Eye

Eye inflammation cure: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment of Eye Inflammation

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Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment of Eye Inflammation

Uveitis is a broad term for many problems with your eye. What they have in common is eye inflammation and swelling that can destroy eye tissues. That destruction can lead to poor vision or blindness.

The word “uveitis” is used because the swelling most often affects the part of your eye called the uvea.

Your eye is made of layers. The uvea is the middle layer.  It’s between the white part of your eye — called the sclera — and the inner layers of your eye.

Your uvea contains three important structures:

The iris. That’s the colored circle at the front of your eye.

The ciliary body. Its job is to help your lens focus and make the fluid that nourishes the inside of your eye.

The choroid. This is a group of blood vessels that give your retina the nutrients it needs.

Are There Different Types of Uveitis?

Yes. Which type you have depends on where the swelling is.

  • Anterior uveitis is the most common. It affects the front of your eye.
  • Intermediate uveitis affects your ciliary body.
  • Posterior uveitis affects the back of your eye.
  • If your entire uvea is inflamed, you have panuveitis.

What Causes It?

Many things, and they’re all tied to inflammation.

For example, a toxic substance could get into your eye and cause inflammation. So could a bruise to your eye.

Uveitis may also be caused by an autoimmune disease, meaning your body is attacking itself. That attack causes inflammation, and so do infections and tumors in your eye or other parts of your body.

Are Some People at Greater Risk?

Folks with certain gene combinations and those who smoke seem to be at greater risk.

Some diseases also increase the chances, including:

  • AIDS
  • Ankylosing spondylitis
  • Behcet’s disease
  • CMV retinitis
  • Herpes zoster infection
  • Histoplasmosis
  • Kawasaki disease
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis
  • Reactive arthritis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Sarcoidosis
  • Syphilis
  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Tuberculosis
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease

Symptoms

They can affect one or both eyes, and they may come on quickly. In some cases, they happen more gradually.

The warning signs include:

  • Eye redness
  • Pain
  • Blurry or lessened vision and sensitivity to light
  • Floaters, those tiny dots or specks in your vision

If you have any of these, it’s important to see your eye doctor. Prompt diagnosis and treatment can help save your vision.

Diagnosis

Your eye doctor will want to know about your medical history and overall health. This is because uveitis can be a result of other diseases. They may order blood tests, skin tests, or X-rays. They’ll also give you a thorough eye exam.

Treatment

The first step may be eye drops that have medicine — usually a corticosteroid — to fight inflammation. You might get dilating eye drops to prevent scarring and relax your eye muscles to cut eye twitches. If the drops don’t work, your doctor may add a pill or injection.

If an infection causes your uveitis, you’ll get other drugs, too. These infection fighters include antibiotics and antivirals.

If you don’t get better with those treatments, or if your uveitis is severe, your doctor may prescribe stronger drugs. These drugs may include immunosuppressives. Those dampen your immune system. You’d use them with corticosteroids.

If you have anterior uveitis, your doctor will probably prescribe eye drops at first. If you have intermediate, posterior, or panuveitis, they may give you injections, oral medications, or an immunosuppressive drug. They could also suggest an implantable device that slowly releases medication.

In some cases, your doctor may recommend a procedure to remove some of the gel-like substance in your eye. You may hear them call it vitreous.

Treatment is important and can prevent serious complications. Make sure you report any new symptom to your doctor, and go to your follow-up visits as your doctor says.

Symptoms, Causes, Treatment & Types

Overview

What is uveitis?

Uveitis is a general term used to describe a group of diseases that cause red eyes, eye pain and inflammation. These diseases typically affect the uvea, the eye’s middle layer. They can also affect other parts of the eye. If not treated, uveitis can cause permanent blindness or vision loss.

Does uveitis affect both eyes?

Uveitis may develop in one eye or both eyes. It can affect the:

  • Retina: The innermost layer of the eye senses colors and light and sends images to the brain.
  • Uvea: The middle layer of the eye includes the iris (colored part of the eye), choroid (membrane with most of the eye’s blood vessels) and ciliary body (connects the iris and choroid and provides nutrients to the eye).
  • Sclera: The eye’s white outer part.

How common is uveitis?

An estimated 30,000 Americans lose their eyesight every year due to uveitis.

Who might get uveitis?

Uveitis affects people of all ages, even children. Women and people between 40 to 60 years old have a slightly higher risk.

What are the types of uveitis?

Healthcare providers typically classify uveitis based on where the eye inflammation occurs. Types of uveitis include:

Anterior: The most common type, anterior uveitis causes inflammation in the front of the eye. Symptoms may appear suddenly and can occasionally resolve on their own if they are mild. Some people have chronic, recurring eye inflammation that goes away with treatment and then comes back. You may be more prone to anterior uveitis if you have:

  • Arthritis, including ankylosing spondylitis (AS).
  • Autoimmune diseases, such as sarcoidosis or juvenile idiopathic arthritis.
  • Gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
  • Prior infections with the herpes virus (cold sore or genital herpes) or the chicken pox virus.

Intermediate: Young adults are more prone to intermediate uveitis. This condition causes inflammation in the middle of the eye. Also called cyclitis or vitritis, it often affects the vitreous, the fluid-filled space inside the eye. Symptoms may improve, go away and then come back and get worse. About one in three people with intermediate uveitis also have:

Posterior: The least common form, posterior uveitis affects the inner part of the eye. It is often also the most severe. It can affect the retina, optic nerve and choroid. The choroid contains blood vessels that supply blood to the retina. It’s sometimes called choroiditis or chorioretinitis. This type can cause recurrent symptoms that last months or years. Potential causes include:

  • Birdshot chorioretinopathy.
  • Viral etiologies such as herpes virus or chicken pox virus.
  • Lupus.
  • Sarcoidosis.
  • Syphilis.
  • Tuberculosis

Panuveitis: Rarely, uveitis affects all three layers of the eye. This type is more severe and raises the chances of permanent vision loss. Potential causes include:

  • Bacterial or fungal retinitis.
  • Viral retinitis.
  • Toxoplasmosis.
  • Lupus.
  • Sarcoidosis.
  • Syphilis.
  • Tuberculosis (TB).

Symptoms and Causes

What causes uveitis?

An estimated one in three uveitis cases have no known cause. People who smoke are more prone to uveitis. Eye inflammation may also result from:

  • Eye injury.
  • Eye surgery.
  • Infections, such as the herpes virus, chicken pox virus, TB, syphilis.
  • Inflammatory diseases, such as lupus, IBD and rheumatoid arthritis.

What are the symptoms of uveitis?

Uveitis symptoms may come on gradually or suddenly. You may experience:

  • Blurred vision.
  • Dark, floating shapes in your field of vision (eye floaters).
  • Eye pain or pressure.
  • Light sensitivity.
  • Red eyes.
  • Vision loss.

Diagnosis and Tests

How is uveitis diagnosed?

The healthcare provider caring for your eyes will look at the inside of your eye during an eye exam. A standard eye exam usually includes:

  • Visual acuity test (reading eye charts) to check for vision loss.
  • Ocular pressure test (tonometry) to measure pressure inside the eye.
  • Slit-lamp exam to examine the inside of the eye with a special microscope called a slit lamp.
  • Dilated eye exam to widen pupils so your healthcare provider can look inside your eyes using a special lens.

Your healthcare provider may also order other tests, such as:

  • Blood tests to rule out infections or underlying autoimmune diseases.
  • Imaging of your chest or brain to look for systemic inflammatory causes.
  • Fluorescein angiography to get images of blood vessels in the back of the eye.
  • Gonioscopy to examine the front of the eye where liquid drains.
  • Optical coherence tomography (OCT) to get detailed images of the back of the eye, including the retina.
  • Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) to produce 3D images of blood flow through the eye.
  • Visual field test to check for damage to the optic nerve that may affect your ability to see things off to the side (peripheral vision).

Management and Treatment

How is uveitis managed or treated?

Untreated uveitis can lead to blindness. It’s important to see your healthcare provider right away if you have eye redness, inflammation, or pain. In many instances, treatments help restore lost vision. They can also prevent more tissue damage and ease inflammation and pain. If a health condition contributed to uveitis, getting that disease treated should also relieve the eye inflammation.

Some forms of uveitis take a long time to go away. Some come back after treatment. Depending on the disease type, treatments include:

  • Antibiotics, antivirals or antifungals: These medications treat uveitis caused by an infection.
  • Eye drops: Dilating (widening) the pupils with eye drops can reduce pain and swelling. Eye drops can also keep the iris and lens from sticking together, a complication that can occur with anterior uveitis. Your healthcare provider may also prescribe eye drops to relieve pressure in the eye (ocular hypertension).
  • Steroidal anti-inflammatories: Medications that contain corticosteroids (steroids) alleviate eye inflammation. These medications come in many forms: drops, ointments, oral pills, injections inside or around the eye, intravenous (IV) infusions or a capsule that your eye healthcare provider surgically implants inside the eye.
  • Immunosuppressants: These medications calm the immune system’s response to autoimmune disease or systemwide inflammation. Your provider may prescribe these drugs if uveitis affects both eyes, doesn’t respond to steroids or threatens your vision. You may take the medication orally as a pill, as an injection or through an IV infusion into a vein.

What are uveitis treatment side effects or risks?

Certain immunosuppressants can increase your risk of cancer. Long-term steroid use may lead to:

What are the complications of uveitis?

An estimated one in five people with uveitis will develop high pressure in the eye (ocular hypertension). This condition can lead to glaucoma and irreversible vision loss. People with uveitis are also at risk for other eye problems, including:

  • Posterior synechiae.
  • Glaucoma.
  • Cataracts.
  • Cystoid macular edema (CME), swelling of the eye macula in the retina.
  • Damage to the vitreous gel substance that fills the eye.
  • Detached retina.
  • Damage to the retina leading to vision loss.

Prevention

How can I prevent uveitis?

Healthcare providers usually don’t know what causes most cases of uveitis. There isn’t much you can do to prevent the disease.

Doing what you can to maintain good eye health is always wise. Getting care for diseases, infections or other health conditions linked to uveitis can help protect your vision. You can also lower your risk by quitting smoking.

Outlook / Prognosis

What is the prognosis (outlook) for people with uveitis?

Most people who get prompt treatment for uveitis have little, if any, long-term vision problems. Treatments can stop disease progression and restore lost vision. Severe forms may need long-term treatment. Severe disease is more likely to cause vision loss or even blindness. If you have conditions that put you at risk for uveitis, regular eye exams are essential. Talk to your eye care healthcare provider any time you have red eyes, eye pain or inflammation.

Living With

When should I call a healthcare provider?

You should call your healthcare provider if you experience:

  • Eye floaters or flashers.
  • Eye pain, redness or swelling.
  • Eye pressure.
  • Sensitivity to light.
  • Vision loss.

What questions should I ask my healthcare provider?

You may want to ask your healthcare provider:

  • Why did I get uveitis?
  • What type of uveitis do I have?
  • What is the best treatment for the type of uveitis I have?
  • Are there any treatment risks or side effects?
  • Will uveitis come back after treatment?
  • What lifestyle changes can I make to protect my vision?
  • Should I watch for signs of complications?

A note from Cleveland Clinic

Uveitis is a serious condition that requires fast medical attention. With early care, treatments can restore vision and prevent tissue damage that can lead to blindness. Your eye care provider can determine the best treatment based on the disease type and cause. Because uveitis often comes back after treatment, regular eye exams are a must for protecting your vision.

Symptoms, Causes, Treatment & Types

Overview

What is uveitis?

Uveitis is a general term used to describe a group of diseases that cause red eyes, eye pain and inflammation. These diseases typically affect the uvea, the eye’s middle layer. They can also affect other parts of the eye. If not treated, uveitis can cause permanent blindness or vision loss.

Does uveitis affect both eyes?

Uveitis may develop in one eye or both eyes. It can affect the:

  • Retina: The innermost layer of the eye senses colors and light and sends images to the brain.
  • Uvea: The middle layer of the eye includes the iris (colored part of the eye), choroid (membrane with most of the eye’s blood vessels) and ciliary body (connects the iris and choroid and provides nutrients to the eye).
  • Sclera: The eye’s white outer part.

How common is uveitis?

An estimated 30,000 Americans lose their eyesight every year due to uveitis.

Who might get uveitis?

Uveitis affects people of all ages, even children. Women and people between 40 to 60 years old have a slightly higher risk.

What are the types of uveitis?

Healthcare providers typically classify uveitis based on where the eye inflammation occurs. Types of uveitis include:

Anterior: The most common type, anterior uveitis causes inflammation in the front of the eye. Symptoms may appear suddenly and can occasionally resolve on their own if they are mild. Some people have chronic, recurring eye inflammation that goes away with treatment and then comes back. You may be more prone to anterior uveitis if you have:

  • Arthritis, including ankylosing spondylitis (AS).
  • Autoimmune diseases, such as sarcoidosis or juvenile idiopathic arthritis.
  • Gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
  • Prior infections with the herpes virus (cold sore or genital herpes) or the chicken pox virus.

Intermediate: Young adults are more prone to intermediate uveitis. This condition causes inflammation in the middle of the eye. Also called cyclitis or vitritis, it often affects the vitreous, the fluid-filled space inside the eye. Symptoms may improve, go away and then come back and get worse. About one in three people with intermediate uveitis also have:

Posterior: The least common form, posterior uveitis affects the inner part of the eye. It is often also the most severe. It can affect the retina, optic nerve and choroid. The choroid contains blood vessels that supply blood to the retina. It’s sometimes called choroiditis or chorioretinitis. This type can cause recurrent symptoms that last months or years. Potential causes include:

  • Birdshot chorioretinopathy.
  • Viral etiologies such as herpes virus or chicken pox virus.
  • Lupus.
  • Sarcoidosis.
  • Syphilis.
  • Tuberculosis

Panuveitis: Rarely, uveitis affects all three layers of the eye. This type is more severe and raises the chances of permanent vision loss. Potential causes include:

  • Bacterial or fungal retinitis.
  • Viral retinitis.
  • Toxoplasmosis.
  • Lupus.
  • Sarcoidosis.
  • Syphilis.
  • Tuberculosis (TB).

Symptoms and Causes

What causes uveitis?

An estimated one in three uveitis cases have no known cause. People who smoke are more prone to uveitis. Eye inflammation may also result from:

  • Eye injury.
  • Eye surgery.
  • Infections, such as the herpes virus, chicken pox virus, TB, syphilis.
  • Inflammatory diseases, such as lupus, IBD and rheumatoid arthritis.

What are the symptoms of uveitis?

Uveitis symptoms may come on gradually or suddenly. You may experience:

  • Blurred vision.
  • Dark, floating shapes in your field of vision (eye floaters).
  • Eye pain or pressure.
  • Light sensitivity.
  • Red eyes.
  • Vision loss.

Diagnosis and Tests

How is uveitis diagnosed?

The healthcare provider caring for your eyes will look at the inside of your eye during an eye exam. A standard eye exam usually includes:

  • Visual acuity test (reading eye charts) to check for vision loss.
  • Ocular pressure test (tonometry) to measure pressure inside the eye.
  • Slit-lamp exam to examine the inside of the eye with a special microscope called a slit lamp.
  • Dilated eye exam to widen pupils so your healthcare provider can look inside your eyes using a special lens.

Your healthcare provider may also order other tests, such as:

  • Blood tests to rule out infections or underlying autoimmune diseases.
  • Imaging of your chest or brain to look for systemic inflammatory causes.
  • Fluorescein angiography to get images of blood vessels in the back of the eye.
  • Gonioscopy to examine the front of the eye where liquid drains.
  • Optical coherence tomography (OCT) to get detailed images of the back of the eye, including the retina.
  • Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) to produce 3D images of blood flow through the eye.
  • Visual field test to check for damage to the optic nerve that may affect your ability to see things off to the side (peripheral vision).

Management and Treatment

How is uveitis managed or treated?

Untreated uveitis can lead to blindness. It’s important to see your healthcare provider right away if you have eye redness, inflammation, or pain. In many instances, treatments help restore lost vision. They can also prevent more tissue damage and ease inflammation and pain. If a health condition contributed to uveitis, getting that disease treated should also relieve the eye inflammation.

Some forms of uveitis take a long time to go away. Some come back after treatment. Depending on the disease type, treatments include:

  • Antibiotics, antivirals or antifungals: These medications treat uveitis caused by an infection.
  • Eye drops: Dilating (widening) the pupils with eye drops can reduce pain and swelling. Eye drops can also keep the iris and lens from sticking together, a complication that can occur with anterior uveitis. Your healthcare provider may also prescribe eye drops to relieve pressure in the eye (ocular hypertension).
  • Steroidal anti-inflammatories: Medications that contain corticosteroids (steroids) alleviate eye inflammation. These medications come in many forms: drops, ointments, oral pills, injections inside or around the eye, intravenous (IV) infusions or a capsule that your eye healthcare provider surgically implants inside the eye.
  • Immunosuppressants: These medications calm the immune system’s response to autoimmune disease or systemwide inflammation. Your provider may prescribe these drugs if uveitis affects both eyes, doesn’t respond to steroids or threatens your vision. You may take the medication orally as a pill, as an injection or through an IV infusion into a vein.

What are uveitis treatment side effects or risks?

Certain immunosuppressants can increase your risk of cancer. Long-term steroid use may lead to:

What are the complications of uveitis?

An estimated one in five people with uveitis will develop high pressure in the eye (ocular hypertension). This condition can lead to glaucoma and irreversible vision loss. People with uveitis are also at risk for other eye problems, including:

  • Posterior synechiae.
  • Glaucoma.
  • Cataracts.
  • Cystoid macular edema (CME), swelling of the eye macula in the retina.
  • Damage to the vitreous gel substance that fills the eye.
  • Detached retina.
  • Damage to the retina leading to vision loss.

Prevention

How can I prevent uveitis?

Healthcare providers usually don’t know what causes most cases of uveitis. There isn’t much you can do to prevent the disease.

Doing what you can to maintain good eye health is always wise. Getting care for diseases, infections or other health conditions linked to uveitis can help protect your vision. You can also lower your risk by quitting smoking.

Outlook / Prognosis

What is the prognosis (outlook) for people with uveitis?

Most people who get prompt treatment for uveitis have little, if any, long-term vision problems. Treatments can stop disease progression and restore lost vision. Severe forms may need long-term treatment. Severe disease is more likely to cause vision loss or even blindness. If you have conditions that put you at risk for uveitis, regular eye exams are essential. Talk to your eye care healthcare provider any time you have red eyes, eye pain or inflammation.

Living With

When should I call a healthcare provider?

You should call your healthcare provider if you experience:

  • Eye floaters or flashers.
  • Eye pain, redness or swelling.
  • Eye pressure.
  • Sensitivity to light.
  • Vision loss.

What questions should I ask my healthcare provider?

You may want to ask your healthcare provider:

  • Why did I get uveitis?
  • What type of uveitis do I have?
  • What is the best treatment for the type of uveitis I have?
  • Are there any treatment risks or side effects?
  • Will uveitis come back after treatment?
  • What lifestyle changes can I make to protect my vision?
  • Should I watch for signs of complications?

A note from Cleveland Clinic

Uveitis is a serious condition that requires fast medical attention. With early care, treatments can restore vision and prevent tissue damage that can lead to blindness. Your eye care provider can determine the best treatment based on the disease type and cause. Because uveitis often comes back after treatment, regular eye exams are a must for protecting your vision.

Symptoms, Causes, Treatment & Types

Overview

What is uveitis?

Uveitis is a general term used to describe a group of diseases that cause red eyes, eye pain and inflammation. These diseases typically affect the uvea, the eye’s middle layer. They can also affect other parts of the eye. If not treated, uveitis can cause permanent blindness or vision loss.

Does uveitis affect both eyes?

Uveitis may develop in one eye or both eyes. It can affect the:

  • Retina: The innermost layer of the eye senses colors and light and sends images to the brain.
  • Uvea: The middle layer of the eye includes the iris (colored part of the eye), choroid (membrane with most of the eye’s blood vessels) and ciliary body (connects the iris and choroid and provides nutrients to the eye).
  • Sclera: The eye’s white outer part.

How common is uveitis?

An estimated 30,000 Americans lose their eyesight every year due to uveitis.

Who might get uveitis?

Uveitis affects people of all ages, even children. Women and people between 40 to 60 years old have a slightly higher risk.

What are the types of uveitis?

Healthcare providers typically classify uveitis based on where the eye inflammation occurs. Types of uveitis include:

Anterior: The most common type, anterior uveitis causes inflammation in the front of the eye. Symptoms may appear suddenly and can occasionally resolve on their own if they are mild. Some people have chronic, recurring eye inflammation that goes away with treatment and then comes back. You may be more prone to anterior uveitis if you have:

  • Arthritis, including ankylosing spondylitis (AS).
  • Autoimmune diseases, such as sarcoidosis or juvenile idiopathic arthritis.
  • Gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
  • Prior infections with the herpes virus (cold sore or genital herpes) or the chicken pox virus.

Intermediate: Young adults are more prone to intermediate uveitis. This condition causes inflammation in the middle of the eye. Also called cyclitis or vitritis, it often affects the vitreous, the fluid-filled space inside the eye. Symptoms may improve, go away and then come back and get worse. About one in three people with intermediate uveitis also have:

Posterior: The least common form, posterior uveitis affects the inner part of the eye. It is often also the most severe. It can affect the retina, optic nerve and choroid. The choroid contains blood vessels that supply blood to the retina. It’s sometimes called choroiditis or chorioretinitis. This type can cause recurrent symptoms that last months or years. Potential causes include:

  • Birdshot chorioretinopathy.
  • Viral etiologies such as herpes virus or chicken pox virus.
  • Lupus.
  • Sarcoidosis.
  • Syphilis.
  • Tuberculosis

Panuveitis: Rarely, uveitis affects all three layers of the eye. This type is more severe and raises the chances of permanent vision loss. Potential causes include:

  • Bacterial or fungal retinitis.
  • Viral retinitis.
  • Toxoplasmosis.
  • Lupus.
  • Sarcoidosis.
  • Syphilis.
  • Tuberculosis (TB).

Symptoms and Causes

What causes uveitis?

An estimated one in three uveitis cases have no known cause. People who smoke are more prone to uveitis. Eye inflammation may also result from:

  • Eye injury.
  • Eye surgery.
  • Infections, such as the herpes virus, chicken pox virus, TB, syphilis.
  • Inflammatory diseases, such as lupus, IBD and rheumatoid arthritis.

What are the symptoms of uveitis?

Uveitis symptoms may come on gradually or suddenly. You may experience:

  • Blurred vision.
  • Dark, floating shapes in your field of vision (eye floaters).
  • Eye pain or pressure.
  • Light sensitivity.
  • Red eyes.
  • Vision loss.

Diagnosis and Tests

How is uveitis diagnosed?

The healthcare provider caring for your eyes will look at the inside of your eye during an eye exam. A standard eye exam usually includes:

  • Visual acuity test (reading eye charts) to check for vision loss.
  • Ocular pressure test (tonometry) to measure pressure inside the eye.
  • Slit-lamp exam to examine the inside of the eye with a special microscope called a slit lamp.
  • Dilated eye exam to widen pupils so your healthcare provider can look inside your eyes using a special lens.

Your healthcare provider may also order other tests, such as:

  • Blood tests to rule out infections or underlying autoimmune diseases.
  • Imaging of your chest or brain to look for systemic inflammatory causes.
  • Fluorescein angiography to get images of blood vessels in the back of the eye.
  • Gonioscopy to examine the front of the eye where liquid drains.
  • Optical coherence tomography (OCT) to get detailed images of the back of the eye, including the retina.
  • Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) to produce 3D images of blood flow through the eye.
  • Visual field test to check for damage to the optic nerve that may affect your ability to see things off to the side (peripheral vision).

Management and Treatment

How is uveitis managed or treated?

Untreated uveitis can lead to blindness. It’s important to see your healthcare provider right away if you have eye redness, inflammation, or pain. In many instances, treatments help restore lost vision. They can also prevent more tissue damage and ease inflammation and pain. If a health condition contributed to uveitis, getting that disease treated should also relieve the eye inflammation.

Some forms of uveitis take a long time to go away. Some come back after treatment. Depending on the disease type, treatments include:

  • Antibiotics, antivirals or antifungals: These medications treat uveitis caused by an infection.
  • Eye drops: Dilating (widening) the pupils with eye drops can reduce pain and swelling. Eye drops can also keep the iris and lens from sticking together, a complication that can occur with anterior uveitis. Your healthcare provider may also prescribe eye drops to relieve pressure in the eye (ocular hypertension).
  • Steroidal anti-inflammatories: Medications that contain corticosteroids (steroids) alleviate eye inflammation. These medications come in many forms: drops, ointments, oral pills, injections inside or around the eye, intravenous (IV) infusions or a capsule that your eye healthcare provider surgically implants inside the eye.
  • Immunosuppressants: These medications calm the immune system’s response to autoimmune disease or systemwide inflammation. Your provider may prescribe these drugs if uveitis affects both eyes, doesn’t respond to steroids or threatens your vision. You may take the medication orally as a pill, as an injection or through an IV infusion into a vein.

What are uveitis treatment side effects or risks?

Certain immunosuppressants can increase your risk of cancer. Long-term steroid use may lead to:

What are the complications of uveitis?

An estimated one in five people with uveitis will develop high pressure in the eye (ocular hypertension). This condition can lead to glaucoma and irreversible vision loss. People with uveitis are also at risk for other eye problems, including:

  • Posterior synechiae.
  • Glaucoma.
  • Cataracts.
  • Cystoid macular edema (CME), swelling of the eye macula in the retina.
  • Damage to the vitreous gel substance that fills the eye.
  • Detached retina.
  • Damage to the retina leading to vision loss.

Prevention

How can I prevent uveitis?

Healthcare providers usually don’t know what causes most cases of uveitis. There isn’t much you can do to prevent the disease.

Doing what you can to maintain good eye health is always wise. Getting care for diseases, infections or other health conditions linked to uveitis can help protect your vision. You can also lower your risk by quitting smoking.

Outlook / Prognosis

What is the prognosis (outlook) for people with uveitis?

Most people who get prompt treatment for uveitis have little, if any, long-term vision problems. Treatments can stop disease progression and restore lost vision. Severe forms may need long-term treatment. Severe disease is more likely to cause vision loss or even blindness. If you have conditions that put you at risk for uveitis, regular eye exams are essential. Talk to your eye care healthcare provider any time you have red eyes, eye pain or inflammation.

Living With

When should I call a healthcare provider?

You should call your healthcare provider if you experience:

  • Eye floaters or flashers.
  • Eye pain, redness or swelling.
  • Eye pressure.
  • Sensitivity to light.
  • Vision loss.

What questions should I ask my healthcare provider?

You may want to ask your healthcare provider:

  • Why did I get uveitis?
  • What type of uveitis do I have?
  • What is the best treatment for the type of uveitis I have?
  • Are there any treatment risks or side effects?
  • Will uveitis come back after treatment?
  • What lifestyle changes can I make to protect my vision?
  • Should I watch for signs of complications?

A note from Cleveland Clinic

Uveitis is a serious condition that requires fast medical attention. With early care, treatments can restore vision and prevent tissue damage that can lead to blindness. Your eye care provider can determine the best treatment based on the disease type and cause. Because uveitis often comes back after treatment, regular eye exams are a must for protecting your vision.

Uveitis – Diagnosis and treatment

Diagnosis

When you visit an eye specialist (ophthalmologist), he or she will likely conduct a complete eye exam and gather a thorough health history. The eye examination usually involves the following:

  • Assessment of vision (with your glasses if you normally wear them) and the response of your pupils to light.
  • Tonometry. A tonometry exam measures the pressure inside your eye (intraocular pressure). Numbing eyedrops may be used for this test.
  • A slit-lamp examination. A slit lamp is a microscope that magnifies and illuminates the front of your eye with an intense line of light. This evaluation is necessary to identify microscopic inflammatory cells in the front of the eye.
  • Ophthalmoscopy. Also known as funduscopy, this exam involves widening (dilating) the pupil with eyedrops and shining a bright light into the eye to examine the back of the eye.

Your doctor may also recommend:

  • Color photography of the inside of the eye (retina).
  • Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. This test measures the thickness of the retina and choroid to reveal inflammation in these layers.
  • Fluorescein angiography or indocyanine green angiography. These tests require placement of an intravenous (IV) catheter in a vein in your arm in order to administer a dye. This dye will reach the blood vessels in the eyes and allow photographs of blood vessel inflammation inside the eyes.
  • Analysis of aqueous or vitreous fluid from the eye.
  • Blood tests.
  • Imaging tests, radiography, CT or MRI scans.

If the ophthalmologist thinks an underlying condition may be the cause of your uveitis, you may be referred to another doctor for a general medical examination and laboratory tests.

Sometimes, it’s difficult to find a specific cause for uveitis. Even if a specific cause is not identified, uveitis can still be treated successfully. In the majority of cases, identifying a cause for the uveitis does not lead to a cure. It is still necessary to use some form of treatment to control the inflammation.

Treatment

If uveitis is caused by an underlying condition, treatment may focus on that specific condition. Usually the treatment for uveitis is the same regardless of the associated cause, as long as it is not infectious. The goal of treatment is to reduce the inflammation in your eye, as well as in other parts of the body, if present. In some cases, treatment may be necessary for months to years. Several treatment options are available.

Medications

  • Drugs that reduce inflammation. Your doctor may first prescribe eyedrops with an anti-inflammatory medication, such as a corticosteroid. Eyedrops are usually not enough to treat inflammation beyond the front of the eye, so a corticosteroid injection in or around the eye or corticosteroid tablets (taken by mouth) may be necessary.
  • Drugs that control spasms. Eyedrops that widen (dilate) the pupil may be prescribed to control spasms in the iris and ciliary body, which can help relieve eye pain.
  • Drugs that fight bacteria or viruses. If uveitis is caused by an infection, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics, antiviral medications or other medicines, with or without corticosteroids, to bring the infection under control.
  • Drugs that affect the immune system or destroy cells. You may need immunosuppressive drugs if your uveitis affects both eyes, doesn’t respond well to corticosteroids or becomes severe enough to threaten your vision.

Some of these medications can have serious eye-related side effects, such as glaucoma and cataracts. Medications by mouth or injection can have side effects in other parts of the body outside the eyes. You may need to visit your doctor for follow-up examinations and blood tests every one to three months.

Surgical or other procedures

  • Vitrectomy. Surgery to remove some of the vitreous in your eye is rarely used to diagnose or manage the condition.
  • A medication-releasing implant. For people with difficult-to-treat posterior uveitis, a device that’s implanted in the eye may be an option. This device slowly releases corticosteroid into the eye for two to three years.

    Cataracts usually develop in people who have not yet had cataract surgery. Up to 30% of patients will also require treatment for elevated eye pressure to prevent the development of glaucoma.

The speed of your recovery depends in part on the type of uveitis you have and the severity of your symptoms. Uveitis that affects the back of your eye (posterior uveitis or panuveitis, including retinitis or choroiditis) tends to heal more slowly than uveitis in the front of the eye (anterior uveitis or iritis). Severe inflammation takes longer to clear up than mild inflammation does.

Uveitis can come back. Make an appointment with your doctor if any of your symptoms reappear or worsen.

Clinical trials


Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this condition.

Preparing for your appointment

Your symptoms may prompt you to make an appointment with your primary doctor. You may be referred to a doctor who specializes in disorders of the eyes (ophthalmologist).

Here’s some information to help you get ready for your appointment and know what to expect from your doctor.

What you can do

  • List your symptoms, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for which you scheduled the appointment.
  • List key personal information, including any major illnesses, traumas or recent life changes.
  • Bring a list of all medications, vitamins or supplements that you’re taking.
  • Ask a family member or friend to come with you. Sometimes it can be difficult to remember all of the information provided during an appointment. Someone who accompanies you may remember something that you missed or forgot. Additionally, someone who comes with you can drive you to your appointment, especially if your symptoms make it difficult to see properly.
  • List questions to ask your doctor.

Preparing a list of questions can help cover all of the points that are important to you. For uveitis, some basic questions to ask include:

  • What’s the most likely cause of my eye problems?
  • What else might be causing my symptoms?
  • What kinds of tests do I need? Do these tests require any special preparation?
  • Is uveitis temporary or long lasting?
  • Will I lose my sight?
  • What treatments are available, and which do you recommend?
  • What types of side effects can I expect from treatment?
  • Is there anything I can do to prevent this from happening again?
  • I have other health conditions. How can I best manage these conditions together?
  • Do you have any brochures or material I can take home with me?
  • What websites do you recommend?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • When did you first begin experiencing symptoms?
  • Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  • How severe are your symptoms? Have they gotten worse?
  • Does anything seem to improve your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?
  • Have you ever had uveitis before?
  • Do you have any other medical problems?
  • Do you have arthritis?
  • Do you have back problems?
  • Have you had any recent skin rashes?
  • Have you had any ulcerated sores in your mouth or on your genitalia?
  • Have you had a recent upper respiratory infection or cold symptoms?

What is Eye Inflammation? – Eye Inflammation

What is Eye Inflammation?

Eye inflammation can refer to inflammation of the eyelids or inflammation of the uvea (middle layer of the eye). Symptoms of inflammation to the eyelids include crusting, swelling, redness, and itching. Inflammation of the uvea includes blurred vision, eye pain, eye redness, and light sensitivity. Eyelid inflammation can be a symptom of a bacterial infection such as a stye.

Treatment for eye inflammation includes eye drops, ointments, and medication. Common drug classes used to treat eye inflammation are alpha agonists, aminoglycoside antibiotic / corticosteroid combinations, aminoglycoside antibiotic / polypeptide antibiotic / corticosteroid combinations, NSAIDs, polyene antifungals, sulfa antibiotic / corticosteroid combinations, and adrenocorticotropic hormones.

See All 53 Drugs

Note: Popularity is based on total prescriptions for the brand and generic versions of each drug, regardless of the condition being treated. Some drugs are prescribed for multiple conditions.

Eye Inflammation: Drug Classes

Eye Inflammation drugs are grouped into the following classes based on how they work:

Corticosteroids are used to treat a variety of conditions including eczema, psoriasis, itching, skin allergies, seborrheic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, eye inflammation, asthma, allergic conjunctivitis, ulcerative colitis, edema, adrenal insufficiency, and hemorrhoids. They work by blocking substances in the body that cause swelling.

Learn about Corticosteroids

NSAIDs are used to treat fever, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, menstrual pain, migraine, eye inflammation, allergic conjunctivitis, and other types of pain and inflammation. They work by reducing an enzyme in the body that causes inflammation and increases the feeling of pain.

Learn about NSAIDs

Polyene antifungals are used to treat candidiasis, yeast infections, thrush, eye infections, and eye inflammation. They work by preventing the growth of the fungus causing the infection.

Learn about Polyene Antifungals

Antiseptics are used for dental care, wound care, and acne. They work by killing bacteria that can cause infections.

Learn about Antiseptics

Alpha agonists are used for pupil dilation and the treatment of hypotension, adrenal insufficiency, glaucoma, nasal congestion, allergic rhinitis, eye inflammation, and dry eyes. They work by reducing swelling in the nasal passages, removing excess fluid in the eyes, and reducing inflammation.

Learn about Alpha Agonists

Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH or corticortropin) is used to treat infantile spasms, multiple sclerosis relapses, rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions. It stimulates the release of steroid hormones, which play a role in immune response and inflammation.

Learn about Adrenocorticotropic Hormones

Inflammation – American Academy of Ophthalmology

Inflammation is a familiar word. We’ve seen it defined as a symptom or risk factor for disease, the body’s response to injury, a side effect of medication, or even a class of medication, called anti-inflammatories. But what exactly does inflammation mean?

Inflammation is when part of the body becomes red, irritated, swollen, or painful. This can happen when the body is fighting an infection from bacteria or viruses or in response to an injury. While inflammation can be uncomfortable, it’s also a good sign because the body is trying to protect and heal itself.

What Causes the Signs and Symptoms of Inflammation?

A stye (a bacterial infection of the eyelid’s oil glands), for example, causes a painful, red, swollen lump to appear on the eyelid, like the woman pictured above. The cause of this lump is what’s called the inflammatory process. Bacteria invade the oil gland and begin the inflammatory process. The body’s immune system identifies the invading bacteria and sends its first responders (the white blood cells) to the infection site. The white blood cells surround and secure the infection, much like a crime scene cordoned off with yellow tape. Their job is to contain the damage, kill the bacteria, and repair the tissue. This entire process causes inflammation, which includes these symptoms:

  • warmth
  • redness
  • swelling
  • pain

The warmth and redness are caused by the increased blood flow to the area. The swelling is caused by an accumulation of fluid at the wound/infection site, and in this case, the fluid inside the stye is pus. The inflammatory process stimulates the nerve endings in the area, which is why we feel pain. This kind of inflammation—called acute inflammation—is the normal, protective response of a healthy immune system. The other type is long-term, misdirected, and unresolved—this is known as chronic inflammation.

Chronic Inflammation

Most chronic inflammation is caused by autoimmune disease. This is when the body’s immune system can’t tell the difference between healthy cells and threatening germs, like viruses or bacteria. The body then attacks its own healthy tissues. Chronic inflammatory disease that affect the eyes include:

90,000 Conjunctivitis – Latvijas Amerikas acu centrs

What is conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the mucous membrane of the eye. This is one of the most common eye diseases.

What are the symptoms of acute conjunctivitis?

Acute conjunctivitis usually begins suddenly. Patient complains about:

  • sensation of a foreign body in the eye;
  • burning sensation in the eye;
  • redness of the eye;
  • 90,015 discharge from the eyes;

  • tearing;
  • edema of the century.

Acute conjunctivitis lasts 3-4 days to two weeks. Usually, the process affects both eyes – the disease begins in one eye and after 3-4 days affects the other eye.

What are the types of conjunctivitis?

Acute conjunctivitis by etiology is divided into:

  • Bacterial conjunctivitis;
  • viral conjunctivitis;
  • allergic conjunctivitis.

How is conjunctivitis diagnosed and treated?

The diagnosis of conjunctivitis is made only clinically.Treatment is prescribed without special bacteriological or virological examination. But, if acute conjunctivitis does not respond to classical methods of treatment, it is necessary to do additional examinations in order to establish the focus of the disease. With untimely and incorrect treatment, acute conjunctivitis can become chronic and torment the patient and the doctor for years. In some cases, the cornea and the deep membranes of the eyeball are involved in the process, thereby impairing vision.

In cases of bacterial and viral conjunctivitis, it is very important to follow the regime so as not to infect people around. Most important personal hygiene rules:

  • Do not touch the eyes with unwashed hands;
  • having touched your eyes, be sure to wash your hands;
  • regularly ventilate the premises;
  • Carry out regular cleaning of premises, paying special attention to cleaning door handles and backs of chairs and armchairs;
  • 90,015 eyes should not be bandaged, as microbes multiply more actively in a warm, humid and closed environment;

  • discharge from the eyes must be regularly cleaned with a swab dipped in boiled water or strong tea leaves.

If symptoms of acute conjunctivitis appear, you should immediately consult a doctor to clarify the diagnosis and prescribe treatment – usually disinfecting drops or ointments. The patient should take into account that often, despite the prescribed therapy, the disease continues and on the third day of the disease the symptoms become more pronounced than on the first day. Change therapy and conduct additional research, if the prescribed medications do not give improvement, should be done after 3-4 days.

How to avoid conjunctivitis?

To avoid getting conjunctivitis:

  • It is recommended that you always wash your hands before and after touching your eyes;
  • you cannot rub your eyes;
  • do not use pillows, towels, cosmetics of other people;
  • avoid contact with patients with acute conjunctivitis;
  • before using unfamiliar cosmetics (e.g. mascara, shampoo, soap, etc.)it is necessary to make sure that there are no allergic reactions.

Allergic conjunctivitis

What is allergic conjunctivitis?

Allergic conjunctivitis is one of the most common types of conjunctivitis that occurs in both children and adults. It is often referred to as the “pink eye”. Allergic conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva or mucous membrane of the eye. The conjunctiva of the eye covers the front of the eyeball and the inside of the eyelids, keeping them moist.

“Pink eye” or red eye in case of allergic conjunctivitis of the eyes

In case of inflammation of the mucous membrane of the eye, the most common complaints are itchy eyes, swelling of the eyelids, lacrimation, photophobia, watery or mucous discharge and foreign body sensation. Itching is a common symptom of allergies that affects over 75% of patients with allergic conjunctivitis. Allergic conjunctivitis is not contagious.

What are the causes of eye allergies?
Allergens that cause conjunctivitis can be found both indoors and outdoors.House dust, dust mites, feathers and pet dander are the most common indoor allergens. Indoor allergens can cause symptoms throughout the year, leading to persistent allergic conjunctivitis. The most common outdoor allergens are grass, trees, and weed pollen. People who are sensitive to these allergens suffer from seasonal allergic conjunctivitis, the most common type of eye allergy. Mold, medicines (including eye drops), cosmetics, food, insect bites can also cause allergic reactions in the human body.Cigarette smoke, perfume and exhaust fumes can act as irritants that cause allergic symptoms or can worsen an allergic reaction.

Plant pollen – image under an electron microscope.

Dust mite – image under an electron microscope.

Allergy as a mistake of the immune system
Atopy is the body’s allergic response to environmental irritants, which is characterized by a genetic response and susceptibility.On the surface of the eye, the immune system reacts, producing antigens that enter the bloodstream and can cause inflammation of the conjunctiva. As a result, the immune system is activated and a cytotoxic reaction is formed, the formation of immune complexes, as well as a cell activation reaction. During an allergic reaction, histamine is released from the mast cells and an immediate inflammatory reaction occurs. The immune system responds to delayed allergic reactions within about 8-24 hours.

Any allergic reaction is based on an inadequate response of the immune system: in order to “protect” the body, it destroys its tissues and cells. The first contact with the allergen causes the formation of large antibodies of the IgE class (less often – IgG4). These antibodies attach to mast cells and basophils. When an allergen re-enters the body, it is recognized by antibodies on the cell surface, the cells are activated, and as a result, a large number of molecules are formed that cause allergic symptoms and tissue damage around the site of contact with allergens – histamine, heparin, serotonin, platelet activating factor, prostaglandins, leukotrienes etc.d.

Schematic description of an allergic reaction

Types of allergic conjunctivitis
Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis and persistent allergic conjunctivitis are usually grouped into the group of mild acute allergic conjunctivitis or hay fever conjunctivitis. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis occurs at the same time every year. Most cases are associated with “hay fever”. The term “hay fever” refers to the range of allergies that occur from grass pollen and weeds during the summer months of June, July and August.

Other allergic subtypes of conjunctivitis – vernal keratoconjunctivitis, atopic keratonjunctivitis and giant papillary conjunctivitis – form the group of chronic conjunctivitis.

Allergic reaction of the conjunctival papillary of the upper eyelid

Corneal ulcer “Shield” with keratoconjunctivitis

Atopic keratinjunctivitis is caused by allergens that can come into contact with the conjunctiva, such as cosmetics, medications, etc.e. In severe cases of eye allergies, for example, in the case of vernal keratoconjunctivitis and atopic keratoconjunctivitis, when the cornea is affected, if timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment are not carried out, a threat to vision may arise.

How is allergic conjunctivitis treated?
In practice, antihistamines (soft cell stabilizers) are used as maintenance therapy, which continues with pulsed therapy with local steroids during exacerbations. Corticosteroids are effective in treating allergic conjunctivitis. However, its side effect profile (cataract, glaucoma, herpes infection, corneal ulcer) makes it an unpopular choice in the long term. Corticosteroids should only be used under the supervision of an eye specialist.

90,000 Treatment of inflammatory eye diseases in Samara

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the lining of the eye that covers the cornea.
Usually, patients report redness of the eyes and eyelids, watery eyes, pus, burning and itching.
There are blepharoconjunctivitis , in which there is inflammation of the conjunctiva and eyelids, keratoconjunctivitis , when the cornea also joins the inflammation, as well as episcleritis , which is largely similar to blepharoconjunctivitis, which does not manifest itself with lacrimation.

Conjunctivitis is also classified according to the causative agent: bacterial, viral, allergic.
Inflammation can also be caused by exposure to harmful chemicals (for example, at work), excess light, vitamin deficiency, and even inflammation of the sinuses.

At the appointment, the ophthalmologist will take an anamnesis: when the symptoms appeared, what kind of symptoms were these, how they changed over time, what preceded their appearance, and also examine the patient. If necessary, an additional analysis will be carried out to determine the pathogen and prescribe the necessary therapy.

Bacterial conjunctivitis usually affects both eyes and produces mucus. Treatment in this case is reduced to antibiotic therapy in the form of eye drops.
Viral conjunctivitis often affects only one eye and is accompanied by lacrimation and mild mucus. Treatment consists of general and topical antiviral drugs.
Allergic conjunctivitis , as a rule, is accompanied by other symptoms of allergy and is treated by excluding the patient’s contact with the allergen, as well as the appointment of antihistamines.

The difference between childhood conjunctivitis is that it usually accompanies diseases of the nasopharynx, otitis media and sinusitis. However, regardless of age, the treatment of conjunctivitis requires a professional approach and specialist supervision. Only timely and accurately selected therapy is the key to recovery and protection from the transformation of the disease into a chronic stage.

Important! Conjunctivitis is contagious, so it is important to follow the rules of personal hygiene: wash your hands, use a personal towel and make-up (for girls).

90,000 Treatment of conjunctivitis at home in St. Petersburg

Exposure to external factors – viruses, poisonous and harmful substances, allergens, bacteria – often negatively affects the health of our eyes, causing the most common disease in ophthalmology – conjunctivitis.

Burning sensation, gritty sensation in the eyes, reddened cornea, inflamed eyelids, constantly flowing tears, and in more severe cases, conjunctival infiltrates and purulent discharge are possible. All these are, of course, very unpleasant conditions. And since most often conjunctivitis occurs due to infection, the best measure would be to diagnose eye inflammation at home.

It is important to know and remember that although this is not such a “scary” outwardly, but not at all inherently harmless disease, as many believe, assuming that all therapy consists in two or three days of using eye drops, and after that there are no complications …

Treatment of eye inflammation with the correct diagnosis is known and not too difficult.However, acute conjunctivitis, poorly cured or completely left without treatment, can become chronic or, even worse, affect the deeper layers of the eye tissues, forming abscesses, and sometimes (and not rarely) lead to keratitis, which will entail loss of vision.

Diagnosis of conjunctivitis at home – a service provided by our medical center “Dynasty” – will allow you to pinpoint the causes of inflammation and provide adequate treatment, preserving the health and beauty of your eyes.

However, our specialists can also treat eye inflammation at home, since it is not always convenient for the patient to carry out some manipulations. And it is imperative to treat conjunctivitis, as we have already found out.

Symptoms to be distinguished

  • If inflammation of the eyes is expressed only by edema and hyperemia of the eyelids and conjunctiva (even tears do not “flow in” streams “), then, most likely, we are talking about allergic conjunctivitis.
  • Added to the described symptoms, redness of the sclera of the eyeball, profuse lacrimation and sometimes multiple, as if scattered white-gray infiltrates, almost certainly indicate the viral nature of the inflammation.
  • And if in the morning you cannot open your eyes because the purulent discharge accumulated during the night has “glued” the eyelids, then there is a high probability of hearing the word “bacterial” in the diagnosis.

Still, let us remind you that the diagnosis and treatment of conjunctivitis at home or in the clinic should be carried out only by an ophthalmologist.

Home Careers

Select the branch “Dynasty” on Novocherkassky prospect, Krasnogvardeisky district “Dynasty” on Lenina, Petrogradsky district “Dynasty” on Repishcheva, Primorsky district “Dynasty” in Vsevolozhsk

Cost of conjunctivitis diagnostics at home

Name of services Price in rubles
St. Petersburg Vsevolozhsk
Calling an ophthalmologist at home (St. Petersburg, within the ring road) on weekdays

2800

Calling an ophthalmologist at home (St. Petersburg, within the Ring Road) on weekends and holidays

3800

Calling an ophthalmologist at home (distance from the ring road up to 10 km) on weekdays

3500

Calling an ophthalmologist at home (distance from the ring road up to 10 km) on weekends and holidays

4750

Calling an ophthalmologist at home (distance from the ring road from 11 to 30 km) on weekdays

4200

Calling an ophthalmologist at home (distance from the ring road from 11 to 30 km) on weekends and holidays

5700

Calling an ophthalmologist at home (distance from the ring road from 31 to 50 km) on weekdays

4900

Calling an ophthalmologist at home (distance from the ring road from 31 to 50 km) on weekends and holidays

6650

Calling an ophthalmologist at home (distance from the ring road from 51 to 80 km) on weekdays

5600

Calling an ophthalmologist at home (distance from the ring road from 51 to 80 km) on weekends and holidays

7600

ADDITIONAL MANIPULATIONS WHEN LEAVING THE HOUSE
Lacrimal duct lavage (visit of an ophthalmologist to the house is paid separately)

1200

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Uveitis (inflammation of the choroid of the eye)

Disease of the choroid of the eye of an inflammatory nature is called uveitis. The lining of the eye consists of blood vessels supplying the eyes with blood. For this reason, inflammation of the choroid affects all tissues of the eye, which is a serious threat to vision.

The main factors influencing the success of treatment are: early diagnosis, regular monitoring, a trusting relationship between doctor and patient and correctly prescribed treatment. If these conditions are met, the damaged eye can be healed.

Regardless of the degree of development, uveitis is a disease that must be treated immediately.Too late diagnosis of the disease can lead to chronic diseases such as deformation of the pupil, catarrh, high intraocular pressure.

Causes of uveitis disease:

Viruses, fungi, parasites and arthritis in other parts of the body,

Diseases such as Behcet’s disease,

Infections (bacteria, viruses, parasites or fungi),

Eye trauma,

Immune system disorders,

Rheumatic diseases,

Disorders such as ulcerative colitis

Uveitis symptoms:

Sensitivity to light

Pain

Blurred eyesight

Blurred eyesight

Blurred vision

eye

Diagnosis of uveitis

With the help of a normal physical examination, it is very easy to diagnose some diseases. If the disease has affected the posterior walls of the eye, it is necessary to conduct angiography, ultrasound, electroretinography (ERG) and similar tests in order to understand the degree of threat and effectiveness of treatment.

If symptoms of the disease occur, an examination by an ophthalmologist is necessary. After starting treatment, it may be necessary to conduct a joint investigation with the rheumatology department on internal medicine.

Treatment of uveitis

In the treatment of uevitis, drops, especially those containing a steroid, are often used to dilate the pupil of the eye.Systemic medication may be needed to treat inflammation deep in the eye. Uveitis is a treatable disease. However, after the end of the course of treatment, the disease may periodically appear. Therefore, it is necessary to continue the examination by an ophthalmologist in order to prevent a relapse of the disease.

Treatment of eye diseases in Kharkov, treatment of eye diseases Kharkov, treatment of conjunctivitis Kharkov

Treatment of eye diseases in Kharkov.

In addition to treating various visual impairments that are associated with diseases of the oculomotor apparatus and refractive errors, in our medical center you can also undergo treatment of eye diseases in Kharkov , which are of an inflammatory nature, which include:

Conjunctivitis – the process of inflammation, which completely captures the mucous membrane of the eye (conjunctiva). The onset of conjunctivitis, as a rule, is associated with the ingress of microbes, viruses or fungi on the mucous membrane of the eye, after which serious redness (in some cases even together with swelling) of the eyelids begins. Treatment of conjunctivitis in children is far from a simple process, which without a timely visit to an ophthalmologist can become quite lengthy and uncomfortable for the patient.

Conjunctivitis in children , as a rule, is of infectious origin. A child can catch this disease by airborne droplets, more often with an epidemic in kindergarten groups or in a school class. Conjunctivitis can be acute, in some cases it becomes chronic.Distinguish conjunctivitis depending on the type of pathogen for viral and bacterial . With viral conjunctivitis, the respiratory organs are affected, this type of conjunctivitis manifests itself even with ordinary colds, often begins in one eye, and then moves on to the second. With bacterial conjunctivitis, there is a manifestation of suppuration, as well as a feeling of a foreign body, due to which children often rub their inflamed eyes, which only worsens the patient’s position.

Quite often, the cause of conjunctivitis is an allergic reaction, and this disease is seasonal.

The most severe types of conjunctivitis are considered to be conjunctivitis caused by chlamydia . This type is difficult to treat, and recovery can sometimes be delayed for many months.

Symptoms of conjunctivitis:

The main symptom of the disease, for which you can accurately diagnose – severe redness of the eyes , and also:

  • swelling of the eyelids;
  • Severe burning sensation in the eyes;
  • sharp redness of the conjunctiva, as well as its swelling;
  • 90,015 pain in the eyes, photophobia;

  • profuse purulent discharge, “sticking of the eyelids” after sleep;
  • In some cases, conjunctivitis is accompanied by general disorders, as in ARVI (high fever, chills, runny nose, headache).

Dry eye syndrome

Dry eye syndrome is a disease that occurs as a result of intense evaporation of the tear film from the surface of the eye, as well as when tear fluid is not produced enough. In the case when the surface of the cornea of ​​the eye is very dry, irritation begins to occur, the eye becomes too vulnerable to various external influences that provoke and aggravate the discomfort.

Dry eye symptoms:

  • pain and pain in the eyes
  • gritty eyes (the main symptom of dry eye syndrome)
  • itching and redness
  • impaired vision
  • persistent eye irritation
  • dry eyes on blinking

Causes of dry eye syndrome

As a rule, there are two reasons for the development of dry eye syndrome, where the first reason is insufficient formation of tear fluid, which occurs due to various diseases, such as autoimmune.Also, the release of tears can be temporarily impaired after ophthalmic surgery. The second reason is the way of life and the environment, it is they that affect how intensely the tear film evaporates, these include:

  • continuous work in front of the computer
  • Continuous driving
  • stay in a room where the air is dry (air conditioning or heating operation)
  • stay in the open air, where there is exposure to ultraviolet radiation and / or strong wind
  • wearing (prolongation) of contact lenses
  • use of ophthalmic drugs (antibacterial)

Blepharitis

Blepharitis refers to a wide group of various eye diseases that are accompanied by chronic inflammation of the eyelid margins.

Symptoms of blepharitis:

Blepharitis manifests itself in slight hyperemia and slightly noticeable swelling of the edges of the eyelids, covered at the roots of the eyelashes with small, easily detachable scales. The eyelids itch a lot, sometimes there is a loss of eyelashes, a feeling of heaviness of the eyelids, watery eyes, the imminent onset of visual fatigue, a manifestation of sensitivity to bright light, wind and other stimuli.

Herpes of the eye (ophthalmic herpes)

Ophthalmic herpes is a rather dangerous manifestation of herpes infection in the human body.These herpes viruses affect the cornea – keratitis, which causes a sharp deterioration in vision. If the disease is started, then the infection will begin to affect the deeper tissues of the eye, which can lead to disability, and in some cases to complete loss of vision.

Demodecosis

If you notice increased fatigue and dryness in the eyes, or redness and itching in the eyelids, sticky discharge with crusts on the eyelids after sleep – all this may indicate symptoms of demodicosis of the eyelids or eyes.This eye disease is caused by ciliary mites, the size of which is from 0.2 to 0.5 mm.

Dacryocystitis

It is an inflammatory disease of the eye lacrimal sac, which is mainly chronic in nature. Dacryocystitis is provoked by narrowing or blockage of the nasolacrimal canal, which occurs due to inflammatory processes in the nasal cavity, near the nasal sinuses or the bones of the skull surrounding the lacrimal sac. leads to the onset of inflammation of the lacrimal sac mucosa.

Dacryocystitis is a dangerous disease that can lead to a purulent-septic complication, and in some cases to the occurrence of a brain abscess and meningitis.

Keratitis

Keratitis is an inflammation of the cornea of ​​the eye, which is manifested by lacrimation, fear of light and blepharospasm. This disease has various causes of development and can be infectious (streptococcus and staphylococcus, herpes, tuberculosis, ARVI) or traumatic in origin.

Keratitis can have various outcomes, such as decreased vision due to the development of corneal opacity (leucorrhoea). This disease is of two types – superficial and deep keratitis

Scleritis

It is an inflammation of the fibrous membrane of the eyeball (sclera). The main causes of scleritis are such systemic diseases as: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, etc. In most cases, scleritis is one of the first manifestations of these diseases, so when making this diagnosis, we strongly recommend an examination by an immunologist or rheumatologist.

Causes of scleritis

As a rule, streptococci and pneumococci are the causative agents of scleral inflammation. Sometimes scleritis can be caused by sinus inflammation (sinusitis), trauma, and infection.

Symptoms of scleritis

Local or general redness of the eyeball, its soreness, the formation of noticeable inflammatory nodules, with an extended course of the disease – thinning of the sclera (staphyloma) occurs. The patient complains of eye pain and photophobia.If other tissues of the eye are involved, visual impairment may occur.

Chalazion

A dense formation, usually rounded, in the region of the eyelid margin, which occurs due to chronic inflammation of the meibomian gland. When the excretory duct of the gland is blocked, the fatty secretion accumulates inside it, after which the gland gradually increases in size and forms into a dense rounded formation, which is surrounded by a capsule.

Symptoms of chalazion

Chalazion is manifested in people of different ages, including children.In the case of an uncomplicated course of the disease, the main complaint of patients is the presence of a rounded formation at the edge of the upper or lower eyelid, which is gradually increasing in size.

This disease does not cause painful sensations and usually does not affect visual acuity. Deterioration of vision occurs when the formation increases significantly and has a mechanical effect (rubs) on the cornea.

Barley on the eye

Barley on the eye, or to be more precise, on the eyelid, is a swelling on the eyelid, which is usually caused due to infection of one or more follicles of the eyelashes at their root.Distinguish barley on the outside, when it is located on the outer surface of the eyelid and on the inner, that is, from the inner surface.

Symptoms of barley

The main symptoms of barley are pain, redness and swelling of the eyelid. The eye may be watery and / or have a foreign body sensation. Other symptoms may be felt depending on whether the stye is internal or external.

Causes of barley

The main cause of barley is staphylococcal infection.As a rule, in 9 out of 10 cases, this disease is associated with this bacterium.

If you have found any of the above symptoms, we recommend that you do not delay visiting an ophthalmologist and do not self-medicate!

Clinical Hospital | Inflammatory diseases of the eye

Blepharitis – inflammation of the edges of the eyelids. They are quite common. Patients are worried about itching and redness of the edges of the eyelids, a feeling of clogging in the eyes.The causes of blepharitis are diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, diathesis, diabetes mellitus, vitamin deficiency, incorrectly selected glasses. Only an ophthalmologist can prescribe the correct treatment for blepharitis.

Conjunctivitis – the most common eye diseases. Among patients seeking help from an eye doctor, the proportion of patients with conjunctivitis is one third.

The causes of conjunctivitis can be bacteria, viruses, chlamydia. These conjunctivitis is contagious.The infection can get into the eye with dirty hands, when bathing in dirty water, when dealing with a patient with conjunctivitis. Conjunctivitis can also occur with hypothermia, with various colds, flu. Patients wake up in the morning with glued eyelashes. The eye turns red. There may be slight or severe swelling of the eyelids. Often, the disease begins in one eye and then spreads to the other. Also, mucopurulent (with bacterial) or mucous (with viral conjunctivitis), discharge, lacrimation is noted.

Allergic conjunctivitis is caused by a person’s hypersensitivity to any drug or substance (dust, pollen, pet hair, and others). These conjunctivitis is not contagious. Disturbed by redness of the eyes, lacrimation.

All conjunctivitis requires an appointment with an ophthalmologist, who will prescribe the treatment required in each case. Self-medication can cause various complications: the transition of acute to chronic conjunctivitis, decreased vision due to inflammation of the cornea.

Keratitis – inflammation of the cornea. The causes of keratitis can be bacteria, viruses, fungi. Keratitis can occur if there is an infection in the body: tuberculosis, syphilis, herpes infection, diseases of the paranasal sinuses (sinusitis), inflammation of the lacrimal sac.

If the cornea is damaged, for example, when a tree branch hits the eye, the infection penetrates into the cornea, and bacterial keratitis develops.

Among viral keratitis, the most common are herpes (caused by the herpes virus) and adenoviral (caused by adenovirus).Herpetic keratitis is often accompanied by a rash of herpes blisters on the lips or on the skin of the nose and eyelids. Adenoviral can occur after suffering a cold and sore throat.

Redness of the eye, pain, photophobia, lacrimation, foreign body sensation worries, visual acuity sharply decreases. With bacterial keratitis, there is an abundant purulent discharge from the eye.
It is strictly forbidden to self-medicate. You should immediately contact an ophthalmologist who will prescribe the correct treatment.If necessary, hospitalization is carried out in the eye department. Improperly treated keratitis can lead to infection penetrating into the eye and to partial or complete loss of vision.

Inflammatory diseases of the choroid : iritis, iridocyclitis, choroiditis.

Distinguish between inflammation of the anterior part of the choroid (iritis and iridocyclitis) and inflammation of its posterior part (choroiditis). They develop when an infection enters the choroid through the vessels.Infection can enter the eye from the outside (with keratitis, with penetrating wounds of the eyeball, after eye operations) and from the inside (if there is a focus of infection in the body, for example, with tuberculosis; rheumatoid diseases, syphilis, inflammatory diseases of the ear, throat, nose, teeth, etc. etc.).

Iritis – inflammation of the iris of the eye. As a rule, iridocyclitis occurs, that is, inflammation of the iris and the ciliary body, since these two sections are closely connected by vessels.
The disease begins acutely. Breaking pains appear in the eye, photophobia, lacrimation appear, the eye turns red, vision is sharply reduced. The pain intensifies sharply at night and is sometimes unbearable. Severe pain is due to the presence of a large number of nerve endings in the iris and in the ciliary body.

In choroiditis, complaints of pain in the eye, photophobia, lacrimation are absent, since there are no sensitive nerve endings in the choroid. Visual acuity decreases only when the inflammatory focus occurs closer to the central zone of the retina.The patient is disturbed by flashes of light in front of the eye, distortion of the letters and objects in question. If inflammatory foci occur in the periphery, then visual acuity does not change.

In case of symptoms of iridocyclitis, an urgent appeal to an ophthalmologist is necessary, who will prescribe the necessary treatment. As a rule, the patient is placed in a hospital, where treatment is carried out, as well as a complete examination of the body to identify foci of infection.

Incorrect treatment of iridocyclitis can lead to serious complications (the development of complicated cataracts, increased intraocular pressure, inflammation of the optic nerve), up to complete loss of vision.With timely treatment started, the outcome of iridocyclitis is favorable.
For the timely detection of inflammatory foci on the choroid, it is necessary to undergo a complete ophthalmological examination with pupil dilation and a thorough examination of the fundus once a year.

90,000 Folk remedies and methods of eye treatment

Number of views: 3 628

Date of last update: 28.10.2021

Average Read Time: 9 minutes

Contents:

Compresses for eyes
Baths for eyes
Natural drops for eyes
Vitamins for eyes
What else should you do to take care of your eyes?

Good vision plays an important role in human life.That is why it is necessary to take care of eye health from childhood. Excessive stress on the visual apparatus, insufficient sleep, stress, allergic reactions, injuries, various eye diseases – all this can negatively affect vision. Modern means for the treatment of eyes can solve such problems as redness and inflammation of the eyes, puffiness, etc.

You can choose an eye remedy from the Visin line by passing a simple test on our website.

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Compresses for eyes

To treat eye inflammation, relieve fatigue and redness, compresses can be made from infusions or decoctions of herbs (chamomile, mint, parsley, dill, etc.)). Compresses can be hot, cold and contrasting. For the first, infusions with a temperature of 38-42 ° C are used. This procedure increases blood flow to the upper layers of the skin and dilates the blood vessels. Cold compresses are made from decoctions with a temperature of 15-18 ° C. This treatment helps to eliminate eye irritation, swelling, relieves tension in the eye muscles, and also tones the skin of the eyelids. Contrast compresses are an alternation of hot and cold every 2-3 minutes. This method is used to tone the blood vessels and strengthen the eye muscles.

How to make eye compresses? Moisten a linen or gauze thick napkin or cotton swab in the infusion (broth). Close your eyes and gently apply the compress to your eyelids without applying pressure. A hot compress can be kept for 5-7 minutes, a cold one for 2-3 minutes. Such procedures can be done 2-3 times a week or as needed.

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Eye bath

This procedure has a positive effect on nerve endings and blood circulation, strengthens blood vessels, helps relieve irritation and eye fatigue.For the baths, you can use cool, clean water. This treatment helps relieve eye fatigue and redness. Warm baths are usually made from decoctions of herbs (dill, chamomile, eyebright, blue cornflower flowers, etc.). They can be used as an additional remedy for the treatment of inflammatory and purulent eye diseases. The temperature of the decoction for warm baths should be 24-26 ° C.

How to make eye baths? Pour water or broth into a small container and lower your face there.Open your eyes for a few seconds, then look up and blink for 30 seconds. The procedure must be repeated 2-3 times. After a warm bath for the eyes, it is recommended to make a cool one.

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Natural eye drops

Drops can be used for pain and eye fatigue, increased eye pressure, as well as in the complex treatment of inflammatory diseases (keratitis, conjunctivitis, etc.). To prepare natural drops, infusions or decoctions of eyebright, chamomile, fennel seeds, honey solution, etc. are usually used.They are used as a separate therapeutic agent or in combination with rinsing (instilled after rinsing).

How are natural drops used? Before instilling drops should be at room temperature. Draw some drops from the container into the pipette. Looking up, gently pull back the lower eyelid and put 2-3 drops into the eye. To prevent the product from leaking out, you need to close your eyes and apply a gauze or cotton swab to them, pressing lightly. Keep your eyes closed for 30-40 seconds.Pour the unused remainder of the composition from the pipette – do not return it back to the container with the broth. If you need to drop several types of drops, then it is recommended to use a different pipette for each.

Be sure to consult your doctor before using homemade compresses, baths or drops for the treatment of eye diseases.

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Vitamins for the eyes

Vitamin A

Retinol (A) is important for cell growth and improvement of vision at dusk.Lack of this vitamin can provoke rapid eye fatigue, myopia and the so-called “night blindness”, in which a person has normal vision in the daytime, and in the dark he sees objects blurry. Vitamin A is found in liver, egg yolk, butter, cheese, fish oil. Some plant products, such as carrots, spinach, apricots, tomatoes, etc., contain carotene, from which our body synthesizes retinol itself.

Vitamins of group B

Thiamine (B1). It helps to reduce the pressure of the fundus and activate nerve impulses in the optic nerves. A lack of thiamine can lead to decreased vision and increased intraocular pressure. Vitamin B1 is found in beef and liver, dairy and grain products.

Riboflavin (B2). Vitamin B2 promotes the conversion of carbohydrates into energy, participates in oxygen metabolism and metabolism. With its lack, photophobia, blepharitis, or conjunctivitis may develop. Sources of riboflavin are dairy products, liver, legumes, eggs.

Pyridoxine (B6). This vitamin is essential for the normal functioning of the nervous system, it also participates in cellular metabolic processes. Due to the lack of pyridoxine in the body, the eyes get tired faster. Vitamin B6 is found in fish, milk, liver, egg yolks, cabbage, sprouted wheat.

Cyanocobalamin (B12). It participates in the work of the central nervous system and in the process of hematopoiesis, helps to restore the optic nerve in glaucoma, and normalizes blood circulation in the eyes.Its deficiency sometimes leads to lacrimation. Vitamin B12 is found in beef, seafood, soy, and seaweed.

Vitamin C

Ascorbic acid © is necessary to strengthen the capillaries and activate the body’s defenses. Lack of vitamin C can lead to loss of visual acuity, decreased tone of the eye muscles and hemorrhages in the tissues of the eye. Ascorbic acid is found in red peppers, rose hips, black currants, cranberries, lingonberries and citrus fruits. The norm of vitamin C per day is 70-100 mg.

Vitamin D

Calciferol (D) strengthens muscles, promotes calcium absorption, and serves to improve vision in case of myopia. With its lack, cataracts can develop. Vitamin D is rich in dairy products, eggs, seafood, mushrooms, yeast.

Vitamin E

Tocopherol (E) restores the cellular structure of the retina, preventing its detachment. Lack of this vitamin can lead to visual impairment. It is found in vegetable, olive and corn oil, nuts, eggs.

Vitamin PP

Nicotinic acid (RR) is essential for normal protein metabolism. Due to its lack, sometimes “night blindness” and myopia develop. Vitamin PP is found in foods such as meat, fish, legumes, and grains.

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What else do you need to do to take care of your eyes?

Also, to maintain eye health, one should not forget about the observance of the regime of rest and work. It is necessary to take care of the normal lighting of the workplace, take breaks from working at the computer.

It is useful to have preventive eye examinations with an ophthalmologist.

The doctor will help you choose the right products for your daily eye care.

VISIN® Classic

It is a fast-acting preparation for relieving edema and treating redness. VISIN® Classic is recommended to be instilled into the eyes in case of mild irritation or itching caused by the ingress of cosmetics, chlorinated water or exposure to environmental factors.

VISIN® Alergy

Redness of the eyes with allergies is sometimes accompanied by lacrimation, the eyes begin to itch and swell.As a preventive treatment and to eliminate unpleasant symptoms of allergy, you can use VISIN® Allergy.

The information in this article is for reference only and does not replace professional medical advice. Consult an ophthalmologist for diagnosis and treatment.

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