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Pristiq and alcohol: Mixing Pristiq and Alcohol | The Recovery Village Drug and Alcohol Rehab

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Drinking on Antidepressants – The New York Times

“People just don’t know,” said Dr. Richard A. Friedman, a professor of clinical psychiatry and director of the psychopharmacology clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York and occasional contributor to The New York Times. “There simply aren’t any good studies of whether there’s a safe amount to drink while taking antidepressants, which is why you have such variable opinions from doctors, ranging from none to modest, whatever that is.”

Dr. Friedman pointed out one thing we do know: “The risk of alcohol abuse and dependence problems for those who suffer from depression is about double the risk of people who don’t.” And if you have an accompanying psychiatric condition like bipolar disorder, he said, the risk of an alcohol use disorder is six to seven times higher.

He noted that some medications may be more dangerous than others when combined with alcohol. Specifically, he warned me away from Wellbutrin, preferred by many patients because it has virtually no sexual side effects; unfortunately that antidepressant, when combined with alcohol, can increase the likelihood of a seizure. Lexapro, the antidepressant I take, belongs to a widely prescribed class of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and is no better or worse when it comes to drinking than other S.S.R.I.s.

Dr. Friedman added that an older type of antidepressants known as monoamine oxidase inhibitors, or MAOIs, could be particularly dangerous when combined with alcohol. Alcohol contains variable amounts of tyramine, a natural substance also found in certain foods like aged cheese and cured meats that, when combined with these drugs, could cause blood pressure levels to skyrocket.

So what to do? Dr. Friedman suggested an experiment: Try having one drink a couple of times a week or less. If no problems arise, such as the return of feelings of depression or anxiety, or a disruption in sleep, you can maintain that level of very moderate drinking. Such side effects may become apparent the next day or take days or weeks to develop, he cautions, especially with higher levels of alcohol intake.

“Many people don’t recognize and make those connections,” he said, so they think that they can continue drinking — or drink more. They can’t. The bottom line is that anyone taking an antidepressant should first speak with a doctor before drinking any alcohol.

As for me, my experiment about how much to drink has been unambiguous: Even a half glass of wine opens the trap doors to depression in my head. Abstaining keeps those doors closed, and my depression at bay. At least for now.

Can You Do It Safely?

Alcohol and antidepressants are two widely used substances in the United States. Both are legal substances that are relatively affordable and easy to obtain.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) shares that, in 2015, more than 86 percent of people reported having used alcohol at some point during their life. Nearly 27 percent of this group reported binge drinking or heavy alcohol use in the past month, with more than 6 percent of people meeting the criteria for an alcohol use disorder. NIAAA’s findings reflect the widespread pattern of alcohol use across the U.S.

Likewise, antidepressants are one of the three most commonly used therapeutic medications in the United States, reports the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 2011 to 2014, about one in eight people over age 12 reported taking antidepressants in the past month.

The rate of antidepressant use had increased significantly, rising by almost 65 percent over the previous 15 years.

Alcohol and Antidepressants Together?

Although both substances are legal and can be used safely in moderation on their own, it is not recommended to use them both at the same time. Several risks arise when alcohol and antidepressants are mixed that can produce unforeseen consequences for users.

Potential side effects of mixing alcohol with antidepressants include:

  •  Worsening of symptoms of depression
  •  Worsening of side effects of your medication
  •  Impaired judgment, coordination, and reaction time
  •  Excessive sedation and drowsiness
  •  Increased risks of alcohol abuse
  •  Trouble sleeping

The above list of symptoms is a collection of general symptoms that may be experienced if an antidepressant is mixed with alcohol. There are five main types of antidepressants, however, that can be expected to cause a range of side effects. Each class of antidepressants works slightly differently in your system and thus will pose slightly different risks when mixed with alcohol.

Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIS)

SNRIs are one of the most commonly prescribed types of antidepressants. They are used to treat symptoms of major depression, mood disorders, and occasionally attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, menopause, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain. SNRIs work by increasing levels of serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain, which help to stabilize mood.

Common SNRIs include:

  •  Cymbalta (duloxetine)
  •  Effexor (venlafaxine)
  •  Pristiq (desvenlafaxine)

SNRIs are not known to have any serious adverse interactions when combined with alcohol, though general symptoms of drowsiness and reduced alertness are likely.

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIS)

SSRIs are the most commonly prescribed antidepressant, as they are highly effective at treating depression and typically cause fewer adverse side effects than some of the other types of antidepressants. SSRIs work by blocking the absorption of serotonin in the brain, which allows messages to be more freely sent and received throughout the brain. The intended result is a better and more stable mood.

Common SSRIs include:

  •  Celexa (citalopram)
  •  Lexapro (escitalopram)
  •  Prozac (fluoxetine)
  •  Paxil (paroxetine)
  •  Zoloft (sertraline)

In comparison to the other types of antidepressants, SSRIs don’t typically cause as many negative side effects when taken with alcohol. Consuming alcohol while also on SSRIs is still not advised, however, since alcohol can cause excessive drowsiness for someone on this type of antidepressant.

Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAS)

TCAs are an additional form of antidepressant that can be prescribed for the treatment of depression, fibromyalgia, some types of anxiety, and chronic pain. TCAs work by increasing levels of norepinephrine and serotonin in the brain while blocking acetylcholine. Scientists believe this interaction helps to restore proper balance in the brain and can help to alleviate symptoms of depression.

Common TCAs include:

  •  Elavil (amitriptyline)
  •  Anafranil (amoxapine-clomipramine)
  •  Norpramin (desipramine)
  •  Sinequan (doxepin)
  •  Vivactil (protriptyline)

When used in combination with alcohol, TCAs become relatively ineffective at reducing symptoms of depression. Additionally, alcohol can increase the sedative effects of TCAs.

Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIS)

MAOIs were one of the most commonly prescribed antidepressants before SSRIs and SNRIs were introduced to the market, and they offered fewer side effects. MAOIs work by restricting the action of monoamine oxidase, which is responsible for breaking down neurotransmitters like serotonin. As a result, more serotonin is available in the brain to stabilize mood.

Common MAOIs include:

  •  Nardil (phenelzine)
  •  Parnate (tranylcypromine)
  •  Marplan (isocarboxazid)
  •  Eldepryl (selegiline)

MAOIs are no longer the first line of antidepressant use because they are known to interact poorly with certain foods and medications, including alcohol, in ways that can produce dangerously high blood pressure.

Noradrenaline and Specific Serotonergic Antidepressants (NASSAS)

NASSAs can be prescribed for the treatment of anxiety disorders and personality disorders as well as depression. They work by blocking negative feedback of norepinephrine and serotonin and thus increasing the amount of these mood-stabilizing neurotransmitters in the brain.

Common NASSAs include:

  •  Tolvon (mianserin)
  •  Remeron, Avanza, and Zispin (mirtazapine)

NASSAs are also unlikely to cause serious threats to your health when combined with alcohol, though drowsiness, sedation, and an increase of symptoms of depression are concerns.

Is There a Safe Amount?

In general, mixing alcohol with antidepressants or any other drug is never recommended. Alcohol is known to interact with antidepressants in ways that can produce unsafe side effects. Increased blood pressure and excessive sedation are just two reasons why it is best to refrain from alcohol use while taking antidepressants.

Some antidepressants, such as SSRIs and TCAs, may be safe to mix with a small amount of alcohol, though it does put you at risk for some side effects. Consuming any amount of alcohol is strongly discouraged if you are taking MAOIs, however, because of the risk of serious health consequences.

In addition to causing unwanted side effects, alcohol runs the risk of making your antidepressant ineffective, which could make your depression worse.

Alcohol is a depressant substance that causes your body and mind to feel relaxed when taken in small amounts. When misused, however, alcohol can cause feelings of depression. Consuming alcohol while on antidepressants may counteract the benefits of the medication that you have worked so hard to achieve.

Some doctors recognize that many of their patients will not want to give up alcohol entirely while on antidepressants, especially since many people take antidepressants for many months or years.

Most types of antidepressants are not likely to cause life-threatening side effects, so doctors may tell patients they can limit themselves to very moderate drinking, if necessary.

A drink a day for women or two drinks per day for men is unlikely to cause serious side effects when mixed with antidepressants.

It is always important, however, to have a good understanding of how you react to your antidepressant first before mixing in alcohol.

You can monitor the likelihood of experiencing symptoms of drowsiness and alertness after drinking alcohol if you already know how your antidepressant affects you.

If you must drink alcohol while taking antidepressants, do so with extreme moderation, and stay informed about the potential side effects.

Pristiq (Desvenlafaxine): Abuse Potential & Addiction

The Pristiq drug is a medication used to treat major depressive disorder. While most users understand the basics of desvenlafaxine, such as it being an anti-depressant, few understand the specifics. It is critical that anyone using it understands Pristiq medication, its benefits, and its risks.

Learn About Pristic Prescription & Misuse:

Pristiq: Approval & Safety

Pristiq is a frequently prescribed antidepressant medication. Also known by its active ingredient, desvenlafaxine, it has been FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder since 2008. While it has only one approved use, there are numerous off-label Pristiq uses.

Desvenlafaxine is considered safe when it is used properly. The correct Pristiq dosage can vary between patients and conditions treated. Patients should always abide by their doctor’s instructions. When it is taken according to directions, it can help to alleviate symptoms of depression, address chronic pain, and prevent hot flashes.

Pristiq Generic And Brand Names

Pristiq is the original brand name of the drug desvenlafaxine. It was created by Wyeth, which has since merged with Pfizer, the current manufacturer of the drug. It is currently the only Pristiq manufacturer, though other versions of the medication are produced by other companies, such as Khedezla, made by Pernix Therapeutics.

Generic desvenlafaxine succinate ER is made by numerous pharmaceutical companies, including:

  • ACTAVIS LABS FL
  • ALEMBIC PHARMS LTD
  • CASI PHARMS INC
  • HIKMA
  • MYLAN

Generic versions of desvenlafaxine have been available since 2015. It is important to note that while these formulations are all very similar to each other, there can be variations, especially when it comes to the inactive ingredients. This means Pristiq side effects can vary depending on if the patient takes the name brand or a generic.

Pristiq Antidepressant Type

Desvenlafaxine medication is classified as an antidepressant. However, knowing that desvenlafaxine is an antidepressant is only half of understanding its drug class. It is also important to know what type of antidepressant it is.

The desvenlafaxine drug class is an SNRI antidepressant. Standing for serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, an SNRI medication increases feel-good chemicals in the brain by slowing the rate at which they are reabsorbed. Pristiq SNRI is considered to be safer than older generations of antidepressants, but how the body reacts to it varies between patients. Not everyone with depression will find that SNRI medications suit them.

Pristiq As A Controlled Substance

Users may wonder if desvenlafaxine is a controlled substance. The answer will depend on which definition of “controlled substance” is being used.

The term is used by the Drug Enforcement Agency in an official capacity, referring to drugs that are on the DEA drug schedule. In this case, a controlled substance is one that has a high potential for abuse when weighted against its therapeutic applications and has special restrictions placed on it. The medication desvenlafaxine is not considered to have a high abuse potential when compared to its benefits, and as a result, it is not a DEA controlled substance.

However, when the average person talks about controlled substances, what they typically mean is anything you need a prescription to access. Under this definition, desvenlafaxine is a controlled substance.

How Long Pristiq Stays In One’s System

Assuming someone is taking desvenlafaxine according to doctor’s orders, there should not be a lot of concern over how long it remains in the system. However, if someone needs to take a medication that interacts with it or is worried about potential drug testing if they are abusing the medicine, there might be a need to know.

The first thing to understand is Pristiq half-life. This comes in at 11 hours. However, this does not mean it is safe to take contraindicated substances after this time. How long one must wait will depend on the substance. For some, waiting a day is enough time, while others require users to wait weeks.

As for drug testing, antidepressants are not typically screened for. However, desvenlafaxine can cause a false-positive result for phencyclidine. As such, anyone taking desvenlafaxine and being tested for phencyclidine use should disclose this to the person administering the test.

Can Pristiq Get You High

The desvenlafaxine drug is not known for producing a sense of euphoria when taken correctly. Even when consumed in large doses, it is not particularly common for the user to experience a notable high. However, there are those who claim it does exist.

Users who abuse desvenlafaxine report that the sensation it produces is one of extreme relaxation and lack of worries, similar to what can be achieved through using cannabis. However, chasing the desvenlafaxine high is dangerous. Doing so requires taking large doses of the medication, leaving the user vulnerable to experiencing an overdose.

Additionally, those who abuse the drug tend to not ingest it in pill form. Instead, they crush it and either swallow the powder or snort it. In both cases, this stands to cause significant problems, from flooding the body with too much of the medication at once to damaging the nasal passages.

Why users abuse desvenlafaxine varies. Sometimes, it is just a matter of curiosity, while for others, it can be a form of self-medication. No matter the motivation, abusing the drug is dangerous and must be avoided. 

Pristiq Abuse & Addiction

Ultimately, the abuse potential for desvenlafaxine is low, with most people being unable to get high from it even when they try. Still, Pristiq abuse does exist. If it continues for long enough, this can result in desvenlafaxine addiction.

Medically speaking, physical addiction to the drug is not possible. However, users can become psychologically dependent upon it, feeling as though life isn’t good enough without abusing the medication. It is also possible to experience Pristiq withdrawal, especially if the medication is stopped suddenly.

Desvenlafaxine Interactions

Desvenlafaxine abuse and addiction can be made even more dangerous due to Pristiq interactions. In fact, these interactions can even make prescribed use risky. No one should take desvenlafaxine unless they have disclosed to their doctor all medications, supplements, and substances they are using. Patients who begin taking new medications should check with the prescribing doctor that they are safe with desvenlafaxine, as there are many known interactions.

Pristiq And Alcohol

Taking desvenlafaxine with alcohol has the potential to increase the negative side effects of the medication, especially those that impact the central nervous system. This means that dizziness and drowsiness can increase, to the point that the user is impaired. It also has the potential to make it more difficult to concentrate or think through problems, putting the user at risk of being taken advantage of by others. Alcohol use should be eliminated when on desvenlafaxine.

Pristiq And Marijuana

Much like alcohol, marijuana is a CNS depressant. This means that the same side effects that come from combining desvenlafaxine and alcohol can occur when mixing cannabis and desvenlafaxine. These effects tend to be strongest when someone is newly taking desvenlafaxine. However, they can remain problematic throughout the time a person takes the medication.

Pristiq Drug Interactions

In addition to its interactions with alcohol and cannabis, desvenlafaxine also interacts with numerous other medications. Combinations that can be dangerous include:

  • Pristiq and Wellbutrin: can cause serotonin syndrome.
  • Pristiq and Adderall: can cause serotonin syndrome.
  • Pristiq and Abilify: greatly increases negative CNS effects.
  • Pristiq and Vyvanse: can cause serotonin syndrome.
  • Pristiq and Xanax: greatly increases negative CNS effects.
  • Pristiq and Trazodone: can cause serotonin syndrome.
  • Pristiq and ibuprofen: increase the risk of bleeding and bruising.
  • Pristiq and aspirin: increase the risk of bleeding and bruising.

This is not an exhaustive list. Make certain to disclose all medications used to the prescribing doctor.

Due to interactions, it may not be possible to take desvenlafaxine and another medication that a person needs. This means weighing options, such as Pristiq vs. Effexor and selecting the best choice between the two. Users can consider everything from the side effects of the medicines to the cost of Pristiq when determining which is best for them.

Recovering From Pristiq Misuse and Addiction

If someone has abused desvenlafaxine or is addicted to the medication, help is needed. Drug rehab centers understand the unique aspects of antidepressant addiction and can help users end their dependence while still caring for their mental health. Such facilities offer personalized alcohol and drug addiction treatment to get started a journey to a sober life.


Page Sources

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  2. Liebowitz MR, Tourian KA. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of Desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d for the treatment of major depressive disorder:a systematic review of clinical trials. Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2010; 12(3): PCC.09r00845. doi:10.4088/PCC.09r00845blu. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2947544/.
  3. Controlled Substances. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE. https://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/schedules/orangebook/c_cs_alpha.pdf.
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Published on: February 13th, 2020

Updated on: February 13th, 2020

Nena Messina is a specialist in drug-related domestic violence. She devoted her life to the study of the connection between crime, mental health, and substance abuse. Apart from her work as management at addiction center, Nena regularly takes part in the educational program as a lecturer.

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Pristiq – Uses, Side Effects, Interactions

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Desvenlafaxine belongs to the class of antidepressant medications known as selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). It is used to treat depression.

It works on the central nervous system (CNS) to elevate mood by increasing the amount of 2 neurotransmitters (chemical messengers) called serotonin and norepinephrine that are available in certain parts of the brain. It may take several weeks before the full benefits of this medication are seen.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

50 mg
Each light pink, square pyramid, extended-release tablet, debossed with “W” over “50” on the flat side, contains 50 mg of desvenlafaxine. Nonmedicinal ingredients: hypromellose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, talc; film coating: polyvinyl alcohol, titanium dioxide, polyethylene glycol, talc, iron oxides, and sunset yellow aluminum lake.

100 mg
Each reddish-orange, square pyramid, extended-release tablet, debossed with “W” over “100” on the flat side, contains 100 mg of desvenlafaxine. Nonmedicinal ingredients: hypromellose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, talc; film coating: polyvinyl alcohol, titanium dioxide, polyethylene glycol, talc, iron oxides, and sunset yellow aluminum lake.

How should I use this medication?

The recommended starting dose of desvenlafaxine for adults is 50 mg once daily at approximately the same time each day. If necessary, your doctor may increase your dose to a maximum of 100 mg daily.

Desvenlafaxine may be taken with or without food. This medication must be swallowed whole with fluid. Do not divide, crush, chew, or dissolve this medication before swallowing it.

When taking this medication, you may see something in your stool that looks like a tablet. This is the empty shell after the medication has been absorbed by your body.

Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take desvenlafaxine if you:

  • are allergic to desvenlafaxine, venlafaxine, or any ingredients of the medication
  • are currently taking an MAO inhibitor (e.g., phenelzine, tranylcypromine, methylene blue, linezolid) or have taken one in the last 14 days (MAO inhibitors should not be taken until at least 1 week after stopping treatment with desvenlafaxine)







  • What side effects are possible with this medication?


    Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

    The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

    The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

    Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

    • abnormal dreams
    • anxiety
    • chills
    • constipation
    • decreased appetite
    • diarrhea
    • difficulty concentrating
    • difficulty urinating
    • dilated pupils
    • dizziness
    • drowsiness
    • dry mouth
    • feeling jittery
    • hair loss
    • headache
    • hot flushes
    • increased sweating
    • irritability
    • muscle stiffness
    • nausea
    • nervousness
    • rash
    • ringing in the ears
    • sexual problems (such as decreased sex drive, difficulty getting an erection, or difficulty having an orgasm)
    • spinning sensation
    • taste changes
    • tingling, burning, or prickly sensations
    • trembling or shaking
    • trouble sleeping
    • tiredness
    • vision changes
    • vomiting
    • weakness
    • weight changes
    • yawning

    Although most of the side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

    Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

    • cold hands and feet
    • dizziness when rising from standing or lying position
    • fainting
    • increased blood pressure
    • increased cholesterol or triglyceride levels
    • new or worsened emotional or behavioural problems
    • pounding or fast heartbeat
    • signs of bleeding (e.g., bloody nose, blood in urine, unusual bruising, bleeding gums, cuts that don’t stop bleeding)
    • symptoms of increased pressure in the eyes (e.g., decreased or blurred vision, eye pain, red eye, swelling of the eye)
    • symptoms of low sodium levels in the blood (e.g., achy, stiff, or uncoordinated muscles; confusion, tiredness, weakness)
    • symptoms of mania (e.g., decreased need for sleep, elevated or irritable mood, racing thoughts)
    • uncontrollable movements of the body or face

    Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

    • seizure
    • signs of a serious allergic reaction (e. g., abdominal cramps, difficulty breathing, nausea and vomiting, or swelling of the face and throat)
    • symptoms of severely increased blood pressure: (e.g., chest pain, blurred vision, dizziness, excessive tiredness, headache, stronger or faster heartbeat)
    • symptoms of serotonin syndrome
      • confusion
      • fast heartbeat
      • hallucinations
      • restlessness
      • shaking
      • shivering
      • sudden jerking of muscles
      • sweating

    Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.







    Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?


    Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

    Abnormal bleeding: There have been some reports of abnormal bleeding associated with desvenlafaxine. The risk of bleeding may be increased by other medications that affect bleeding (e.g., ibuprofen, naproxen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], warfarin). If you notice unusual bleeding or bruising, contact your doctor right away. If you have a bleeding disorder, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

    Blood pressure: Treatment with desvenlafaxine may increase blood pressure. People with high blood pressure should have their blood pressure controlled before taking this medication. Your doctor will check your blood pressure regularly while you are taking this medication.

    Bone fractures: Medications in the same class as desvenlafaxine have been reported to increase the risk for bone fractures. If you have osteoporosis or are at risk for developing osteoporosis, or have had a recent bone fracture, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

    Cholesterol: This medication may increase cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Your doctor may monitor these levels while you are taking this medication. If you have high cholesterol or triglyceride levels, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

    Drowsiness/reduced alertness: If you are taking desvenlafaxine, do not drive a car or perform hazardous tasks until you have determined that this medication does not impair your ability to perform these tasks safely.

    Glaucoma: This medication may cause the symptoms of glaucoma (increased pressure in the eye) to become worse. If you have glaucoma, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. Report any changes in vision to your doctor as soon as possible while you are taking this medication.

    Heart and other blood vessel disease: If you have heart disease or blood vessel disease in the brain (e.g., history of a stroke), discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

    Kidney function: Reduced kidney function or kidney disease may cause this medication to build up in the body, causing side effects. If you have reduced kidney function, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

    Low sodium levels: This medication may cause low sodium levels, especially for seniors, people who are dehydrated, and people taking diuretics (water pills). Contact your doctor if you notice symptoms of low sodium such as confusion, concentration or memory problems, weakness, or unsteadiness.

    Lung problems: Rarely, some people taking this medication may develop certain lung problems or infections. These can become serious very quickly. If you notice any coughing, difficulty breathing, or chest discomfort while taking desvenlafaxine, see your doctor as soon as possible.

    Mania or bipolar disorder: This medication may activate mania. If you have a history of mania or bipolar disorder, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

    Narrowing or blockage of the gastrointestinal tract: This medication should not be taken by people who have narrowing or blockage of the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, intestines) due to medical conditions such as “short gut” syndrome, cystic fibrosis, or inflammatory bowel disease (e. g., ulcerative colitis).

    Seizures: As with other antidepressants, this medication may increase the risk of seizures. If you have had seizures in the past, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

    Serotonin syndrome or neuroleptic malignant syndrome: This medication may cause the rare but potentially life-threatening conditions called serotonin syndrome or neuroleptic malignant syndrome, especially when used with other medications that increase serotonin levels (e.g., sumatriptan, rizatriptan, tramadol, St. John’s wort). Get immediate medical attention if you experience symptoms such as:

    • agitation
    • confusion
    • diarrhea
    • fast heart rate
    • fever
    • hallucinations
    • increased body temperature
    • lack of coordination
    • nausea
    • overactive reflexes
    • vomiting

    Stopping the medication: Stopping this medication suddenly may lead to unwanted symptoms such as:

    • agitation
    • anxiety
    • confusion
    • diarrhea
    • dizziness
    • electric shock sensations
    • fatigue
    • headache
    • irritability
    • nausea
    • sleep disturbances
    • sweating

    Although these symptoms usually go away without treatment, tell your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms. When this medication is stopped, it should be stopped gradually as directed by your doctor.

    Suicidal or agitated behaviour: People taking antidepressants such as desvenlafaxine may feel agitated (restless, anxious, aggressive, emotional, trouble sleeping, and feeling not like themselves), or they may want to hurt themselves or others. These symptoms may occur within the first few weeks of starting this medication. If you notice any changes in mood, behaviours, thoughts, or feelings in yourself or someone who is taking this medication, contact a doctor immediately. Your doctor will monitor you closely for behaviour changes, especially at start of treatment or when your dose is increased or decreased.

    Pregnancy: Newborns whose mothers take medications such as desvenlafaxine during the third trimester of pregnancy may experience complications that require prolonged hospitalization. These complications normally resolve over time.

    This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately. Do not stop taking this medication without talking to your doctor. If this medication is stopped, it should be stopped gradually as directed by your doctor.

    Breast-feeding: This medication passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking desvenlafaxine, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

    Children: The safety and efficacy of using this medication have not been established for children less than 18 years of age. The use of this medication by children less than 18 years old may cause behavioural and emotional changes, such as suicidal thoughts and behaviour.

    Seniors: Seniors may be more likely to experience side effects, especially increased blood pressure, with this medication than younger adults. Lower doses may be needed.





    What other drugs could interact with this medication?


    There may be an interaction between desvenlafaxine and any of the following:

    • acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)
    • alcohol
    • alpha-agonists (e. g., clonidine, methyldopa)
    • amphetamines (e.g., dextroamphetamine, lisdexamfetamine)
    • antipsychotics (e.g., haloperidol, quetiapine, olanzapine, risperidone)
    • apixaban
    • buspirone
    • clopidogrel
    • cyclobenzaprine
    • dabigatran
    • dasatinib
    • dexmethylphenidate
    • dextromethorphan
    • dipyridamole
    • edoxaban
    • epinephrine
    • ergot alkaloids (e.g., ergotamine, dihydroergotamine)
    • glucosamine
    • heparin
    • linezolid
    • lithium
    • low molecular weight heparins (e.g., dalteparin, enoxaparin, tinzaparin)
    • methadone
    • methylene blue
    • methylphenidate
    • mirtazapine
    • monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs; e.g., moclobemide, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine)
    • multiple vitamin/mineral supplements
    • narcotic pain medications (e.g., codeine, fentanyl, morphine)
    • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; e. g., ibuprofen, indomethacin, ketorolac, naproxen)
    • obinutuzumab
    • omega-3 fatty acids
    • pentoxifylline
    • pseudoephedrine
    • rivaroxaban
    • St. John’s wort
    • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; e.g., citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline)
    • serotonin antagonists (e.g., granisetron, ondansetron)
    • other serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs; e.g., duloxetine, venlafaxine)
    • tapentadol
    • ticagrelor
    • ticlopidine
    • tipranavir
    • tramadol
    • trazodone
    • tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline, desipramine, imipramine)
    • triptan medications (e.g., naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan)
    • tryptophan supplements
    • vitamin E
    • warfarin

    If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

    • stop taking one of the medications,
    • change one of the medications to another,
    • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
    • leave everything as is.

    An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

    Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

    All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Pristiq










How Antidepressants and SSRIs Affect Alcohol Cravings

Antidepressants are a type of medication used to treat depression; this can be done by altering levels of certain chemicals in the brain called neurotransmitters. Serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline are neurotransmitters that have been associated with depression and other mood disorders such as anxiety, phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Drugs prescribed are designed to target these chemicals specifically or work with more than one of these chemicals to alleviate symptoms. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are a type of medication that helps to reduce the symptoms of depression. Antidepressant SSRI chemicals include Fluoxetine (Prozac) and Citalopram, paroxetine and sertraline. It is thought that serotonin influences mood, emotions and sleep. SSRIs work by inhibiting the reabsorption of serotonin which leaves more of this chemical available in the brain, thus increasing a more positive mood.

While there is evidence for antidepressants consistently alleviate depressive symptoms in patients with co-morbidity alcohol dependence and depression, some groups of patients may show an increase in alcohol consumption.  SSRIs are not known to have very serious side effects but there have been recent reports of SSRIs inducing alcohol cravings.

Research has found that antidepressants can intensify the effects of alcohol, or can lead individuals to increase their alcohol consumption and become heavily dependent on alcohol. SSRIs induced alcoholism is likely to be relatively common but reported as being rare. This is due to under diagnosis and treatment due to assumptions of those who are considered depressed having an increased risk of developing an addiction to alcohol as a form of a coping mechanism.

More studies need to be performed in order to discover the link between antidepressants and SSRIs. Alcohol tends to modify serotonin activity throughout the brain in regards to both signalling and neurotransmission. Since antidepressants prevents reuptake of serotonin, it may lead to elevated levels of serotonin, which could cause manic symptoms, risky behaviour, and dangerous mood swings. Most research has been found to support SSRIs reducing alcohol consumption in animals and humans. Several human studies on heavy drinkers found SSRIs to reduce overall alcohol consumption by approximately 15 to 20 percent (Naranjo et al. 1994).

As well as in one study, of 18 heavy drinkers the SSRI Citalopram reduced both drinking and self-reported craving for alcohol (Kranzler et al. 1995). Although, these studies may support the theory that SSRIs reduce alcohol consumption their samples only include those who are already heavily dependent on alcohol. In addition, these reports are only correlation and therefore cannot imply causation therefore SSRIs may not be the sole reason for decreasing alcohol consumption.

For example, those who are heavy drinkers may be depressed (an issue of co-morbidity). Therefore, when these individuals take SSRIs they no longer need to consume high levels of alcohol as their symptoms of depression are being treated.

Recent reports have suggested that an increase of alcohol consumption is found in those who are not classified as dependent. This means that those who were not alcohol dependent become dependent due to changes in their brain chemicals. Some research has linked SSRI (such as Paxil) to increased alcohol cravings and abuse.

This risk might be higher in people who carry certain genes that already make them more susceptible to alcohol abuse. For example, the 5-HT3 serotonin receptor is rapidly enhanced by ethanol (chemical found in alcohol) that releases dopamine in the reward system (Enoch, Gorodetsky, Hodgkinson, Roy & Goldman, 2011). This serotonin transporter gene has been linked to excessive drinking, alcohol dependence and impulsiveness.

Suggestively, the reward sensations felt when consuming alcohol while on antidepressant medication is perhaps a cause of alcohol dependency. Further evidence, comes from an increase of women becoming alcohol dependent associated with an increase of women being prescribed on antidepressants. With one in three women now taking antidepressants, women suffer more adverse reactions to antidepressants which could illustrate a reason why 4% of women are now alcohol dependent.

From now, it is important to avoid alcohol while on antidepressants. Although, medications do not specifically instruct users to avoid alcohol completely it is important to be very careful when mixing alcohol and medications. Drugs are only tested on only thousands of patients but are then given to millions of people and therefore not all serious side effects may be noted.

Pristiq Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing

See also Warning section.

Drowsiness, dizziness, nausea, dry mouth, constipation, loss of appetite, weight loss, blurred vision, nervousness, trouble sleeping, or excessive sweating may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

This medication may raise your blood pressure. Check your blood pressure regularly and tell your doctor if the results are high.

An empty tablet shell may appear in your stool. This effect is harmless because your body has already absorbed the medication.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: severe/pounding headache, shakiness (tremor), decreased interest in sex, changes in sexual ability, easy bruising/bleeding.

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: cough that doesn’t go away, shortness of breath, chest pain, black stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, eye pain/swelling/redness, widened pupils, vision changes (such as seeing rainbows around lights at night), seizures.

This medication may increase serotonin and rarely cause a very serious condition called serotonin syndrome/toxicity. The risk increases if you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin, so tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take (see Drug Interactions section). Get medical help right away if you develop some of the following symptoms: fast heartbeat, hallucinations, loss of coordination, severe dizziness, severe nausea/vomiting/diarrhea, twitching muscles, unexplained fever, unusual agitation/restlessness.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US –

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Desvenlafaxine: MedlinePlus Drug Information

A small number of children, teenagers, and young adults (up to 24 years of age) who took antidepressants (‘mood elevators’) such as desvenlafaxine during clinical studies became suicidal (thinking about harming or killing oneself or planning or trying to do so). Children, teenagers, and young adults who take antidepressants to treat depression or other mental illnesses may be more likely to become suicidal than children, teenagers, and young adults who do not take antidepressants to treat these conditions. However, experts are not sure about how great this risk is and how much it should be considered in deciding whether a child or teenager should take an antidepressant. Children younger than 18 years of age should not normally take desvenlafaxine, but in some cases, a doctor may decide that desvenlafaxine is the best medication to treat a child’s condition.

You should know that your mental health may change in unexpected ways when you take desvenlafaxine or other antidepressants even if you are an adult over 24 years of age. You may become suicidal, especially at the beginning of your treatment and any time that your dose is increased or decreased. You, your family, or your caregiver should call your doctor right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: new or worsening depression; thinking about harming or killing yourself, or planning or trying to do so; extreme worry; agitation; panic attacks; difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep; aggressive behavior; irritability; acting without thinking; severe restlessness; or frenzied abnormal excitement. Be sure that your family or caregiver knows which symptoms may be serious so they can call the doctor if you are unable to seek treatment on your own.

Your healthcare provider will want to see you often while you are taking desvenlafaxine, especially at the beginning of your treatment. Be sure to keep all appointments for office visits with your doctor.

The doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer’s patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with desvenlafaxine. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You also can obtain the Medication Guide from the FDA website: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm085729.htm.

No matter your age, before you take an antidepressant, you, your parent, or your caregiver should talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of treating your condition with an antidepressant or with other treatments. You should also talk about the risks and benefits of not treating your condition. You should know that having depression or another mental illness greatly increases the risk that you will become suicidal. This risk is higher if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had bipolar disorder (mood that changes from depressed to abnormally excited) or mania (frenzied, abnormally excited mood) or has thought about or attempted suicide. Talk to your doctor about your condition, symptoms, and personal and family medical history. You and your doctor will decide what type of treatment is right for you.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

This document, provided by Lexicomp ® , contains all the information you need to know about the drug, including the indications, route of administration, side effects and when you should contact your healthcare provider.

Trade names: USA

Khedezla [DSC]; Pristiq

Trade names: Canada

APO-Desvenlafaxine; Pristiq

Warning

  • Drugs like this have increased the likelihood of suicidal thoughts or actions in children and young people.This risk may be higher in people who have attempted suicide or have had suicidal thoughts in the past. All people taking this drug must be closely monitored. Call your doctor right away if you have signs such as depressed mood (depression), nervousness, anxiety, grumpiness, or anxiety attacks, or if other mood or behavior changes occur or worsen. Call your doctor immediately if you have suicidal thoughts or attempted suicides.
  • This drug is not approved for use in children. Consult your doctor.

What is this drug used for?

  • The drug is used to treat depression.
  • This medicinal product can be used for other indications. Consult your doctor.

What should I tell my doctor BEFORE taking this drug?

  • If you are allergic to this drug, any of its ingredients, other drugs, foods or substances.Tell your doctor about your allergy and how it manifested itself.
  • For narrow-angle glaucoma.
  • If you are taking any of the following drugs: linezolid or methylene blue.
  • If you have taken a drug for depression or Parkinson’s disease in the past 14 days. These include isocarboxazid, phenelzine, tranylcypromine, selegiline, or rasagiline. An episode of very high blood pressure may occur.
  • If you are taking another drug that contains the same drug.
  • If you are taking another drug like this. If in doubt, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

This list of drugs and diseases that may be adversely associated with this drug is not exhaustive.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the medicines you take (both prescription and over-the-counter, natural products and vitamins) and your health problems.You need to make sure that this drug is safe for your medical conditions and in combination with other drugs you are already taking. Do not start or stop taking any drug or change the dosage without your doctor’s approval.

What do I need to know or do while taking this drug?

  • Tell all healthcare providers that you are taking this drug.These are doctors, nurses, pharmacists and dentists.
  • It may take several months to achieve full effect.
  • Avoid driving or other activities that require increased attention until you see how this drug affects you.
  • To reduce the risk of dizziness or loss of consciousness, get up slowly from a lying or sitting position. Use caution when going up and down stairs.
  • Do not stop taking this drug abruptly without talking to your doctor.This can increase the risk of side effects. If necessary, this drug should be stopped gradually as directed by your doctor.
  • High blood pressure has happened with this drug. Monitor your blood pressure as directed by your doctor.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol while taking this drug.
  • Consult your doctor before using marijuana, other forms of cannabis, prescription or over-the-counter drugs that may slow you down.
  • This drug may increase the risk of bleeding. Sometimes bleeding can be life-threatening. Consult your doctor.
  • The risk of eye problems may be increased in some patients with this drug. Your doctor may order you to see an ophthalmologist to see if you are at increased risk of developing these eye problems. Call your doctor right away if you have eye pain, change in vision, swelling, or redness around the eye.
  • This drug may lower sodium levels. Very low sodium levels can be life-threatening, leading to seizures, fainting, difficulty breathing, or death.
  • This drug may interfere with some laboratory tests. Tell all healthcare providers and lab staff that you are taking this drug.
  • If you are 65 years of age or older, use this drug with caution.You may have more side effects.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breastfeeding. The benefits and risks for you and your child will need to be discussed.
  • Taking this drug during the third trimester of pregnancy may cause some health problems in the newborn. Consult your doctor.

What side effects should I report to my doctor immediately?

WARNING. In rare cases, some people with this drug can have serious and sometimes deadly side effects. Call your healthcare professional or get medical attention right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms, which may be associated with serious side effects:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction such as rash, hives, itching, reddened and swollen skin with blistering or scaling, possibly associated with fever, wheezing or wheezing, tightness in the chest or throat, difficulty breathing, swallowing or speaking, unusual hoarseness, swelling in the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of low sodium levels such as headache, trouble concentrating, memory impairment, confused thinking, weakness, seizures, and balance problems.
  • Signs of bleeding such as vomiting or coughing up blood; vomiting of the type of coffee grounds; blood in the urine; black, red, or tarry stools; bleeding from the gums; non-cyclic vaginal bleeding; bruising that occurs or increases for no reason; bleeding that you cannot stop.
  • Signs of high blood pressure, such as very severe headache, or dizziness, or loss of consciousness, or blurred vision.
  • Signs of a lung or respiratory problem, such as shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, cough, or fever.
  • Pain or pressure in the chest.
  • Convulsions.
  • Feeling extremely tired or weak.
  • Hallucinations (a person sees or hears something that is not in reality).
  • Some men have had sexual dysfunction with this drug. These included decreased interest in sex and lack of erection. If you have any sexual dysfunction while taking this drug, call your doctor right away.
  • A serious and sometimes fatal complication called serotonin syndrome can occur. This risk may increase with the concomitant use of certain other drugs. Call your doctor right away if you have anxiety, imbalance, confusion, hallucinations, fever, tachycardia or irregular heartbeat, flushing, muscle twitching or stiffness, seizures, tremors or tremors, excessive sweating, severe diarrhea, nausea or vomiting , very severe headache.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

Any medicine can have side effects. However, many people have little or no side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if these or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Feeling dizzy, sleepy, tired, or weak.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • Constipation.
  • Dry mouth.
  • Sleep disorders.
  • Lack of hunger.
  • Sweating.
  • Shiver.
  • Something that looks like a pill can be seen in the stool. This is normal and not a cause for concern. If you have any questions, please consult your doctor.

This list of potential side effects is not exhaustive. If you have any questions about side effects, please contact your doctor. Talk to your doctor about side effects.

You can report side effects to the National Health Office.

You can report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-332-1088. You can also report side effects at https://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

What is the best way to take this drug?

Use this drug as directed by your healthcare practitioner. Read all the information provided to you. Follow all instructions strictly.

  • Take this medication with or without food.
  • The drug should be swallowed whole with a liquid. The drug should not be chewed, broken, crushed or dissolved.
  • Take this drug at about the same time of the day.
  • Continue taking this drug as directed by your doctor or other healthcare professional, even if you feel well.

What should I do if a dose of a drug is missed?

  • Take the missed dose as soon as you can.
  • If it is time for your next dose, do not take the missed dose and then return to your normal schedule.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or an additional dose.

How do I store and / or discard this drug?

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Store in a dry place. Do not store in the bathroom.
  • Store all medicines in a safe place. Keep all medicines out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Dispose of unused or expired drugs. Do not empty into toilet or drain unless directed to do so. If you have any questions about the disposal of your medicinal products, consult your pharmacist. Your area may have drug recycling programs.

General information on medicinal products

  • If your health does not improve or even worsens, see your doctor.
  • You should not give your medicine to anyone and take other people’s medicines.
  • Some medicines may have different patient information sheets. If you have questions about this drug, talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other healthcare professional.
  • A separate patient instruction sheet is attached to the product. Please read this information carefully. Reread it every time you replenish your supply.If you have questions about this drug, talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare professional.
  • If you think there has been an overdose of a drug, call a Poison Control Center immediately or seek medical attention. Be prepared to tell or show which drug you took, how much and when it happened.

Use of information by consumer and limitation of liability

This information should not be used to make decisions about taking this or any other drug.Only the attending physician has the necessary knowledge and experience to make decisions about which drugs are appropriate for a particular patient. This information does not guarantee that the drug is safe, effective, or approved for the treatment of any disease or specific patient. Here are only brief general information about this drug. It does NOT contain all available information on the possible use of the drug with instructions for use, warnings, precautions, information about interactions, side effects and risks that may be associated with this drug.This information should not be construed as a treatment guide and does not replace information provided to you by your healthcare professional. Check with your doctor for complete information on the possible risks and benefits of taking this drug. Use of this information is governed by the Lexicomp End User License Agreement available at https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/solutions/lexicomp/about/eula.

Copyright

© UpToDate, Inc.and its affiliates and / or licensors, 2021. All rights reserved.

Pristiq / Pristiq Tablet English – Item

  • Can Pristiq / Pristiq Tablet be used for Major Depressive Disorder and Depression?

    Yes, major depressive disorder and depression are among the most common reported uses for Pristiq / Pristiq Tablet. Please do not use Pristiq / Pristiq Tablet for major depressive disorder and depression without consulting first with your doctor.Click here to view the survey results to find out how other users are using Pristiq / Pristiq Tablet.

  • Should I use this product empty stomach, before food or after food?

    TabletWise.com website users have most commonly reported using Pristiq / Pristiq Tablet after food. However, this information may not be appropriate for your specific situation. Please consult your healthcare professional for an appointment schedule.Click here to view the survey results to see what other users have to say about the best time to take Pristiq / Pristiq Tablet.

  • Is it safe to drive or operate heavy equipment while using this product?

    If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, hypotension, or headache while taking Pristiq / Pristiq Tablet, you may need to stop driving and heavy industrial equipment.You should stop driving if taking the drug makes you drowsy, dizzy, or hypotensive. Doctors recommend to stop drinking alcohol with such drugs, because alcohol significantly increases side effects and drowsiness. Please check how your body is responding when taking Pristiq / Pristiq Tablet. Be sure to contact your healthcare professional for advice based on your body and overall health.

  • Is this medication (product) addictive or addictive?

    Most drugs are not addictive or addictive. In most cases, the government classifies drugs that can be addictive as controlled dispensing drugs. For example, an H or X chart in India and an II-V chart in the United States. Please review the information on the drug packaging to make sure this drug is not a controlled drug.Also, do not self-medicate or train your body to medication without consulting your healthcare professional.

  • Can I stop using this product immediately or do I need to slowly withdraw from its use?

    Some medications need to be discontinued gradually due to the recovery effect. Be sure to contact your healthcare professional for advice based on your body, general health, and other medications you are taking.

  • Khedezla and alcohol interaction

    When checking the interactions according to the authoritative sources Drugs.com, Rxlist.com, Webmd.com, Medscape.com, contraindications or side effects were found that could be harmful or intensify the negative effect when using a combination of drugs with alcohol.

    Consumer:

    Alcohol may increase the nervous system side effects of desvenlafaxine, such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating.Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit drinking alcohol while you are being treated with desvenlafaxine. Do not use more than the recommended dose of desvenlafaxine, and avoid activities that require mental alertness, such as driving a car or operating dangerous equipment, until you know how the drug is affecting you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions or concerns.

    Professional:

    As a rule, avoid: alcohol may increase some of the pharmacological effects of CNS-active substances.Use in combination may result in additive depression of the central nervous system and / or impairment of judgment, thinking, and psychomotor abilities.

    Management: Patients receiving CNS-active substances should be warned of such interaction and advised to avoid or limit alcohol consumption. Outpatients should be informed to avoid hazardous activities requiring complete mental alertness and motor coordination until they know how these agents are affecting them, and to notify their physician if they are experiencing excessive or prolonged CNS exposure that interferes with them. normal activity.

    Sources

    • Gilman AG, Rall TW, Nies AS, Taylor P, eds. “Goodman and Gilman’s the Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. 8th ed.” New York, NY: Pergamon Press Inc. (1990):
    • Warrington SJ, Ankier SI, Turner P “Evaluation of possible interactions between ethanol and trazodone or amitriptyline.” Neuropsychobiology 15 (1986): 31-7
    • “Product Information. Fycompa (perampanel).” Eisai Inc, Teaneck, NJ.
    • “Product Information.Rexulti (brexpiprazole). “Otsuka American Pharmaceuticals Inc, Rockville, MD.

    Khedezla

    Generic Name: desvenlafaxine

    Brand: Khedezla, Pristiq

    Synonyms: no

    90,000 Pristiq vs. Effexor: Differences, Similarities and What’s Best for You – Drug Vs.Friend

    Drug Vs. Friend

    Drug Review and Main Differences | Treatment conditions | Efficiency | Insurance coverage and cost comparison | Side Effects | Drug Interactions | Warnings | Frequently Asked Questions

    More than 16 million American adults have depression (major depressive disorder). Pristik and Effexor are two popular medications for the treatment of depression. mental health condition. Effexor XR (Extended Edition) also treats generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety.Both drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Wyeth Pharmaceuticals LLC, a subsidiary of Pfizer, manufactures both drugs in proprietary forms.

    Pristik and Effexor belong to a group of drugs called SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors). They work by regulating the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine in the CNS (central nervous system), thereby improving symptoms of depression.

    Note that the generic name for Pristika is desvenlafaxine and the generic name for Effexor is venlafaxine. These drugs are very similar. When effexor (venlafaxine) is metabolized, it is converted to an active metabolite, desvenlafaxine.

    Although Pristiq and Effexor are SNRIs, they have some differences, which we will describe below.

    What are the main differences between Pristiq and Effexor?

    Pristik and Effexor are SNRI antidepressants available in branded and generic forms.Both drugs are approved for use in adults.

    Pristiq is available as an extended release tablet. The dosage may vary, but the standard dose is 50 mg per day.

    Effexor is available in tablet form as well as extended release capsules and extended release tablets. Typical dosage is 75 or 150 mg per day (XR formulation).

    BNI

    Brand

    903

    Main Differences Between Pristiq and Effexor
    Pristik Effexor

    6

    Brand and generic Brand and generic
    What is the common name? Desvenlafaxine succinate (desvenlafaxine) Venlafaxine hydrochloride (venlafaxine)
    What form (s) is the drug in? Tablet (extended release) Tablets, sustained release capsules, sustained release tablets
    What is the standard dosage? 50 mg per day Varies: Typical dosage is 75 or 150 mg XR per day.
    How long does a typical treatment take? Varies Varies
    Who usually takes this drug? Adults Adults

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    Conditions that Pristiq and Effexor treat

    Pristiq (What is Pristik?) Indicated for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults.Sometimes Pristik is prescribed. not as intended for other purposes.

    Effexor (immediate release) is indicated for the treatment of major depressive disorder. Effexor XR (What is Effexor?) Is indicated for major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and panic disorder.

    prescription)

    prescription)

    Condition Pristik Effexor
    Severe depressive disorder yes Yes (

    forms

    Yes (

    forms

    Yes (XR Form only)
    Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia) Misuse Yes (XR Form Only)
    Panic Disorder Misappropriated Yes (XR Form Only)

    Are Pristik or Effexor more effective?

    A meta-analysis examined the safety and efficacy of Pristiq and Effexor.The researchers concluded that both drugs were similar in terms of effectiveness in treating depression as well as side effects. However, patients taking Pristik experienced less nausea than patients taking Effexor.

    Consult your healthcare professional for medical advice. Only your healthcare professional can determine which medication is best for you based on your medical condition and medical history, and any medications you are taking that may interact with Pristiq or Effexor.

    Get a pharmacy discount card

    Coverage and cost comparison between Pristiq and Effexor

    Insurance plans and Medicare Part D usually cover Pristiq. The typical prescription price for generic 30, 50 mg tablets is around $ 380. A free SingleCare card can bring the price down to under $ 60.
    Insurance plans and Medicare Part D usually cover Effexor XR (the most commonly prescribed type of Effexor).The typical prescription price for 30 150 mg capsules is around $ 140. You can use the free SingleCare card to bring the price down to around $ 15.

    Because insurance plans vary and are subject to change, contact your health plan for the most current coverage information.

    Pristik Effexor
    Usually covered by insurance? yes yes
    Usually covered by Medicare Part D? yes yes
    Standard dosage Sustained release tablets 30.50 mg 30 150mg capsules Sustained release
    Typical co-pay 1 Medicare 9019 $ 1 9019

    $ 0–20
    SingleCare cost $ 60–80 $ 15–40

    Common side effects Pristiq vs.Effexor

    The most common side effects of Pristik are nausea, dizziness, insomnia, increased sweating, constipation, drowsiness, decreased appetite, anxiety and sexual problems in men.

    The most common side effects of Effexor XR are nausea, drowsiness, dry mouth, sweating, sexual problems, decreased appetite and constipation.

    Other side effects may occur. Check with your healthcare professional for a complete list of side effects.

    9019 9019 9016 9016 9016

    903 Constipation

    yes

    Pristik Effexor *
    Side effect Applicable? Frequency Applicable? Frequency
    Nausea yes 22% yes 30%
    Dry mouth yes 9016

    yes 9% yes 9%
    Decreased appetite yes 5% yes 10%
    1319
    yes

    yes

    16%
    Drowsiness yes 4% yes fifteen%
    Insomnia yes 9% yes 10% yes eleven%
    Decreased libido yes 4% yes 5%
    Problems with ejaculation yes 1% yes 10%
    Erectile dysfunction3 3 yes 5%

    * percentages are for Effexor XR, the most commonly prescribed Effexor drug.
    Source: DailyMed (Pristik), DailyMed (Effexor XR)

    Drug Interactions Pristik versus Effexor

    Using SNRI antidepressants with MAO inhibitors may increase the risk of serotonin syndrome, which can be life-threatening. Pristik or Effexor must be separated from the MAOI for seven to 14 days, depending on which drug was discontinued first. Pristik or Effexor should not be taken with other medications that increase serotonin levels, such as other SSRIs or SSRIs antidepressants, migraine triptans, and opioids for the same reason.In addition, the cough of dextromethorphan, which is found in Robitussin-DM, as well as many other cough and cold products, should be avoided as it can also cause serotonin syndrome when combined with Pristik or Effexor.

    Other drugs that can interact with Pristik or Effexor include NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as aspirin or ibuprofen, and anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin. Avoid drinking alcohol while taking Pristik or Effexor.

    If Pristiq is taken with a drug that is metabolized by the enzyme cytochrome P 2D6, the level of the other drug may become too high and become toxic. Dosage adjustment may be required. Effexor does not have this interaction.

    This is not a complete list of drug interactions. Consult your healthcare professional for a complete list of drug interactions.

    Codinum dopamine

    Codinodine

    Medicine Class formulation Pristik Effexor
    isocarboxazid
    Linezolid
    phenelzine
    selegiline tranylcypromine
    MAOI’s (monoamine oxidase inhibitors) yes Yes
    Rhizatriptan
    Sumatriptan
    Zolmitriptan
    Triptans yes yes
    St. John’s wort Supplement io yes yes yes yes
    Dextromethorphan (in many cough and cold products) Cough medicine yes yes
    Desvenlafaxine
    Duloxetine
    Venlafaxine
    Antidepressants SNRIs yes Yes
    Citalopram
    Escitalopram
    fluoxetine
    fluvoxamine
    Paroxetine
    Sertraline
    antidepressants SSRIs yes Yes
    amitriptyline
    desipramine
    imipramine
    Nortriptyline
    Tricyclic antidepressants yes yes
    Aspirin
    Ibuprofen
    Meloxicam
    Nabumetone
    Naproxen
    NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) yes 9019

    yes 903 Vararyn 9016 yes yes 903 Wararyn

    Phentermine Slimming aid yes yes
    Atomoxetine
    Metoprolol
    Nebivolol
    Perphenazine
    Tolterodine
    Medicines, meth CYP2D6 abolisable yes No

    Warnings Pristiq and Effexor

    All antidepressants, including Pristiq and Effexor, have a suicidality warning.The boxed warning is the most serious warning required by the FDA. Children, adolescents, and young adults (under 24) who are taking antidepressants are at increased risk of suicidal ideation and behavior. All patients on antidepressants should be monitored closely.

    Other warnings include:

    • Pristik and Effexor are not approved for use in pediatric patients.
    • Serotonin Syndrome is a serious, life-threatening emergency caused by an accumulation of too much serotonin.Patients taking Pristik or Effexor should be closely monitored for signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as hallucinations, seizures, changes in blood pressure, and agitation. Patients should seek emergency medical attention if any of these symptoms appear. Patients taking other drugs that increase serotonin levels (triptans, tricyclic antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone, dextromethorphan, amphetamines, St. John’s wort, and MAOIs) have a higher risk of developing serotonin syndrome.
    • Pristik or Effexor may increase blood pressure. Monitor your blood pressure regularly. If you have high blood pressure or heart problems, consult your doctor before taking Pristiq or Effexor.
    • SNRIs may increase the risk of bleeding. The risk increases with the concomitant use of aspirin, NSAIDs, or warfarin.
    • Activation of mania or hypomania may occur. In patients with bipolar disorder, antidepressants can cause a mixed / manic episode.
    • Avoid SNRIs or use with caution in patients with untreated anatomically narrow angles (angle-closure glaucoma). Ask your doctor if you are at risk.
    • When you stop taking Pristiq or Effexor, ask your doctor for a schedule for gradually tapering the dose. Abruptly stopping the drug can cause withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, tremors, confusion, and seizures. A gradual dose reduction can help avoid these symptoms.
    • Hyponatremia (low sodium levels) may occur due to inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion syndrome. Patients may experience headaches, difficulty concentrating, memory impairment, confusion, weakness, and unsteadiness, which can lead to a fall. More serious cases may occur. Patients should seek emergency care when symptoms appear and stop taking SNRIs.
    • Do not drive or operate machinery until you know how Pristiq or Effexor is affecting you.
    • Talk with your doctor about using Pristiq or Effexor if you have a history of seizures.
    • In rare cases, there have been reports of rash and allergic / systemic anaphylaxis or angioedema. If you develop a rash or allergic symptoms, stop taking Pristik or Effexor and seek immediate medical attention. Do not take Pristiq or Effexor if you are allergic to any of the ingredients.
    • These drugs have been associated in rare cases of interstitial lung disease and eosinophilic pneumonia.If you are taking Pristiq or Effexor and have shortness of breath, cough, or chest discomfort, seek immediate medical attention.
    • Pristik or Effexor should be used during pregnancy only if the benefit to the mother outweighs the risk to the baby. Stopping the medication can cause a relapse of depression or anxiety. Therefore, patients should be assessed on a case-by-case basis. Your healthcare provider may weigh the risks and benefits of using SNRIs during pregnancy.Newborns exposed to SNRIs in the third trimester developed complications requiring prolonged hospitalization, respiratory support, and tube feeding. If you are already taking Pristiq or Effexor and find you are pregnant, contact your doctor immediately.
    • Pristik: Swallow the tablet whole with water. Do not chew, crush, dissolve, or split tablets.
    • Effexor XR: Swallow the capsule whole with water.Do not split, crush, chew, or place the capsule in water. Alternatively, you can open the capsule, sprinkle the contents of a spoonful of applesauce and swallow the mixture right away, then drink a glass of water.

    Frequently asked questions about Pristiq and Effexor

    What is Pristiq?

    Pristik is an SSRI antidepressant. Pristik treats depression in adults. The common name is desvenlafaxine.

    Is apple cider vinegar good for blood pressure?

    What is Effexor?

    Effexor is also an SSRI antidepressant.Effexor treats depression in adults. Effexor XR (extended release) treats depression, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. The common name for Effexor is venlafaxine.

    Are Pristik and Effexor the same thing?

    The drugs are very similar. When Effexor is metabolized in the body, it is converted to desvenlafaxine, the active ingredient in Pristik. The two drugs are similar but have some differences, such as dose, price, incidence of side effects, and drug interactions.

    Is Pristik or Effexor Better?

    Both drugs are similar in effectiveness. Your healthcare provider can advise you on which drug is right for you.

    Can I use Pristik or Effexor during pregnancy?

    Consult your healthcare professional. He or she will weigh the benefits of taking an antidepressant against the risk to the child. Newborns who received certain antidepressants, including SSRIs or SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as Prozac), developed serious complications during the third trimester of pregnancy.

    If you are already taking Pristik or Effexor and find out that you are pregnant, contact your obstetrician-gynecologist immediately. If you are breastfeeding, also consult your obstetrician / gynecologist.

    Can I use Pristiq or Effexor with alcohol?

    No. Pristik or Effexor should not be taken with alcohol because the combination may increase the risk of respiratory depression (slow breathing, lack of oxygen) and increase sedation and drowsiness, and worsen alertness.The combination can also worsen anxiety and depression.

    Does Pristik help with an alarm?

    Although Pristik is indicated only for the treatment of depression, some doctors prescribe it off-label for anxiety. However, in clinical trials, 3% of patients taking Pristik 50 mg (the recommended dose) experienced anxiety as a side effect. Some people need to try different medications to see which works best. Check with your healthcare professional for more information.

    Pristiq Mood Stabilizer?

    Medicines classified as mood stabilizers are commonly used to treat bipolar disorder. Pristik is indicated for the treatment of depression. Taking Pristik can improve your mood, but it is not classified as a mood stabilizer. Pristik is an SSRI antidepressant.

    Is Venlafaxine an SSRI?

    Yes. Effexor (venlafaxine) is an SNRI. Other SNRIs for depression include Pristiq (desvenlafaxine), Fetzima (levomilnacipran), and Cymbalta (duloxetine).

    Pristiq Oral: uses, side effects, interactions, pictures, warnings and dosing

    Benefits

    Benefits

    Desvenlafaxine is used to treat depression. It can improve your mood, your sense of well-being, and your energy levels. Desvenlafaxine is known as a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI). It works by helping to restore the balance of certain natural substances (serotonin and norepinephrine) in the brain.

    How to use Pristiq

    Read the Treatment Guide and, if possible, the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start taking desvenlafaxine and each time you get the drug.If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

    Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually once a day. The dosage depends on your medical condition and response to treatment.

    Do not crush, chew, or dissolve this medication in water. This can lead to the release of all the drug at the same time, which increases the risk of side effects. Also, do not split tablets unless they have a rating line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so.Swallow a whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing.

    To reduce the risk of side effects, your doctor may instruct you to start taking this drug at a low dose and gradually increase the dose. Follow your doctor’s instructions carefully. Do not increase your dose or use this medication more often or for longer than prescribed. Your condition will not improve any faster and your risk of side effects will increase. Use this medication regularly to get the most out of it.To help you remember, use it at the same time every day.

    It is important to keep taking this drug even if you feel well. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Some conditions can get worse when this drug is stopped suddenly. In addition, you may experience symptoms such as mood swings, headache, fatigue, sleep changes, and short-term sensations like electric shock.To prevent these symptoms while you are stopping treatment with this drug, your doctor may gradually reduce your dose. Check with your doctor or pharmacist for more details. Report any new or worsening symptoms immediately.

    If you are switching from another antidepressant to desvenlafaxine, your doctor should slowly reduce the dose of the old antidepressant to prevent a withdrawal reaction from the other antidepressant.Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

    It may take several weeks before you receive all the benefits of this medication. Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it gets worse.

    Related links

    What conditions does Pristik treat?

    Side effects

    Side effects

    See also Warning section.

    Drowsiness, dizziness, nausea, dry mouth, constipation, loss of appetite, weight loss, blurred vision, nervousness, trouble sleeping, or excessive sweating may occur.If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist right away.

    This medicine may raise your blood pressure. Check your blood pressure regularly and tell your doctor if the results are high.

    An empty tablet shell may appear in your chair. This effect is harmless because your body has already absorbed the medicine.

    Remember that your doctor prescribed this medication for you because he or she thought the benefit to you was greater than the risk of side effects.Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

    Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: severe / stabbing headache, tremors (tremors), decreased interest in sex, changes in sexual performance, easy bruising / bleeding.

    Get immediate medical attention if you have very serious side effects, including: persistent cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, black stools, vomiting like coffee grounds, eye pain / swelling / redness, dilated pupils vision changes (for example, seeing a rainbow around lights at night), seizures.

    This medication can increase serotonin and rarely causes a very serious condition called serotonin syndrome / toxicity. The risk is increased if you also take other drugs that increase serotonin levels, so tell your doctor or pharmacist about all drugs you are taking (see Drug Interactions section). Get immediate medical attention if you develop any of the following symptoms: rapid heartbeat, hallucinations, loss of coordination, severe dizziness, severe nausea / vomiting / diarrhea, muscle twitching, unexplained fever, unusual agitation / restlessness.

    A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching / swelling (especially of the face / tongue / throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

    This is not a complete listing of potential side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

    In the USA –

    Ask your doctor about side effects. You can report side effects to the FDA by calling 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

    In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You can report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

    Related links

    List Pristiq side effects by likelihood and severity.

    Precautions

    Precautions

    Before taking desvenlafaxine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or venlafaxine; or if you have any other allergies.This product may contain inactive ingredients that may cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

    Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially: a personal or family history of psychiatric disorders (such as bipolar / manic-depressive disorder), a personal or family history of attempted suicide, bleeding problems, personal or family history glaucoma (a type of angle closure), high blood pressure, heart problems (such as chest pain, heart failure, heart attack), history of stroke, high cholesterol, kidney disease, liver disease, seizure disorders, low sodium in the blood (hyponatremia).

    This drug may make you dizzy or drowsy, or blur your vision. Alcohol or marijuana can make you dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive, use cars, or do anything that requires alertness or clear vision until you can do so safely. Avoid alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana.

    Before surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all products you use (including prescription, non-prescription, and herbal products).

    The elderly may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially dizziness when standing and bleeding. Older people are also more likely to develop a type of mineral imbalance (hyponatremia), especially if they are also taking “water pills” (diuretics) with this medication. Dizziness and mineral imbalances can increase the risk of falling.

    Based on information from a similar drug (venlafaxine), children may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially loss of appetite and weight loss.Monitor height and weight in children who are taking this drug. Check with your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

    During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when necessary. It may harm the unborn baby, and babies born to mothers who have used this drug in the last 3 months of pregnancy rarely develop withdrawal symptoms such as difficulty eating / breathing, cramps, muscle stiffness, or constant crying.If you notice any of these symptoms in your newborn, tell your doctor right away.

    Since untreated mental / mood problems (such as depression, anxiety, and anxiety attacks) can be serious medical conditions, do not stop taking this medication without your doctor’s approval. If you plan to become pregnant, become pregnant, or think you may become pregnant, talk to your doctor immediately about the benefits and risks of using this medication during pregnancy.

    This medication passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing baby. Talk to your doctor before breastfeeding.

    Related links

    What should I know about pregnancy, care and prescribing Pristiq to children or the elderly?

    interactions

    interactions

    Drug interactions may alter how your medications work or increase your risk of serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions.Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription / over-the-counter drugs and herbal products) and share with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medication without your doctor’s approval.

    Some foods that can interact with this drug include: other drugs that can cause bleeding / bruising (including antiplatelet drugs like clopidogrel, NSAIDs like ibuprofen / naproxen, “blood thinners” like dabigatran / warfarin) …

    Aspirin may increase the risk of bleeding when used with this medicine. However, if your doctor has ordered you to take low doses of aspirin for heart attack or stroke prevention (usually in doses of 81-325 milligrams per day), you should continue to take it unless your doctor tells you otherwise. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

    Taking MAO inhibitors with this medicine may cause serious (possibly fatal) drug interactions.Avoid taking MAO inhibitors (isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, safinamide, selegiline, tranylcypromine) during treatment with this drug. Most MAO inhibitors should also not be taken for two weeks before and for at least 7 days after treatment with this drug. Ask your doctor when to start or stop taking this medication.

    The risk of serotonin syndrome / toxicity is increased if you are taking other drugs that increase serotonin levels.Examples include street drugs such as MDMA / ecstasy, St. John’s wort, some antidepressants (including other SNRIs such as duloxetine / milnacipran, SSRIs such as fluoxetine / paroxetine), tryptophan, and others. The risk of serotonin syndrome / toxicity may be more likely when you start or increase your dose of these drugs.

    Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other drugs that cause drowsiness, such as opioid pain or cough suppressants (eg codeine, hydrocodone), alcohol, marijuana, sleep or anxiety medications (eg alprazolam, lorazepam, zolpidem) , muscle relaxants (such as carisoprodol, cyclobenzaprine), or antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine).

    Check the labels on all of your medicines (such as allergy or cold medicines) because they may contain ingredients that cause drowsiness. Ask your pharmacist about the safe use of these products.

    Desvenlafaxine is very similar to venlafaxine. Do not use medicines containing venlafaxine while you are using desvenlafaxine.

    This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including urine tests for amphetamines), which may cause false test results.Make sure lab staff and all your doctors know you are using this drug.

    Related links

    Does Pristik interact with other medications?

    overdose

    overdose

    If someone has overdose and has serious symptoms such as fainting or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, contact a Poison Control Center immediately. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.Residents of Canada can call the provincial poison control center. Overdose symptoms may include: severe drowsiness, seizures, rapid / irregular heartbeat.

    Notes

    Do not share this medicine with others.

    Laboratory and / or medical tests (such as blood pressure, cholesterol, growth monitoring in children) should be done periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. See your doctor for more details.

    Observe all regular medical and psychiatric appointments.

    Missed dose

    If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is close to your next dose, skip them and resume your normal dosing regimen. Don’t double your dose to catch up.

    Storage

    Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicines out of the reach of children and pets.

    Do not flush medicines down the toilet or pour them down the drain unless directed to do so. Correctly discard this product when it has expired or is no longer needed. Check with your pharmacist or local waste disposal company. The information was updated in September 2017. Copyright (c) 2017 First Databank, Inc.

    Images Pristiq 25 mg tablets, extended-release

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    90,000 What is SNRI? – WellOnward Russia / Russia


    This class of drugs is used to treat pain and a wide range of mental and behavioral disorders.

    Snri is

    serotonin

    and

    norepinephrine.

    an exciting inhibitor that is a group

    Antidepressant drugs

    Refusal

    They are used

    treat depression

    and also anxiety,

    Obsession with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

    ,

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    ,

    Fibromyalgia

    nerve pain and other pain disorders.

    CHRIS works by blocking the brain’s reabsorption (reuptake) of the chemicals serotonin and norepinephrine.

    These drugs were first introduced in the mid-1990s.

    CHRIS types

    Some common SNRIS include:


    • Pristiq (Desvenlafaxine)

    • Cymbalta (Duloxetine)

    • Savella (Milnacipran)

    • Effexor (Venlafaxine)

    • Fetzima (levomilnacipran)

    Snri side effects

    SNRI side effects may include:

    • Dizziness
    • Nausea
    • Dry mouth
    • Sweating
    • Fatigue

    • Insomnia
    • Anxiety or agitation

    • Constipation
    • Difficulty urinating
    • Headache
    • Loss of appetite
    • Decreased sexual desire or problems with sexual arousal

    SNRI warnings

    Let your doctor know about all the medical conditions you have before starting on SNRI.

    CHRIS can cause a rare problem called

    Serotonin Syndrome

    which is characterized by dangerously high

    Serotonin levels

    Refusal

    Tell your board now if you experience any of the following symptoms:

    • Worry, agitation, confusion, or worry
    • Heavy sweating
    • Tremor
    • Lack of coordination
    • Rapid heart rate


    Antidepressants

    may increase the risk of suicide or behavior, especially in children, adolescents, and young adults.Talk to your doctor if this is a problem.

    Certain CHRs can raise your blood pressure or worsen liver problems.

    Tell your doctor about any prescription, non-regulation, illegal, recreational, herbal, nutritional, or dietary supplement you are taking before starting on SNRI.

    It may take several weeks or longer before you experience the benefits of SNRI.

    SNRI conclusion

    You may develop withdrawal withdrawal symptoms if you suddenly stop taking CHIs or miss a few doses of the drug.

    SNRI withdrawal symptoms may include:

    • Anxiety
    • Urgently need to urinate
    • Diarrhea
    • Dizziness
    • Fatigue, chills, muscle aches, or others

      flu symptoms

    Don’t stop taking SNRI without first talking to your doctor.

    CHris and alcohol

    Alcohol can worsen certain side effects of SIDI.

    Avoid drinking alcohol while taking these medications.

    CHRIS and pregnancy

    Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or may become pregnant while taking SNRI.

    Pregnant women should avoid taking these medications, but do not stop taking SNRI without first talking to your doctor.

    CHRIS can pass into breast milk. Talk to your doctor before taking SNRI if you are breastfeeding.

    SNri vs Ssri

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (

    Ssri.

    ) Class is another group of antidepressants.


    Ssris

    Block only the reuptake of serotonin, while CHRIS will block the uptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine.

    Some studies have shown that CHRIS may have better pain relieving properties and may be more effective in treating certain forms of depression.

    Other studies have shown mixed results.

    More data is needed to fully understand how these two types of antidepressants compare to each other.

    International Industrial Exhibition “EXPO-RUSSIA BELARUS 2017” Minsk Business-Forum

    The purpose of the exhibition:

    Consolidation of political, economic, humanitarian and socio-cultural relations between the two countries.

    Organizer:

    • JSC “Zarubezh-Expo”

    With the support of:

    • State Duma and the Federation Council

    • Russian Export Center

    • Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation

    • Mininistry of Economic Development of the Russian Federation

    • Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation

    • Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation

    • Ministry of Agriculture of the Russian Federation
    • The Chamber of Commerce of the Russian Federation

    • Branch ministries of the Republic of Belarus

    Thematic sections of the exhibition:

    • Energy and energy-saving technologies

    • Mechanical Engineering

    • Aviation

    • Agriculture

    • The oil and gas industry

    • Nuclear power

    • Telecommunications

    • Medicine

    • Education

    • Scope of services (tourism, road transport, transport logistics)

    In frameworks “Expo-Russia Belarus 2017” business and cultural program is provided:

    2nd Minsk Business-Forum , round tables, thematic meetings with representatives of the ministries, B2B meetings.

    Presently the large number of companies, Chambers of Commerce of the Russian regions and companies of the Republic of Belarus are expected to participate in the exhibition.

    The Organizing Committee:

    OJSC “Zarubezh Expo”

    Str. Prechistenka, 10

    +7 (495) 637-50-79, 637-36-33, 637-36-66

    +7 (499) 766-92-82

    multi-channel number +7 (495) 721-32-36

    info @ zarubezhexpo.ru

    Read all news

    .