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Sweating forehead at night: What Are Night Sweats a Sign Of? 8 Causes and Treatment

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What Causes Night Sweats In Men? Signs and Treatment

If you wake up every morning drenched in sweat, you’ve probably frantically Googled “what causes night sweats” at one point or another. But the truth is, there is no one cause. You’ll probably have to do some sleuthing to figure out what’s prompting your perspiration.

Night sweats are fairly common: In one study published in Annals of Family Medicine, about one-third of primary care patients reported night sweats during the past month. But most sufferers of night sweats never report the symptom to their doctor, says study author James Mold, M.D., a professor of family medicine at the University of Oklahoma.

So what are the most common causes? We’ve rounded up just a few of them.

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What makes some guys prone to night sweats?

Your body uses sweat to reduce your core temperature when it spikes above a threshold called the thermoneutral zone, research suggests. Lots of things can push your body temp into this zone, from use of heavy blankets to inflammatory processes inside your body when you have an infection or disease.

Several conditions can impact your sympathetic nervous system, your sweat glands, or other factors that influence your body’s ability to regulate its temperature. It’s also possible that people who work out may be conditioned to sweat at lower temperatures than expected, according to a study review by Mold and his colleagues.

What causes night sweats?

In a literature review published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, Dr. Mold and his colleagues revealed that several factors increase the likelihood of night sweats, including panic attacks, sleep problems, fever, numbness in hands and feet, anxiety and stress, and trouble breathing at night.

Night sweats may also be a side effect of medication, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), commonly prescribed for depression. “Though causation has neither been proven nor disproven with certainty, it seems likely that SSRIs are a cause,” says Mold.

In a handful of cases, night sweats could indicate a serious problem. Mold’s study review suggests that they can be a symptom of autoimmune diseases, heart problems, or sleep apnea, which can cause you to momentarily stop breathing while you sleep.

While these cases are fairly rare, if you wake up in a pool of sweat almost every night, or if your alarm sounds and you’re soaked through your pajamas, you should see your doctor, says Mold. He also suggests monitoring your body temperature twice a day for a week to detect any fevers, and keeping a record of other symptoms to bring to your doc.

Ultimately, the best strategy to reduce night sweats is to treat whatever underlying condition is causing them. In the case of SSRI-induced night sweats, some people have seen improvement by adding medications called alpha-adrenergic blockers, research shows.

You should also avoid using heavy blankets or bedding, and eating spicy foods before bed.

Julie Stewart
Julie Stewart is a writer and content strategist whose work has also appeared in Health, and Women’s Health, Everyday Health, Vice, and Shape.

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Why Do I Sweat When I Sleep?

It can be disconcerting to climb into bed, fall asleep easily and wake up drenched in sweat hours later—or to feel overheated once insomnia kicks and you just can’t seem to turn off your brain. What’s the cause of these nighttime blasts of heat?

“I started studying night sweats because I had patients asking me about them, and I wanted to give them an answer,” says Dr. James Mold, emeritus professor of family and preventive medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.

In 2011, Mold published a review study that looked at all the available research on the causes and symptoms of night sweats. He turned up more questions than answers. Even the definition of “night sweats” is not well-established, and descriptions of the condition range from mild to “drenching” perspiration.

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“One thing we did find is that sweating at night is associated with states of arousal, and that some of the things that cause people to sweat at night include [antidepressants] or blood pressure medications, alcohol or eating too close to bed,” Mold says. Each of these can disrupt the body’s natural metabolic slow-down or temperature-control mechanisms, and so disrupt or curtail sleep, his study suggests.

Of course, the hormone shifts associated with menopause are also a common cause of nighttime hot flashes, says Dr. Hadine Joffe, an associate professor in the division of sleep medicine at Harvard Medical School. Even if you’re not waking up in a pool of sweat, these hormone shifts can cause “mini arousals”—basically, periods of very light sleep—that can cause a person to feel unrefreshed or “sapped” during the day.

Intense exercise too close to bed can also “throw off” the body’s thermoregulation processes, says Michael Grandner, an associate professor and director of the Sleep & Health Research Program at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. He explains that a person’s body temperature naturally dips just before bed, which promotes sleep. Eating or exercising too close to bed can fire up your metabolism, which increases heat production and so may interfere with the body’s natural powering down.

MORE: TIME’s Guide To Sleep

But what about the sudden surge of heat on those nights when you can’t sleep? Those could be caused by everything from an over-active brain to the types of bedding or attire you favor. “Nighttime sweats are often simply caused by pajamas, mattresses and sheets that don’t breathe well,” Grandner says.

Your body’s built-in sleep clocks cause your core temperature to drop during the hour or two before bed, and once you’re asleep, it should continue to drop very gradually until reaching its lowest point sometime around 3 A. M., Grandner explains. Anything that messes with those normal temperature progressions can disrupt your sleep. If you were nice and cool when you got into bed, loading up on heavy pajamas or extra-warm blankets could trap heat, disrupt your body’s natural temperature slide and keep you awake.

There’s also some evidence linking insomnia with higher levels of autonomous nervous system arousal, including a rapid heart rate, higher metabolism and increased body temperature. While the research is a little spotty, it suggests an overactive, agitated mind—one preoccupied with worry or thoughts of the coming day—could lead to the release of the stress hormones cortisol, which could rev up some internal functions that produce heat.

That could explain why, on nights when you can’t sleep, you end up kicking off your covers and turning over your pillows in search of some cool comfort.

To stave off the sweats, start by swapping out your existing bedding for comforters and sheets that breathe well and keep cool. Untreated cotton is always a good, affordable option. Grandner also says that many foam mattresses trap heat; be sure to select a mattress (and mattress pad or topper) that will help promote cool sleeping.

Sleeping with one foot outside of your covers may also help. “The bottom of the feet have important temperature sensing functions and can help the body maintain a cool sensation even under a warm blanket,” Grandner says. The same is true of your neck, so try to keep it and your head outside of your comforter. (Some research shows that cooling your head at night, either with a cooling cap or by turning down the thermostat, can combat insomnia.)

If your nighttime sweats seem to be caused by meds or menopause, tell your doctor. He or she may be able to switch your medications to stop your symptoms. For menopause-related hot flashes, there are drug therapies—both hormonal and not—that can help, Joffe says.

Keeping cool at night is easier said than done. But understanding that heat is the enemy of sleep can help you snooze more soundly.

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Hyperhidrosis symptoms & treatments – Illnesses & conditions

Hyperhidrosis can be challenging to treat and it may take a while to find the best treatment for you. Less invasive treatments will usually be recommended first.

Lifestyle changes

Changing your lifestyle cannot cure primary hyperhidrosis (hyperhidrosis with no obvious cause), but it can improve your symptoms and help your confidence.

The advice below may help.

  • Avoid triggers that you know make your sweating worse, such as spicy foods and alcohol
  • Use antiperspirant frequently, rather than deodorant
  • Avoid wearing tight, restrictive clothing and man-made fibres, such as nylon
  • Wearing black or white clothing can minimise signs of sweating
  • Armpit shields can absorb excessive sweat and protect your clothes
  • Wear socks that absorb moisture, such as thick socks made of natural fibres, or special soles or sports socks designed to absorb moisture
  • Avoid wearing socks made out of man-made materials and change your socks at least twice a day if possible
  • Ideally wear shoes made of leather, and try to alternate between different pairs of shoes every day

Stronger antiperspirants

If a regular antiperspirant doesn’t control your sweating, your GP may prescribe or suggest a stronger one for you.

Antiperspirant containing aluminium chloride is often used to treat hyperhidrosis. This works by plugging the sweat glands. You will need to apply it at night just before you go to sleep and wash it off in the morning.

The most common side effect of aluminium chloride is mild irritation or itching and tingling where it is applied. Using the antiperspirant less frequently can help reduce irritation. Using emollients (moisturisers) regularly and soap substitutes instead of soap may also help.

Anticholinergics

You may be prescribed a type of medicine called an anticholinergic or antimuscarinic. These work by blocking the effects of a chemical called acetylcholine, which the nervous system uses to activate the sweat glands.

Anticholinergics are available as tablets or solutions that are applied to affected areas. They’re not widely used to treat hyperhidrosis and most types are not licensed to treat it, but some people find them helpful.

Propantheline bromide is an anticholinergic medicine licensed for treating hyperhidrosis. However, anticholinergic medicines unlicensed for hyperhidrosis – such as oxybutynin and glycopyrronium bromide – can also be prescribed if your doctor feels they might help.

Possible side effects of anticholinergics include a dry mouth, blurred vision, stomach cramps, constipation and difficulty passing urine.

Referral to a dermatologist

If lifestyle changes and treatment don’t work, your GP may refer you to a dermatologist (a specialist in treating skin conditions) for further treatment, such as iontophoresis, botulinum toxin or surgery.

Iontophoresis

Iontophoresis may help if you have excessive sweating that affects your hands or feet. It can also be used to treat armpits, although this is usually less effective.

Iontophoresis involves treating affected areas of skin with a weak electric current passed through water or a wet pad. This is thought to help block the sweat glands.

If your hands and feet need treating, you place them in a bowl of water and a weak electric current is passed through the water. If your armpits need treating, a wet contact pad is placed against each armpit and a current is passed through the pad.

The treatment is not painful but the electric current can cause mild, short-lived discomfort and skin irritation.

Each session of iontophoresis lasts between 20 and 30 minutes, and you will usually need to have 2 to 4 sessions a week. Your symptoms should begin to improve after a week or 2, after which further treatment will be required at 1 to 4 week intervals, depending on how severe your symptoms are.

Iontophoresis is often very effective, although you may need to make regular visits to your local hospital’s dermatology clinic to receive treatment.

Alternatively, iontophoresis kits that you can use at home may be recommended, with prices in the range of £250-500.

Botulinum toxin injections

Botulinum toxin can be injected into the skin in areas of the body affected by hyperhidrosis. This helps reduce sweating in these areas by blocking the signals from the brain to the sweat glands.

Around 15-20 injections are given in the affected areas of the body, such as the armpits, hands, feet or face. The procedure usually takes about 30-45 minutes in total.

The effect of the injections usually lasts for several months, after which time the treatment can be repeated if necessary.

Potential side effects of botulinum toxin injections include:

  • pain, redness or itching where the injections are given
  • nausea, headaches and hot flushes after the injections are given
  • another part of your body sweating more to make up for treated area – known as compensatory sweating
  • muscle weakness around the treatment area

Most of these side effects are short-lived or will resolve as the effect of the injections wears off.

Availability of botulinum toxin on the NHS can vary widely depending on your clinical commissioning group (CCG), and you may only be able to get it privately. Costs for private treatment depend on the part of the body being treated. For example, injecting the forehead can cost around £150, while treating both armpits could cost up to £450 or more.

Surgery and other procedures

In a few cases where hyperhidrosis is particularly severe and treatment hasn’t been successful, surgery may be recommended.

Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS)

Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is the most widely used type of surgery to treat hyperhidrosis. It’s usually used in cases affecting the palms or armpits.

Small incisions are made in the side of the chest and the nerves that control sweating in the affected area are cut or clipped. This means signals can no longer pass along them to the sweat glands. The operation is carried out under general anaesthetic and done on both sides of the body.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends that ETS can be used to treat excessive sweating of the palms or underarms. However, before the procedure is performed, your clinician should explain:

  • ETS carries a risk of serious complications (see below)
  • it’s very common for excessive compensatory sweating to occur after the procedure, which causes some people to regret the procedure
  • the procedure is not always successful at reducing sweating

For this reason, only people with severe hyperhidrosis which hasn’t responded to treatment should be considered.

Read the full NICE guidelines on endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for primary hyperhidrosis of the upper limb.

Side effects and complications of ETS can also include:

  • sweating of the face and neck after eating food – this is known as gustatory sweating and may affect up to half of people who have the procedure
  • bleeding into the chest during surgery
  • air becoming trapped inside the chest (pneumothorax), which can cause chest pain and breathing difficulties
  • damage to the nervous system that causes the upper eyelid on one side of the body to droop (Horner’s syndrome) – this may be permanent

Removing or destroying sweat glands

Excessive sweating under the arms may occasionally be treated with a procedure to remove or destroy the sweat glands in the armpits.

This can be carried out in a number of ways:

  • making an incision in the armpit and carefully scraping away (curettage) or cutting out (Shelley’s procedure) the sweat glands
  • using a probe held above the skin (no incisions are needed), which emits electromagnetic radiation that destroys the sweat glands
  • inserting a laser device under the skin through a small incision and using it to destroy the sweat glands

These procedures are generally carried out under local anaesthetic, which means you will be awake but your armpit will be numbed.

These procedures can sometimes be a permanent solution to excessive underarm sweating, although they are only carried out by a small number of practitioners. Availability on the NHS is likely to be very limited and you will probably need to pay for private treatment.

These procedures don’t work for everyone and some of them are relatively new, which means there isn’t always evidence about their long-term safety and effectiveness.

Treating anxiety

Feelings of anxiety are not directly responsible for causing primary hyperhidrosis, but they can make the situation worse and create a vicious cycle.

You may feel self-conscious, which can trigger anxiety in certain situations, such as when meeting new people or being in a crowded room. The anxiety can make the sweating worse.

If your anxiety is making your sweating worse, a type of talking therapy called cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) might help. Medication for anxiety is not usually recommended because it can make sweating worse.

Hyperhidrosis | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating that occurs on the:

  • Underarms

  • Palms

  • Face

  • Scalp

  • Feet

What is hyperhidrosis?

The body uses sweat as a form of temperature control, in order to cool itself. Hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating, which means sweating more than normal.

People with hyperhidrosis report feelings of social isolation and withdrawal from others in order to avoid touching others. This includes dating, business activities (where shaking hands is commonplace) and other activities for fear of body odor and damp clothing.

People with hyperhidrosis don’t have more sweat glands than other people. Rather, the nerve that controls sweating—the sympathetic nerve—is oversensitive and causes the overproduction of sweat.

Who gets hyperhidrosis?

There are two types of hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating): primary hyperhidrosis and secondary hyperhidrosis.

Primary hyperhidrosis is usually inherited, which means one of your family members may have had it. Primary hyperhidrosis begins in childhood and worsens with puberty, especially in women.

Secondary hyperhidrosis is caused by some other condition or behavior. Some of these might include:

Some cancers are known to cause night sweats, so if you only sweat at night, see your doctor as soon as possible to rule out a serious disease.

Hyperhidrosis Symptoms

Depending  where on your body you experience hyperhidrosis will determine your symptoms. Typically, symptoms include:

  • Excess sweat on your palms, hands, underarms, face and trunk (body)

  • Some patients may experience extreme flushing on their faces

Hyperhidrosis Diagnosis

Our doctors diagnose hyperhidrosis by doing a physical examination and listening to a patient’s history. We can also measure the level of sweating in two different ways:

  1. Starch Iodine Test: This is a test that turns the sweat brown and is used to detect excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis)

  2. Vapometer: This device measures transepidermal water loss and measures the amount of sweat that the hands, underarms, feet and scalp make. Measuring the amount of sweat gives your doctor an objective way to compare the amount of sweat before and after treatment.

Hyperhidrosis Treatment

There are different treatments for hyperhidrosis, depending on the severity of the condition. These include:

Medications

Drying Topical Creams

Daily topical creams that dry the skin are usually the first introduced treatment. Aluminum chloride or aluminum chloride hexahydrate are the most common of these creams.

Applied daily, usually at night, and then covered to encourage absorption, these creams can be very effective. However, some people find that they have uncomfortable side effects, including burning and skin reactions.

Oral Medications

Oral medications are known as systemic therapies, meaning they affect your entire body. These medications are called anticholinergics, which mean they cause a drying reaction in the body. These oral medications can be a good option for patients who sweat in multiple locations. There are some side effects, like dry mouth and dry eyes. Sometimes, after using these medications for a while, patients find these medications lose their effectiveness.

Dietary Changes

New research suggests changes in diet, such as adopting a vegetarian diet, and dietary supplements may reduce the severity of hyperhidrosis.

Botulinum Toxin

This treatment involves administering injections into affected areas. These injections cause a very reliable temporary decrease in sweating, typically lasting from three to six months.

Microwave thermolysis of sweat glands

This treatment directs energy at the sweat glands in the underarm. By destroying the sweat glands in the underarm, excessive sweating in that area stops immediately. Only 2% of the sweat glands in the body are located in the underarm area, so destroying them in this area does not affect the body’s ability to cool.

Before the procedure, your doctor will numb the underarm area. Then your underarm skin is lifted into the system and microwave energy is directed to the sweat glands. The procedure typically takes an hour and involves no incisions or cuts.

Surgery

Sympathectomy is often used as a last resort for treating hyperhidrosis after other methods have shown no effect. This procedure involves cutting the sympathetic nerve, which is the nerve that controls the sweat reaction.

Behavioral Medicine

Patients diagnosed with hyperhidrosis may experience increased stress associated with excessive sweating. Although topical and oral medications are the first steps of treatment for the physical symptoms of hyperhidrosis, behavior medicine techniques may provide relief from stress, anxiety and other negative emotional reactions which can be experienced with this condition. Behavior medicine consultation is recommended for all patients to improve emotional, social and occupational/academic functioning in youth and adults with hyperhidrosis.

Night Sweats in Children: Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

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Uninterrupted sleep is a key factor in the healthy growth and development in children. But if your child is struggling to get a good night’s sleep, it’s important to know the reason behind it. If the child’s head sweats while sleeping, it can lead to discomfort and your child may have trouble getting a sound sleep. Your toddler’s night sweats can result in him crying in the middle of the night for the same reason. In such scenarios, it is necessary to get to the bottom of it and understand it properly.

What Are Night Sweats?

Whether or not night sweats are a result of a medical condition, they can be detrimental to a child’s health. Night sweats mean, quite simply, sweating during the night. This generally occurs as a result of the environment being hot, humid, or both, leading to sweating. Children require a deep sleep every night as that gives the body the time to repair itself. The body auto-regulates its own temperature when the weather is warm, but as this system is not developed fully in young children – this results in the sweat glands becoming larger than normal, and hence, sweating.

Common Causes of Night Sweats in Kids

Here are some of the common causes of night sweat in children:

  1. Using bedsheets that are either thick or large in number
  2. Wearing night apparel made of non-breathable material
  3. Having a room that is warmer than normal
  4. Lack of ventilation in the room
  5. The child is suffering from an infection that raises body temperature
  6. Effects of some medication your child may be on
  7. Having a nightmare
  8. Non-optimal weight, leading to body issues
  9. Having spicy food before going to bed, which is difficult to digest
  10. Changes in atmospheric temperature, even between air-conditioned rooms
  11. Suffering from sleep apnea, a condition where breathing stops and starts randomly
  12. Other sleeping problems, including snoring
  13. Cold and cough that causes a blocked nose
  14. Anxiety and stress a child might be suffering from

Symptoms of Excessive Night Sweating in Children

Here are some of the typical symptoms of night sweating:

  • Your child might be gasping for breath intermittently while sleeping
  • Your child’s breathing pattern might be irregular
  • Your child might seem tired and exhausted throughout the day
  • Your child has a tendency to keep their mouth open while he sleeps

How Is the Problem of Night Sweating Diagnosed in Children?

It is best to take your child to the doctor and get a medical opinion on any of the above-mentioned symptoms you see in him. The doctor will want to know the history pertaining to your child’s health, including any sleep-related habits that he has. The doctor will also inquire about the environment of the house, asking about temperature and ventilation. Then, a general check-up will be done to see if your child has an infection in the sinus or the ears, or any other underlying issue.

Treatment for Child Sweating at Night

There’s no specific treatment that directly targets a child’s night sweats. However, you can ensure that your child remains sweat-free by keeping him hydrated at all times, shifting him to a room that has proper ventilation, clothing him in soft, breathable material, and has bedding that is soft and light.

If the night sweats occur because of a disorder or an illness diagnosed by a doctor, your child will most likely be given medication to treat that problem. Make sure you are regular with it and do not skip a dose.

How to Help Your Child Avoid Sweating At Night

Here are a few tips you can use to avoid night sweats in children.

  1. Ensure that your child’s bedroom is at a temperature that is comfortable for the entire duration of the night.
  2. Avoid giving your child spicy or rich foods for dinner. Such foods can increase body temperature and thus the chances of having night sweats. Make sure that the child stays up for at least 30 minutes after dinner and does not sleep immediately.
  3. To help the child sleep better, take slow walks with him around the house post-dinner. This will help him digest his food better.
  4. Invest in proper, loose, and comfortable clothing that is purely meant for sleeping.
  5. Rid your child’s bedroom of needless comforters, blankets, and anything that might be too warm for him to sleep in.
  6. Ask your child about his day every day to understand if he is facing any problems in school or otherwise. This way, you can help him come out of his anxiety or stress if he has any.
  7. Talk to your doctor about your child’s symptoms and get regular checkups done to identify any medical issues.
  8. In case you notice that a certain type of medicine triggers nighttime sweating in your child, let your doctor know about it and see if they might recommend an alternative for the same.

Can Wool Bedding Ease Night Sweats in Children?

Wool bedding is generally considered the best option for a toddler. Wool has an inherent property of regulating body temperature, making it suitable for any environment. It will keep your child warm when it’s cold, and cool when it’s hot. Since night sweats make things uncomfortable, wool bedding will absorb most of the moisture and will keep things from being sticky or clammy, and keep your child in a deep slumber without any interruptions.

Your child’s excessive sweating at night can cause you to start worrying about him. By ensuring a good environment, proper clothing, and a fixed schedule, you can help him achieve the necessary sleep he needs. On consulting the doctor, any other issues can be resolved easily and night sweats would be nothing more than a thing of the past.

Also Read: Bedwetting in Kids

What Are Hot Flashes and Sweating?

In people with cancer, certain conditions and medications can cause sweating, hot flashes, or night sweats. They happen when your body tries to lower its temperature. They can happen even when the area around you or the room you’re in is cool.

  • Sweating is also known as perspiring. Sweat, or perspiration, is the fluid created by the sweat glands in the body when heat is given off through skin. 
  • Hot flashes can cause sweating which can range from mild to excessive. Sometimes these are called hot flushes.
  • Night sweats are sweating and hot flashes that mostly happen when you’re sleeping .

Sweating

Sweating is your body’s way to lower its temperature. It normally happens when your body is exposed to heat, after exercise, because of hormone changes, or when people are feeling anxious and stressed. If you are sick, having a fever can also cause sweating. In people with cancer, sweating can also be caused by a fever, a tumor, or cancer treatment.

Hot flashes

Hot flashes involve sweating, but can be described as a sensation of heat or flushing. They might include flushing in the face or may be described as heat in other areas of the body. People who have hot flashes describe them as ranging from feeling just a sensation of warmth with mild sweat to having chills and enough perspiration to soak your clothes or bedding. If hot flashes are moderate to severe, sometimes you might have problems sleeping and fatigue, too.

Hot flashes often normally occur in women because of hormone changes during menopause. In women being treated with hormone therapy for breast cancer, hot flashes can have different severity and can be long-lasting.

Hot flashes can also occur in women being treated for other cancers with methods known to have early menopause or temporary hormone changes as a side effect. These hot flashes might be temporary or long-lasting depending on the treatment given.

Men being treated for prostate cancer who have surgery and androgen suppression therapy may have hot flashes for a period of time that might eventually go away. If your treatment plan includes any of these treatments or if you are having hot flashes, talk to your cancer care team so they can assess your specific situation.

What to look for

  • Feeling unusually hot in one or more areas of your body.
  • Having wet or damp skin any time of day, including during the night or waking up to find sheets damp.
  • Fever followed by heavy sweating as the body temperature goes back down
  • Chilling or shaking chills
  • Drenching sweats even when there’s no fever or the area around you doesn’t seem overly hot.

Night Sweats: Menopause & Other Causes

Overview

What are night sweats?

Night sweats are drenching sweats that soak clothes and bedding and disturb sleep. Night sweats occur when blood vessels expand, causing increased blood flow, and then contract. This causes a sudden wave of heat that spreads throughout the body, followed by sweating, reddening of the skin, and rapid heartbeat. Often, the night sweat is followed by a cold chill.

Possible Causes

What causes night sweats?

Night sweats are common is women who are going through perimenopause and menopause. Perimenopause is a normal, natural phase of a woman’s life. During this time, a woman’s ovaries produce less estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone, and menstrual periods become irregular. The low or changing levels of estrogen in particular are the cause of night sweats.

Perimenopause usually happens between ages 40 and 50. It is the transition step before menopause. A woman has reached menopause when she hasn’t had a period for 12 months in a row. The average age of menopause is 51.

Are perimenopause and menopause the only causes of night sweats?

No. Night sweats can occur for a variety of reasons and can occur in both women and men. Other health conditions in which night sweats are seen include:

  • Infectious diseases, including tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • Colds, flu, fever
  • Bacterial infections, including endocarditis (inflammation of the inner lining of the heart), osteomyelitis (inflammation of bone/bone marrow), pyogenic abscess (pus in the liver)
  • Hormonal diseases, including overactive thyroid, diabetes, endocrine tumors
  • Substance abuse, including alcohol, heroin, cocaine
  • Hyperhidrosis (the body produces too much sweat without any known medical cause)
  • Neurologic disorders, including autonomic dysreflexia, autonomic neuropathy (damage to autonomic nerves), syringomyelia (cyst in the spinal cord), stroke
  • Panic disorder, anxiety
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, a digestive disease)
  • Obstructive sleep apnea (a sleep disorder)
  • Cancer, including leukemia (blood and bone marrow cancer) and lymphoma (blood cell cancer)
  • Side effects of cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors, tamoxifen, opioids, steroids
  • Side effects of other medications, including some antidepressants and diabetes medications, steroids, acetaminophen, aspirin, and high blood pressure drugs

Women who experience other than menopause-related night sweats typically have other symptoms, as well. Only your doctor can determine the cause of your night sweats. Almost all causes are treatable. If you have ongoing night sweats, see your doctor.

Care and Treatment

How are night sweats treated?

Treatment depends on the cause of the night sweats. For menopause-related night sweats, hormone therapy – estrogen alone or with progestin – is one option. Hormone therapy can also help with other symptoms of menopause including bone loss and vaginal dryness. Estrogen replacement therapy should not be used in women with a history of breast cancer. All hormone therapies carry some risks, including blood clots and gallbladder inflammation.

Non-estrogen medications used to treat hot flashes include:

  • Megestrol (also used to treat breast and uterine cancers; increase appetite/reverse weight loss)
  • Antidepressants
  • Anticonvulsants (also used to control/prevent seizures)
  • Clonidine (also used to treat high blood pressure, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, and other conditions)

Non-drug treatments for night sweats from any cause include:

  • Wearing loose-fitting, lightweight, cotton pajamas
  • Using layered bedding that can be removed as needed during the night
  • Turning on a bedroom fan/opening windows
  • Sipping cool water throughout the night
  • Keeping a cold pack under a pillow, then turning your pillow over to rest your head on a cool surface
  • Avoiding common night sweat triggers such as alcohol, spicy foods, caffeine, cigarettes
  • De-stressing through deep breathing, relaxation, and exercise
  • Undergoing hypnosis to help relax and focus on feeling cool
  • Exercising daily. Walking, swimming, dancing, and bicycling are all good choices.

Do menopause-related night sweats ever end?

Night sweats go away after a few years in most women undergoing menopause. Unfortunately, other women may experience night sweats for the rest of their lives. However, the night sweats usually lessen in severity.

90,000 Head sweating – causes, diagnosis and treatment

Perspiration of the face and head (cranial hyperhidrosis) is an increased perspiration in the corresponding area. Excretion of sweat is often accompanied by localized redness of the skin and a feeling of heat, other symptoms depend on the cause of sweating. Hyperhidrosis can be caused by stress and nightmares, pathologies of the brain and peripheral nerves, hypertension. To find out the cause of increased sweating, a neurological examination with EEG and electroneurography, radiography, functional tests, laboratory tests are performed.Relief of unpleasant symptoms consists in the treatment of the underlying disease.

Causes of head sweating

Emotional shocks

The symptom often develops in stressful situations, with fright. Patients prone to emotional lability report that severe sweating of the head and face occurs during public speaking, passing exams, and important interviews. Sweating is so profuse that sweat trickles down the skin.Also, the face and ears turn red, the feeling of heat and rush of blood to the head worries. Such symptoms cause severe psychological discomfort, which is why patients try not to attract attention to themselves, avoid new acquaintances, which leads to social maladjustment.

Nightmares

Unpleasant dreams are common causes of head hyperhidrosis, especially in children. The patient sleeps restlessly at night, rushes about in bed, screams. At the same time, profuse sweating is observed, especially pronounced in the facial area and hairy part of the skin: hair can get wet, wet spots form on the pillowcase. After awakening, a person is not immediately aware of the surrounding reality, for some time he is in a state of severe fright. If nightmares bother several nights in a row, accompanied by a fear of falling asleep, you should seek medical help.

Vegeto-vascular dystonia

Disorders of the coordinated work of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the nervous system increase the function of the sweat glands of the face, while increased sweating of the palms and armpits is also possible.Excessive sweating in the head with VSD provokes various reasons: excitement, the intake of spicy or too hot food, natural hormonal changes in women. Sweating starts suddenly, sweat beads on the forehead or runs down the face, and the hair becomes wet. Such attacks are repeated up to several times a day.

Hypertensive crisis

A sudden increase in blood pressure is combined with an expansion of the blood vessels of the scalp and face, which causes profuse sweating. According to the observations of patients, severe sweating occurs against the background of sharp headaches and dizziness. Often it makes a lot of noise in the ears, vision becomes indistinct (“flies flicker” before the eyes). In addition to the head, sweat is released and trickled down into the neck and upper body. The skin in this area is red and hot to the touch. Similar symptoms are more typical for the neurovegetative form of hypertensive crisis.

Lesion of cranial nerves

The development of excessive sweating of the head may be associated with irritation of peripheral nerve endings.The most common is Lucy-Frey syndrome, which is caused by damage to the ear-temporal nerve of various causes (after mumps, sialoadenitis, salivary gland surgery). In this disorder, the head sweats a lot in the area of ​​the ear and temple on one side, which is more often manifested after eating. Unreasonable beads of sweat on the chin are a sign of string drum syndrome following a surgical injury.

Neurological diseases

Increased head sweating occurs in various pathologies of the brain that cause dysfunction of the sweat glands.In acute neurological problems, profuse sweating begins suddenly and is usually short-lived. In patients with chronic degenerative processes, the head sweats for a long time. Sweating can be accompanied by a decrease in memory and attention, speech disorders (long pauses between answers, incoherent speech), temporary paresis of the limbs. Hyperhidrosis is caused by reasons such as:

  • Parkinson’s disease. Sweating is a compensatory reaction to damage to the autonomic nervous system.In addition to increased sweating in the scalp and face, pathognomonic symptoms of the disease are noted: tremor of the fingers, gait disturbances, loss of memory, attention, and other cognitive functions.
  • Neurosyphilis. The defeat of the roots of the cranial nerves of an infectious cause often leads to disruption of the normal functioning of the sweat glands, therefore, the head sweats profusely in patients. In addition, debilitating headaches, dizziness, tinnitus are troubling.
  • Stroke. Increased sweating occurs in the event of damage to the center of thermoregulation in the hypothalamus. A characteristic feature: sweating is observed only on half of the head and neck (more often on the side of muscle paresis). At the same time, speech and movement disorders appear.

Traumatic brain injury

After head injuries, severe sweating may occur, which is caused by damage to the nerve structures of the brain responsible for thermoregulation, or by rupture of peripheral cranial nerves.The degree of impairment of the secretion of sweat glands depends on the cause of TBI and the extent of the injuries received. In addition to hyperhidrosis, excruciating headaches develop, accompanied by nausea and repeated vomiting, and loss of consciousness is possible. In severe injuries, local sweating is replaced by cold sweat.

Complications of pharmacotherapy

A side effect is usually noted a few minutes after the rapid intravenous administration of nitrates, agents used in the treatment of stable angina pectoris and acute coronary syndrome. The appearance of pronounced hyperhidrosis in the face and head is preceded by a feeling of heat. Sweating is combined with severe redness of the skin. Headaches and dizziness are typical, with a sudden rise out of bed, a fainting state is observed. The presence of such disorders should be reported to the attending physician to adjust the dosage of the drug.

Rare causes

  • Essential local hyperhidrosis .
  • Gustatory hyperhidrosis : symmetrical sweating due to the trigeminal reflex.
  • Dermatological diseases : organoid or diaphoretic nevus, exocrine-hairy angiomatous hamartoma, glomus tumors.
  • Hereditary diseases : Gamstorp-Wolfarth syndrome, congenital dyskeratosis (Zinsser-Engman-Cole syndrome).

Diagnostics

Identification of the cause provoking head sweating is carried out by the therapist, who either establishes the diagnosis on his own, or refers the patient to specialized specialists. A comprehensive examination is prescribed to assess the general condition of the body, to exclude organic pathology that could cause increased sweating. The following methods have the greatest diagnostic value:

  • Neurological examination . Initial examination includes assessment of superficial and deep tendon reflexes, cognitive performance and muscle response. Be sure to investigate dermographism, perform an orthostatic test and Danini-Ashner’s reception, which make it possible to exclude dysfunction of the autonomic system.
  • Electroneurography. Investigation of the functional capabilities of the peripheral nerves of the head region is carried out using their local stimulation with electrical impulses. The method is necessary to identify specific syndromes (Lucy-Frey, drum string). With possible brain damage, an EEG is shown.
  • X-ray examination . To exclude organic pathologies of the nervous system as the cause of hyperhidrosis of the face and head, the results of radiography are indicative. When suspicious formations, traumatic injuries are detected, CT or MRI of the brain is prescribed to clarify the nature of the disease.
  • Functional tests . Sweat production rate is assessed using quantitative methods – gravimetry and evapometry. Hyperhidrosis is spoken of when sweating rates exceed 10 mg per minute. To detect the area of ​​the lesion, high-quality tests are effective – starch iodine test, ninhydrin test.
  • Laboratory Methods .The survey plan includes standard general and biochemical blood tests. In women, estrogen and progesterone levels are measured. In case of suspicion of cerebral syphilis, microscopic and bacteriological examination of cerebrospinal fluid, serological reactions are recommended.

In case of severe sweating of the head and face, which occurs against the background of intense skin hyperemia and excruciating headaches, blood pressure is measured, an ECG is recorded, and an ultrasound of the heart is performed, if necessary. If symptoms develop in emotionally labile patients, a psychiatric evaluation is required. Patients with primary local hyperhidrosis are advised to consult a geneticist.

Treatment

Help before diagnosis

To reduce the unpleasant sensations of increased sweating, it is necessary to observe hygiene standards, avoid wearing hats made of synthetic materials. It is advisable to exclude from the diet spicy and spicy foods, alcohol, which often increase sweating.Herbal sedatives can be used to relieve symptoms during public speaking. With local cranial hyperhidrosis, you should consult a specialist to identify the cause of the unpleasant manifestations and choose the optimal treatment tactics.

Treatment of head hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin

Conservative therapy

If the disease that caused excessive sweating is identified, the symptoms disappear after the cause has been eliminated. In the acute period of injuries, neurological diseases, therapy is aimed at correcting vital functions and restoring the functional capabilities of the body, and the elimination of increased sweating is carried out by symptomatic means. When sweating is combined with erythrophobia, psychotherapeutic methods are effective. The following pharmaceutical preparations are used for the medical treatment of head hyperhidrosis:

  • Anticholinergic . Drugs from the atropine group selectively inhibit the activity of neurons in the sympathetic nervous system, thereby reducing sweat production.Medicines are taken orally or given intravenously.
  • Sedatives . For moderate hyperhidrosis, herbal and synthetic sedatives are effective. If the scalp sweats a lot, light “daytime” tranquilizers may be required, which do not affect performance.
  • Local remedies . Wipe the skin with aluminum chloride hexahydrate, which is diluted in alcohol.In some patients, local iontophoresis with saline solutions, anticholinergics is effective.
  • Antiparkinsonian drugs . With increased sweating caused by Parkinson’s disease, specific medications are prescribed that affect the metabolism of dopamine in the brain. Treatment is carried out in long courses.
  • Antihypertensive drugs . For rapid relief of a hypertensive crisis, loop diuretics, beta-blockers are administered.In the future, an individual scheme for the treatment of hypertension is selected for the prevention of exacerbations.
  • Botulinum toxin . If other drug methods are ineffective, intradermal administration of the drug is recommended. The drug allows you to reduce the number of nerve impulses entering the sweat glands, and thereby reduce sweating.

Surgical treatment

Hyperhidrosis of the head and face, refractory to conservative medical measures, requires surgical interventions.Most often, they resort to endoscopic sympathectomy (destruction or clipping of the sympathetic trunk), which is aimed at reducing the functional activity of the sweat glands. To eliminate the consequences of severe TBI as the leading cause of hyperhidrosis, removal of intracranial hematomas for decompression of brain structures is indicated, if necessary, bone fragments are repositioned.

90,000 Head sweating – causes, diagnosis and treatment

Perspiration of the face and head (cranial hyperhidrosis) is an increased perspiration in the corresponding area.Excretion of sweat is often accompanied by localized redness of the skin and a feeling of heat, other symptoms depend on the cause of sweating. Hyperhidrosis can be caused by stress and nightmares, pathologies of the brain and peripheral nerves, hypertension. To find out the cause of increased sweating, a neurological examination with EEG and electroneurography, radiography, functional tests, laboratory tests are performed. Relief of unpleasant symptoms consists in the treatment of the underlying disease.

Causes of head sweating

Emotional shocks

The symptom often develops in stressful situations, with fright. Patients prone to emotional lability report that severe sweating of the head and face occurs during public speaking, passing exams, and important interviews. Sweating is so profuse that sweat trickles down the skin. Also, the face and ears turn red, the feeling of heat and rush of blood to the head worries.Such symptoms cause severe psychological discomfort, which is why patients try not to attract attention to themselves, avoid new acquaintances, which leads to social maladjustment.

Nightmares

Unpleasant dreams are common causes of head hyperhidrosis, especially in children. The patient sleeps restlessly at night, rushes about in bed, screams. At the same time, profuse sweating is observed, especially pronounced in the facial area and hairy part of the skin: hair can get wet, wet spots form on the pillowcase.After awakening, a person is not immediately aware of the surrounding reality, for some time he is in a state of severe fright. If nightmares bother several nights in a row, accompanied by a fear of falling asleep, you should seek medical help.

Vegeto-vascular dystonia

Disorders of the coordinated work of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the nervous system increase the function of the sweat glands of the face, while increased sweating of the palms and armpits is also possible.Excessive sweating in the head with VSD provokes various reasons: excitement, the intake of spicy or too hot food, natural hormonal changes in women. Sweating starts suddenly, sweat beads on the forehead or runs down the face, and the hair becomes wet. Such attacks are repeated up to several times a day.

Hypertensive crisis

A sudden increase in blood pressure is combined with an expansion of the blood vessels of the scalp and face, which causes profuse sweating.According to the observations of patients, severe sweating occurs against the background of sharp headaches and dizziness. Often it makes a lot of noise in the ears, vision becomes indistinct (“flies flicker” before the eyes). In addition to the head, sweat is released and trickled down into the neck and upper body. The skin in this area is red and hot to the touch. Similar symptoms are more typical for the neurovegetative form of hypertensive crisis.

Lesion of cranial nerves

The development of excessive sweating of the head may be associated with irritation of peripheral nerve endings.The most common is Lucy-Frey syndrome, which is caused by damage to the ear-temporal nerve of various causes (after mumps, sialoadenitis, salivary gland surgery). In this disorder, the head sweats a lot in the area of ​​the ear and temple on one side, which is more often manifested after eating. Unreasonable beads of sweat on the chin are a sign of string drum syndrome following a surgical injury.

Neurological diseases

Increased head sweating occurs in various pathologies of the brain that cause dysfunction of the sweat glands.In acute neurological problems, profuse sweating begins suddenly and is usually short-lived. In patients with chronic degenerative processes, the head sweats for a long time. Sweating can be accompanied by a decrease in memory and attention, speech disorders (long pauses between answers, incoherent speech), temporary paresis of the limbs. Hyperhidrosis is caused by reasons such as:

  • Parkinson’s disease. Sweating is a compensatory reaction to damage to the autonomic nervous system.In addition to increased sweating in the scalp and face, pathognomonic symptoms of the disease are noted: tremor of the fingers, gait disturbances, loss of memory, attention, and other cognitive functions.
  • Neurosyphilis. The defeat of the roots of the cranial nerves of an infectious cause often leads to disruption of the normal functioning of the sweat glands, therefore, the head sweats profusely in patients. In addition, debilitating headaches, dizziness, tinnitus are troubling.
  • Stroke. Increased sweating occurs in the event of damage to the center of thermoregulation in the hypothalamus. A characteristic feature: sweating is observed only on half of the head and neck (more often on the side of muscle paresis). At the same time, speech and movement disorders appear.

Traumatic brain injury

After head injuries, severe sweating may occur, which is caused by damage to the nerve structures of the brain responsible for thermoregulation, or by rupture of peripheral cranial nerves.The degree of impairment of the secretion of sweat glands depends on the cause of TBI and the extent of the injuries received. In addition to hyperhidrosis, excruciating headaches develop, accompanied by nausea and repeated vomiting, and loss of consciousness is possible. In severe injuries, local sweating is replaced by cold sweat.

Complications of pharmacotherapy

A side effect is usually noted a few minutes after the rapid intravenous administration of nitrates, agents used in the treatment of stable angina pectoris and acute coronary syndrome. The appearance of pronounced hyperhidrosis in the face and head is preceded by a feeling of heat. Sweating is combined with severe redness of the skin. Headaches and dizziness are typical, with a sudden rise out of bed, a fainting state is observed. The presence of such disorders should be reported to the attending physician to adjust the dosage of the drug.

Rare causes

  • Essential local hyperhidrosis .
  • Gustatory hyperhidrosis : symmetrical sweating due to the trigeminal reflex.
  • Dermatological diseases : organoid or diaphoretic nevus, exocrine-hairy angiomatous hamartoma, glomus tumors.
  • Hereditary diseases : Gamstorp-Wolfarth syndrome, congenital dyskeratosis (Zinsser-Engman-Cole syndrome).

Diagnostics

Identification of the cause provoking head sweating is carried out by the therapist, who either establishes the diagnosis on his own, or refers the patient to specialized specialists. A comprehensive examination is prescribed to assess the general condition of the body, to exclude organic pathology that could cause increased sweating. The following methods have the greatest diagnostic value:

  • Neurological examination . Initial examination includes assessment of superficial and deep tendon reflexes, cognitive performance and muscle response. Be sure to investigate dermographism, perform an orthostatic test and Danini-Ashner’s reception, which make it possible to exclude dysfunction of the autonomic system.
  • Electroneurography. Investigation of the functional capabilities of the peripheral nerves of the head region is carried out using their local stimulation with electrical impulses. The method is necessary to identify specific syndromes (Lucy-Frey, drum string). With possible brain damage, an EEG is shown.
  • X-ray examination . To exclude organic pathologies of the nervous system as the cause of hyperhidrosis of the face and head, the results of radiography are indicative. When suspicious formations, traumatic injuries are detected, CT or MRI of the brain is prescribed to clarify the nature of the disease.
  • Functional tests . Sweat production rate is assessed using quantitative methods – gravimetry and evapometry. Hyperhidrosis is spoken of when sweating rates exceed 10 mg per minute. To detect the area of ​​the lesion, high-quality tests are effective – starch iodine test, ninhydrin test.
  • Laboratory Methods .The survey plan includes standard general and biochemical blood tests. In women, estrogen and progesterone levels are measured. In case of suspicion of cerebral syphilis, microscopic and bacteriological examination of cerebrospinal fluid, serological reactions are recommended.

In case of severe sweating of the head and face, which occurs against the background of intense skin hyperemia and excruciating headaches, blood pressure is measured, an ECG is recorded, and an ultrasound of the heart is performed, if necessary. If symptoms develop in emotionally labile patients, a psychiatric evaluation is required. Patients with primary local hyperhidrosis are advised to consult a geneticist.

Treatment

Help before diagnosis

To reduce the unpleasant sensations of increased sweating, it is necessary to observe hygiene standards, avoid wearing hats made of synthetic materials. It is advisable to exclude from the diet spicy and spicy foods, alcohol, which often increase sweating.Herbal sedatives can be used to relieve symptoms during public speaking. With local cranial hyperhidrosis, you should consult a specialist to identify the cause of the unpleasant manifestations and choose the optimal treatment tactics.

Treatment of head hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin

Conservative therapy

If the disease that caused excessive sweating is identified, the symptoms disappear after the cause has been eliminated. In the acute period of injuries, neurological diseases, therapy is aimed at correcting vital functions and restoring the functional capabilities of the body, and the elimination of increased sweating is carried out by symptomatic means. When sweating is combined with erythrophobia, psychotherapeutic methods are effective. The following pharmaceutical preparations are used for the medical treatment of head hyperhidrosis:

  • Anticholinergic . Drugs from the atropine group selectively inhibit the activity of neurons in the sympathetic nervous system, thereby reducing sweat production.Medicines are taken orally or given intravenously.
  • Sedatives . For moderate hyperhidrosis, herbal and synthetic sedatives are effective. If the scalp sweats a lot, light “daytime” tranquilizers may be required, which do not affect performance.
  • Local remedies . Wipe the skin with aluminum chloride hexahydrate, which is diluted in alcohol.In some patients, local iontophoresis with saline solutions, anticholinergics is effective.
  • Antiparkinsonian drugs . With increased sweating caused by Parkinson’s disease, specific medications are prescribed that affect the metabolism of dopamine in the brain. Treatment is carried out in long courses.
  • Antihypertensive drugs . For rapid relief of a hypertensive crisis, loop diuretics, beta-blockers are administered.In the future, an individual scheme for the treatment of hypertension is selected for the prevention of exacerbations.
  • Botulinum toxin . If other drug methods are ineffective, intradermal administration of the drug is recommended. The drug allows you to reduce the number of nerve impulses entering the sweat glands, and thereby reduce sweating.

Surgical treatment

Hyperhidrosis of the head and face, refractory to conservative medical measures, requires surgical interventions.Most often, they resort to endoscopic sympathectomy (destruction or clipping of the sympathetic trunk), which is aimed at reducing the functional activity of the sweat glands. To eliminate the consequences of severe TBI as the leading cause of hyperhidrosis, removal of intracranial hematomas for decompression of brain structures is indicated, if necessary, bone fragments are repositioned.

90,000 Head sweating – causes, diagnosis and treatment

Perspiration of the face and head (cranial hyperhidrosis) is an increased perspiration in the corresponding area.Excretion of sweat is often accompanied by localized redness of the skin and a feeling of heat, other symptoms depend on the cause of sweating. Hyperhidrosis can be caused by stress and nightmares, pathologies of the brain and peripheral nerves, hypertension. To find out the cause of increased sweating, a neurological examination with EEG and electroneurography, radiography, functional tests, laboratory tests are performed. Relief of unpleasant symptoms consists in the treatment of the underlying disease.

Causes of head sweating

Emotional shocks

The symptom often develops in stressful situations, with fright. Patients prone to emotional lability report that severe sweating of the head and face occurs during public speaking, passing exams, and important interviews. Sweating is so profuse that sweat trickles down the skin. Also, the face and ears turn red, the feeling of heat and rush of blood to the head worries.Such symptoms cause severe psychological discomfort, which is why patients try not to attract attention to themselves, avoid new acquaintances, which leads to social maladjustment.

Nightmares

Unpleasant dreams are common causes of head hyperhidrosis, especially in children. The patient sleeps restlessly at night, rushes about in bed, screams. At the same time, profuse sweating is observed, especially pronounced in the facial area and hairy part of the skin: hair can get wet, wet spots form on the pillowcase.After awakening, a person is not immediately aware of the surrounding reality, for some time he is in a state of severe fright. If nightmares bother several nights in a row, accompanied by a fear of falling asleep, you should seek medical help.

Vegeto-vascular dystonia

Disorders of the coordinated work of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the nervous system increase the function of the sweat glands of the face, while increased sweating of the palms and armpits is also possible.Excessive sweating in the head with VSD provokes various reasons: excitement, the intake of spicy or too hot food, natural hormonal changes in women. Sweating starts suddenly, sweat beads on the forehead or runs down the face, and the hair becomes wet. Such attacks are repeated up to several times a day.

Hypertensive crisis

A sudden increase in blood pressure is combined with an expansion of the blood vessels of the scalp and face, which causes profuse sweating.According to the observations of patients, severe sweating occurs against the background of sharp headaches and dizziness. Often it makes a lot of noise in the ears, vision becomes indistinct (“flies flicker” before the eyes). In addition to the head, sweat is released and trickled down into the neck and upper body. The skin in this area is red and hot to the touch. Similar symptoms are more typical for the neurovegetative form of hypertensive crisis.

Lesion of cranial nerves

The development of excessive sweating of the head may be associated with irritation of peripheral nerve endings.The most common is Lucy-Frey syndrome, which is caused by damage to the ear-temporal nerve of various causes (after mumps, sialoadenitis, salivary gland surgery). In this disorder, the head sweats a lot in the area of ​​the ear and temple on one side, which is more often manifested after eating. Unreasonable beads of sweat on the chin are a sign of string drum syndrome following a surgical injury.

Neurological diseases

Increased head sweating occurs in various pathologies of the brain that cause dysfunction of the sweat glands.In acute neurological problems, profuse sweating begins suddenly and is usually short-lived. In patients with chronic degenerative processes, the head sweats for a long time. Sweating can be accompanied by a decrease in memory and attention, speech disorders (long pauses between answers, incoherent speech), temporary paresis of the limbs. Hyperhidrosis is caused by reasons such as:

  • Parkinson’s disease. Sweating is a compensatory reaction to damage to the autonomic nervous system.In addition to increased sweating in the scalp and face, pathognomonic symptoms of the disease are noted: tremor of the fingers, gait disturbances, loss of memory, attention, and other cognitive functions.
  • Neurosyphilis. The defeat of the roots of the cranial nerves of an infectious cause often leads to disruption of the normal functioning of the sweat glands, therefore, the head sweats profusely in patients. In addition, debilitating headaches, dizziness, tinnitus are troubling.
  • Stroke. Increased sweating occurs in the event of damage to the center of thermoregulation in the hypothalamus. A characteristic feature: sweating is observed only on half of the head and neck (more often on the side of muscle paresis). At the same time, speech and movement disorders appear.

Traumatic brain injury

After head injuries, severe sweating may occur, which is caused by damage to the nerve structures of the brain responsible for thermoregulation, or by rupture of peripheral cranial nerves.The degree of impairment of the secretion of sweat glands depends on the cause of TBI and the extent of the injuries received. In addition to hyperhidrosis, excruciating headaches develop, accompanied by nausea and repeated vomiting, and loss of consciousness is possible. In severe injuries, local sweating is replaced by cold sweat.

Complications of pharmacotherapy

A side effect is usually noted a few minutes after the rapid intravenous administration of nitrates, agents used in the treatment of stable angina pectoris and acute coronary syndrome. The appearance of pronounced hyperhidrosis in the face and head is preceded by a feeling of heat. Sweating is combined with severe redness of the skin. Headaches and dizziness are typical, with a sudden rise out of bed, a fainting state is observed. The presence of such disorders should be reported to the attending physician to adjust the dosage of the drug.

Rare causes

  • Essential local hyperhidrosis .
  • Gustatory hyperhidrosis : symmetrical sweating due to the trigeminal reflex.
  • Dermatological diseases : organoid or diaphoretic nevus, exocrine-hairy angiomatous hamartoma, glomus tumors.
  • Hereditary diseases : Gamstorp-Wolfarth syndrome, congenital dyskeratosis (Zinsser-Engman-Cole syndrome).

Diagnostics

Identification of the cause provoking head sweating is carried out by the therapist, who either establishes the diagnosis on his own, or refers the patient to specialized specialists. A comprehensive examination is prescribed to assess the general condition of the body, to exclude organic pathology that could cause increased sweating. The following methods have the greatest diagnostic value:

  • Neurological examination . Initial examination includes assessment of superficial and deep tendon reflexes, cognitive performance and muscle response. Be sure to investigate dermographism, perform an orthostatic test and Danini-Ashner’s reception, which make it possible to exclude dysfunction of the autonomic system.
  • Electroneurography. Investigation of the functional capabilities of the peripheral nerves of the head region is carried out using their local stimulation with electrical impulses. The method is necessary to identify specific syndromes (Lucy-Frey, drum string). With possible brain damage, an EEG is shown.
  • X-ray examination . To exclude organic pathologies of the nervous system as the cause of hyperhidrosis of the face and head, the results of radiography are indicative. When suspicious formations, traumatic injuries are detected, CT or MRI of the brain is prescribed to clarify the nature of the disease.
  • Functional tests . Sweat production rate is assessed using quantitative methods – gravimetry and evapometry. Hyperhidrosis is spoken of when sweating rates exceed 10 mg per minute. To detect the area of ​​the lesion, high-quality tests are effective – starch iodine test, ninhydrin test.
  • Laboratory Methods .The survey plan includes standard general and biochemical blood tests. In women, estrogen and progesterone levels are measured. In case of suspicion of cerebral syphilis, microscopic and bacteriological examination of cerebrospinal fluid, serological reactions are recommended.

In case of severe sweating of the head and face, which occurs against the background of intense skin hyperemia and excruciating headaches, blood pressure is measured, an ECG is recorded, and an ultrasound of the heart is performed, if necessary. If symptoms develop in emotionally labile patients, a psychiatric evaluation is required. Patients with primary local hyperhidrosis are advised to consult a geneticist.

Treatment

Help before diagnosis

To reduce the unpleasant sensations of increased sweating, it is necessary to observe hygiene standards, avoid wearing hats made of synthetic materials. It is advisable to exclude from the diet spicy and spicy foods, alcohol, which often increase sweating.Herbal sedatives can be used to relieve symptoms during public speaking. With local cranial hyperhidrosis, you should consult a specialist to identify the cause of the unpleasant manifestations and choose the optimal treatment tactics.

Treatment of head hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin

Conservative therapy

If the disease that caused excessive sweating is identified, the symptoms disappear after the cause has been eliminated. In the acute period of injuries, neurological diseases, therapy is aimed at correcting vital functions and restoring the functional capabilities of the body, and the elimination of increased sweating is carried out by symptomatic means. When sweating is combined with erythrophobia, psychotherapeutic methods are effective. The following pharmaceutical preparations are used for the medical treatment of head hyperhidrosis:

  • Anticholinergic . Drugs from the atropine group selectively inhibit the activity of neurons in the sympathetic nervous system, thereby reducing sweat production.Medicines are taken orally or given intravenously.
  • Sedatives . For moderate hyperhidrosis, herbal and synthetic sedatives are effective. If the scalp sweats a lot, light “daytime” tranquilizers may be required, which do not affect performance.
  • Local remedies . Wipe the skin with aluminum chloride hexahydrate, which is diluted in alcohol.In some patients, local iontophoresis with saline solutions, anticholinergics is effective.
  • Antiparkinsonian drugs . With increased sweating caused by Parkinson’s disease, specific medications are prescribed that affect the metabolism of dopamine in the brain. Treatment is carried out in long courses.
  • Antihypertensive drugs . For rapid relief of a hypertensive crisis, loop diuretics, beta-blockers are administered.In the future, an individual scheme for the treatment of hypertension is selected for the prevention of exacerbations.
  • Botulinum toxin . If other drug methods are ineffective, intradermal administration of the drug is recommended. The drug allows you to reduce the number of nerve impulses entering the sweat glands, and thereby reduce sweating.

Surgical treatment

Hyperhidrosis of the head and face, refractory to conservative medical measures, requires surgical interventions.Most often, they resort to endoscopic sympathectomy (destruction or clipping of the sympathetic trunk), which is aimed at reducing the functional activity of the sweat glands. To eliminate the consequences of severe TBI as the leading cause of hyperhidrosis, removal of intracranial hematomas for decompression of brain structures is indicated, if necessary, bone fragments are repositioned.

90,000 Increased sweating of the body, legs, head

Excessive sweating is a serious problem that causes physical and psychological discomfort to a person .In addition to the fact that it is extremely unpleasant to feel how the water literally flows from you in a stream, you feel a huge self-doubt, avoiding shaking hands and close contact with people.

In our practice, we often met clients who for years suffered from excessive sweating, embarrassed to seek help from doctors. What is this problem, why does it arise and how is it treated?

Causes of increased sweating

  • Heredity .Hyperhidrosis – excessive sweating in the armpits, palms, face and other parts of the body can be inherited.
  • Disruptions in the activity of the autonomic nervous system , which is responsible for thermoregulation in our body.
  • Hormonal disorders . As a result of malfunctioning of the thyroid gland.

And these are only the main reasons, therefore, the treatment of sweating should be comprehensive. It is not always possible to thoroughly cure this problem, but it is quite possible to cope with it successfully.In our clinic of plastic surgery and cosmetology, the problem of excessive sweating in any part of the body is effectively solved.

Excessive sweating: treatment

The easiest and most effective way to get rid of sweating for a long time is to inject Botox in a proven clinic with an experienced cosmetologist.

Increased body sweating is treated as follows: a botulinum toxin preparation is injected into the areas of the body suffering from increased sweating through an injection with a thin needle, which blocks nerve impulses that connect the sweat glands with the central nervous system.

Excessive sweating of the legs, armpits, face and other parts of the body is treated in a similar way .

Increased head sweating

Profuse sweating of the scalp is often accompanied by facial hyperhidrosis. Often the face is covered with large red spots. People with excessive sweating of the head are more likely than others to be susceptible to colds and infectious diseases, because a humid environment is free conditions for the habitation and reproduction of dangerous microorganisms and bacteria.

Sweating around the scalp can increase during sleep and indicate a variety of serious medical conditions. In any case, if you notice excessive sweating in different parts of the body, even if it is legs or armpits, immediately seek professional help. Dermatologists and cosmetologists of Svoy Klinik will help you cope with the problem quickly and for a long time.

Learn more about resolving problem

Hyperhidrosis treatment

Excessive sweating and unpleasant odor in different areas of the body are a lot of troubles for both men and women. To cope with the problem will allow effective treatment of hyperhidrosis.

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90,000 Why does the forehead sweat in adults

Many adults have persistent forehead sweats, regardless of exercise or other factors. This circumstance often puts a person in an uncomfortable position, causing him discomfort.

Of course, this problem requires a certain solution, despite its seeming insignificance. The fact is that it is not possible to disguise the sweat on the forehead in any way, because any agent literally flows from the surface of the forehead.

Main causes of excessive sweating

It is important to understand that forehead sweating is a problem of increased sweating of the entire face. In connection with this circumstance, it can be concluded that the main cause of this trouble is head hyperhidrosis. With this disease, beads of sweat are constantly observed on a person’s forehead, although the environment should not lead to this.

Other causes of this problem include:

  • The probable cause of excessive sweating is the general psycho-emotional state of a person.In people suffering from depressive conditions, the appearance of this symptom is observed much more often.
  • Excessive activity of the sympathetic nervous system can also cause this problem. The fact is that this system is responsible for the work of several internal organs, the violation of which can lead to the appearance of this syndrome.
  • The occurrence of various malfunctions of the thyroid gland is a fairly common cause of excessive sweating.
  • Sweating can occur from previous head injuries.In many ways, this problem is associated with pinched nerve endings, etc.
  • Various rashes of red spots on the forehead (blushing syndrome) can lead not only to the development of a certain fear of the appearance of these rashes, but also affect the increased sweating of the forehead.
  • The presence of spicy and fatty foods in the human diet can adversely affect gastric secretion. Sweating is only a consequence of this problem.
  • Many experts note that one of the main causes of forehead sweating is vascular dystonia – the incorrect development of blood vessels in the human body.

Of course, the presence of sweating is not a deadly disease, but it can significantly complicate a person’s life. Therefore, experiencing frequent hot flashes of sweating on the forehead, you should immediately seek the advice of your doctor.

Which specialist will help with this problem?

At the first signs of forehead sweating, you need to contact the local clinic, to the therapist on duty. Based on the symptoms, the specialist must determine the root cause of the appearance of this problem.If the reasons lie on the surface, i.e. in excess of eating junk food, the doctor will prescribe certain drugs that reduce sweating.

It’s another matter if sweating is a symptom of a more complex medical condition. In such cases, you cannot do without a visit to a cardiologist, who must determine the condition of your blood vessels.

In general, the symptomatology itself that accompanies sweating is extremely important. If you are concerned about stomach pains, then the first step is to contact a gastroenterologist, and an increase in lymph nodes is accompanied by a visit to an oncologist.Simply put, each case is strictly individual and requires a specific investigation.

How to treat excessive sweating of the forehead?

Treatment should be based on a detailed diagnosis of the body and identification of problem human organs that require specific treatment. Only understanding the root cause leads to a correct diagnosis and treatment plan.

Treatment of patient sweating is divided into two categories: conservative and surgical.

Conservative treatment includes:

  • Ingestion of various herbal infusions. Very good help, in this case, decoctions of mint, lemon balm, oak bark, etc.
  • If the patient has depression and a general negative emotional background, the doctor prescribes the use of various sedatives.
  • Prescribing a specific diet. Most people overuse spicy and fried foods, which can lead to certain problems, including excessive sweating.
  • If problems with the thyroid gland are detected, an endocrinologist prescribes treatment.
  • Botox injections may help under certain conditions. They block the nerve endings that go to the sweat glands.

The surgical method of treatment includes two operations:

  • The surgeon uses an endoscope to clamp the sympathetic ganglion.
  • The second operation is similar to the first, but access to the ganglion is provided by incising the muscles.

People suffering from this ailment must have wipes at hand so that they can wipe off excess sweat. This will not only avoid irritation but also improve overall hygiene.

Conclusion

Many people, especially those who have encountered this problem themselves, are concerned about the question – why does the forehead sweat in adults for no reason? As you can see from this article, diagnosing this problem is quite difficult, so you will hardly be able to find out all the causes of sweating on your own.

In addition, excessive sweating of the forehead can be a harbinger of much more serious diseases, the course of which often goes unnoticed. Most people generally tend not to notice the problem of excessive sweating, considering it a feature of their body. However, this approach is fundamentally wrong and can lead to the start of diseases of varying severity. Therefore, if you notice that you often experience excessive sweating of the forehead, immediately contact your doctor.

90,000 when tilting the head, in the occiput, in the temples, with pressure.

  • Types of headaches

Headache is a nonspecific pain sensation that is localized in the region of the temple, eyes, bridge of the nose, and the back of the neck. They can be dull and sharp, boring, pulsating and squeezing, they can occur as a reaction to light, noises, harsh sounds or any other stimulus. No one is immune from headaches: children, men and women, the elderly and very young.

According to statistics, 7 out of 10 people suffer from regular headaches.

Headaches: types and classification

Headache can be caused by organic causes (various brain lesions as a result of inflammatory processes), and it can also have a psychogenic nature. Psychogenic headaches are the most common type: more than 70% of the world’s population suffer from them.

Tension headaches

The most common species that arises as a response to a certain mental stimulus.Women are more susceptible to this ailment than men. Such headaches are divided into chronic and episodic. Symptoms:

  • episodic course of HDN – no more than 30-35 minutes per episode, in rare cases lasts up to 1 week.
  • for chronic course – daily, constant pain when tilting the head of a squeezing, squeezing character. Both the whole head and only one part of it can hurt: the pain can be localized on one side like a migraine. In the chronic form, a headache is recorded at night.
  • Headache in the occiput, in the neck, paroxysmal, but not pulsating.
  • Chronic pains usually do not worsen when performing work, therefore, they cannot be the reason for refusal to professional activity. During physical exertion, the pain also does not increase, there may be a feeling of squeezing with a hoop, which the patient describes with the phrase “the head is in a vice”.
  • headache may be accompanied by weakness and nausea.

Tension headaches are often associated with stress, poor lifestyle choices, and physical inactivity.If a person sits in one position for a long time (at the computer), there is a chronic tension of the spine, neck muscles, and cerebral circulation. In this case, vasospasm often occurs.

Cluster (beam) headache

Cluster (beam) headache – excruciating sharp pain, burning and very strong, arising spontaneously, concentrated around the eyes. A headache in the bridge of the nose penetrates the eye, the patient complains that he has a pain behind the eye, gives it to the temple, forehead, ear or cheek and causes redness of the eyes, tearing, sweating of the forehead.The peak of the pain episode is 15 minutes. PBC affects more than 1% of the world’s population, mostly men.

Sudden headache, dizziness, nausea is the reason for immediate medical attention. Leaving everything on its own or resorting to analgesics, you run the risk of missing the onset of a serious illness. ON CLINIC specialists are experienced doctors who constantly improve their qualifications and combine it with practical experience. At your service are consultations of doctors of all directions: from a gastroenterologist to a surgeon.You can also make an appointment by phone or online.

Migraine

Migraine – paroxysmal headache on the left or right, more often localized in the frontal-orbital-temporal region. Darkening in the eyes, headache, accompanied by nausea, irritability to light, noise, harsh screams are symptoms of migraine.

Migraines are not caused by trauma, glaucoma, stroke, ICP, or hypertension. Rather, the pulsating nature of the pain is associated with problems in the vessels.Migraine provoking factors: climate change, reaction to weather conditions, taking contraceptives, alcohol or abuse of nuts, cheese, chocolate, as well as the scourge of modern life – stress, nervous strain.

A migraine attack is often preceded by a precursor – the so-called aura: visual, auditory, vestibular manifestations lasting from 20 minutes to 1 hour. As a result of a local spasm of the cerebral vessels, as a result of which a person can feel how “the earth is floating out from under his feet”, see flickering points in the eyes or hear non-existent sounds.There may be physical changes: numbness of the hands or their complete immobility, speech disorders. Also, a migraine can manifest itself as a symptom such as a headache in the left temple or in the right. Other manifestations of it: tinnitus, photopsy of vision (a feeling of light in the eyes in the form of a suit and flashes), dizziness, and sometimes fainting.

A vegetative type migraine is accompanied by tremors, weakness, rapid breathing, as well as panic and palpitations.

Migraine attacks can be managed with traditional pills such as aspirin and paracetamol.If the headache in the right temple, in the occipital or frontal part does not stop and lasts more than a day, this is a serious signal that you must immediately consult a doctor.

Intracranial hypertension

Intracranial hypertension . As a rule, few people pay attention to this type of pain, because it is easily stopped with an analgesic pill or goes away on its own. But gradually, with an increase in intracranial pressure, the pain increases, becomes bursting, there is a diffuse headache.The maximum localization of pain is in the frontal part, with decreasing or increasing intensity. Headache with intracranial pressure increases with sneezing and coughing, pain appears when the eyeballs move, and may be accompanied by attacks of nausea and vomiting.

Symptoms such as staggering walking, noise and ringing in the ears, dizziness, nausea, headache, the causes of which are not clear to you, can also be manifestations of intracranial hypertension.

Temporal arteritis

Temporal arteritis is a disease requiring immediate treatment.Headaches in the occipital region, inflammation of the arteries of the neck and head are characterized by aching and prolonged pain that turns into a piercing one. It occurs more often in people over 50 who prefer an inactive lifestyle.

It is difficult to name the reasons for this type of headache. This is initially a decrease in immunity against the background of the presence in the body of a number of antibodies, hepatitis B virus and ARVI. Outwardly, the disease manifests itself as loss of sleep, loss of weight and appetite, increased sweating, depression, myalgia (muscle pain).

If you are worried about headaches in the back of the head, the causes of which you cannot diagnose yourself, contact ON CLINIC. Reception is carried out by qualified doctors with many years of practical experience.

Headache caused by trigeminal neuralgia

Trigeminal neuralgia (tic) is a disease that affects the nerves of the face. Has a hereditary basis, and is also caused by viruses, infections, allergens, tumors and can occur as a result of trauma.

Pain caused by trigeminal neuralgia – short-term, acute, often in the face. Headaches may occur when moving, during long conversations, while eating.

Night headache

This type of headache, as the name implies, occurs more often at night. Pursues women who have gone on a strict diet and severely restrict themselves to food. As a result, a decrease in blood sugar, a constant desire to eat, a bad mood and a headache in the region of the crown and in the temples.Also, the cause may be heredity in the female line.

To get rid of this type of headache, it is enough to establish a regimen of food intake and sleep, eat in small portions during the day, go to bed at the same time. If you’re on a diet, eat low-fat cottage cheese a couple of hours before bed. If a headache in the temples has become your constant “companion”, treatment should be started immediately.

It is possible to list the types of headaches for a long time: headaches with low pressure, headaches with excessive physical exertion, headaches with menopause in women and with PMS …

Be more attentive to your health! Ailments, headache and dizziness, the causes of which you do not know, and therefore simply do not pay attention to them,
do not appear out of nowhere.They always signal that some kind of malfunction has occurred in the body. Only an experienced doctor who has the necessary advanced equipment at his disposal can identify the source of the disease, select an individual therapy regimen and achieve success in treatment.

ON CLINIC: Expert class equipment. Experienced doctors. Thousands of satisfied patients. Join us!

  • Types of headaches

Are there any reasons for concern?

Excretion of sweat is one of the body’s adaptive reactions to normalize body temperature, namely the fight against overheating. Many parents get scared when, after a daytime or night’s sleep, the baby wakes up with a wet crown

In most cases, there is no cause for concern. To understand the reasons, critically assess how hot it is in the room, whether the child is overly wrapped, etc. As a rule, the reason lies most often in overheating. The body and hair of the sweaty baby should be blotted with a soft towel and changed into dry clothes.

Certain diseases, such as rickets, can also cause excessive sweating.Violation of phosphorus-calcium metabolism affects the state and functioning of the central and autonomic nervous system. Hence, the initial stages of rickets are characterized by excessive fearfulness of the baby, flinching and severe sweating. In order to understand the causes of sweating and not to miss an ailment, it is advisable to consult a pediatrician.


First, take into account the fact that sweating is a natural physiological process. Sweat glands begin to function in children from 3-4 weeks.

The autonomic nervous system is responsible for the secretion of sweat in our body. Body temperature, respiration, heart rate and much more depend on it. In babies, it is not very well developed, and this can lead to the fact that the baby sweats a lot and often, and the sweat becomes thicker or, conversely, too liquid. And when a problem occurs in one of the parts of the nervous system, the baby sweats “in some places” or, conversely, in some places does not sweat at all. If you see that your child is sweating too much, especially if the child is sweating during sleep, you should visit the pediatrician.

If the baby has an unusual, pungent smell of sweat, this indicates that the problem lies outside the nervous system. Among other things, this is how some hereditary diseases manifest themselves – for example, with phenylketonuria, a child’s sweat smells like mice. But the sour smell of sweat occurs in babies due to rickets.

If excessive sweating in a child is accompanied by whims, changes in behavior, sobbing for no reason, restless sleep, this can signal a serious illness.

The causes of sweating can also be caused by a lack of vitamin D, with heart failure, with a cold, with severe hyperfunction of the thyroid gland, as well as taking any medication.

If everything is normal with the child, then he sweats:

  • When he is hot, he has a fever or is anxious.
  • Moisture appears throughout the body: in the armpits, on the chest, back, head.
  • sweat smells natural, not harsh.

For suspected rickets:

  • The baby sweats a lot and often, especially when he strains, for example, while eating or after using the toilet.
  • baby smells sour; sweat irritates the skin and makes your baby itchy.
  • the top of the child’s head gets wet, and the baby dries it on the pillow.
  • the child is often worried, shudders, cries, does not sleep well.

For problems with the nervous system:

  • The baby begins to sweat for no apparent reason, sometimes very hard.