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Beet juice side effects high blood pressure: Beetroot juice and blood pressure: Study and benefits

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Beetroot juice and blood pressure: Study and benefits

Beetroot has been used since the Middle Ages as a treatment for ailments, particularly those relating to the blood and digestion.

Medical researchers have recently returned to this plant product to investigate its effect on blood pressure and explore opportunities to put it to use in modern medicine and the home management of conditions.

Researchers have concluded that one glass of beetroot juice a day is enough to significantly reduce blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. They conducted a placebo-controlled trial with dozens of participants.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), high blood pressure is either the primary cause of or contributes to more than 1,000 deaths in the United States every day.

Because of the widespread impact of high blood pressure, researchers are likely to investigate in some depth any simple dietary interventions that could potentially benefit the wider population.

High blood pressure is a serious public health concern. It increases the risk of more dangerous health conditions, such as heart attack, stroke, and chronic heart failure. High blood pressure is also a major risk factor for kidney disease.

Share on PinterestBeetroot juice has been investigated for the powerful effect of its nitrate content on blood pressure.

Beetroot contains high levels of dietary nitrate (NO3), which the body converts into biologically active nitrite (NO2) and nitric oxide (NO). In the human body, NO relaxes and dilates blood vessels.

Other leafy vegetables, such as lettuce and cabbage, also have high levels of the compound. They take it up from the soil through their roots.

A meta-analysis of 16 trials was published in The Journal of Nutrition in 2013.

The researchers found that “Inorganic nitrate and beetroot juice supplementation was associated with a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure.”

One major trial was carried out at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) in the United Kingdom and published in the journal Hypertension. The research was funded by the British Heart Foundation.

They found the following results:

“This interesting study builds on previous research by this team and finds that a daily glass of beetroot juice can lower blood pressure in people with hypertension – even those whose high blood pressure was not controlled by drug treatment.”

Dr. Shannon Amoils, British Heart Foundation, senior research advisor

For the trial, Prof. Amrita Ahluwalia of the vascular pharmacology department at QMUL and her colleagues recruited 64 people aged between 18 and 85 years.

Half of the participants were taking prescribed medication for high blood pressure but did not reach their target blood pressure, and the rest had been diagnosed with high blood pressure but were not yet taking medication for it.

The participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group consumed a 250-milliliter (ml) glass of beetroot juice, and the other group had the same, except their beetroot juice was nitrate-free.

The nitrate-free beetroot juice was the basis of the placebo group.

All groups consumed the juice daily for 4 weeks. They were also monitored for 2 weeks before and after the study, bringing the total trial period to 8 weeks.

The trial was double-blind, which means neither the administering clinicians nor the patients knew whether the beetroot juice they were given was the placebo or the active supplement.

During the 4 weeks in which they were taking the juice, patients in the active supplement group, whose beetroot juice contained inorganic nitrate, experienced a reduction in blood pressure of 8/4 millimeters of mercury (mmHg).

The first figure is systolic pressure, generated when the heart is pumping, and the second figure is diastolic pressure, created when the heart is relaxing and filling with blood. The 8/4-mmHg reduction brought the blood pressure of many participants back into the normal range.

In the 2 weeks after they stopped drinking the juice, their blood pressure returned to the higher levels noted at the start of the study.

This is the first study that shows evidence of dietary nitrate supplementation’s long-lasting benefit in a group of patients with high blood pressure.

Share on PinterestHigh blood pressure is a common health issue in the U.S., and beetroot juice acts as a natural aid.

The patients in the active supplement group also experienced a 20 percent or so improvement in blood vessel dilation capacity, and their artery stiffness reduced by around 10 percent.

Studies show that these changes are linked to a reduced risk of heart disease.

There were no changes in blood pressure, blood vessel function, or artery stiffness in the placebo group.

The authors note that the reduction achieved in the active supplement group is close to that achieved by medication. The average reduction in blood pressure caused by a single anti-hypertension drug is 9/5 mmHg.

The study concludes:

“These findings suggest a role for dietary nitrate as an affordable, readily-available, adjunctive treatment in the management of patients with hypertension.

To put the importance of these findings in context: The authors note that large-scale observational studies show that for every 2 mmHg increase in blood pressure, the risk of death from heart disease goes up 7 percent and the risk of stroke by 10 percent.

Commenting on the findings, Prof. Ahluwalia says:

“This research has proven that a daily inorganic nitrate dose can be as effective as medical intervention in reducing blood pressure and the best part is we can get it from beetroot and other leafy green vegetables.”

She says that one reason the findings are exciting is that they open up the potential for people with high blood pressure to increase dietary nitrate in a way that can be easily worked into their daily lives while still providing a positive benefit.

“It is hugely beneficial for people to be able to take steps in controlling their blood pressure through non-clinical means, such as eating vegetables,” Prof. Ahluwalia adds. “We know many people don’t like taking drugs life-long when they feel okay, and, because of this, medication compliance is a big issue.”

“The possibility of using a natural product, rather than another pill, to help lower blood pressure, is very appealing,” adds Dr. Amoils.

Prof. Ahluwalia advises that people looking to increase their daily nitrate intake should avoid boiling vegetables, as the nitrate dissolves in water. Instead, “steaming, roasting, or drinking in a juice all has a positive effect,” she notes.

As for the next step in confirming the relationship between beetroot juice and blood pressure, she says this was a small trial. The next stage would be a larger study that tries to replicate the findings over a longer period with a much larger group of people who have high blood pressure.

Here is a link to a wide range of natural beetroot products. Please note that this will open an external site.

6 health benefits, nutrition, and how to use it

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

Beetroot juice may offer a range of health benefits due to its unique combination of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Beetroots, or beets, have risen in popularity now that researchers have identified links between drinking beetroot juice and lowered blood pressure, reduced inflammation, and improved athletic performance.

Beetroots have an excellent nutritional profile that includes plenty of essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. They also contain unique bioactive compounds called betalains, which may benefit a person’s health.

People can get these benefits from consuming whole beetroots or their juice.

In this article, we look at the research behind six proposed health benefits of beetroot juice. We also cover dosage and how to make the juice at home.

Beetroot juice contains a wide range of essential vitamins and minerals. Drinking this vegetable juice regularly can help prevent deficiencies in these nutrients.

A 100-milliliter (ml) serving of organic beetroot juice, which is equivalent to a small glass, contains 29 calories, no fat, and the following nutrients:

  • 0.42 grams (g) of protein
  • 7.50 g of carbohydrates
  • 5.42 g of sugar
  • 0.40 g of fiber

Beetroot juice also contains antioxidants. Antioxidants reduce oxidative stress, which research has linked to the development of cancer, inflammatory conditions, and heart disease.

Beetroots are a rich source of essential vitamins and minerals, including:

  • folate, which is important for DNA and cell health
  • vitamin B-6, which supports metabolism and red blood cell production
  • calcium, an essential mineral for bone growth and strength
  • iron, which allows red blood cells to carry oxygen
  • magnesium, a mineral that supports immune, heart, muscle, and nerve health
  • manganese, which contributes to the regulation of metabolism and blood sugar levels
  • phosphorous, an essential nutrient for teeth, bones, and cell repair
  • copper, which plays a role in making collagen, maintaining bones and blood vessels, and supporting immune function
  • zinc, which promotes wound healing, supports the immune system, and encourages normal growth

Beetroots also contain other beneficial compounds:

  • Phytochemicals give plants their color and flavor. They also stimulate the immune system, minimize inflammation, and reduce oxidative stress.
  • Betalains are responsible for the deep red color of beetroots. These pigments have promising antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitoxic properties.
  • Nitrates refer to a group of organic compounds that improve blood flow and promote heart health.

A growing body of research suggests that beetroots can help lower a person’s blood pressure. Researchers believe that this is due to their nitrate content.

Beets naturally contain large quantities of nitrates, which the body converts into nitric oxide. This compound dilates the blood vessels, which improves blood flow and lowers overall blood pressure.

In a recent study, researchers gave participants 70 ml of either nitrate-rich beetroot juice or a nitrate-depleted placebo juice. The blood pressure of those in the test group decreased by 5.2 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) more than that of those in the placebo group after just 30 minutes. However, the effect of the concentrated beetroot juice subsided within 24 hours.

Another small-scale study showed that drinking 250 ml of beetroot juice every day for 4 weeks lowered blood pressure among people with hypertension.

However, people who are already taking medication to lower their blood pressure may not notice the same benefits. The findings of a 2015 study involving people who were taking blood pressure medications revealed that nitrate-rich beetroot juice did not lower blood pressure after 1 week compared with nitrate-depleted beetroot juice.

Beetroot juice contains anti-inflammatory compounds called betalains.

According to a 2015 review, betalains inhibit specific signaling pathways that play a role in inflammatory diseases.

A 2014 study showed that a betalain called phenethylamine-betaxanthin reduced the activity of an inflammatory enzyme by 32 percent.

Beetroots are rich in iron, an essential component of red blood cells. Without iron, red blood cells cannot transport oxygen around the body.

People who have low iron levels can sometimes develop a condition called iron deficiency anemia. Adding sources of iron to the diet can reduce the risk of this condition.

The symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include:

Beetroot juice contains antioxidants, vitamin A, vitamin B-6, and iron. These compounds help protect the liver from inflammation and oxidative stress while enhancing its ability to remove toxins from the body.

A recent small-scale animal study in rats with liver injury found that the rodents that received a beetroot extract had minimal liver damage in comparison with control rats.

Certain compounds in beetroot juice, such as nitrates and betalains, may improve athletic performance.

According to a 2017 systematic review, nitrates can boost a person’s athletic efficiency by increasing blood flow and oxygen to the muscles.

A 2018 study looked at the effects of betalain on 28 trained male cyclists. The cyclists received 100 mg of either beetroot concentrate or placebo every day for a week. Compared with the placebo group, the beetroot concentrate group had higher exercise efficiency and increased blood flow.

Currently, there are no official dosage recommendations for beetroot juice.

According to a 2014 study, drinking one 250-ml glass of beetroot juice per day may lower blood pressure. The juice did not cause any serious side effects, but the participants did report a change in the color of their urine.

The authors noted that the ability of beetroot juice to lower blood pressure depends on the nitrate concentration, which can vary widely among different beetroot juices. The authors recommend a concentration of 4 millimoles per liter (mmol) of nitrate to lower blood pressure in healthy adults.

Share on PinterestA person with low blood pressure should avoid drinking beetroot juice regularly.

In most cases, people can safely eat beets or drink beetroot juice without experiencing any negative side effects.

Drinking beetroot juice regularly can affect the color of urine and feces due to the natural pigments in beets. People may notice pink or purple urine, which is called beeturia, and pink or purple feces. These color changes are temporary and not a cause for concern.

The nitrates in beetroot juice affect blood pressure. Anyone who has low blood pressure or is currently taking blood pressure medication should speak with a healthcare professional before adding beets or beetroot juice to their diet.

Beets contain high levels of oxalates, which can cause kidney stones in people with a high risk of this condition.

People can make beetroot juice at home using a juicer, blender, or food processor.

How to prepare the beets:

  1. Trim the tops off the beets before washing them thoroughly. Leave the beetroot skin intact for extra nutrients.
  2. Chop the beets into small pieces.

How to juice the beets:

  1. Set up a juicer with a bowl or pitcher in position to catch discarded material.
  2. Feed the beetroot pieces into the juicer one at a time.
  3. Pour the beetroot juice into a glass, and immediately drink it or place it in the refrigerator to chill.

How to blend the beets:

  1. Place the beetroot pieces into the blender, and add a splash of water to help soften up the beetroot.
  2. Blend until smooth.
  3. Remove large chunks from the juice using a cheesecloth or fine-mesh strainer.
  4. Discard the pulp and pour the beetroot juice into a glass. Chill it in the refrigerator or serve it straight away.

People can drink beetroot juice on its own, or they can blend it with the juice of other fruits and vegetables.

The following healthful ingredients can add a flavorful twist:

People can also buy beetroot juice from their local grocery store or choose between brands online.

It is important to check the nutrition label on products and avoid juices that contain added sugars and preservatives.

Beetroots are a healthful addition to most diets. People can experience the health benefits of beetroots by eating them raw or cooked or by drinking beetroot juice. Juiced beets contain many beneficial nutrients that the cooking process can remove.

6 health benefits, nutrition, and how to use it

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

Beetroot juice may offer a range of health benefits due to its unique combination of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Beetroots, or beets, have risen in popularity now that researchers have identified links between drinking beetroot juice and lowered blood pressure, reduced inflammation, and improved athletic performance.

Beetroots have an excellent nutritional profile that includes plenty of essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. They also contain unique bioactive compounds called betalains, which may benefit a person’s health.

People can get these benefits from consuming whole beetroots or their juice.

In this article, we look at the research behind six proposed health benefits of beetroot juice. We also cover dosage and how to make the juice at home.

Beetroot juice contains a wide range of essential vitamins and minerals. Drinking this vegetable juice regularly can help prevent deficiencies in these nutrients.

A 100-milliliter (ml) serving of organic beetroot juice, which is equivalent to a small glass, contains 29 calories, no fat, and the following nutrients:

  • 0.42 grams (g) of protein
  • 7.50 g of carbohydrates
  • 5.42 g of sugar
  • 0.40 g of fiber

Beetroot juice also contains antioxidants. Antioxidants reduce oxidative stress, which research has linked to the development of cancer, inflammatory conditions, and heart disease.

Beetroots are a rich source of essential vitamins and minerals, including:

  • folate, which is important for DNA and cell health
  • vitamin B-6, which supports metabolism and red blood cell production
  • calcium, an essential mineral for bone growth and strength
  • iron, which allows red blood cells to carry oxygen
  • magnesium, a mineral that supports immune, heart, muscle, and nerve health
  • manganese, which contributes to the regulation of metabolism and blood sugar levels
  • phosphorous, an essential nutrient for teeth, bones, and cell repair
  • copper, which plays a role in making collagen, maintaining bones and blood vessels, and supporting immune function
  • zinc, which promotes wound healing, supports the immune system, and encourages normal growth

Beetroots also contain other beneficial compounds:

  • Phytochemicals give plants their color and flavor. They also stimulate the immune system, minimize inflammation, and reduce oxidative stress.
  • Betalains are responsible for the deep red color of beetroots. These pigments have promising antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitoxic properties.
  • Nitrates refer to a group of organic compounds that improve blood flow and promote heart health.

A growing body of research suggests that beetroots can help lower a person’s blood pressure. Researchers believe that this is due to their nitrate content.

Beets naturally contain large quantities of nitrates, which the body converts into nitric oxide. This compound dilates the blood vessels, which improves blood flow and lowers overall blood pressure.

In a recent study, researchers gave participants 70 ml of either nitrate-rich beetroot juice or a nitrate-depleted placebo juice. The blood pressure of those in the test group decreased by 5.2 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) more than that of those in the placebo group after just 30 minutes. However, the effect of the concentrated beetroot juice subsided within 24 hours.

Another small-scale study showed that drinking 250 ml of beetroot juice every day for 4 weeks lowered blood pressure among people with hypertension.

However, people who are already taking medication to lower their blood pressure may not notice the same benefits. The findings of a 2015 study involving people who were taking blood pressure medications revealed that nitrate-rich beetroot juice did not lower blood pressure after 1 week compared with nitrate-depleted beetroot juice.

Beetroot juice contains anti-inflammatory compounds called betalains.

According to a 2015 review, betalains inhibit specific signaling pathways that play a role in inflammatory diseases.

A 2014 study showed that a betalain called phenethylamine-betaxanthin reduced the activity of an inflammatory enzyme by 32 percent.

Beetroots are rich in iron, an essential component of red blood cells. Without iron, red blood cells cannot transport oxygen around the body.

People who have low iron levels can sometimes develop a condition called iron deficiency anemia. Adding sources of iron to the diet can reduce the risk of this condition.

The symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include:

Beetroot juice contains antioxidants, vitamin A, vitamin B-6, and iron. These compounds help protect the liver from inflammation and oxidative stress while enhancing its ability to remove toxins from the body.

A recent small-scale animal study in rats with liver injury found that the rodents that received a beetroot extract had minimal liver damage in comparison with control rats.

Certain compounds in beetroot juice, such as nitrates and betalains, may improve athletic performance.

According to a 2017 systematic review, nitrates can boost a person’s athletic efficiency by increasing blood flow and oxygen to the muscles.

A 2018 study looked at the effects of betalain on 28 trained male cyclists. The cyclists received 100 mg of either beetroot concentrate or placebo every day for a week. Compared with the placebo group, the beetroot concentrate group had higher exercise efficiency and increased blood flow.

Currently, there are no official dosage recommendations for beetroot juice.

According to a 2014 study, drinking one 250-ml glass of beetroot juice per day may lower blood pressure. The juice did not cause any serious side effects, but the participants did report a change in the color of their urine.

The authors noted that the ability of beetroot juice to lower blood pressure depends on the nitrate concentration, which can vary widely among different beetroot juices. The authors recommend a concentration of 4 millimoles per liter (mmol) of nitrate to lower blood pressure in healthy adults.

Share on PinterestA person with low blood pressure should avoid drinking beetroot juice regularly.

In most cases, people can safely eat beets or drink beetroot juice without experiencing any negative side effects.

Drinking beetroot juice regularly can affect the color of urine and feces due to the natural pigments in beets. People may notice pink or purple urine, which is called beeturia, and pink or purple feces. These color changes are temporary and not a cause for concern.

The nitrates in beetroot juice affect blood pressure. Anyone who has low blood pressure or is currently taking blood pressure medication should speak with a healthcare professional before adding beets or beetroot juice to their diet.

Beets contain high levels of oxalates, which can cause kidney stones in people with a high risk of this condition.

People can make beetroot juice at home using a juicer, blender, or food processor.

How to prepare the beets:

  1. Trim the tops off the beets before washing them thoroughly. Leave the beetroot skin intact for extra nutrients.
  2. Chop the beets into small pieces.

How to juice the beets:

  1. Set up a juicer with a bowl or pitcher in position to catch discarded material.
  2. Feed the beetroot pieces into the juicer one at a time.
  3. Pour the beetroot juice into a glass, and immediately drink it or place it in the refrigerator to chill.

How to blend the beets:

  1. Place the beetroot pieces into the blender, and add a splash of water to help soften up the beetroot.
  2. Blend until smooth.
  3. Remove large chunks from the juice using a cheesecloth or fine-mesh strainer.
  4. Discard the pulp and pour the beetroot juice into a glass. Chill it in the refrigerator or serve it straight away.

People can drink beetroot juice on its own, or they can blend it with the juice of other fruits and vegetables.

The following healthful ingredients can add a flavorful twist:

People can also buy beetroot juice from their local grocery store or choose between brands online.

It is important to check the nutrition label on products and avoid juices that contain added sugars and preservatives.

Beetroots are a healthful addition to most diets. People can experience the health benefits of beetroots by eating them raw or cooked or by drinking beetroot juice. Juiced beets contain many beneficial nutrients that the cooking process can remove.

6 health benefits, nutrition, and how to use it

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

Beetroot juice may offer a range of health benefits due to its unique combination of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Beetroots, or beets, have risen in popularity now that researchers have identified links between drinking beetroot juice and lowered blood pressure, reduced inflammation, and improved athletic performance.

Beetroots have an excellent nutritional profile that includes plenty of essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. They also contain unique bioactive compounds called betalains, which may benefit a person’s health.

People can get these benefits from consuming whole beetroots or their juice.

In this article, we look at the research behind six proposed health benefits of beetroot juice. We also cover dosage and how to make the juice at home.

Beetroot juice contains a wide range of essential vitamins and minerals. Drinking this vegetable juice regularly can help prevent deficiencies in these nutrients.

A 100-milliliter (ml) serving of organic beetroot juice, which is equivalent to a small glass, contains 29 calories, no fat, and the following nutrients:

  • 0.42 grams (g) of protein
  • 7.50 g of carbohydrates
  • 5.42 g of sugar
  • 0.40 g of fiber

Beetroot juice also contains antioxidants. Antioxidants reduce oxidative stress, which research has linked to the development of cancer, inflammatory conditions, and heart disease.

Beetroots are a rich source of essential vitamins and minerals, including:

  • folate, which is important for DNA and cell health
  • vitamin B-6, which supports metabolism and red blood cell production
  • calcium, an essential mineral for bone growth and strength
  • iron, which allows red blood cells to carry oxygen
  • magnesium, a mineral that supports immune, heart, muscle, and nerve health
  • manganese, which contributes to the regulation of metabolism and blood sugar levels
  • phosphorous, an essential nutrient for teeth, bones, and cell repair
  • copper, which plays a role in making collagen, maintaining bones and blood vessels, and supporting immune function
  • zinc, which promotes wound healing, supports the immune system, and encourages normal growth

Beetroots also contain other beneficial compounds:

  • Phytochemicals give plants their color and flavor. They also stimulate the immune system, minimize inflammation, and reduce oxidative stress.
  • Betalains are responsible for the deep red color of beetroots. These pigments have promising antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitoxic properties.
  • Nitrates refer to a group of organic compounds that improve blood flow and promote heart health.

A growing body of research suggests that beetroots can help lower a person’s blood pressure. Researchers believe that this is due to their nitrate content.

Beets naturally contain large quantities of nitrates, which the body converts into nitric oxide. This compound dilates the blood vessels, which improves blood flow and lowers overall blood pressure.

In a recent study, researchers gave participants 70 ml of either nitrate-rich beetroot juice or a nitrate-depleted placebo juice. The blood pressure of those in the test group decreased by 5.2 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) more than that of those in the placebo group after just 30 minutes. However, the effect of the concentrated beetroot juice subsided within 24 hours.

Another small-scale study showed that drinking 250 ml of beetroot juice every day for 4 weeks lowered blood pressure among people with hypertension.

However, people who are already taking medication to lower their blood pressure may not notice the same benefits. The findings of a 2015 study involving people who were taking blood pressure medications revealed that nitrate-rich beetroot juice did not lower blood pressure after 1 week compared with nitrate-depleted beetroot juice.

Beetroot juice contains anti-inflammatory compounds called betalains.

According to a 2015 review, betalains inhibit specific signaling pathways that play a role in inflammatory diseases.

A 2014 study showed that a betalain called phenethylamine-betaxanthin reduced the activity of an inflammatory enzyme by 32 percent.

Beetroots are rich in iron, an essential component of red blood cells. Without iron, red blood cells cannot transport oxygen around the body.

People who have low iron levels can sometimes develop a condition called iron deficiency anemia. Adding sources of iron to the diet can reduce the risk of this condition.

The symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include:

Beetroot juice contains antioxidants, vitamin A, vitamin B-6, and iron. These compounds help protect the liver from inflammation and oxidative stress while enhancing its ability to remove toxins from the body.

A recent small-scale animal study in rats with liver injury found that the rodents that received a beetroot extract had minimal liver damage in comparison with control rats.

Certain compounds in beetroot juice, such as nitrates and betalains, may improve athletic performance.

According to a 2017 systematic review, nitrates can boost a person’s athletic efficiency by increasing blood flow and oxygen to the muscles.

A 2018 study looked at the effects of betalain on 28 trained male cyclists. The cyclists received 100 mg of either beetroot concentrate or placebo every day for a week. Compared with the placebo group, the beetroot concentrate group had higher exercise efficiency and increased blood flow.

Currently, there are no official dosage recommendations for beetroot juice.

According to a 2014 study, drinking one 250-ml glass of beetroot juice per day may lower blood pressure. The juice did not cause any serious side effects, but the participants did report a change in the color of their urine.

The authors noted that the ability of beetroot juice to lower blood pressure depends on the nitrate concentration, which can vary widely among different beetroot juices. The authors recommend a concentration of 4 millimoles per liter (mmol) of nitrate to lower blood pressure in healthy adults.

Share on PinterestA person with low blood pressure should avoid drinking beetroot juice regularly.

In most cases, people can safely eat beets or drink beetroot juice without experiencing any negative side effects.

Drinking beetroot juice regularly can affect the color of urine and feces due to the natural pigments in beets. People may notice pink or purple urine, which is called beeturia, and pink or purple feces. These color changes are temporary and not a cause for concern.

The nitrates in beetroot juice affect blood pressure. Anyone who has low blood pressure or is currently taking blood pressure medication should speak with a healthcare professional before adding beets or beetroot juice to their diet.

Beets contain high levels of oxalates, which can cause kidney stones in people with a high risk of this condition.

People can make beetroot juice at home using a juicer, blender, or food processor.

How to prepare the beets:

  1. Trim the tops off the beets before washing them thoroughly. Leave the beetroot skin intact for extra nutrients.
  2. Chop the beets into small pieces.

How to juice the beets:

  1. Set up a juicer with a bowl or pitcher in position to catch discarded material.
  2. Feed the beetroot pieces into the juicer one at a time.
  3. Pour the beetroot juice into a glass, and immediately drink it or place it in the refrigerator to chill.

How to blend the beets:

  1. Place the beetroot pieces into the blender, and add a splash of water to help soften up the beetroot.
  2. Blend until smooth.
  3. Remove large chunks from the juice using a cheesecloth or fine-mesh strainer.
  4. Discard the pulp and pour the beetroot juice into a glass. Chill it in the refrigerator or serve it straight away.

People can drink beetroot juice on its own, or they can blend it with the juice of other fruits and vegetables.

The following healthful ingredients can add a flavorful twist:

People can also buy beetroot juice from their local grocery store or choose between brands online.

It is important to check the nutrition label on products and avoid juices that contain added sugars and preservatives.

Beetroots are a healthful addition to most diets. People can experience the health benefits of beetroots by eating them raw or cooked or by drinking beetroot juice. Juiced beets contain many beneficial nutrients that the cooking process can remove.

Overview, Uses, Side Effects, Precautions, Interactions, Dosing and Reviews

Briskin, B. S. and Demidov, D. A. [Enterosorption with pectin-containing medication in the treatment of peritonitis]. Khirurgiia (Mosk) 2005;(4):14-19. View abstract.

Cossack, Z. T. and Musaiger, A. O. Effect on lipid metabolism of beet fibre in desert nomads with low habitual fibre intake. Eur.J.Clin.Nutr. 1991;45(2):105-110. View abstract.

Frank, T., Stintzing, F. C., Carle, R., Bitsch, I., Quaas, D., Strass, G., Bitsch, R., and Netzel, M. Urinary pharmacokinetics of betalains following consumption of red beet juice in healthy humans. Pharmacol Res 2005;52(4):290-297. View abstract.

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Hagander, B., Asp, N. G., Efendic, S., Nilsson-Ehle, P., Lungquist, I., and Schersten, B. Reduced glycemic response to beet-fibre meal in non-insulin-dependent diabetics and its relation to plasma levels of pancreatic and gastrointestinal hormones. Diabetes Res. 1986;3(2):91-96. View abstract.

Hagander, B., Asp, N. G., Ekman, R., Nilsson-Ehle, P., and Schersten, B. Dietary fibre enrichment, blood pressure, lipoprotein profile and gut hormones in NIDDM patients. Eur J Clin Nutr 1989;43(1):35-44. View abstract.

Hamberg, O., Rumessen, J. J., and Gudmand-Hoyer, E. Blood glucose response to pea fiber: comparisons with sugar beet fiber and wheat bran. Am.J.Clin.Nutr. 1989;50(2):324-328. View abstract.

Hara, H., Haga, S., Kasai, T., and Kiriyama, S. Fermentation products of sugar-beet fiber by cecal bacteria lower plasma cholesterol concentration in rats. J Nutr 1998;128(4):688-693. View abstract.

Lampe, J. W., Slavin, J. L., Baglien, K. S., Thompson, W. O., Duane, W. C., and Zavoral, J. H. Serum lipid and fecal bile acid changes with cereal, vegetable, and sugar-beet fiber feeding. Am.J.Clin.Nutr. 1991;53(5):1235-1241. View abstract.

Langkilde, A. M., Andersson, H., and Bosaeus, I. Sugar-beet fibre increases cholesterol and reduces bile acid excretion from the small bowel. Br.J.Nutr. 1993;70(3):757-766. View abstract.

Mitchell, S. C. Food idiosyncrasies: beetroot and asparagus. Drug Metab Dispos. 2001;29(4 Pt 2):539-543. View abstract.

Schwab, U., Louheranta, A., Torronen, A., and Uusitupa, M. Impact of sugar beet pectin and polydextrose on fasting and postprandial glycemia and fasting concentrations of serum total and lipoprotein lipids in middle-aged subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism. Eur J Clin Nutr 2006;60(9):1073-1080. View abstract.

Stevens, J., Ahn, K., Juhaeri, Houston, D., Steffan, L., and Couper, D. Dietary fiber intake and glycemic index and incidence of diabetes in African-American and white adults: the ARIC study. Diabetes Care 2002;25(10):1715-1721. View abstract.

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7 Side Effects Of Drinking Beetroot Juice In Excess

Though beetroot juice is healthy and nutritious, it may not be suitable for all. For instance, beetroots have a high content of oxalates. These compounds can bind with calcium in the body and may eventually lead to kidney stones (1).

Excess intake of beetroot can also cause the accumulation of metal ions in the liver (2).

Though people can safely eat beets and drink juice in most cases, it is important to know the negative effects as well. In this post, we have highlighted the potential side effects of beetroot juice.

What Are The Side Effects Of Beetroot Juice?

1. Might Cause Beeturia

Beeturia is characterized by the discoloration of urine following the intake of beets or foods colored with beetroots. Urine may range from pink to deep red, and this condition could be prevalent in about 14% of the population and have increased frequency in those with iron deficiency (3).

A study conducted on eight individuals showed that the intake of beetroot juice supplements could lead to beeturia in all but one individual (4).

For the majority, beeturia happens to be a harmless phenomenon that resolves on its own once the individual reduces the intake of beet/beet juice (3).

2. May Increase Kidney Stone Risk

According to Clinical Nutrition Research, beets are rich in oxalate and may contribute to stone formation (1). If you already have stones, your doctor might recommend you to stop or reduce beetroot/beetroot juice consumption.

There are four types of kidney stones, with calcium being the most common of all. The mineral can combine with other substances, especially oxalate, and form a stone.

Beetroot is high in oxalate and can directly contribute to kidney stones. It increases urinary oxalate excretion, which can lead to the development of calcium oxalate stones (1).

3. May Cause Anaphylaxis

Though rare, beetroot may cause anaphylaxis, which is an acute allergic reaction to an allergen to which the body has become hypersensitive.

In a study, a young girl complained of urticaria (red rashes on the skin that itch intensely, sometimes leading to dangerous swelling) and asthma after ingesting boiled beetroot (5). The girl also experienced hives, throat tightness, and bronchospasm. She has advised a diet free of beetroot, and she had no symptoms again (5).

4. May Cause Colored Stools

Beetroot (and foods with red coloring) may cause stools to appear reddish (6).

There is some evidence that beetroot may also cause black and tarry stools due to the presence of altered blood (7).

Dark and tarry stools could also be a symptom of beeturia. You may want to visit your doctor and discuss your recent dietary choices and history of similar events (3).

5. May Cause A Stomach Upset

Beetroot contains nitrates*. According to a publication by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, exposure to high levels of nitrates may lead to abdominal cramps (8).

The juice may also cause stomach problems in some people (9).

*Beetroot and certain other foods contain nitrates, which are converted to nitrites upon ingestion.

6. May Cause Problems During Pregnancy

The nitrates in beets may cause a problem here. Pregnant women are more sensitive to the effects of nitrate. This can be attributed to the natural increase of methemoglobin levels in the blood during the later stage of pregnancy.

Excess nitrate can lead to methemoglobinemia (elevated levels of methemoglobin in the blood), causing symptoms like lack of energy, headache, dizziness, blue-gray coloration of skin around the eyes, mouth, lips, hands, and feet (10).

Though most epidemiological studies of pregnant women having elevated nitrate levels in their groundwater did not show any negative effects on their offspring, one study found an association between dietary nitrates and an increase in neural tube defects (10).

7. Might Harm The Liver

Studies suppose that extreme intake of table beetroot may cause several disturbances not only in healthy patients but also in those dealing with metal-accumulating diseases (2).

Excess intake of the veggie can cause the accumulation of metal ions in the liver (2).

How Much Of Beetroot Juice Is Too Much?

There are limited research and no official recommendation regarding the safe dosage of beetroot juice. Hence, it is best to consult with your doctor.

A Note On SuperBeets

SuperBeets is a popular health supplement that allegedly lowers blood pressure and improves circulation. It is made of beetroots that are dehydrated into crystals.

There only is one study about SuperBeets, and concrete evidence on its efficacy to lower blood pressure is lacking. The supplement may lower blood pressure levels, but more research is warranted (11).

Most testimonials from people state that the supplement can lower blood pressure levels. However, certain others reported no benefits. Exact information on SuperBeets is lacking.

If you are vulnerable to the side effects of beetroot juice, the supplement could do more harm than good. Hence, it is imperative to discuss this with your doctor.

Conclusion

Beetroot juice is replete with important nutrients. But its excess intake can cause undesirable effects. Since the ideal dosage of beetroot juice is not established, we suggest you check with your doctor. If you have kidney stones, please refrain from having beets in any form.