does not have a toothache!

Ten questions about baby teeth…

QUESTION No. 1. Is it true that milk teeth are formed from milk?

So thought Hippocrates, who gave them this name. In principle, the ancient doctor was not far from the truth: there is a lot of calcium in breast milk, which is used to build teeth and bones. In the “drink” from cows this important macronutrient is not less, but it is practically not absorbed by the body. Hence the conclusion: breastfeed the baby, and he will have teeth – just a feast for the eyes!

QUESTION No. 2.Why do baby teeth sometimes erupt “out of schedule”?

In a child who was born prematurely, weakened, with low weight, as well as who was ill in the first months of life and has signs of rickets, the delay in teething is associated with unfavorable factors acting on the body. If the child is healthy, and there are no teeth by 9-12 months, ask grandparents what month they erupted in mom and dad. The program of late teething of deciduous teeth, as a rule, is written in the genes.However, the same genes can endow a baby with teeth much ahead of schedule.

QUESTION No. 3. In what order should teeth erupt?

Dentists calculate the number of teeth that a baby should have, according to the formula – age (in months) minus six: at 7 months – one tooth, at 8 – two, at 9 – three, and so on. And this is to a minimum! By the time the baby is one year old, 6-8 incisors have time to grow and the upper molar begins to break through, and he will receive a full set of 20 milk teeth only by the 2nd birthday (see the table for details).
If the order is violated, pay attention of the pediatrician to this fact and show the baby to the pediatric dentist.

QUESTION No. 4. How do you know if the first tooth will hatch soon?

The earliest symptom is increased production of saliva. It begins to flow like a river a couple of months before the event due to irritation of the nerve endings. Gathering in the cervical folds, saliva significantly irritates the delicate baby skin, so it must be constantly blotted with a soft gauze napkin, keeping it close at hand all the time.

A later sign of the appearance of the first tooth is a noticeably changed behavior of a six-month-old baby. It can be unreasonable whims, whining, poor sleep and appetite, a constant urge to put a toy or a finger in your mouth … Noticing this, look into the child’s mouth. Are the gums underneath red and swollen? Has an inflamed tubercle appeared in the middle? A few more days, and the baby can be given a silver spoon “by the tooth”.

QUESTION No. 5. If the teeth are teething, does it mean that the baby will definitely get sick?

Teething is not measles or chickenpox, but a normal, natural process in which the temperature should not rise.The ideal option is when the edge of a tooth is discovered by accident while feeding a child – one day the mother just stumbles upon it with a spoon. But this is not always the case.

Anxiety caused by a baby’s hatching tooth, as well as the associated lack of sleep and malnutrition, weaken the immune system and make the child defenseless against infections – respiratory and intestinal. Try to protect the child from them by minimizing contact with strangers. Make sure that everything that the baby pulls into the mouth is clean, otherwise indigestion cannot be avoided.Do not give him new food, do not get preventive vaccinations, do not change the usual regimen. As a rule, this is enough so that the appearance of the next tooth does not create problems.

QUESTION No. 6. How to make teething easier?

Inflammation of the gums in the place where the edge of the incisor is about to appear, tooth-cutting gels with analgesics and substances that relieve redness and swelling are eliminated. In the series of Karavaev’s balms there is a special version of Vitaon for infant gums: the herbal extracts contained in it have an anesthetic effect with a slight “freezing” effect – the cold soothes itching and pain, has an anti-inflammatory effect, and simply distracts the baby from unpleasant sensations.

QUESTION No. 7. How to feed a child at a crucial moment of teething?

With the first tooth, the sucking reflex is replaced by the need to gnaw and bite, so liquid and soft food is now indispensable. At each feeding, give your child a piece of dried bread, a slice of cucumber or carrots that have not been cooked until they are completely soft, and a quarter of an apple without peels and seeds. Chewing improves the blood supply to the gums, trains and strengthens the teeth that have appeared, and improves the nutrition of those that need to erupt.The ability to chew well is one of the signs of the well-being of the central nervous system. In addition, this is the key to not only healthy digestion, but also clear articulation, intelligible speech. Babies who have “porridge in their mouths” in infancy really preferred porridge and puree to solid food.

QUESTION No. 8. Does a baby need to brush his teeth?

It used to be that it was not necessary to do this until 2-3 years of age: after all, it is impossible to teach such a crumb to wield a brush. However, pediatric dentists have revised the previous guidelines.It turns out that the child will have to master the science of how to properly brush his teeth under the supervision of his parents from the first tooth until the age of 10 – only at this age can he be entrusted with a brush at his disposal.

Does the baby already have an incisor? Buy a special finger brush for babies at the pharmacy. Squeeze a little baby toothpaste for milk teeth on it – literally on the very edge. This amount is sufficient to clean one or more incisors. Until the child learns to rinse his mouth after the procedure, use the paste not every time – you can remove plaque from the tooth with a “bare” brush.Brushing a baby’s teeth is enough once a day.

QUESTION No. 9. Is it true that the nipple can break the bite?

Unfortunately, this is the case. Stick to the rule: the first tooth has appeared – it’s time to part with the dummy. Otherwise, the incisors will begin to grow forward, creating the so-called open bite (like in a rabbit) and distorting the features of the child’s face – after all, the jaws are actively formed at an early age. True, there are special orthodontic nipples that are used to correct such defects that have been outlined already in infancy.

Meanwhile, bite problems arise not only because of the pacifier – they are congenital or associated with bottle feeding, and not from the mother’s breast. Underdevelopment of the lower jaw is often found in “artificial” children. Because of the tightness, the teeth can grow on it as a “bush”, overlapping each other. A droplet-shaped pacifier will help this trouble. Babies, whose lower jaw is well developed, are more suitable for the “cherry” nipple, which repeats the shape of the mother’s nipple.

QUESTION No. 10.What will help make your baby’s teeth strong?

To strengthen the enamel, pediatricians advise to arrange a “calcium subsidy” for a child during teething – give 1/3 of a tablet of calcium gluconate (or glycerophosphate) 3 times a day for 2 weeks. They do not dissolve in water – rub them and add to food.

And you can use eggshell instead of tablets – calcium is absorbed from it several times better. Collect the shell of several hard-boiled eggs and, removing the inner film from it (to avoid an allergic reaction), heat it in a pan, grind in a mortar or grind in a coffee grinder until powdery state.Sprinkle the powder into your baby’s food literally on the tip of a knife three times a day for 2 weeks.

We advise you to read – Extraction of teeth under general anesthesia.