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Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis on the feet

Localised pustular psoriasis – also known as palmoplantar pustular psoriasis (PPP) – affects about

5% of people with psoriasis. It occurs most commonly between the ages of 20 and 60. It can be painful and is more common in women than men. About 10-25% of people with PPP have a family history of psoriasis but the precise reason why some people develop it is not known.

PPP causes pustules on the palms and soles. As in all types of psoriasis, infection and stress are suspected trigger factors. PPP is normally recognisable by yellow/ white pustules approximately 2-3mm in diameter, appearing on fleshy areas of hands and feet, such as the base of the thumb and the sides of the heels.

These pustules are sterile, which means they are not the result of infection. Antibiotics do not affect them. After a time, the pustules dry up and resolve, leaving brown stains on the skin surface. The natural history of the disease is usually cyclical (occurring often or repeatedly), with the appearance of new crops of pustules followed by periods of low activity in which the pustules resolve. See Pustular psoriasis.

Acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau is a very rare form of localised pustular psoriasis. This looks similar to palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, but is localised to the ends of the fingers and, less commonly still, the toes (acropustulosis). It usually starts after some trauma to the skin. It tends to be painful and frequently affects the nails. It may lead to loss of the nails. Bone changes can be seen in severe cases. It is difficult to treat and many therapies  have been tried. Topical treatments are usually not very successful but occasionally systemic medications may help to clear the lesions and restore the nails.

Nail involvement

Given they are part of the skin, it is perhaps not surprising that nails can be affected by a skin disease such as psoriasis. Nail psoriasis is very common, yet no one knows why some people get nail involvement and others do not. Nails grow from the nail plate, which is just under the cuticle. In people who develop psoriasis of the nails, it is involvement of the nail plate that causes pitting, ridging, thickening, lifting and discolouration of the nail due to abnormalities in the growth of tissue in the nail bed.

The nail is made of modified skin and, once it has grown, it can only be altered by filing or clipping. Treatments are usually directed at the nail bed or the nail folds that tuck around the edges.  Treated inflammation in these tissues can result in better nail growth with fewer features of psoriasis, but treatment of nail psoriasis can be difficult. See Nail psoriasis

Triggers of psoriasis

It is not fully understood what causes psoriasis, but it is an inherited inflammatory disease. It can be triggered by events, illness or injury to the skin. A particular process known as Koebner’s phenomenon or Koebnerisation is named after the German dermatologist Heinrich Koebner. Koebner found that people with psoriasis whose skin became traumatised following an injury, often developed a psoriatic lesion in the area, but where psoriasis had not previously been seen; such sites include cuts, bruises, burns, bumps, vaccinations, tattoos and other skin conditions.

Diagnosis

If you think you may have psoriasis on your foot or feet, it is best to get a diagnosis. Visiting your GP or asking your pharmacist is a good place to start. Alternatively, you may wish to see a local chiropodist (sometimes known as a podiatrist), particularly if your nails have become thickened and difficult to manage.

Psoriasis on a foot or both feet may be diagnosed by simple examination, but if there is any doubt then referral to a specialist (dermatologist) may be required. It is unlikely that any specific test will be performed unless there is a suspicion of a fungal infection, when some samples may be taken for laboratory analysis.

Treatments

For plaque psoriasis on the foot, treatment will generally be similar to those recommended for other areas of the body, with the use of topical (applied to the skin) creams, ointment and gels. See Treatments for psoriasis.

The use of phototherapy (ultraviolet light) may be considered, but availability and access to appropriate centres can sometimes be limited. It may be possible to treat psoriasis affecting the hands and feet with localised phototherapy. See Psoriasis and phototherapy.

Palmoplantar pustular psoriasis is often difficult to treat, although some people do benefit from potent topical steroids combined with tar preparations. However, in most cases treatment with acitretin (a vitamin A derivative) tablets is the most effective. Treating nails can be problematic, as once the nail changes appear the damage has already occurred. It is important to check that other conditions that affect the nail, such as fungal infection, are not present, as these can often look similar to nail psoriasis. It is advisable to keep nails short and clean. See Nail psoriasis.

Psoriatic arthritis in the foot

The ankle is a hinge joint between the talus bone of the foot and the two bones of the lower leg, the tibia and fibula. The ankle joint lets you move your foot up and down. Other movements, such as tilting and rotation, occur at other joints in the foot itself. Each foot contains 26 bones which form joints where they meet. These joints are all lined with a synovial membrane that produces a lubricating oil. Many tendons pass around the ankle to connect the bones with the muscles that move them. These are also covered in synovial membrane and oiled with synovial fluid. In psoriatic arthritis, any part of the foot can be affected and become inflamed and painful, which in turn may lead to permanent disability.

What happens?

The synovial membranes that line joints, tendons and connective tissue become thickened and inflamed (tendonitis and enthesitis). This releases more fluid than normal so the joints and tendons become tender and swollen, which may result in:

  • pain
  • tenderness
  • swelling
  • stiffness
  • difficulty walking
  • deformity (such as sausage-shaped toes)
  • decreased range of movement
  • locked joints
  • joints feeling hot.

The pattern of joints that may be involved can vary from person to person, and may just affect a small number of joints (oligoarthritis) or many joints (polyarthritis). Most commonly, psoriatic arthritis is asymmetric in pattern (not identical on both sides) unlike rheumatoid arthritis, which is symmetrical.

In terms of symptoms, psoriatic arthritis can cause stiffness in the joints, particularly after a period of inactivity such as after waking up in the morning. Psoriatic arthritis can also cause swelling of an individual toe so it looks like a sausage, called dactylitis. Some people also experience heel pain because the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscles to the heel bone, has become inflamed. Swelling around the ankle is common in psoriatic arthritis affecting the foot.

Psoriatic arthritis can lead to shortening or clawing of the toes, hyperextension of the big toe and some in-rolling of the ankle with flattening of the metatarsal arch. Stiffness of the joints, rather than instability, also happens quickly and can become irreversible within a few months. The occurrence of calluses and ulcers on the soles of the foot is less common than in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but corns over the interphalangeal joints can be very painful. Symptoms tend to flare up and then die down again. If the inflammation is persistent and left untreated, toe joints can fuse together, with the space between the individual joints being lost.

You should always seek medical advice if you experience stiffness in your joints especially after inactivity, severe pain, redness or swelling in one or both feet, whether this is mild or severe. It is essential to minimise the inflammation to avoid permanent joint deformity.

Causes and triggers

As with skin psoriasis, the cause of psoriatic arthritis is unknown, with an event or illness often considered a trigger. There is also a theory (hypothesis) of a ‘deep Koebner phenomenon’ which might initiate psoriatic arthritis, although this is yet to be proven.

Getting a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis

The presence of psoriasis may provide an indication of psoriatic arthritis when someone develops joint symptoms. Psoriatic arthritis can develop in people with a lot or a little of psoriasis, and may be more common in people with nail psoriasis. As well as joint symptoms, psoriatic arthritis can lead to feeling tired. Many people become frustrated by a lack of diagnosis; psoriatic arthritis tends to have periods of improvement and worsening, which may also be attributed to mechanical joint problems and not inflammatory arthritis.

If you have the symptoms of inflammatory arthritis, such as psoriatic arthritis, your doctor will often refer you to a rheumatologist. In some cases, further tests (blood) and imagery (X-ray, ultrasound, MRI) may be sought, although this will depend on the individual circumstances and level of confidence in the initial diagnosis.

Treatment

In most instances, specific treatment to the foot is necessary to some degree. Treating psoriatic arthritis in the foot will include many of the therapies used in managing arthritis elsewhere. The aim of therapy is to reduce inflammation, pain and avoid permanent disability.

Initial treatment is likely to include analgesia (pain relief), often the anti-inflammatory painkillers recommended such as ibuprofen, are those that can be supplied over the counter (OTC). To treat the inflammation and swelling a prescription-only medicine (POM) may be required and would only be available from your doctor. Treatments may include corticosteroid injections to the worst involved areas (painful, but effective for up to 6 months), oral (tablet) corticosteroids, anti-inflammatory gels and disease-modifying drugs such as methotrexate. Sometimes, in large joints, a procedure called arthrocentesis is carried out. This involves drawing out  (aspirating) the fluid for investigation for infection and the diagnosis of inflammatory conditions. The treatments listed above may only be prescribed if you have seen a rheumatologist. See Treatments for psoriatic arthritis.

Surgery and the psoriatic foot

Orthopaedic surgery to correct deformed joints is only justified in the presence of long-standing deformity where pain is preventing adequate mobility and all alternative medical treatments have failed. The advancement of newer techniques in recent years has seen better results in small joint replacement, but such procedures still need careful consideration and discussion with advice from an appropriate surgeon.

Physiotherapy

It is always advisable to rest severely inflamed joints, but physiotherapy and exercise can help to maintain mobility of your joints so they are less likely to become stiff and seize up. See Physiotherapy and exercise: Psoriatic arthritis

How successful are the treatments?

Anti-inflammatory drugs can help to reduce pain, swelling and stiffness. Unfortunately, however, they can make skin symptoms worse in some people. Steroid injections to joints may give relief. Disease-modifying drugs such as methotrexate can damp down both skin and joint symptoms, as can targeted biologic agents.

In some cases, surgery to remove a thickened synovial membrane (synovectomy), realign a joint (osteotomy) or to fuse a joint (arthrodesis) may stop pain which results from movement.

Sometimes it is possible to remove the painful end of a bone (excision arthroplasty).

Remember: All treatments may have unwanted side effects or require special precautions (eg during pregnancy). Always make sure you have all the information before embarking on any course of therapy; this includes reading the patient information leaflets (PILs) provided with your medicines.

Other common conditions

If you develop problems with your foot, such as sores, rashes, nail deformities or painful swollen joints, do remember that they may not be caused by psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis.

Some common skin conditions that affect the feet include:

  • athlete’s foot (tinea pedis) – caused by fungal infections
  • plantar warts (verruccas) – generally appear on the soles of the foot with a callus appearance but are caused by the human papollomavirus (HPV)
  • calluses – often the result of an ill-fitting shoe that rubs, causing the skin to harden
  • corns – similar to calluses, but often found on the top of a toe
  • pitted keratolysis – usually on the soles and caused by bacteria
  • dyshidrotic eczema (dyshidrotic dermatitis) – an itchy rash, the cause of which is unknown, but which worsens in warm weather
  • ingrown toenails – due to poor nail care, where the nail is cut too short and grows into the skin, causing pain and swelling
  • diabetic ulcers – due to decreased blood flow and poor circulation in someone with diabetes.

Some common joint conditions that affect the feet include:

  • gout – where crystals of uric acid are deposited in the joints, tendons and skin
  • bunions – swellings and tenderness when the joints in your big toe no longer fit together as they should, often caused by ill-fitting shoes
  • heel spurs (plantar fasciitis or fasciosis) – inflammation at the site where the fascia attaches under the heel
  • heel bursi t is (subcalcaneal bursi t is) – inflammation of the fluid-filled sac (bursa) located between the skin of the back of the heel and the Achilles tendon
  • Achilles tendinosis – the Achilles tendon is placed under more pressure than it can cope with and small tears develop, along with inflammation and, in some cases, leading to tendon rupture
  • chronic inflammation of the heel pad – caused by a heavy heel strike giving rise to a dull ache in the heel, which increases during the day.

What can I do to help my feet?

The most important action is to seek advice and help when you notice any changes in your foot, whatever they may be. You can talk to your GP or local pharmacist for advice. Some problems can be resolved simply. For issues that are more persistent you may be referred to a specialist, such as a dermatologist, rheumatologist, physiotherapist, surgeon or chiropodist/podiatrist.

For general foot care, personal hygiene is important, particularly in avoiding fungal and viral infections. Change shoes and socks regularly, avoid shoes which are ill-fitting or cause bad posture. If you are overweight, losing weight could relieve the pressure on your joints and improve your walking gait.

If you are diagnosed with psoriasis, develop a treatment regime that works for you; often, applying treatment after a bath or shower, along with the use of an emollient, can make the process easier.

If you have nail involvement, keep nails trimmed and clean. If they are thick, try trimming them after soaking them in a bath or shower, as this makes them softer and easier to cut. Alternatively, seek an appointment with a chiropodist, which is often available via the NHS.

 If you have psoriatic arthritis, it is important to rest inflamed joints. Sourcing footwear that supports the foot and helps to reduce the pressure on the inflamed areas can help, as can inner soles and orthotic supports. Once again, a chiropodist is best placed to advise you.

This article is adapted from The psoriatic foot leaflet.

Download our Psoriatic foot leaflet as a PDF

Always consult your doctor or healthcare provider.

Psoriatic Arthritis in the Feet: Symptoms, Treatment, Home Remedies

Psoriasis you can usually spot: the autoimmune disease often causes red patches of skin topped with thick, silvery scales. It occurs when your body’s immune system goes into overdrive, attacking healthy tissue and causing an overproduction of skin cells. But what you can’t see is that same abnormal immune response may also cause inflammation in your joints.

About one-third of people with psoriasis develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA) — a chronic, inflammatory disease of the joints and entheses, or places where tendons and ligaments connect to bone.

Most people with psoriatic arthritis develop psoriasis first, and are later diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis. But joint problems from psoriatic arthritis can sometimes begin before skin signs appear. Or sometimes skin issues are so mild that patients don’t connect psoriasis with joint pain and realize they could have PsA. (That’s what happened to psoriatic arthritis patient Frances Downey.)

Psoriatic arthritis can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling in any joint in your body, from your hands to your back — and often, in your feet. You can read here about common psoriatic arthritis symptoms.

How Psoriatic Arthritis Affects the Feet

Each foot contains 26 bones and 33 joints that are controlled by a number of muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Inflammation from psoriatic arthritis can occur in any one of those spots, explains says Alex Kor, DPM, podiatrist with Witham Health Services in Indiana. Ankle joints can also be affected by psoriatic arthritis, as well as tendons that pass around the ankle and connect the bones with the muscles that move them.

What Does Psoriatic Arthritis in the Feet Feel Like?

When your feet are affected by psoriatic arthritis, you may have pain, tenderness, and swelling in your foot. This occurs when the membranes that line the joints, tendons, and connective tissue in the foot become inflamed. Similar to other forms of inflammatory arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, joints may feel may warm to the touch, and stiffness may be worse in the morning or after periods of inactivity.

Symptoms may also flare, then go into periods of remission. Here’s more information about coping with psoriatic arthritis flares.

But unlike with rheumatoid arthritis — where symptoms typically occur in the same joints on both sides of your body (or symmetrically), PsA is usually asymmetrical. “You can have psoriatic arthritis in the ankle joint of one foot and the toe of another,” explains Dr. Kor, who also serves as spokesperson for the American Podiatric Medical Association.

Specific foot problems caused by PsA include:

Sausage toes

Medically speaking, it’s called dactylitis, a condition that refers to swelling of an entire toe (or finger), which gives it a sausage-like appearance. Dactylitis happens when the small joints in the toe, as well as the entheses of the surrounding tendons, become inflamed. An enthesis is the point of insertion of a tendon, ligament, joint capsule, or fascia to bone. Inflammation of the entheses is common in psoriatic arthritis.

Gout — another form of arthritis — also causes pain and swelling in the toes. But with gout, symptoms are sudden, severe, and often target the joint at the base of the big toe. “Psoriatic arthritis can affect multiple joints, and is seen a little more in the third, fourth, and fifth toe joint,” adds Dr. Kor. Here’s more information about gout symptoms.

Heel pain

In psoriatic arthritis, heel pain stems from inflammation of the Achilles’ tendon, where the tough band of tissue connects your calf muscle to your heel bone. It’s a common spot for inflammation of the entheses when you have PsA.

Pain on the sole of your foot

The plantar fascia is a thick tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot. It connects the toes to the heel bone, and often becomes inflamed when you have psoriatic arthritis. It’s common for people to assume they have only plantar fasciitis, or inflammation of the plantar fascia, when they actually have psoriatic arthritis.

Toe nail changes

Your nails may lift off the nail bed; they may also have pitting (or small indents), discolor, or thicken — similar to a fungal infection. These psoriatic arthritis nail changes occur from abnormalities in the growth of tissue in the nail bed.

How to Keep Your Feet Healthy with Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic condition that can get worse over time. A small percentage of people with PsA develop arthritis mutilans, which is a severe and painful form of the disease that can lead to deformity and disability. Though there’s no cure for psoriatic arthritis, you can take steps to manage symptoms, control inflammation, and protect your joints. To help keep your feet healthy:

1. Stick to your PsA treatment plan. Your rheumatologist may prescribe nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to relieve pain and reduce inflammation, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) to help slow the progression of psoriatic arthritis, or biologics, which are complex, targeted DMARDs that act on certain immune system pathways, to manage psoriatic arthritis symptoms and help prevent disease progression.

2. Lose weight if you need to. Maintaining a healthy weight reduces the amount of stress on the joints in your feet, which can help relieve pain and improve your walking gait. Excess body weight can also increase inflammation, and potentially make arthritis symptoms worse. Check out these weight loss tips that are especially helpful when you have arthritis.

3. Get active. Exercise can help keep joints flexible, boost energy, and burn more calories. Physical activity can also improve vasodilation (or widen blood vessels), which can increase blood flow to the joint to help flush out inflammation, adds Dr. Kor. You don’t have to walk, run, or jump if it hurts, he says. Choose activities that are less stressful on the joints in your feet, such as swimming, doing water aerobics, using a stationary bike or elliptical machine.

Stretching exercises, especially ones that are focused on the source of your foot pain, such as the plantar fascia or Achilles’ tendon, can help relieve pain. Talk to your doctor or podiatrist about exercises that are safe for you.

4. Ice after exercise. Cold constricts blood vessels, which decreases blood flow to the joint to help reduce swelling and inflammation, explains Dr. Kor. Grab an ice pack, frozen bag of veggies or stick cubes in a reusable bag — just be sure to use towel or other barrier between the cold pack and your skin to prevent irritation. Here are more ways to use cold therapy to manage arthritis.

5. Toss flimsy shoes. And don’t walk barefoot, advises Dr. Kor. Sturdy shoes with good support and a large toe box can help reduce pressure on inflamed areas and swollen toes. Extra cushioning and wide widths may help too. Your podiatrist may also recommend custom orthotics. These shoe inserts are specifically designed to provide more comfort and reduce pressure on bones and tendons in your feet.

Talk to your doctor to determine the best footwear for you. Here are some tips about picking the right shoes when you have arthritis.

6. Ask about a cortisone shot. These injections can help reduce swelling and inflammation in your heels, the soles of your feet, or a single toe joint. “It’s not a cure-all,” says Dr. Kor. “Used judiciously, cortisone shots can help reduce a flare for some patients.” Learn more about getting cortisone shots to manage arthritis.

Psoriasis of the feet | The Foot Hub

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Merola JF, Qureshi A, Husni ME. Underdiagnosed and undertreated psoriasis: Nuances of treating psoriasis affecting the scalp, face, intertriginous areas, genitals, hands, feet, and nails. Dermatol Ther. 2018 May;31(3):e12589. doi: 10.1111/dth.12589. Epub 2018 Mar 6. PMID: 29512290; PMCID: PMC6901032.

Raposo I, Torres T. Palmoplantar Psoriasis and Palmoplantar Pustulosis: Current Treatment and Future Prospects. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2016 Aug;17(4):349-58. doi: 10.1007/s40257-016-0191-7. PMID: 27113059.

Derancourt C, Van Landuyt H, Laurent R. Le psoriasis palmo-plantaire: diagnostic et stratégie thérapeutique [Palmoplantar psoriasis: diagnosis and therapeutic strategy]. Ann Dermatol Venereol. 1998 Mar;125(3):220-5. French. PMID: 9747257.

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Palmoplantar psoriasis | DermNet NZ

Author: Dr Amy Stanway, Dermatology Registrar, Waikato Hospital, Hamilton, New Zealand, 2004. Updated by Hon Assoc Prof Amanda Oakley, Dermatologist, Waikato Hospital, Hamilton, New Zealand, January 2015.


What is psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease in which there are clearly defined, red, scaly plaques (thickened skin). There are various subtypes of psoriasis.

Psoriasis is linked to other health conditions, including inflammatory arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease (especially Crohn disease), uveitis and coeliac disease.

How does psoriasis affect the palms and soles?

Psoriasis may be localised to the palms and soles or part of generalised chronic plaque psoriasis. Two common patterns are observed:

  • Well-circumscribed, red, scaly, plaques similar to psoriasis elsewhere
  • Patchy or generalised thickening and scaling of the entire surface of palms and/or soles without redness (an acquired keratoderma)

Palmoplantar psoriasis

See more images of palmoplantar psoriasis.

Palmoplantar pustulosis and the rare acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau (acral pustulosis), in which yellow-brown pustules occur, are no longer classified as psoriasis. However, the conditions are associated. About 10–25% of people with palmoplantar pustulosis also have chronic plaque psoriasis.

What causes palmoplantar psoriasis?

The tendency to psoriasis is inherited, but what causes it to localise on the palms and soles is unknown. It may be triggered by an injury to the skin, an infection, or another skin condition such as hand dermatitis. It may first occur during a period of psychosocial stress. Certain medications, particularly lithium, may be associated with the onset of flares of psoriasis.

Psoriasis is more common, often more severe, and sometimes difficult to treat in patients that are obese, have metabolic syndrome, that drink excessive alcohol or smoke tobacco.

What are the clinical features of palmoplantar psoriasis?

Palms and soles affected by psoriasis tend to be partially or completely red, dry and thickened, often with deep painful cracks (fissures). The skin changes tend to have a sharp border and are often symmetrical, ie similar distribution on both palms and/or both soles. At times, palmar psoriasis can be quite hard to differentiate from hand dermatitis and other forms of acquired keratoderma. Plantar psoriasis may sometimes be similar in appearance to tinea pedis. There may be signs of psoriasis elsewhere.

Palmoplantar psoriasis tends to be a chronic condition, ie, it is very persistent.

Compared to chronic plaque psoriasis on other sites, palmoplantar psoriasis is more commonly associated with:

How is the diagnosis of palmoplantar psoriasis made?

Palmoplantar psoriasis is diagnosed by its clinical appearance, supported by finding chronic plaque psoriasis in other sites. Mycology of skin scrapings may be performed to exclude fungal infection. Skin biopsy is rarely needed.

The differential diagnosis of palmoplantar psoriasis includes:

What is the treatment for palmoplantar psoriasis?

Improvement in general health can lead to an improvement in palmoplantar psoriasis.

  • Weight loss, if overweight
  • Regular exercise
  • Stress management
  • Minimum alcohol
  • Smoking cessation
  • Investigation and management of associated health conditions

Mild psoriasis of the palms and soles may be treated with topical treatments:

  • Emollients: thick, greasy barrier creams applied thinly and frequently to moisturise the dry, scaly skin and help prevent painful cracking.
  • Keratolytic agents such as urea or salicylic acid to thin down the thick scaling skin. Several companies market effective heel balms containing these and other agents.
  • Coal tar: to improve the scale and inflammation. Because of the mess, coal tar is often applied at night under cotton gloves or socks.
  • Topical steroids: ultrapotent ointment applied initially daily for two to four weeks, if necessary under occlusion, to reduce inflammation, itch and scaling. Maintenance use should be confined to 2 days each week (weekend pulses) to avoid thinning the skin and causing psoriasis to become more extensive.

Calcipotriol ointment is not very successful for palmoplantar psoriasis. It may also cause an irritant contact dermatitis on the face if a treated area inadvertently touches it. Dithranol is too messy and irritating for routine use on hands and feet.

More severe palmoplantar psoriasis usually requires phototherapy or systemic agents, most often:

Biologics (targeted therapies) are also sometimes prescribed for severe palmoplantar psoriasis. However, it should be noted that TNF-alpha inhibitors such as infliximab and adalimumab may trigger palmoplantar pustulosis.

 

Psoriasis and Other Skin Problems of the Feet – Solon Podiatrist

August is Psoriasis Awareness Month. Psoriasis is an immune disorder characterized by itchy, raised, red patches found anywhere on the skin. A flare-up of psoriasis on your feet is likely to show up on the soles, but can also affect the tops, including your toes. The skin on your feet may swell, redden, thicken, crack, or form blisters.

Psoriasis can mimic the symptoms of athlete’s foot, so it’s important to check with our qualified podiatrists, Dr. Megan L. Oltmann and Dr. Craig B. Frey of Foot & Ankle Associates of Cleveland if you notice these kinds of symptoms. We can make a firm diagnosis and provide prescription-strength medications to treat your symptoms, which can provide quicker, more effective relief than over-the-counter varieties.

Besides psoriasis, several other skin conditions can affect the feet, including

  • Eczema – an allergic reaction to contact with certain fabrics, detergents, or other irritants that cause patches of skin to become dry, itchy, and scaly
  • Melanoma – a particularly serious form of skin cancer
  • Ulcers – deep wounds that don’t heal due to poor circulation, often affecting people with diabetes or peripheral arterial disease (PAD)
  • Various fungal infections, including athlete’s foot, that can spread to your toenails and make them brittle and discolored
  • Warts – raised, fleshy bumps caused by a virus
  • Corns and calluses – areas of thick skin on the bottom and sides of the feet are called calluses. When they form on top of your toes, we call them corns. Corns and calluses need treatment only if they cause you pain or interfere with walking or wearing shoes.

Our experienced podiatrists serve residents of Cuyahoga and the surrounding counties (Summit, Portage, and Geauga) at our state-of-the-art podiatry office in Solon, Ohio. Call us when you have concerns about the skin of your feet or any other foot or ankle problem. Call (440) 903-1041 or contact us online.

Psoriasis on the Feet and Legs

Psoriasis is an autoimmune condition that causes red, scaly patches on the skin of your feet and legs. It can often be painful and itchy. Stress or injury can cause the condition to flare and worsen. While there is no cure for psoriasis, there are numerous treatments that can help alleviate symptoms and control outbreaks.

Diagnosing Psoriasis

If you were diagnosed with psoriasis, you may have symptoms such as raised, red, scaly patches on your feet or legs. You may also have inflammation as well as thick patches of skin that are flaky and white, gray, or silver in color. 

Patches of psoriasis can range in size from a single small area to one that is large and widespread. Psoriasis can affect the joints of the feet and legs as well. 

Some cases of psoriasis that are on the toes or feet can be mistaken for a fungal infection or athlete’s foot. 

Psoriasis often runs in families and occurs in those with a weakened immune system. A podiatrist will be able to make a diagnosis of the condition and recommend appropriate treatment options.

Psoriasis Treatment Options

Psoriasis can often be controlled at home using a combination of treatments. Focusing on stress management techniques, moisturizing the skin, avoiding triggers such as alcohol, maintaining a healthy diet, and making sure to get enough sunlight are some ways to help control the condition.

If your psoriasis is painful, itchy, or interfering with your daily life, a podiatrist can help effectively treat your symptoms to make the condition manageable and less noticeable. Since each person’s case is different, a combination of treatments may be needed depending on your specific condition. 

To treat psoriasis effectively, the skin cells that are growing rapidly and causing the condition need to be stopped or slowed down. These cells are the cause of inflammation and the formation of plaques on the skin. 

Some treatments a podiatrist may recommend are:

  • Topical medication
  • Oral medication
  • Injections
  • Ultraviolet (UV) light therapy
  • Salicylic acid solution
  • Coal tar

Greater Washington Podiatry Can Help Treat Psoriasis

If you have psoriasis on your feet and legs and are looking for treatment options, contact Greater Washington Advanced Podiatry for help. We can provide a free initial consultation and can create a treatment plan based on your personal condition and needs. To set up an appointment, fill out our contact form online or call our office at (301) 515-FEET.

 

Psoriasis (for Parents) – Nemours KidsHealth

What Is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a chronic (long-lasting) skin condition. People with psoriasis have a skin rash and, sometimes, joint problems or nail changes.

There’s no cure for psoriasis, but treatment can help most people who have it control its symptoms.

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Psoriasis?

The main symptom of psoriasis (seh-RYE-eh-siss) is red, thickened patches of skin called plaques. These can burn, itch, or feel sore. Often, silvery scales cover the plaques.

Plaques can happen anywhere. In children, they’re most common on the:

  • face
  • scalp
  • areas where skin touches skin (such as where the arm bends or in the armpit)
  • diaper area (in babies)

Other symptoms of psoriasis include:

  • dry, cracked skin that may bleed at times
  • thick, pitted nails
  • arthritis (painful, stiff, swollen joints)

What Are the Types of Psoriasis?

In children, common types of psoriasis include:

Plaque psoriasis. This is the most common type of psoriasis. It causes plaques and silvery scales, usually on the knees, elbows, lower back, and scalp. They can be itchy and painful and may crack and bleed.

Guttate (GUT-ate) psoriasis. This type often shows up after an illness, especially strep throat. It causes small red spots, usually on the trunk, arms, and legs. Spots also can appear on the face, scalp, and ears.

Inverse psoriasis. This causes smooth, raw-looking patches of red skin that feel sore. The patches develop in places where skin touches skin, such as the armpits, buttocks, upper eyelids, groin and genitals, or under a woman’s breasts.

What Causes Psoriasis?

The exact cause of psoriasis isn’t known. But experts do know that the body’s immune system, which fights germs and diseases, is involved. Overactive immune system cells make skin cells grow faster than the body can shed them, so they pile up as plaques on the skin.

Some genes have been linked to psoriasis. About 40% of people with psoriasis have a family member who has it.

Anyone can get psoriasis and it may begin at any age. It can’t spread from person to person.

What Are Psoriasis Flare-Ups?

Symptoms of psoriasis can go away completely, then suddenly come back. When the symptoms are worse, it’s called an “outbreak” or “flare-up.” Symptoms of psoriasis can be brought on or made worse by:

  • infections such as strep throat and colds
  • some medicines, such as lithium and beta-blockers
  • stress
  • skin irritations
  • cold weather
  • drinking alcohol
  • smoking

How Is Psoriasis Diagnosed?

Doctors usually diagnose psoriasis by examining the skin, scalp, and nails. They’ll also ask whether someone else in the family has psoriasis and if the child recently had an illness or started taking a new medicine.

Rarely, doctors might take a skin sample (a biopsy) to check more closely. A biopsy can tell the doctor whether it’s psoriasis or another condition with similar symptoms.

How Is Psoriasis Treated?

Psoriasis is usually treated by a dermatologist (skin doctor). A rheumatologist (a doctor who treats immune problems) may also help with treatment. Treatments can include:

  • ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun or from home or office treatments. But in some children, sunlight can make psoriasis worse.
  • creams, lotions, ointments, and shampoos such as moisturizers, corticosteroids, vitamin D creams, and shampoos made with salicylic acid or coal tar
  • medicines taken by mouth or injected medicines

A doctor might try one therapy and then switch to another, or recommend combining treatments. It’s not always easy to find a therapy that works, and sometimes what works for a time stops helping after a while.

How Can Parents Help?

For some children, psoriasis is just a minor inconvenience. For others, it is a difficult medical condition.

To manage symptoms and make outbreaks less likely, your child should:

Kids and teens with psoriasis may feel uncomfortable with the way their skin looks. Help your child understand that psoriasis is common and treatments can help.

Whether your child’s psoriasis is mild or severe, learn about the condition together. Offer to help find a therapist or join a support group if that might help. Talk to your doctor or check websites like:

90,000 Symptoms and treatment of psoriasis on hands, feet, head and nails

Psoriatic skin lesions can develop in any person, regardless of gender, age and nature of work. Most often, the first symptoms of this disease appear in the age range from 15 to 25 years. Below will be discussed the symptoms and treatment of psoriasis on the hands, feet, head and nails, and will also give recommendations for the prevention of recurrence of psoriatic disease.

Contents :

Symptoms of psoriasis in various parts of the body

The clinical symptoms of psoriasis in the arms and legs have characteristic signs. The following symptoms indicate the formation of psoriatic lesions on the upper and lower extremities:

  • A characteristic papular rash, which is often localized on the knee and elbow bends, on the inner thighs and forearms.
  • With mechanical action on psoriatic plaques, there is an increase in desquamation, and the papule itself in appearance resembles a stearin spot.
  • With complete removal of keratinized scales, a shiny thin film is visualized on the surface of the plaque.
  • The Auspitz phenomenon appears. When a thin psoriatic film is removed, a moist surface covered with blood droplets resembling dew is visualized on the surface of the plaque. Blood drops do not merge with each other, but are located separately from each other.
  • In addition, with the formation of psoriatic lesions in the legs and arms, new foci of papular rash tend to appear in those places that were previously damaged by combs, abrasions and cuts.This state is called the Kebner phenomenon.

Symptoms of psoriasis of the head

The site of localization of skin papular rash with psoriasis of the head is the occipital and frontal zones, as well as the area behind the ears. Most often, psoriatic lesions spread along the hairline. Initially, psoriatic plaques are small and sporadic. As the disease progresses, the pathological structures increase in volume and merge with each other, spreading over the entire surface of the scalp.At the stage of initial changes, psoriatic peeling resembles seborrhea of ​​the scalp. In addition, there is intense itching and visible skin irritation. Unlike seborrhea, there is no hair loss in psoriasis.

Symptoms of nail psoriasis

An alternative name for psoriasis of the nail plates is onychodystrophy. This form of chronic dermatosis in 50% of cases develops in people with cutaneous psoriasis. The characteristic manifestations of this disease include:

  • Complete or partial separation of the nail plate from the bed;
  • Rapid keratinization and growth of the subungual epithelium;
  • Inflammatory lesion of soft tissues located around the nail plates;
  • The appearance of small psoriatic plaques around the nails;
  • Small subungual hemorrhages, black or brown.

Unlike fungal infections of the nails, with psoriasis there is no unpleasant odor, the nail plates are not deformed, and the nails themselves acquire a yellow tint.

General principles of treatment

Comprehensive treatment of psoriasis in the upper and lower extremities includes the use of the following methods:

  • Drug therapy, including the use of drugs for oral administration and external application.For therapeutic purposes, tabletted cytostatics are prescribed, and for external application to areas of psoriatic rashes, ointments and creams with glucocorticosteroids, phytoextracts and local anesthetics are used. Also, sprays are widely used that have anti-inflammatory, cooling and anti-edema effects.
  • Spa treatment (medicinal baths, mud applications).
  • Photochemotherapy.
  • Physiotherapy treatment.
  • Compliance with dietary recommendations and taking multivitamin complexes.

For the treatment of psoriasis of the nail plates, the following drugs are used for external application:

  • Advantan cream.
  • Dayvonex ointment.
  • Ointment Beloderm.
  • Anthralin cream or ointment.

Each product is applied to damaged areas 2 times a day and left until completely absorbed.

Medications containing vitamin D3 help slow the progression of this disease. In order to prevent the recurrence of psoriasis, Xamiol gel, Rockaltrol capsules and Daivobet ointment can be used. Dermatotropic agents such as zinc and salicylic ointment help to slow down the rate of division of skin cells. To reduce the intensity of inflammation, Zorak gel or Tazorak cream will help.

Recommendations for prevention

To avoid the next recurrence of skin or nail psoriasis, these simple rules help:

  1. Citrus fruits, corn and cornmeal products, spicy, fried, smoked pickled foods, alcohol, red meat, chicken eggs, tomatoes, chocolate, coffee and honey should be excluded from the daily diet.Each food ingredient mentioned can trigger a relapse of the disease.

  2. Outdoor walks are recommended daily, and in summer it is necessary to visit the seaside, since sea water has a beneficial effect on the condition of the skin in psoriasis.

  3. Maximum stress limitation.

  4. Taking in the off-season multivitamin complexes containing vitamins of group B, vitamin E, D and A.

  5. For scalp psoriasis, preference should be given to medicated balms, shampoos and lotions.

  6. When washing the body, you should avoid using coarse washcloths and massage brushes.

  7. A humidifier must be installed in the living area.

  8. In addition, it is important to avoid mechanical damage to the skin, as well as to exclude skin contact with chemical agents.

90,000 treatment, photos, symptoms and causes of the appearance

https://ria.ru/20211008/psoriaz-1753757116.html

Why psoriasis is dangerous: the doctor spoke about the causes and treatment of the disease

Psoriasis: treatment, photos, symptoms and reasons for the appearance

Why psoriasis is dangerous: the doctor spoke about the causes and treatment of the disease

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune skin disease that manifests itself as light pink or red spots on the body. About what are the reasons for it … RIA Novosti, 08.10.2021

2021-10-08T21: 00

2021-10-08T21: 00

2021-10-08T22: 29

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psoriasis

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MOSCOW, October 8 – RIA Novosti.Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune skin disorder that appears as light pink or red spots on the body. About what are the causes of its occurrence, whether it is transmitted by contact, which methods of treatment are most effective, a description of the symptoms with a photo – in the material of RIA Novosti About psoriasis “Psoriasis is a chronic disease of a multifactorial nature (this means that it develops with an unfavorable combination of factors) – told RIA Novosti Maksim Maksimov, dermatovenerologist, urologist-andrologist of the MedicCity clinic, deputy chief physician for medical work.“It is often even characterized by pathological changes in the musculoskeletal system.” The disease affects the skin, on which red, excessively dry, raised spots are formed – the so-called papules, which merge with each other, forming plaques. Psoriasis is associated with an increased risk psoriatic arthritis, lymphomas, cardiovascular diseases, Crohn’s disease and depression. Psoriatic arthritis affects up to 30 percent of people suffering from this disease. the role of hereditary predisposition, changes in the nervous, endocrine, immune systems.There are also factors that can provoke this disease. For example, chronic infections, psychoemotional overstrain, alcohol and toxic substances, “the expert explained. The incidence of psoriasis also depends on age, region and ethnicity. It is believed that a combination of environmental and genetic factors is responsible for these differences. According to a study by the Medical Genetic Center. Genotek, every third Russian has a genetic predisposition to psoriasis.The main genetic cause of psoriasis is considered to be the HLA-C gene located in the region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on the sixth chromosome. This gene is required to recognize one’s own and foreign cells. Mutations in it can lead to a disruption of this function and the attack of the immune system on its own skin cells. “About 31.1 percent of study participants have at least one variant of the HLA-C gene, which increases the risk of psoriasis three to five times … Psoriasis is chronic inflammatory skin disease.In Russia, one to five percent of the population suffers from it. This is a disease in which heredity plays a large role – the contribution of genetics to psoriasis is about 66 percent. Adults are more susceptible to this disease. In addition, it is known that risk factors include streptococcal infections, smoking, obesity and stress, “the document notes. Risk factors for the development of the disease include: Men and women suffer from the disease with the same frequency. It can begin at any age, although more often only first appears between the ages of 15 and 25.About a third of people with psoriasis report having been diagnosed with the disease before the age of 20. Symptoms Symptoms of the disease vary in severity depending on the stage. Psoriasis is characterized by: Although plaques appear in different places on the body, their typical localization is: elbows and knees. sacrum and loin. The scalp is often affected. This type is called seborrheic psoriasis. If plaques have formed on the flexion surfaces and folds of the skin (this can be the inner surface of the elbow and knee joints, the groin and armpits, the area under the breast), then the person has inverse psoriasis.With this form of the disease, the spots will be smooth, without scales. When the palms are affected, the skin in these places becomes rough, covered with cracks and flakes. The hallmark of pathology is the psoriatic triad, or the Auspitz triad. This is a collection of unique signs of a disease, on the basis of which it is easier for a doctor to make a diagnosis. It includes three phenomena: Types There are eight types of psoriasis, which differ in the nature of the manifestations and the appearance of formations on the skin. Ordinary psoriasis “Psoriasis ordinary (psoriasis vulgaris) – with this form, rashes (papules) of red-pink, sometimes deep red appear. colors, and on their surface – white-gray scales, – explained the doctor.- The size of the rashes can be from a few millimeters to several centimeters. With this form of psoriasis, rashes can be localized on the skin of the trunk, upper and lower extremities, and the head. “This type of disease occurs most often in 80 percent of patients. As the pathology develops, the rashes gradually merge into plaques of various shapes and sizes. psoriasis) involves inflammation and flaking of the skin, which often covers more than 90 percent of the body’s surface.This can be accompanied by severe dryness, itching, swelling, and pain. This type can develop from any type of psoriasis. It is often the result of abrupt withdrawal of systemic glucocorticoids. It can also be triggered by alcohol, neuropsychic stress, infections (in particular, colds). This form of psoriasis can be fatal because severe inflammation and exfoliation interfere with the body’s ability to regulate temperature and perform skin barrier functions.The skin under and around them is red and tender. Pustular psoriasis can be localized or more common to all parts of the body. The first includes palmar-plantar pustular psoriasis and Gallopo’s continual acrodermatitis. Both forms are localized to the arms and legs. Inverse psoriasis Flexor psoriasis, or “inverse psoriasis,” also known as flexural psoriasis, appears as smooth, inflamed areas of the skin. Spots often affect skin folds, especially around the genitals (between the thigh and groin), under the armpits, in the skin folds of the large abdomen (known as panniculitis), in the gluteal cleft, under the breast, and so on.It is believed that injuries and infections play a role in the development of this atypical form of psoriasis. According to Maxim Maximov, with teardrop psoriasis, the color of the rashes is the same as in ordinary psoriasis, but they are usually small in size – two to four millimeters. They can also be localized on the skin of the trunk, upper and lower extremities. The rashes themselves look like drops and rise slightly above the surface of the skin. Psoriasis often develops for the first time or worsens after streptococcal infection, in typical cases – after streptococcal sore throat or streptococcal pharyngitis.Arthropathic psoriasis Arthropathic psoriasis is also called psoriatic arthritis. It is a form of chronic inflammatory arthritis, the clinical manifestations of which vary greatly and often occur in combination with psoriasis of the skin and nails. Inflammation of the joints and surrounding connective tissue most often affects the fingers and toes, which can lead to severe swelling. Psoriatic arthritis can also affect the hips, knees, spine (spondylitis), and the sacroiliac joint (sacroiliitis).About 30 percent of people with psoriasis experience psoriatic arthritis. Cutaneous manifestations of the disease usually occur before arthritic symptoms in about 75 percent of cases. That is why early diagnosis of the disease and its treatment are important – you should immediately consult a doctor. Onychodystrophy Nail psoriasis, or psoriatic onychodystrophy, is characterized by changes in the appearance of the nails. This type of disease occurs in 40-45 percent of people with psoriasis and in 80-90 percent of those with psoriatic arthritis.These changes can include any combination of discoloration of the nails and the nail bed (yellowing, whitening or graying), the appearance of dots, spots, transverse lines on and under the nails, thickening of the skin under and around the nails, as well as stratification and thickening, is the likelihood of complete loss of nails (onycholysis) or the development of increased fragility. Psoriasis of the oral cavity Psoriasis in the mouth is very rare, unlike lichen planus, another common papulosquamous disease that usually affects both the skin and the mouth.When psoriasis affects the lining of the mouth, it may be asymptomatic or present as white or gray-yellow plaques. Tongue fissures are common in people with oral psoriasis and are reported to occur in 6.5 to 20 percent of people with psoriasis affecting the skin. Stages The disease has three stages: progressive, stationary, and regressing. Progressive This stage is characterized by the appearance of large the number of nodular rashes that gradually spread to other parts of the body, and also increase in size.The affected areas cause discomfort and severe itching. If the plaques get wet, there is a risk of infection. Stationary During the stationary stage, new plaques do not form, and old ones do not go away. On the contrary, they begin to become covered with a crust or scales. Regressive At the regressive stage, the number of plaques begins to decrease, they can completely disappear, leaving slightly pigmented spots on the skin. It is important to consider that this stage is not a complete recovery. Psoriasis can recur, especially if left untreated and unhealthy.Diagnosis of the disease The doctor should be consulted at the first sign of the disease. The characteristic features of psoriasis are scaly, erythematous plaques, papules, or patches of skin that can cause pain and itching – they differ from eczema in the absence of blisters. Diagnosis usually does not require special blood tests or diagnostic procedures. If necessary, the doctor can do scrapings from the affected area. If psoriasis progresses or is severe, abnormalities in blood tests may be found, confirming the presence of an active inflammatory, autoimmune, rheumatic process, as well as endocrine and biochemical disorders.The disease can be confused with other diseases of the epidermis. For example, with discoid dermatitis, eczema and so on. Treatment “Treatment of psoriasis depends on the form, stage, nature of the rash, factors that could cause an exacerbation of psoriasis are also taken into account,” said dermatovenerologist Maxim Maximov. “This is the use of hyposensitizing agents. , antihistamines and other drugs. PUVA therapy is successfully applied, in which the skin is exposed to a combined effect of photoactive substances and ultraviolet radiation. “Local treatment Local treatment involves the application of various ointments to the affected area to reduce the discomfort. The choice of such drugs is varied, but only a doctor should choose the drug. Systemic therapy For the treatment of psoriasis, drugs such as retinoids, immunosuppressants (drugs that suppress the body’s immune response), steroids and vitamin D3 preparations can be used. They have many side effects, so you cannot take these medications uncontrollably. Also, there is a high efficiency of treatment of psoriasis with monoclonal antibodies.They selectively affect the targets responsible for the development of the disease. Physiotherapy For psoriasis, such methods of apparatus physiotherapy are used as: Ozone therapy Ozone therapy is often used. It has an analgesic effect, as well as cytostatic and immunomodulatory. Prevention For the prevention of psoriasis, it is necessary to lead a healthy lifestyle, exclude alcoholic beverages from the diet, as well as fried, salty, fatty and eat a balanced diet. It is important to properly care for your skin: hard washcloths should be replaced with a soft sponge or cotton cloth, and regular soap should be replaced with a pH-neutral detergent.After water procedures, the skin should not be rubbed with a towel – you need to gently blot it. It is better to wear clothes made from natural fabrics and suitable in size. In addition, severe stress should be avoided.

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health – society, health, psoriasis

MOSCOW, October 8 – RIA Novosti. Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune skin disorder that appears as light pink or red spots on the body. About what are the causes of its occurrence, whether it is transmitted by contact, what methods of treatment are most effective, a description of the symptoms with a photo – in the material RIA Novosti

About psoriasis

“Psoriasis is a chronic disease of multifactorial nature (this means that it develops with an unfavorable confluence of a number of factors), – told RIA Novosti Maxim Maksimov, dermatovenerologist, urologist-andrologist of the MedicCity clinic, deputy chief physician for medical work.“It is often even characterized by pathological changes in the musculoskeletal system.” the risk of psoriatic arthritis, lymphomas, cardiovascular diseases, Crohn’s disease and depression Psoriatic arthritis affects up to 30 percent of people with this ailment. known:

“However, hereditary predisposition, changes in the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems play a role in the development of psoriasis.There are also factors that can provoke this disease. For example, chronic infections, psychoemotional stress, alcohol and toxic substances, “the expert explained.

The incidence of psoriasis also depends on age, region and ethnicity. It is believed that a combination of environmental and genetic factors is responsible for these differences. According to a medical genetic study. Center Genotek, every third Russian has a genetic predisposition to psoriasis.The main genetic cause of psoriasis is considered to be the HLA-C gene located in the region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on the sixth chromosome. This gene is required to recognize one’s own and foreign cells. Mutations in it can lead to a disruption of this function and the attack of the immune system on its own skin cells. February 5, 2020, 10:21 , increasing the risk of psoriasis three to five times… Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. In Russia, one to five percent of the population suffers from it. This is a disease in which heredity plays a large role – the contribution of genetics to psoriasis is about 66 percent. Adults are more susceptible to this disease. In addition, it is known that risk factors include streptococcal infections, smoking, obesity and stress, “the document notes.

Risk factors for the development of the disease include:

  • microbes – various types of fungus, mycoplasma;

  • neuropsychic trauma, stress;

  • endocrine diseases – diabetes mellitus, thyroid diseases;

  • foci of chronic infection, especially streptococcal;

  • immunodeficiency states;

  • sun rays;

  • hormonal disorders;

  • lipid and protein metabolism disorders;

  • skin and joint injuries.

Men and women suffer from the disease with the same frequency. It can start at any age, although it most often first appears between the ages of 15 and 25. About a third of people with psoriasis report being diagnosed with the disease before age 20.

Symptoms

Symptoms of the disease vary in intensity depending on the stage.

Psoriasis is characterized by:

  • severe burning and itching at the site of inflammation;

  • feeling of tightness of the skin;

  • swelling and soreness of the joints;

  • cracks on the fingertips;

  • gum inflammation.

Although plaques appear in different places on the body, their typical localization exists: elbows and knees, sacrum and lower back. The scalp is often affected. This type is called seborrheic psoriasis. If plaques have formed on the flexion surfaces and folds of the skin (this can be the inner surface of the elbow and knee joints, the groin and armpits, the area under the breast), then the person has inverse psoriasis. With this form of the disease, the spots will be smooth, without scales.When the palms are affected, the skin in these places coarsens, cracks and flakes.

The hallmark of pathology is the psoriatic triad, or the Auspitz triad. This is a collection of unique signs of a disease, on the basis of which it is easier for a doctor to make a diagnosis. It includes three phenomena:

  1. 1

    The phenomenon of a stearin spot – when scraped, the skin peels off heavily. Over time, scales separate from the papules.

  2. 2

    The symptom of psoriatic film is characterized by the fact that a thin layer of cellular tissue resembling polyethylene is removed from the papule.

  3. 3

    The phenomenon of “blood dew” – after the detachment of the psoriatic film in humans, surface capillaries are exposed in the form of small blood points.

Types

There are eight types of psoriasis, which differ in the nature of manifestations and the appearance of lesions on the skin.

Ordinary psoriasis

“Psoriasis vulgaris (vulgar psoriasis) – with this form, rashes (papules) of a red-pink, sometimes deep red color appear, and on their surface there are white-gray scales,” the doctor explained.- The size of the rashes can be from a few millimeters to several centimeters. With this form of psoriasis, rashes can be localized on the skin of the trunk, upper and lower extremities, and the head. “

This type of disease occurs most often – in 80 percent of patients. As the pathology develops, the rashes gradually merge into plaques of various shapes and sizes.

Erythrodermic psoriasis

Psoriatic erythroderma (erythrodermic psoriasis) involves inflammation and scaling of the skin that often covers more than 90 percent of the body’s surface.This can be accompanied by severe dryness, itching, swelling, and pain. This type can develop from any type of psoriasis. It is often the result of abrupt withdrawal of systemic glucocorticoids. It can also be triggered by alcohol, neuropsychic stress, infections (in particular, colds). This form of psoriasis can be fatal as severe inflammation and exfoliation interfere with the body’s ability to regulate temperature and perform skin barrier functions.

Pustular psoriasis

Pustular psoriasis appears as bumps filled with non-infectious pus (pustules).The skin under and around them is red and tender. Pustular psoriasis can be localized or more common to all parts of the body. The first includes palmar-plantar pustular psoriasis and Gallopo’s continual acrodermatitis. Both forms are localized on the arms and legs.

July 26, 02:11

What diseases can rough elbows talk about?

Inverse psoriasis

Psoriasis of flexion surfaces, or “inverse psoriasis”, also known as bending psoriasis, manifests itself as smooth, inflamed areas of the skin.Spots often affect skin folds, especially around the genitals (between the thigh and groin), under the armpits, in the skin folds of the large abdomen (known as panniculitis), in the gluteal cleft, under the breast, and so on. Injuries and infections are thought to play a role in the development of this atypical form of psoriasis.

Teardrop-shaped psoriasis

According to Maxim Maksimov, with teardrop-shaped psoriasis, the color of the rashes is the same as in ordinary psoriasis, but they are usually small in size – two to four millimeters.They can also be localized on the skin of the trunk, upper and lower extremities.

The rashes themselves look like drops and rise slightly above the surface of the skin.

Guttate psoriasis often first develops or worsens after streptococcal infection, typically after streptococcal sore throat or streptococcal pharyngitis.

Arthropathic psoriasis

Arthropathic psoriasis is also called psoriatic arthritis. It is a form of chronic inflammatory arthritis, the clinical manifestations of which vary greatly and often occur in combination with psoriasis of the skin and nails.Inflammation of the joints and surrounding connective tissue most often affects the fingers and toes, which can lead to severe swelling. Psoriatic arthritis can also affect the hips, knees, spine (spondylitis), and the sacroiliac joint (sacroiliitis). About 30 percent of people with psoriasis experience psoriatic arthritis. Cutaneous manifestations of the disease usually occur before arthritic symptoms in about 75 percent of cases. That is why early diagnosis of the disease and its treatment are important – you should immediately consult a doctor.

Onychodystrophy

Nail psoriasis, or psoriatic onychodystrophy, is characterized by changes in the appearance of the nails. This type of disease occurs in 40-45 percent of people with psoriasis and in 80-90 percent of those with psoriatic arthritis. These changes can include any combination of discoloration of the nails and the nail bed (yellowing, whitening or graying), the appearance of dots, spots, transverse lines on and under the nails, thickening of the skin under and around the nails, as well as stratification and thickening, is the likelihood of complete loss of nails (onycholysis) or the development of increased fragility.

Oral psoriasis

Psoriasis in the mouth is very rare, unlike lichen planus, another common papulosquamous disease that usually affects both the skin and the mouth. When psoriasis affects the lining of the mouth, it may be asymptomatic or present as white or gray-yellow plaques. Tongue fissures are common in people with oral psoriasis and are reported to occur in 6.5 to 20 percent of people with skin psoriasis.

Stages

The disease includes three stages: progressive, stationary and regressive.

Progressive

This stage is characterized by the appearance on the skin of a large number of nodular eruptions, which gradually spread to other parts of the body, and also increase in size. The affected areas cause discomfort and severe itching. If the plaques get wet, there is a risk of infection.

Stationary

During the stationary stage, new plaques do not form and old ones do not disappear.On the contrary, they begin to become covered with a crust or scales.

Regressive

At the regressive stage, the number of plaques begins to decrease, they can completely disappear, leaving slightly pigmented spots on the skin. It is important to consider that this stage is not a complete recovery. Psoriasis can recur, especially if left untreated and unhealthy.

Diagnosis of the disease

The doctor should be consulted at the first sign of the disease.The characteristic features of psoriasis are scaly, erythematous plaques, papules, or patches of skin that can cause pain and itching – they differ from eczema in the absence of blisters. Diagnosis usually does not require special blood tests or diagnostic procedures. If necessary, the doctor can do scrapings from the affected area. If psoriasis progresses or is severe, abnormalities in blood tests may be found, confirming the presence of an active inflammatory, autoimmune, rheumatic process, as well as endocrine and biochemical disorders.The disease can be confused with other diseases of the epidermis. For example, with discoid dermatitis, eczema, and so on.

Treatment

“Treatment of psoriasis depends on the form, stage, nature of the rash, factors that could cause an exacerbation of psoriasis are also taken into account,” said dermatovenerologist Maxim Maximov. “This is the use of hyposensitizing agents, antihistamines and others. PUVA therapy is successfully applied, in which the skin is exposed to a combined effect of photoactive substances and ultraviolet radiation. “

Topical treatment

Topical treatment involves the application of various ointments to the affected areas, which reduce discomfort. The choice of such drugs is varied, but the drug should only be chosen by the doctor.

Systemic therapy

Drugs such as retinoids, immunosuppressants (drugs that suppress the body’s immune response), steroids and vitamin D3 preparations can be used to treat psoriasis. They have many side effects, so you cannot take these medications uncontrollably.Also, there is a high efficiency of treatment of psoriasis with monoclonal antibodies. They selectively target targets responsible for the development of the disease.

Physiotherapy

For psoriasis, such methods of apparatus physiotherapy are used as:

  • UV-therapy;

  • ultrasound therapy;

  • electrosleep (relieves emotional stress, helps to treat neurogenic disorders).

Ozone therapy

Ozone therapy is often used. It has an analgesic effect, as well as cytostatic and immunomodulatory effects.

Prevention

For the prevention of psoriasis, it is necessary to lead a healthy lifestyle, exclude alcoholic beverages from the diet, as well as fried, salty, fatty and eat a balanced diet. It is important to properly care for your skin: hard washcloths should be replaced with a soft sponge or cotton cloth, and regular soap should be replaced with a pH-neutral detergent.After water procedures, the skin should not be rubbed with a towel – you need to gently blot it. It is better to wear clothes made from natural fabrics and suitable in size. In addition, severe stress should be avoided.

Experts recommend following a diet for psoriasis – Rossiyskaya Gazeta

Winston Churchill, suffering from psoriasis, suggested erecting a monument of pure gold to the one who would come up with a cure for this ailment.

Alas, psoriasis, one of the most common skin lesions, remains a mystery disease.The only thing that doctors reliably know today is that the disease has a genetic predisposition and is inherited.

Infectious is not contagious

Here’s what to know about psoriasis:

The name comes from the Greek “psora” meaning itching. Itching is what causes the greatest concern for patients who have skin rashes at the time of exacerbation.

Sometimes this disease is called “scaly lichen” and is even confused with pink lichen, but unlike lichen psoriasis is absolutely not contagious.Its transmission from person to person is impossible.

Physicians distinguish two most dangerous age periods when psoriasis can appear for the first time: from 16 to 22 years old and from 57 to 60 years old.

Favorite places of psoriasis appearance – on the head under the hair, the surface of the elbow and knee joints, the region of the sacrum. In some people, the disease is acute, but quickly, while others have psoriatic elements on the skin of the knees and elbows for several years (duty plaques).

There are rare but most insidious forms of psoriasis.For example, palmar-plantar, when plaques appear on the foot and palms. Often, with this type of psoriasis, the nails are also affected – they become loose and thickened, crumble along the edges. In addition, stripes, warts and depressions appear on the surface of the nails. It is important to be able to distinguish this pathology from nail and foot fungus.

In the so-called arthropathic psoriasis, not only the skin is affected, but also the joints. Most often, feet and hands.

Risk factors

Although the onset of psoriasis is genetically determined, there are many provoking factors:

streptococcal and viral infections,

prolonged nervous tension and stressful situations,

inflammation, sunburn and skin trauma,

bad habits, especially alcohol abuse,

overweight,

endocrine changes (first of all, an increased level of female sex hormones – estrogens.Their high content in the blood occurs against the background of diseases of the endocrine system or taking hormonal drugs),

drug overdose (especially you should beware of beta-blocking drugs, drugs with lithium and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, as well as drugs taken for hypertension).

rheumatism,

HIV infection,

allergy.

Folk remedies

Warm baths with freshly brewed celandine help to alleviate the condition.

You can also lubricate the affected skin with a mixture of eucalyptus, honey and Kalanchoe (take 10 g of Kalanchoe juice, the same amount of honey, 30 g of eucalyptus oil – mix everything thoroughly).

By the way

Those who regularly drink beer are more likely to develop psoriasis, according to Harvard Medical School. They calculated that 5 glasses of beer a week doubled the risk of illness. Doctors believe it could be caused by the plant protein used to ferment the drink.

Psoriasis may increase the risk of heart attack and other cardiovascular ailments, researchers at the University of Copenhagen say.

Psoriasis worsens towards night. 7 out of 10 patients especially often complain of symptoms at ten in the evening. Researchers at Wake Forest University believe that this is due to daily fluctuations in body temperature. Its increase in the evening increases the itching.

Advice

Doctors do not yet know how to treat psoriasis. Therapy of the disease is aimed mainly at eliminating symptoms and improving the patient’s condition.Here are some tips:

1 Take care of your immunity. It is a malfunction of the immune system that, as a rule, leads to an exacerbation of the disease. Lymphocytes accumulate under the skin, while cytoxins, substances that regulate inflammatory reactions, begin to be produced. The result is scaly rashes, the so-called plaques.

2 Avoid colds and colds. Examining the geography of the incidence, doctors found that in the northern regions with long winters, the risk of psoriasis is higher. It can be provoked by hypothermia or frostbite, colds, flu.

3 Do not hide your illness from the sun. Even in the old days it was said that “the roses of the devil” (as the manifestations of psoriasis were called) are afraid of light. Doctors confirm: with the arrival of a warm period, when clothes do not cover the skin from the sun, the symptoms of psoriasis subside, and in some patients they disappear altogether.

But it’s also not worth frying endlessly on the beach.

4 Protect skin from injury and excessive exposure to the environment. The phenomenon when psoriatic plaques appear on the sites of sunburn and chemical burns, frostbite and scars is called the “Kebner phenomenon”.Avoid excessive drying of the skin, this also aggravates the symptoms of the disease.

5 There is no way without a diet. With psoriasis, you must completely abandon garlic and onions, chocolate, hot spices. It is better not to consume alcoholic beverages either. It is worth reducing to a minimum smoked meats, fatty meats, fried foods, honey. Opt for fruits and vegetables, boiled fish and lean meats.

What we are treated with: psoriasis. Winter is close

Treatment with ultraviolet rays (including in combination with psoralen and sometimes with retinoids) has long been used against psoriasis.Ultraviolet light with a wavelength of 311–313 nanometers works most efficiently, therefore, lamps that emit it have been created specifically against skin diseases. Ultraviolet light and psoralen destroy the DNA of the surviving keratinocytes and prevent them from dividing uncontrollably, forming new plaques. At the same time, light for medicinal purposes (the dosage is determined by the doctor depending on the sensitivity of the skin and its type) does not cause an increased risk of skin cancer in patients, so this method is considered safe. However, doctors still recommend refraining from light therapy for people with a predisposition to melanoma: it is not for nothing that the World Health Organization classifies solariums as a risk factor.However, experts from the Cochrane Collaboration did not find the advantages of narrow-wave ultraviolet over broad-wave, and treatment with psoralen – over therapy without it, but with retinoids. In general, it is not yet clear which approach is better, and the safety of narrow-wave ultraviolet radiation in the long term still needs to be confirmed.

Methotrexate and cyclosporine are one step higher. The first slows down the metabolism, the second is an antibiotic. Both drugs slow down cell division, and cyclosporine also lowers immunity by suppressing cyotokines that activate T cells.At the same time, cyclosporine does not suppress the synthesis of blood cells in general and does not have the “hormonal” side effects inherent in corticosteroids. According to another review by the Cochrane Collaboration, methotrexate and cyclosporine are the safest of the systemic drugs, but still work. Further (by increasing the strength of action, including the side effect) are certolizumab, infliximab, alephasept. In general, the authors called certolizumab, infliximab and ustekinumab as a compromise between dangerous side effects and barely helping weak drugs.

For nail psoriasis, infliximab, golimumab, SRT (surface radiation therapy), electron beams and weak X-rays have proven to be the most effective. However, the evidence for the effectiveness of fumaric acid esters against psoriasis is limited. Azatrioprine, etretinate, and colchicine will be the most effective treatments for psoriatic arthritis, but more research is best.

Indicator.Ru recommends: choose according to the severity of the disease

Doctors have created a “ladder” of drugs for psoriasis for a reason: the effectiveness of drugs from it really increases along with side effects.If, in mild forms, ultraviolet light and ointments with analogs of vitamin D3 still make sense, severe cases should be treated with metatrexate, cyclosporine, and antibody-based biologics. Unfortunately, the latter are very expensive, but not everyone needs them. We can only hope that they will become cheaper over time. However, even as long as psoriasis is weak or not in an exacerbation stage, there are measures that will help protect yourself from its manifestation for longer (and there is also a Cochrane review about them), and most of them are free – just change your lifestyle.Firstly, in the case of excess weight and psoriasis, the symptoms of skin disease from the diet also recede. Secondly, it may help to lose weight through exercise (but this is not certain). This is due to the link between inflammation and obesity.

Replenishment of vitamin D3 deficiency and sunbathing can also help, but it is not worth striving for horse dosages, sunbathing on the beach or spending a lot of time in a solarium. Since psoriasis can be associated with mental disorders (for example, depression), it is necessary to carry out therapy in these areas, then the condition as a whole will improve – although it is not always clear which condition is primary, it is likely that they aggravate each other.It is also useful to treat bacterial infections: if streptococcus can definitely provoke psoriasis, then staphylococci, for example, worsen the course of the disease, although they do not cause it.

In addition, try to surround the skin with comfort: do not dry it out (for example, you can buy a humidifier or hang a wet towel on the battery) and avoid hypothermia.

Our advice cannot be equated with a doctor’s prescription. Before you start taking this or that drug, be sure to consult with a specialist.

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symptoms, causes of occurrence, treatment methods

Opinion

Karina Andreeva
Expert author

Psoriasis is a chronic, progressive inflammatory disease in which plaques develop on the skin of the face, body and / or head.According to statistics, 125 million people in the world suffer from psoriasis. We understand what stages of the disease exist, who is at risk and how modern medicine is struggling with the problem.

Answer Galina Menshchikova, PhD, dermatologist

Psoriasis has many different forms. The most common starts with a small, reddish rash on the skin. They grow and merge with each other. These plaques are fairly easy to spot – they are usually covered in silvery-white scales that come off easily if scratched.They appear most often on the scalp, elbows and knees. All rashes are usually symmetrical. Also, often with psoriasis, the nail plate is affected – punctate depressions form on the nails, this phenomenon is called the “thimble symptom”. It is present in about 50% of patients.

There is also inverse psoriasis, when the rash appears in an atypical place – for example, under the mammary glands, in the groin, under the armpits. In this case, the disease is most often associated with diabetes mellitus.

In young girls and adolescents, after a sore throat or other cold disease, small nodules “papules” appear throughout the body – this is how teardrop-shaped, or ladies’ psoriasis develops.

Another common form is palmar-plantar psoriasis. It greatly affects the quality of life: rashes occur on the palms and feet, so a person cannot walk normally and do anything with his hands. The rash tightens the skin, cracks appear, the patient’s local temperature rises, and the skin burns and flakes.

Psoriasis has three stages. In progressing there is the growth of plaques and papules or the fusion of plaques with each other. At the stationary stage, the growth process stops and new plaques do not appear. When regressing, large plaques resolve and either leave behind hyperpigmented spots or disappear completely. At the same time, cell growth stops.

Psoriasis is especially likely in those whose relatives have experienced this disease: it is most often transmitted genetically.It can also occur in diabetic patients.

Both women and men get sick equally often. Women usually face the problem between the ages of 16 and 60; men – from 22 to 58 years old.

Psoriasis is not contagious, so it is impossible to get it by airborne droplets or sexually. In addition, there is currently no prevention of psoriasis.

Psoriatic arthritis often occurs in patients with psoriasis affecting the nail plate.Usually the patient wakes up in the morning with a strong feeling of stiffness. To return to a more or less active lifestyle, it should take about 30-40 minutes.

This is a wake-up call, as articular syndrome can even lead to disability.

Another potential problem is erythroderma. In this condition, the plaques merge with each other and affect the entire human skin.

Among the potential diseases that accompany psoriasis are diabetes mellitus, heart failure, arterial hypertension, obesity, depression and alcoholism.As they say, “people do not die of psoriasis, but they die with it.”

Treatment is tailored to each patient individually. It depends on the duration of the disease, stage, severity, age and comorbidities.

First, there is local therapy. In this case, specific antipsoriatic substances are used – derivatives of vitamin D3, local retinoids, anti-inflammatory ointments (corticosteroid). From auxiliary external agents, creams, lotions, ointments with tar, urea and with acids (salicylic, lactic) can be distinguished: they are necessary for an exfoliating effect.They also use reducing drugs that soften and dissolve plaques, they contain oil – for example, “Naftaderm”.

Another type of therapy is systemic. It is more serious: with it, the patient takes drugs against psoriasis in tablets or injections. These are, first of all, cytostatics – antineoplastic drugs that disrupt the processes of cell growth (“Methotrexate” and “Cyclosporin”). Retinoids (“Acitretin”) are also used.

There is also an external method of treatment – for example, with the help of phototherapy: the skin is exposed to ultraviolet rays of the B spectrum.

First of all, it is necessary to relieve inflammation and slow down the processes of cell division on the skin. The creams and lotions your doctor prescribes will soften the scales and help relieve itching. It is important for patients not to overdry the skin and use moisturizers, and also avoid contact with irritating factors (hard washcloths, scrubs, tattoos are prohibited).

If the skin is injured, it leads to the appearance of new rashes.

An exacerbation may last for several months.In general, psoriasis makes itself felt twice a year – in spring and autumn.

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Karina Andreeva
Expert author

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90 000 Symptoms and signs of psoriasis: diagnosis and treatment of psoriasis

06/11/2020

Psoriasis: a chronicle, but not a sentence

The skin is an organ that protects the human body from the penetration of pathogenic bacteria, substances of foreign origin.But this organ is also prone to disease, and psoriasis is considered one of the most difficult to treat. So what is psoriasis and what is the reason for it?

What is psoriasis

Psoriasis is the most mysterious and most studied disease. For several decades, scientists have been racking their brains over the causes of its occurrence, but they still cannot give an exact answer why people suffer from this disease and how to treat psoriasis until complete recovery.

You need to know that this disease is non-infectious, since its pathogens are not bacteria or fungi, but a person’s own immunity.The patient’s skin cells begin the process of division at an incredible rate. The life cycle of a cell is approximately thirty days, and in case of a disease – no more than 5 days.

Because of its appearance, the disease was called “scaly lichen”, and from Greek means “itching”, which reflects the main symptom.

Causes of psoriasis

Although research is ongoing, scientists believe that psoriasis is an inherited disease with a variety of causes. Among them are poor metabolism, thyroid problems, immunological disorders, neurological disorders.

The disease of psoriasis, the causes of which have not yet been found, has several theories.

According to the first theory, there are two types of disease:

  1. First type. It is transmitted by genetics and is associated with dysfunction of the human immune system. More than half of patients under the age of 30 suffer from this form.
  2. Second type. It is not related to immunity and is not inherited. Appears in people after 40 years.

If you believe another theory, then psoriasis is a consequence of impaired immunity due to various factors: infectious disease, unhealthy diet, frequent stress.For example, alcohol has been found to exacerbate symptoms. Exacerbation can be caused by: chocolate, hot pepper, vinegar. This theory indicates that this disease is systemic. This means that in case of malfunctions in the body, the disease can affect other tissues and even organs.

Psoriasis symptoms

Main signs: the appearance of flaky, inflamed red spots, which are accompanied by itching. Plaques of this kind are located most often on the elbow joints, on the scalp, in the lower back, ¼ of patients have nail damage.

A disease such as psoriasis has multiple symptoms, not just one. The disease is divided into three types, depending on the seasonality of exacerbation: indefinite, summer and winter. Most often you can find it in winter.

When psoriasis worsens on the hands, red plaques appear, the size of which can vary from a small dot to the size of the palm. Such rashes are flaky and itchy unbearably. The scales on the surface quickly and easily fly off, and under them remain dense, located in depth.The affected areas may crack and fester. Progressive squamous lichen has a Kebner phenomenon. This is when stains appear on the places of scratches or cracks.

Scalp psoriasis, affecting the scalp, does not lead to baldness. In a disease such as psoriasis, the initial stage is characterized by desquamation. After a while, the plaques pass behind the ears and on the neck. If psoriasis appears on the face, then the areas of the eyes and eyebrows are usually affected, and in isolated cases, the lips.

Psoriasis of nails

Psoriasis of nails begins with the appearance of longitudinal grooves or points.The nail plate becomes gray or yellowish. The skin under the plate or the nail itself becomes dense. The disease can affect only one nail, or maybe all. All changes occur from the edge of the plate and smoothly move towards the base. In severe cases, the nail plate completely departs.

Symptoms are typical for nail psoriasis:

  • hemorrhages under the nails;
  • small pits;
  • plate dullness;
  • roughness.

Psoriasis in children

Such skin pathology as psoriasis in children is very rare. However, if this happens, then the symptoms and locations are no different from adults. Treatment of psoriasis in children is the same as in adults, but without drugs that could harm the child’s body.

How is psoriasis treated?

So what to do with psoriasis and is it possible to overcome the disease completely? There are several treatments available today and a holistic approach is needed for best results.

  1. Drug therapy. To try to cope with the disease, doctors prescribe vitamin A and drugs to suppress the activity of the immune system. For external treatment, an ointment for psoriasis is used to relieve inflammation and protect the skin from various harmful fungi and bacteria. Such ointments are very important, because patients often suffer from secondary infections, and therefore, skin recovery slows down. For more severe cases, hormonal creams and ointments may be prescribed.One of these ointments, which we usually recommend in response to the question “how is psoriasis treated?” – kremgen, you can buy it in our online pharmacy. Cremegen ointment has a gentle composition. But it is dangerous to use creams on your own without a doctor’s prescription, because they have many side effects and contraindications. Preparations with active zinc are successfully used in the fight against the disease. This substance is natural for the skin. Such an ointment will relieve itching, restore the protective functions of the skin.
  2. Physiotherapy methods.With the help of physiotherapy, you can cope with many of the manifestations of this disease. Psoriasis is afraid of the sun’s rays, so ultraviolet radiation is used in the treatment. Ultrasound, laser and magnetotherapy can also be prescribed.
  3. Plasmapheresis. A portion of blood is taken from the patient, plasma is separated from it and injected back to the patient. It is believed that all toxins are removed along with the plasma.
  4. Food. Diet for psoriasis is incredibly important. All foods that cause allergic reactions should be excluded from the diet.You need to consume vitamin products and fiber daily. Alcoholic drinks, carbonated drinks, baked goods, eggs, smoked meats are completely excluded.
  5. Psychotherapy. It is known that psoriasis tends to exacerbate during periods of stress and depression. Many people, after being diagnosed, begin to worry about the disease and thereby exacerbate the situation. It is very helpful to see a therapist who can help you deal with negative emotions. You can attend group therapy. It should be noted that the disease should not become a reason for lowering self-esteem, because there are many public figures who suffer from this disease.The disease did not prevent them from becoming idols for millions of people on the planet.

Some argue that psoriasis is the result of poor lifestyle choices and not a disease. There is some truth in this. A psoriasis diagnosis is a chance to rethink your habits and diet. If you start treatment on time and correctly, do not self-medicate, then you can achieve amazing results. Some patients manage to achieve lifelong remission.

Main types of psoriasis

Psoriasis is a common skin condition that accelerates the life cycle of skin cells.As a result of this disorder, skin cells develop very quickly and accumulate on the surface of the skin. It is from the extra cells that red spots and scales are formed, which itch and sometimes hurt.

Unfortunately, this disorder cannot be cured at the moment, but its symptoms can and should be controlled. Often, the disease is aggravated, then “goes away”, and the main task of the doctor and the patient is to stop the ultra-rapid development of skin cells.

This is an autoimmune disorder, which means that the body’s immune system, which protects it from disease, begins to overreact and cause problems.In psoriasis, a type of white blood cell called T cells becomes so active that it triggers an immune response. Puffiness and rapid multiplication of skin cells is one of the consequences of such a reaction.

Skin cells develop in the deep layers of the skin and slowly rise to the surface. This is called a cell turnover (cycle), which usually lasts about a month. In psoriasis, this cycle can only last for a couple of days, which causes cells from the deep layer of the skin to rise too quickly and begin to accumulate on the surface of the skin.It looks red and scales.

Several triggers can cause an outbreak and its symptoms, including:

  • Infection,
  • Stress,
  • Changes in the weather that make the skin dry,
  • Taking certain medications,
  • Scratches, cuts or burns.

Psoriasis can be family-run and is therefore a genetic disorder. Although this disease can affect everyone. At the same time, there are several risk factors that increase the likelihood of encountering the disease:

  • Postponed viral and bacterial infections.This disorder often develops in HIV-infected people. Also at risk are children and young people with recurrent infections, especially streptococcal.
  • Stress. Psoriasis can be caused by severe stress, as it can affect the body’s immune function.
  • Obesity. If you are overweight, psoriatic plaques can form in wrinkles and skin folds.
  • Smoking. This bad habit is not only capable of causing the development of the disease, but can also aggravate the patient’s condition.

This disease often develops between 15 and 35 years old, and in about 10-15% of cases, it manifests itself before the age of 10 years. Very rarely, the disease develops even in infancy.

What are the types of psoriasis?

The US National Trust identifies 5 varieties of this disease. It depends on the type of disease which treatment tactics will be chosen.

  1. Plaque psoriasis. This is the most common type of disease.It manifests itself as dense red patches or plaques that are covered with a silvery layer of dead skin cells. Most often, these spots form on the scalp, knees, elbows and the lower back. They can itch, ache, crack, and bleed.
  2. Guttate psoriasis. This type of disease manifests itself in the form of small puncture lesions. It often appears during childhood or young age and can be caused by a streptococcal infection. It is the second most common form of the disease, affecting about 10% of all patients.
  3. Reverse psoriasis. This type of disorder manifests itself in the form of red lesions on the skin folds. Most often, the area under the knee, armpit or groin is affected. These lesions can appear smooth and shiny. Many people with this form of the disorder have a different type of disease in other parts of the body.
  4. Pustular psoriasis. This type of disease manifests itself in the form of white blisters, in which pus of a non-infectious nature accumulates. These bubbles are surrounded by red spots.Pus is made up of white blood cells. It is not an infectious disease and therefore cannot be transmitted to a healthy person. The pustular type of disorder manifests itself in different parts of the body, but most often the bubbles form on the arms or legs.
  5. Erythrodermic psoriasis. This is a particularly severe form of the disease, which is characterized by the formation of very severe redness that spreads throughout the body. It causes severe pain and itching, as well as flaking of the skin. Only 3% of all patients face erythrodermic psoriasis.It most often develops in people with an unstable plaque-like form of the disease.

This disorder manifests itself on any part of the body – on the eyelids, ears, lips, mouth, skin folds, hands, feet and nails. Each case requires a different approach to treating and controlling symptoms.

If psoriasis occurs only in a specific area of ​​the body, phototherapy and topical therapy are often used. However, doctors may prescribe oral or injectable medications if the disease has spread to multiple areas of the body or severely impairs a person’s quality of life.

How do the symptoms of psoriasis appear:

  • Scalp. In this case, the disease can manifest itself mildly – with little crust formation, or severely – when a thick crust of plaques covers the entire scalp. The disease can also spread beyond the hairline – to the forehead, back of the neck and around the eyes.
  • Face. In this case, the disease affects the eyebrows, the skin in the area between the nose and the upper lip, the upper part of the forehead and the area of ​​the skin on the hairline.Symptoms of psoriasis that appear on the face must be treated very carefully, because the skin of the face is very sensitive.
  • Hands, feet and nails. If the outbreak has affected the arms or legs, treat quickly but carefully. In some cases, cracks, blisters, and swelling appear on the hands and feet. Up to 50% of patients are faced with changes in the nail plates. In the case of psoriatic arthritis, nails are affected in at least eight out of ten patients.
  • Genitals. The genitals most commonly suffer from inverse psoriasis, although other forms of the disease can also strike the genitals.This is especially true for men.
  • Skin folds. In this case, the disease most often manifests itself under the armpits or under the breast. Sweating and friction are often triggers for symptoms.

How to understand how severe a patient’s condition is?

Palm size is approximately 1% of body surface area. In mild form, the disease affects less than 3% of the body area. With an average form – between three and ten percent.If more than 10% of the body surface area suffers, then the patient is faced with a severe form of the disease.

For example, with a mild form, only the knees are affected, with a medium form – the knees and part of the forearm on both hands, and with a severe form – a large area of ​​the knees, all the forearm and skin on the head.

Psoriasis Treatment

There are several options for treating this autoimmune disease. But remember that it is only aimed at alleviating symptoms and reducing the frequency of exacerbations.Doctors prescribe one of several therapy options, or a combination of methods:

  • Local treatment – applying cream to the affected skin, Chunk saved
  • Phototherapy – exposure to ultraviolet rays on the skin or spending more time in the sun. It is very important that the amount of time allotted for phototherapy is dosed by the doctor.